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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 11, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at lipm: hurricane irma sweeps up florida's west coast — leaving cities flooded and more than half of all homes without power. president trump says there will be government help. these are storms of catastrophic severity and we're marshalling the full resources of the federal government to help our fellow americans in florida, alabama, georgia, texas, louisiana, tennessee and all of those wonder places and states in harm's way. when americans are in need, americans pull together. earlier irma barrelled along the north coast of cuba, leaving ten people dead. many homes in the capital havana have been inundated. and on the anniversary of 9/11, president trump attends ceremonial events to pay tribute to the nearly 3,000 who died. a crucial vote in parliament tonight on britain's exit from the eu. this is the scene live in the commons where mps
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are debating the bill that will transfer eu law into uk law ahead of brexit. also in the next hour, more than three hundred thousand muslim rohingyas have now fled myanmar as the un says the systematic attacks on them amount to ethnic cleansing. the parents of a six—year—old child threaten to sue their sons‘ school after boys were allowed to come to class wearing dresses. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the us state of florida has been battered by hurricane irma causing widespread damage. president trump has described it as a storm of "catastrophic severity" and added he was marshalling the full resources of the federal government to deal with its aftermath. at least four people have been
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killed, and more than half of all homes and businesses in the state are without power. parts of miami are under water. the hurricane has swept up from the caribbean — where it killed dozens of people and wreaked terrible damage. over the weekend it hit cu ba's northern coast, then moved north battering the islands in the florida keys before passing by miami and close to the coastal city of tampa. irma has now been downgraded to a tropical storm — still with near—hurricane force gusts of wind and is heading north towards the state of georgia. daniela relph reports. naples on florida's west coast, known for its beaches and golf courses, but not today. here taking the brunt of hurricane irma. the storm may have been downgraded, but it doesn't feel like that for much of florida. it's really, really dangerous outside, to be honest with you.
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watching from the inside as water gushes through the streets and into some buildings. in the distance is the ocean, the coast of biscayne bay near miami, but water has breached all the defences, surging through the entire area. despite dire warnings, miami itself seems to have dodged the worst of the weather, but the city is deserted, the wind intense, the rain torrential. the top of this crane blown away in the storm. what's left dangles in the strong winds. power cuts are widespread and a curfew remains across much of the state of florida. the normal rhythm of life has been suspended. we'll do our best to try to make sure we help all the citizens of this community to adjust and try to get them back to a sense of normalcy. with so many areas abandoned, looting has been a major problem.
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here the targets are sports shops, boxes of trainers piled into cars. the police say they won't tolerate criminal activity and a number of arrests have been made. hurricane irma wreaked havoc through the caribbean before reaching florida, none more so than on saint martin. today a group of dutch tourist in were evacuated to a nearby island, still traumatised by their experience. translation: we are alive so we should be happy with that. it wasn't nice. i've never experienced anything like it. translation: five days without water, electricity and supplies, that's a long time. i've left but others haven't. they've lost their whole existence. across the caribbean, a major relief and rescue operation is under way. here the french military are bringing humanitarian aid to communities who have been cut
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off for days. hundreds of british troops have also been deployed to uk territories in the region. we're now seeing the final show of strength from hurricane irma. these are the overnight scenes from tampa in florida, where her presence was still felt, but she has lost her bite and is now far less powerful. the danger isn't quite over, but hurricane irma will continue to weaken as it heads north into georgia. at a ceremony to mark the anniversary of 9/11, president trump offered his condolences to those caught in the aftermath of hurricane irma. before we begin i'd like to send our nation's prayers to everyone in the path in hurricane irma and to everyone suffering through the devastation of hurricane harvey.
