Skip to main content

tv   HAR Dtalk  BBC News  September 12, 2017 12:30am-1:00am BST

12:30 am
the ayes to the right, 326, the nays to the left 290. so the ayes have it. the ayes have it. unlock. programme motion to be moved formally will stop thank you. the question is as on the order paper. all those in favour say aye. contrary, said nos. the measure! clear the lobby. that is vote number three that is taking place, and that is on the details and how many hours will be set aside for mp5 to debate the details on the bill. but that is the details on the bill. but that is the crucial vote that we have had. the bill has now been given a second reading, and the government had a much bigger majority in the second
12:31 am
vote tha n much bigger majority in the second vote than it did in the second. so we know that labour mps were under orders to vote against the bill. they did not want a second reading. we know that other opposition parties had also told mps that they should vote against the bill being given a second reading, as well. but in spite of that, the government ended up winning the vote 326 votes to 290. that is a government majority of 36. we should remember that this is a government that copper on paper at least, does not have a majority in the house of commons. but the bottom-line, though, is the second readings are usually about broad brush principle is, not about the detail. that comes later in the committee stage and so forth. i suppose a lot of the conservative mps who do have concerns, ken clarke, anna soubry, dominic grieve and so on, they agree
12:32 am
with the general principle that we need an orderly transfer of all the regulations from the eu books onto oui’ regulations from the eu books onto our books. but it is the nitty—gritty, the fine detail, that is where you come a cropper miss, is at it's is a —— that is where you come a cropper on this, isn't it? then it is satisfy the concerns that have been expressed by conservative mps over the last couple of days, in areas where they might be able to joina areas where they might be able to join a common cause with labour and other opposition mp. we have had the conservatives in the past few days of debate saying they will back the bill at second reading, and we should have the bill, but they would like to see the government, with amendments. so zac goldsmith, a man who wants to see amendments dealing
12:33 am
with that. other mp5 have raised other areas. we had a string of concern as who said that there should be amendments later on. and thatis should be amendments later on. and that is before you get to ken clarke and dominic grieve, who have been clear that they would like to see the government come up with quite big changes to address some of the concerns they have about the bill. but what mps have decided now is that in terms of the broad principle of the bill, that the 1972 act that took the uk into the european union, that that should be repealed, while they agree with that. they agreed that eu laws need to be transferred into the british legal system, if you can call it that. they agree with the broad principle. it is the details of how it all happens where we will see some of the more complex arguments in the days are nice to
12:34 am
come after the party conference season come after the party conference season in october, which is when the debate will come back to the commons. but they are now voting on the programme motion. this is the proposal that there should be a eight days of debate on the details, when mps will have the chance to go through the bill line by line and go through the bill line by line and go through their own proposals on changes. the government is also saying that on each one of those eight days, there will be eight hours of parliamentary debate on the floor of the commons. so that is the government but that proposal. what some critics have said is that that is not enough time, so they have forced another vote, a third vote of the evening, on this bill. 0k. as we wait for that, we will move on. they give full beam with us. stay with us for analysis of the final vote, coming up. —— thank you for being with us. we will stay with the brexit them. while we wait for that vote in the commons, the issue has also dominated discussions at the
12:35 am
tuc conference today. —— theme. as brexit looms, navigating a future relationship with the across the channel is proving tricky. technically, the tuc is calling for staying inside the single market permanently even if it means more immigration. don't rule yourself out, keep options on the table and put jobs, rights, and livelihoods first. not everything at the tuc happens on the conference floor. in the smoke—free rooms, some of the unions which fund the labour party are putting real pressure onjeremy corbyn. the first victory, as they see it, is getting him to sign up to single market membership during transition. now they want him to go further.
12:36 am
today it sounded like they were having some success. there has to be a trade relationship with europe, formerly within the single market or whether it is an agreement to trade within the single market. i think it is open for discussion and negotiation. labour were quick to point out that this didn't signal a change in policy. but some brexit—backing unions want him to move in the other direction. we want to be in a position where leave mean to leave and some people want to use the single market as a trojan horse to keep others in europe. but the tuc‘s leadership is hoping to make the political weather on brexit. they are trying to put clear blue water between them and the government on eu and the single market. let's you're a little bit more from
12:37 am
the brexit and remain teams, the pro and anti sides. we've heard this bill is about providing stability and certainty for iran. voting against it does not make any sense to me, particularly after the house passed article 50 legislation. this bill is the vehicle for the government and this how deal with a unique and extraordinaire situation, and ensured a functioning statute we re and ensured a functioning statute were merely the eu. unless, i believe, you tried to run the referendum will create chaos in the process , referendum will create chaos in the process, voting against it should not be an option for any member to night. ministers have indicated that they will be flexible wherever possible, but on the programme motion, having lived through the maastricht debates, i think there is little to be gained and much to be lost by debating unnecessarily. —— maastricht debates. this bill
12:38 am
increases the progress being made to provide the stability and certainty they require for a smooth transition and continuity of business post—brexit. and continuity of business post-brexit. the labour mp stephen kinnock says the bill would give sweeping powers to ministers. and that cannot be allowed to happen. the conservative members who say they're going to vote in favour of they're going to vote in favour of the bill keeps saying that it is because they don't want to block brexit. but actually that has nothing to do with it. so we on the labour side of the house, we voted to trigger article 50. we sat, absolutely, that the will of the people must be done. but we don't think the way to do that is to give a massive, sipping senate powers to ministers. it would be an irony, wouldn't it, if the idea of leaving the eu was about strengthening the sovereignty of this parliament, and is doing that, we have powers that should be parliamentary powers to