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these are storms of catastrophic severity and we're marshalling the full resources of the federal government to help our fellow americans in florida, alabama, georgia, texas, louisiana and tennessee and all of those wonder places and states in harm's way. when americans are in need, americans pull together and we are one country and when we face hardship, we emerge, closer, stronger and more determined than ever. let's talk to our correspondent gary 0'donoghue who is in tampa. too early to talk about recovery, but it would seem the worst is over? yes, we're just experiencing a little storm at the moment, but in terms of tampa and this area, these are the dying embers of what we've
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experienced here overnight. certainly in the early hours, it was gusting very, very heavily and raining very heavily. although i think tampa could have had it a lot worse because it is a very low lying place as you can tell behind me. the buildings are right up to the waterfront and any kind of real storm surge would have caused some real havoc here in tampa and it's a huge area, three million people. having said all that, the tampa bay area still has hundreds of thousands of people without electricity. and that's something that the utilities are trying to put right as quick as possible, but there is a lot to do in that area. the curfews have been lifted in tampa and you can see there are things around us starting to get back to normal, but there is still trouble ahead for those states further north, georgia, south cord line that, i think they're going to get heavy rain and some very, very
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heavy winds and this is the point where people try and start to rrn heavy winds and this is the point where people try and start to rm to their homes, all the people who were evacuated, going back to trep tation, of course, to see what's there, to see what's left, to see what damage is done. and then to start rebuilding their lives again. some of these people will have particularly on the east coast of florida, will have suffered quite a lot of damage last year from hurricane matthew, daytona beach area and things like that. it must bea area and things like that. it must be a completely dishearting process to have to go through it all again. gary, thank you very much indeed. gary, thank you very much indeed. gary 0'donohue there it in tampa. 0ur correspondentjane 0'brien is in miami. too early to talk about recovery, but clearly things have passed? well, actually simon, here in miami, it's not too early to talk about recovery. this area, yesterday, was com pletely recovery. this area, yesterday, was completely underwater. there was a river running through here and now look at it. cars are already back of
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the notorious miami traffic has started and officials have said that the recovery is under way in earnest. now, there is still about 7296 earnest. now, there is still about 72% of the city without power. they are saying that a number of people we re are saying that a number of people were arrested for looting overnight and during the hurricane when the city was under curfew. there have been a few incidents reported there, but to be honest, people are coming back out and they are assessing the damage and most are saying in miami they are expecting clean—up rather than recovery, that's good news for mid——ally. 0ther than recovery, that's good news for mid——ally. other parts of the state, as we know the keys have fared far worse. this isn't the time to tell you and you are in the wrong place for me to tell you this, but police are saying be careful of alligators and snakes? i will heed that warning, thank you very much, simon! alligators and snakes are a problem
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here in florida particularly down in the south. we are a stone's throw from the everglades and i am assuming the water has caused alligators to come out. there is a problem with pythons. people who release their pythons into the wild because they get too big or fed—up with them have caused a major ecological problem. now, whether the weather helped get rid of pythons, i'm not sure, but wildlife, i imagine will be a problem particularly in more remote and rural areas. jane, thank you very much. jane 0'brien in miami there with the latist. before it hit florida, the storm battered cuba, ripping roofs off houses and causing widespread damage to the country's northern coast. the government says at least ten people have been killed. flooding also hit the capital havana — where residents were warned to stay off the streets. thousands of tourists were stranded at the country's tourist resorts as the storm hit. 0ur correspondent will grant sent this report. havana's streets resemble canals.
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forfamilies from its poorest neighbourhoods the situation is becoming desperate. when hurricane irma came crashing into the island, she brought rains and storm surges which flooded entire city blocks. cu ba's picturesque capital today, a city of felled trees and debris. power is out across havana, complicating the clean—up operation. people are coping as best they can. translation: i heard that 9096 of the electricity is out in the whole country. we're going to be without power for several days. that's going to hurt us a lot. translation: this is terrible. 0ur homes, our furniture, now we must wait until the water comes down to recover what's been flooded. this has been very painfulfor cuba in terms of damage to property and damage to livelihoods.
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it seems that hurricane irma may have knocked cuba's economyjust as hard as she hit its coastline. hit it she most certainly did. for almost two days hurricane irma crept along cuba's northern shore thrashing anything in its path from tiny fishing villages to five—star resorts. perhaps the best known fishing village on the island is this one. once the inspiration for ernest hemingway's the odd man and the sea, now it is struggling to clean up from hurricane irma's awesome power. thousands of tourists remain trapped in the beach town. tensions gradually rising as the chances of making it out home quickly look ever more remote. cuba's communist government is on an emergency footing, mobilising all the resources at its disposal.
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from the army, to the state security apparatus, every bureaucrat and every administrator has been drafted in. the president praised the cuban people for their response and said discipline and hard work would overcome the storm's devastating effects. for now, it is the island's strong sense of community, neighbours helping neighbours that will get cuba through this initial crisis. the long—term clean up though may need international aid. some images taken by nasa. this is hurricane irma seen from space. one frame every 15 minutes. this is from 6am last wednesday to 9am this morning and you can see the way the hurricane travels across the caribbean and up into florida. so stunning images there coming from
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nasa. commemorations have been taking place across america to mark 16 years since the 9/11 terrorist attack in which nearly 3,000 people were killed. president trump and first lady melania observed a solemn moment of silence at the white house and later at the pentagon. paying tribute to those who lost their lives, the president said the nation grieves with their families. for the families with us on this anniversary, we know that not a single day goes by when you don't think about the loved one stolen from your life. today our entire nation grieves with you and with every family of those, 2977 innocent soles who were murdered by terrorists 16 years ago, each family here today represents a son or daughter, a sister or brother, a mother or father who was taken from
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you on that terrible, terrible day. but no force on earth can ever take away your memories, diminish your love or break your will to endure and carry on and go forward. hurricane irma sweeps up america's north coast. at least four people died in florida and ten people killed in cuba. mps are debating the bill that would tra nsfer mps are debating the bill that would transfer uk eu law into uk law. more than 4,000 muslim rohingya have fled myanmar. frank de boer has been
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sacked by crystal palace afterjust four league games in charge. four defeats without scoring goal is the worst start to a season by any club in the top division for over 90 years the former england, fulham and liverpool manager roy hodgson is expected to take over on a two year deal. senior fa executives are to be summoned to a parliamentary inquiry about the two investigations that cleared england women's team manager mark sampson of making allegedly racial remarks to former player eni aluko. i'll be back with more on those stories at 4.30pm. the brexit secretary, david davis, has warned mps that voting against the eu withdrawal bill would amount to backing a "chaotic" exit from the european union. the commons will vote late tonight after another day of debate on legislation under way, which will convert all existing eu laws into domestic ones. labour says it will oppose the bill, claiming it represents a "power grab".
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0ur chief political correspondent correspondent vicki young has the latest from westminster. it isa it is a long parliamentary evening and night. the votes won't happen until after midnight. labour has said it will oppose it and to explain why to me now i'm joined by one of labour's brexit spokesmen, paul blomfield. 0ne one of labour's brexit spokesmen, paul blomfield. one of your mps said don't kill this bill off at birth. we are not trying to wreck it. we are trying to repair it. and we have made that point clear to the government. from july we expressed out concerns, out government. from july we expressed our concerns, our shadow brexit secretary keir starmer, has written to david davis and we have invited the government to address which the deficiencies are. you are accusing the government of a power grab. they
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say that this technical exercise moving all that eu law over, needs to be done. it needs to be done quickly. they have to do it in this way? they have to do it? but they don't have to do it in this way. they're doing it in a way that provides for mo parliamentary oversight. now that is something that doesn't have to exist within the bill and there is no precedent in the history of our country since of course henry viii, the monarch who resented parliament just of course henry viii, the monarch who resented parliamentjust as much as theresa may seems to. to move on to the negotiations. jeremy corbyn has done an interview with bbc radio. he was asked about the single market and staying in the single market and staying in the single market and staying in the single market and he seemed to suggest that formal membership of the single market is open for clear. is that the policy? we have been clear in relation to the transition and therefore, we ought to seek to replicate the sort of terms that we
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have at the moment. but beyond that, looking at the long—term settlement, what we want to achieve is what's best for the economy and jobs and we think it is an enormous mistake to rule structural arrangements off the table ina rule structural arrangements off the table in a way that's going to thwart our ability to get that right deal and i think that's what jeremy is saying. are you talking about a norway—type deal? is saying. are you talking about a norway-type deal? no. the norway deal wouldn't be right for britain given the nature of our economy. what we are saying is don't have structural red lines. don't let ideological obsessions get in the way of what's right for the british people and if that means looking at some reformed membership of the single market then that's one of the ogses we'd look at. anything else would be crazy for britain. thank you very much indeed, paul blomfield there. the government is not expecting a defeat. they think it will go through. there could be some
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rebels on the labour side. jeremy corbyn is telling his mps to vote against the bill. some are not willing to go along with it. vicki young. hundreds of thousands of rohingya muslims have now fled myanmar, formerly known as burma, in the past fortnight to seek refuge across the border in bangladesh. the un human rights commissioner has warned that the situation now looks like a textbook example of ethnic cleansing. the un is urging myanmar to end what it calls the "cruel military operation" in the west of the country where there are multiple reports of security forces burning rohingya villages, and killing the inhabitants. the bloody violence in rakhine state has meant that more than three hundred thousand rohingya muslims have already fled across the border with many more still coming. many of those refugees have settled in makeshift camps near the city of cox's bazar. sanjoy majumder has been to one of them and sent this report. when you're starving, you get desperate and then it becomes dangerous. this aid truck's surrounded by a seething mass of rohingyas. the organisers, private donors, too nervous
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to distribute their supplies. there's no sign of the police, and things begin to turn ugly. fights break out. volunteers try to enforce a sense of order, but it is futile. the rohingya relief operation is slowly but surely spinning out of control. most of it at the hand of local groups and individuals, entirely out of their depth. you get a sense of the desperation. people have just climbed onto this little van, trying their best to get hold of little bags of rice that are being handed out. but it's utterly chaotic, there's no sense of order, there's nobody actually coordinating it. and then look over here. these are clothes that have just
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been flung on the ground, thrown from the aid trucks as they rush away from the scene. well—meaning, but an utterly wasted effort. and too many people are getting left out. translation: i have five people in my family, including two small children. most nights, they just go to bed hungry. this man tries to hand out money to the refugees, and soon realises it is a foolish mistake, unleashing a frenzied response from the mob that soon turns threatening. translation: i live in saudi arabia. i saw on television how they are suffering, so i came here to give them some money. the international aid groups, including the un, are here, but their operations are restricted to the authorised camps. the tens of thousands of refugees who are outside are entirely dependent on hand—outs from locals. let us get the latest now on hurricane irma.
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budd scholl is the mayor of sunny isles beach — a city fifteen miles outside of miami. he joins me now on webcam. it is the first moment really to assess the damage it has caused and what's your assessment? our assessment is, it is ugly, but it could have been worse. we were expecting a six to nine foot storm surge which would have engulfed our city. we are a coastal community. just off the mainland on the north side of miami and we are a quarter mile wide and two—and—a—half miles long. we have a got a lot of damage, but not a lot of damage. we have got power lines down and traffic lights, the city is impassable. so we have a cu rfew the city is impassable. so we have a curfew and we have the city in lockdown where we are not letting we have seen looting
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ta ke are not letting we have seen looting take place. that's why you have got a curfew in place? that's correct. 0ur city is easy to lockdown. we are a coastal community and we have two cause ways and we have a coastal road to the north and the south. so there is only four means of ingres and ingres in the city. so we have police patrols at all four areas and we have and that enables us to control. so we have had no issue with looting in our city. some neighbouring cities on the mainland we have heard about some issues with looting, but law enforcement across—the—board is looting, but law enforcement across—the—boa rd is doing looting, but law enforcement across—the—board is doing a very good job of trying to mitigate the problems. we are looking at the pictures that you have sent to us. pictures you took. you say the storm surge was not as bad as expected,
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but you did have to deal with winds and the rain that went with it? right. ironically, those winds were about half of what we expected and you can see the damage done by those winds which probably peaked at 90 or 100mph. this storm had sustained winds at some point of 185mph and we re winds at some point of 185mph and were peaking at 220mph. those winds that we actually experienced did the kind of damage that you're seeing in the pictures. we feel very, very fortu nate we the pictures. we feel very, very fortunate we didn't get the type of winds that we were expecting from a category 4 or a category 5 storm. so having seen the reports of deaths across the caribbean and indeed in parts of your own state, what are you doing? you are counting your lucky stars? we really are. i have to tell you, simon, it was very, very for tuous that we sustained the damage that we sustained. i know
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that sounds counter—intuitive, but we feel very fortunate. it will be uncomfortable for our residents and guests because we won't allow folks backin guests because we won't allow folks back in until we have the place secured for people to move about. there are some concerns that alligators and snakes and other normally sea—bound creatures are finding their way inland. is that something you're having to deal with? no, remember south florida is border to the west by the everglades. so those folks that live on the west side of town, that's more of a phenomenon that they have to deal with, snakes and alligators. so when we have these types of conditions, it disorientates the reptiles and the wildlife and sometimes they venture out of their natural hab nat and that's what some folks are experiencing. it is good of you to give us your time. thank you very much. thank you, simon.
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a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a woman's body was found at the bestival music festival in dorset. the body of the 25—year—old from london was found in a wooded area, on the edge of the festival site at lulworth castle. earlier our news correspondent, richard lister, gave us this update on the police investigation. a postmortem is due to be carried out. dorset police are hoping it will give them more information about how the woman died. a man has been arrested. he is due to be interviewed under caution. as this investigation is carried out, the police have sealed off part of the site on the lulworth estate to allow a forensic examination examination to take place. they are working closely with the festival organisers and they are asking for anybody who may have relevant information to come forward. this festival is firmly established and it is known for being a family—friendly festival. 30,000 people were there yesterday, but part of the site
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has been sealed off. and it is the focus of a murder inquiry. # £0,000 was stole from a security van at the goodwood festival on saturday. 0ne saturday. one of the guards sustained a minor shoulder injury. police are appealing for any witnesses or for anyone else who may have information about the robbery to come forward. let's have a look at the weather. good afternoon. a mixture of sunny spells and showers today. some of the showers have been fairly heavy as well. as we move through the rest of the day today, through this evening and overnight, we will continue to see a few showers for a time, but they will become confined to the west for western parts of scotla nd to the west for western parts of scotland and northern ireland, wales and south—west england. further
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east, we will see drier spells and some clearer skies. temperatures overnight falling to a minimum of between ten and 13 celsius. now, while we have the clearer skies in the east, i think we will see some sunshine to start the day tomorrow. the cloud will tend to bubble up as we move through the day. few showers from the word go in the west and they will make their way slowly eastwards, the odd shower not out of the question the further east you are, but more in the way of dry weather than we have seen today. in the afternoon we will start to see rain pushing into northern ireland and that's a sign of things to come as we move through tomorrow evening. the area of low pressure works its way eastwards and it will bring heavy bursts of rain for northern ireland and southern scotland, but we will see the winds picking up and we could see gusts up to around 75mph in the central swathe of the uk. so there could be a little bit of damage locally. so stay tuned to the forecast. hello, this is bbc news with me, simon mccoy. the headlines: president trump has described hurricane irma as a storm
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of "catastrophic severity" as he pledged full government resources to deal with its aftermath. in florida, at least four people have been killed and more than half of all homes and businesses are without power. when americans are in need, americans pull together, and we are one country. and when we face our challenge, we emerge stronger, closer and more determined than ever. officials in cuba say at least ten people have been killed by hurricane irma, which battered the island at the weekend, flooding the streets of havana. the majority of the victims died in collapsed buildings. president trump was commemorating the anniversary of 9/11 — appearing alongside the first lady to pay tribute to the nearly 3,000 who died in the us terror attacks 16 years ago. mps are debating the brexit bill.
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the bill is meant to convert eu legislation to uk law — but labour says it's a power—grab by the government. now time for the sport. frank de boer became the first managerial casualty of the season as he was sacked by crystal palace. the former crystal palace winger and coachjohn former crystal palace winger and coach john salako does former crystal palace winger and coachjohn salako does not agree with the decision. it is not something the club wants or needs. the turnover of managers is a real concern because you need that stability, unidirectional. the academy needs addressing. when you're going to sign players, this tra nsfer you're going to sign players, this transfer window, i thought there would be a big clear out, they would back frank, let him bring in six, seven or eight signings, but it did not happen. to be sat here now, it
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is all a bit of a circus. the talk is all a bit of a circus. the talk is now roy hodgson will come in who is now roy hodgson will come in who is another ex—england manager, vastly experienced. we have been through holloway, peerless, pardew, alla rdyce, very through holloway, peerless, pardew, allardyce, very strong, pragmatic, very experienced english managers and roy would fit that bill —— tony pulis. there will be an enquiry into the england manager mark samson who was accused of making racist remarks to any aluko. the culture sport and media select committee have ta ken the culture sport and media select committee have taken into account various previous issues. there was a
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complaint that eniola aluko made about the england women's team's boss paul sampson. three weeks ago she told me she had been the victim of bullying and discrimination. the fa in two separate reviews cleared mark samson of those allegations and said he was guilty of no wrongdoing whatsoever but aluko told they she was upset at how the investigation had been conducted. the fa said there was nothing wrong with the two reviews. they were happy with how it was conducted. samson said last week he wanted to move on, his conscience was clear. i think this will make it ha rd was clear. i think this will make it hard for the fa to move on because that select committee doesn't tend to call fa executives to explain themselves. i understand that both aluko themselves. i understand that both alu ko and another themselves. i understand that both aluko and another former player
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lianne sanderson will be asked to give evidence as well and the hearing will take place in mid—0ctober. thank you. elsewhere celtic‘s captain scott brown has signed a contract which will keep him with the scottish champions until 2019. he is in his tenth year. that is all the sport for now. more in the next hour. thank you. power from offshore wind will be cheaper than that generated by new nuclear plants for the first time, experts are predicting. in the latest auction of government subsidies, firms have said they will build new offshore wind farms for half the cost of two years ago. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin reports. offshore wind energy
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at the cutting edge of technology. giant floating turbines way higher than big ben being prepared in norway for delivery to scotland. it's conventional offshore wind power behind today's news, though, with a truly staggering fall in costs, way better than even the industry itself had hoped for. the results that we've seen come back from the auction are nothing short of astounding, and that's even for those of us that work in the energy sector. it's part of the low carbon revolution. solar power in some places in the uk is now being built with zero subsidy and onshore wind would provide the cheapest energy if the government relaxed what is effectively a ban on the technology in england. so, the latest results for new electricity generation confirm that onshore wind and solar have no subsidy. offshore wind has support at £57 per megawatt hour. and new nuclear is much higher at £92.50 per megawatt hour. when you've got extremely expensive projects like hinkley point c, i think the government really needs to reconsider what is the best dealfor the uk.
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it is a blow for hinkley power station, where costs have been growing just as offshore costs have been falling. but the industry says you cannot compare the two technologies like for like. we need a balanced mix of sources of power to power us for the future. and we need to do that in as low carbon way as possible. i'm very pleased about this because it helps to ensure that renewables will be a significant part of that, along with nuclear and other technologies, for the future. much more energy storage from giant battery farms like this one near leighton buzzard will be needed to store more of the power that we will get from offshore wind. but the offshore industry is innovating further. and it is seen today as the clearest signal so far that the uk's clean energy revolution has begun. let's get to westminster. the debate
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is getting underway for the second day before the vote tonight on the legislation which would allow the uk parliament to bring in all eu legislation and make it effectively british legislation. let's go to vicki young who is just yards away outside that chamber. we are expecting a vote tonight. how tight could it be? i think the government will get through this pretty easily. downing street have said they are confident this bill will get through and that is because even though there are some conservatives who have doubts and concerns about this, one called the bill monstrous, there does not seem to be the appetite to defeat theresa may at this point. that does not mean that further down the parliamentary line they will not wa nt the parliamentary line they will not want some changes. the overwhelming feeling from all sides today, listening to the debate in the last
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couple of hours or so, they do think some changes will need to be made. the message from the government is clear. we are leaving the european union at the end of march 2019. they have to give legal certainties to individuals and businesses they unidirectional there is not a vacuum that all this eu law is transposed over into eu law —— uk law as well. most conservatives will vote with the government tonight. this is what cheryl gillan had to say. we have all heard the rather sadistic attempts to give this process the simple descriptor, the hard brexit and soft brexit which are the polarised viewpoints. i prefer a practical view. this bill does what it says on the tin. it provides a method to facilitate a very complex and legal constitutional extrication that has resulted from a democratic vote to leave the european union. i will therefore be supporting the government in the lobbies tonight
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and hope many of my colleagues on the other side of the house as well as on this side of the house will do the same. ministers insisted that this was a technical process, that they have been given these powers, they have been given these powers, they need this bill, because it all has to be transferred over. but that is not how others see it. jeremy corbyn is ordering his labour mps to oppose the bill. they are saying this amounts to a power grab, that ministers will have to change actual policies, change laws without any parliamentary scrutiny. and most labour mps will be following the orders of their leader like angela smith. mr speaker, ifi do orders of their leader like angela smith. mr speaker, if i do vote against the second reading tonight, it is not because i am voting against brexit. that is a huge misrepresentation of the nature of this debate and the nature of the decisions that are contained if we
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pass the second reading of this bill. rather, iwill pass the second reading of this bill. rather, i will be voting against a brexit badly handled, and which threatens to weaken further our non—established and hard—won democratic traditions. there was laughter there from conservative mps, because some of them suspect that the opposition parties are going to oppose this bill, not for any valid reason. they think they are ultimately trying to stop brexit happening at all, something which is denied by the labour leadership. it is interesting because this afternoon we have had a few labour mps standing up and saying they will not go along with whatjeremy corbyn saying they will not go along with what jeremy corbyn wants, saying they will not go along with whatjeremy corbyn wants, because they too think this bill is necessary. ido necessary. i do not regard this bill as hugely controversial. if it was abolishing workers' rights, abandoning paid holidays and ending pollution controls, that would be different,
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but it does not. however, it is undoubtably the case the proposed bill needs amending for many of the reasons outlined by my right honourable friend the member for holborn and st pancras. firstly the henry viii clauses. transferring all of these into uk law is on enviable task. most of the labour mps who will be backing this bill are mps who are very much on the leave side of this campaign. caroline flint is interesting because she was on the remain side. 0ur argument today is that she represents a constituency that she represents a constituency that voted to leave. she is still on a manifesto that promised to deliver brexit and respect the result of it and she felt she could not oppose this bill and also fulfil her commit meant to her constituents. she said
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she will abstain at this point. it shows how the whole brexit debate has divided the country. it has divided this place but also it has shown up the divisions between both labour and the conservatives. thank you, vicki young. christian fraser has been looking at the key points. here we have our ticking clock. we have the border to dispute and the rights of eu and uk citizens. all i
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hear says michel barnier is the ticking clock. it is clear the uk does not feel legally obliged to honour its obligations after departure. how can we build trust and start discussing a future partnership? i think we have seen some concrete progress. 0ur discussions this week have exposed yet again that uk's approach is more pragmatic and flexible than that of the eu as it avoids unnecessary disruption for businesses and consumers. that leaves us with a big? 0ver consumers. that leaves us with a big? over the direction of this the gauche asian. —— it leaves us with a big question mark over the direction of the negotiation. they want us out of the negotiation. they want us out of the negotiation. they want us out of the single market and the customs
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union. the next few months matter because it is all about sorting out article 50. the government wants to try and get agreement with europeans in october on the article 50 issues. the eu negotiates in a very specific way. nothing happens for ages and at the 11th hour everyone panics and sta rts the 11th hour everyone panics and starts to negotiate. i think by the end of september, october, we will start to see things move. david davis will hope that is the case. there are other things to get through. let's look at the key milestones in the months ahead. the next face—to—face meeting of next week on the 18th of september, which has become even more important after a summer of slow progress. david davis is getting impatient and he is pushing for rolling weekly meetings. perhaps we will get more clarity when the crucial german election is out of the way. there are two bid
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leaders summit before the end of the year and we leaders summit before the end of the yearand we can leaders summit before the end of the year and we can probably expect a showdown in october and then there is one more in december before the final brexit meeting of the year when eu ambassadors meet on the 20th of december. business leaders here in the uk are waiting on the sidelines, delaying crucial contingency planning for the coming yea rs. contingency planning for the coming years. how long can they wait? the next few months will be critical in shaping the future brexit deal and at any point in this process we could be back to square one. and from our starting point here to the final meeting on the 20th of december? it is exactly 100 days. and christian will be back tonight with katty kay in washington for beyond 100 days which will be looking at issues on both sides of the atlantic. it is on the news channel and bbc four. the parents of a six—year—old child
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are threatening to sue their sons‘ school after boys were allowed to come to class wearing dresses. nigel and sally rowe have taken their son out of his church of england primary school on the isle of wight because one of his class mates comes to school some days as a girl. the school at the centre of this story on the isle of wight is not being identified, to protect all the children involved including the children of nigel and sally rowe, the parents who have now withdrawn their six—year—old son. they say he was confused when another male pupil came to school wearing a dress. they say it's wrong to encourage very young children to embrace transgenderism and that it offends their christian values. we want to protect our children and we want a good dialogue now about it so it's notjust pushed into schools and accepted. we are concerned about how it could influence other children. we don't know, as sally said, what the full ramifications of that could be. it is just too young. let childrenjust be children.
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the church of england school wrote to the couple urging them to accept it when male pupils came to school in dresses. the school has the backing of the diocese of portsmouth, who say that: campaigners for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights say mr and mrs rowe have misjudged this, as children with gender issues need sympathy to avoid being bullied. i have a child who took a lot of bullying on my behalf and that bullying was exactly the same, it was parents saying, "we have a right to have an opinion", and they told their children their opinion, and having told their children their opinion, their children thought it was open season on bullying my son. mr and mrs rowe, who are devout christians here on the isle of wight, say they have received lots of hate
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messages on social media. but they say this is about parents‘ rights and those christian values, both of which they now want tested in the courts. two years ago, the couple withdrew another of their sons when a male arrived hearing a dress. they say they are not trans phobic. and they will teach their two sons at home, even though the school and the church say that attitude is lacking in modern day understanding and sensitivity. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first — the headlines on bbc news: hurricane irma sweeps up florida's west coast leaving more death and destruction in its wake. more than half of all homes in the state are without power — parts of miami are under water. at least four people have died in florida and ten people have been killed in cuba.
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a crucial vote will take place in parliament tonight on britain's exit from the eu. more than 300,000 muslim rohingyas have now fled myanmar — the un human rights chief has warned the current situation is a "textbook example" of ethnic cleansing. hello. i have a look at how the markets have been performing today. it has been an especially healthy day here in the uk. in the us there have also been rises as the us are relieved that hurricane irma has not hit florida as much as previously thought. felix asset management is in the driving seat at hornby. it announced the departure of the chief
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executive for a new chapter. the biggest fall on the ftse is the company behind primark, that is associated british foods. that is despite saying profits would be higher than last. and insurance companies are trying to examine the cost of the damage caused by hurricane irma. for more on this we can talk to richard hunterfrom wilson on this we can talk to richard hunter from wilson king on this we can talk to richard hunterfrom wilson king investment management. thank you forjoining us. how do we go about assessing the financial damage and billy macro caused by irma ? financial damage and billy macro caused by irma? it is difficult. on the one hand you have fairly specialised insurers in florida who will be much hard disk it. you then have more general insurers. you have had a good day today on the basis of
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what you have mentioned on the basis that hurricane irma has been downgraded to a tropical storm. clearly it has done some damage. those estimates of damages ranging up those estimates of damages ranging up to $250 million has now been severely reduced. they now fear it could be closer to 50 or $60 million. clearly still a financial impact in the region, but not as bad as first feared. that is irma but people in houston and the surrounding area are still mopping up surrounding area are still mopping up after harvey. what impact will both of these storms have on the wider american economy. the human cost which is a big negative in terms of people losing their homes etc, can have quite a positive economic impact in the medium—term, in as much as there is clearly, both
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in terms of residential and business properties, a great deal of rebuilding to be done. there are ca rs rebuilding to be done. there are cars to be replaced, there arejobs for people who are helping as part of the cleaning effort, so ironically, in three to six months‘ time, it could more than replace the amount of gdp that the us will have lost very short—term. amount of gdp that the us will have lost very short-term. returning to the uk, abs is the worst performer today, how come? it has to be put into context that in the last six months the share price was up 19%. there were strong figures for primark where sales figures are expected to be up 13% compared to the last time last year. one of the problems primark has got is input costs or the cost of importing some of its materials have increased, perfectly when you compare the
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wea kness perfectly when you compare the weakness of sterling versus the dollar. it is that outlook which has damaged the share price as opposed to the actual performance of the company which leaves it in pretty good shape. richard, thank you. simon, back to you. thank you. more now on our top story. hurricane irma has brought intense rain, violent winds and tornadoes to the west coast of florida as it continues its trail of destruction. islands in the caribbean have been ha rd islands in the caribbean have been hard hit. we can speak to someone from anguilla. it looks very calm behind you but i suspect there is a huge effort underway to get things back to normal? absolutely. it is a sunny day today. nature rebound is a lot quicker than i think the
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humankind does. but this sunshine really opens up the full reality which is pretty stark and makes people here think about what their future will be. just describe how stark it is. for people who do not know the island, what is left?|j stark it is. for people who do not know the island, what is left? i am going to move around and try and get some more pictures for you, but the reality is really showing itself. sony people have lost their roof. many people currently have no electricity. there is no power to the island. there is difficulty in getting gas. there is difficulty in getting gas. there is difficulty in getting diesel for those who have generators. there are some human casualties happening is far as literally people are trying to get food and water. that is unusual for us in anguilla because we are very
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familiar, being part of the hurricane belt, being prepared for hurricanes. and we were prepared for hurricane irma, but as we know, hurricane irma, but as we know, hurricane irma, but as we know, hurricane irma packed such severe winds that many people can describe to you moments of either trying to brace themselves against a window which was almost ready to be blown out, holding onto doors in an attempt to try and pull themselves in from the storm. at times... the grim reality is that many of our businesses and hotels have been destroyed. it is coming home to us that the future ahead is not as bright as the sunshine you see. josephine, you have been critical of the uk response in the past. downing street have been putting out
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photographs of the raf and helicopters bringing aid to anguilla. have you changed your mind about the uk response? u nfortu nately, about the uk response? unfortunately, i really don‘t like to engage in what i think is sometimes misrepresentation. for example, there was a suggestion that heavy equipment had been landed on anguilla by the raf. in fact, what happened was it was an attempt to land the heavy equipment but it never happened. 0n the occasion just following the storm there may have been as many as 20 marines who were on the island to do work, maybe for about three or four macro hours. that cannot be considered an adequate response to what was nothing short of a catastrophic disaster in anguilla and i continued to maintain that. i applaud the fact
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that perhaps now with that criticism it has led to perhaps more robust focus on and well, but in terms of that focus and the efforts reaching and touching people here, it is still criticism. it is notjust criticism, it is angry criticism? still criticism. it is notjust criticism, it is angry criticism7m has to be. we are a british colony. i‘m sure if this was to dock on mainland uk the residents here would feel the same way. the fact that we are 4000 miles away should make no difference to the fact we are under the same realm and under the same flag. it is very good of you to give us your time flag. it is very good of you to give us yourtime and flag. it is very good of you to give us your time and we wish you well. thank you. thank you for having me. we will have all the latest with huw edwards at five but first, let‘s catch up with the weather. good afternoon. a mix of sunny
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spells and blustery showers today. 0vernight we will continue to see blustery showers for a time and that then we are starting to see some clear spells and dry weather the further east you are. temperatures falling to a minimum of ten to 13 celsius. we will start off with some sunshine first thing tomorrow. for eastern parts of scotland and eastern parts of scotland and eastern parts of england, some sunshine first thing. some scattered showers and they will tend to edge their weight used with. more in the way of dry weather and cloud bubbling up, apart from in the afternoon when we see the cloud pushing into northern ireland. we will see this area of low pressure pushing its weight used woods to bring some fairly heavy rain. some blustery winds as well. we could see gusts of 75 mph. we could see some disruption locally. stay tuned to
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the forecast. today at 5:00 — search and rescue teams deployed across florida, as authorities assess the damage caused by hurricane irma. at least four people are thought to have died, up to six million homes are without power, and there‘s a warning of a humanitarian crisis in the florida keys. these are storms of catastrophic severity. we are marshalling the full resources of the federal government to help ourfellow americans. having swept earlier along the north coast of cuba, irma left at least ten people dead, and flooded many homes in the capital, havana. we‘ll have the latest from florida, and we‘ll be talking to some of those who experienced the storm. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00 — ahead of a key parliamentary vote on brexit, the government urges mps to back what it describes as an "orderly departure" from the eu.
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