12:39 am
the executive, and allow them, using things like the henry viii clauses, to ride horses through our parliamentary democracy. we are not prepared to allow that to happen. we accept the principle that a bill like this is required, but this is the wrong bill. it is not fit for purpose. and therefore, i think, outside of the debate is prevailing, deceiving. the fact is it did not prevail. we know what the result was. and is that the great repeal bill has been passed by quite a significant majority. theresa may has given her response. we're just us has given her response. we're just us through now. the parliamentary vote m ea ns us through now. the parliamentary vote means we can " move on with negotiations solid foundations" — thatis negotiations solid foundations" — that is to me is that —— mr ismay‘s reaction. she says that it means that the parliamentary vote means
12:40 am
that the parliamentary vote means that " britain can move forward on negotiations with solid foundations". —— that is theresa may's ration. we hearing about the henry viii clauses. these are the controversies surrounding this bill. it is based on the former king who knew a few things about taking back control from europe. this is all about what are known as henry viii clauses, named after the statue publications of 1539. they get the king the power to legislate by proclamation, bypassing parliament. the modern clauses allow ministers to change laws without full scrutiny of parliament. this has set alarm bells ringing in many quarters, as we have been telling you throughout the day. those who argue it will undermine the ultimate sovereignty of government say it will give the
12:41 am
game and more powers, but actually undermines it. and if you from critics that the eu laws that cover things such as workers‘ rights and environmental protection, they could be change on the quiet. ministers could do what they like. vickerman says none of that is going to happen. —— the government says none of that is could it happen. we heard that from david lidington, closing the debate, on the government‘s side. some eu regulations need to be changed to make sense in british law. so the henry viii clauses as pa rt law. so the henry viii clauses as part of a grey rebel —— part of the great repeal bill, make sense, in his opinion. there will be separate piece of legislation that will be subject to parliamentary scrutiny in several areas. so that links llanaber of several areas. so that links lla na ber of exactly several areas. so that links lla naber of exactly what several areas. so that links llanaber of exactly what these henry viii laws are, and why they are causing so much controversy. let‘s
12:42 am
go back to our parliamentary correspondence, sean curran, who watched the whole debate today. we are waiting for the final vote on the details of how many days the length of time that the next stage of the passage of the great repeal bill will take. i mean, one assumes, sean, that the government has the upper hand here, knowing what the time to leave will be, and what needs to be done. they do want to miss anything up, though. absolutely. you might remember a few yea rs absolutely. you might remember a few years ago, nick clegg, when he was to be the prime minister, wants to reform the house of lords. he was able to get his players through the second reading in parliament, lately but we had this evening. but then he could not get the programme motion
12:43 am
agreed, which meant that the debate would be open—ended. it could have gone on forever. as a result, the plans were dropped. the government does not have that option with this bill. so the timetable is extremely important for ministers. if the programme motion was to be defeated, that they could notjust go back to the touring board. they would have two press on and commit themselves to any number of days of debate. —— drawing board. they have said they will be eight days of debate, and each debate will take eight hours. this will take place in full view of everybody in the house of commons. they have been concerns expressed during the debate that, while many have said that it will not be long enough, given that it is such a huge undertaking, as we heard from the former canberra minister cheryl gallant, who referred back to the days of maastricht, saying nothing
12:44 am
will be gained from in this debate. —— cabinet minister. this follows on from the big decision that voters took on the eu referendum, but the bill itself does not take any big decisions. it is part of the process of leaving, and their argument is that mps who just get on with it and start debating. but we will find out the results of this debate now. the ayes to the right, 318. the nos to the left, 301. thank you. the ayes to the right, 318. the nos to the left, 301. so the ayes have it. the ayes have it. unlock the resolution to be moved formally. the question
12:45 am
is aye? the nos? the question is an on the order paper. those in favour save aye. on the order paper. those in favour save aye. 0k, on the order paper. those in favour save aye. ok, so a much tighter vote there. interesting. this was tighter than on the great repeal bill itself, which suggest that some of those who voted for the bill to go through did not feel that there was not enough time, really, for a full debate on this in committee.|j not enough time, really, for a full debate on this in committee. i think that was always possible. that was all it could be a pressure point for the government, because some of the government‘s own supporters, quite prominent eurosceptics, had suggested there should be more time to debate. that was certainly the closest vote of the evening. or it
12:46 am
turned out to beat. or the early morning, i should say. it turned out to be the last vote. —— it turned out to be. there have been five votes a nd out to be. there have been five votes and they have now finished with the eu would draw bill. so that means that there will be those eight days where they will look at the details. eight hours a piece. —— withdraw bill. that is a great thing for the government‘s business managers, because now they will be working to the government‘s timetable. but that is a close vote then we have seen so far. we have just heard from our political editor about a clash that conservative mps could be asking for in voting for the passage of this bill. some of the passage of this bill. some of the amendments have already been put
12:47 am
forward by a number of conservative mps, and 07112 consewatisse mp5, support of 12 conservative mps, including the select committee chairs nicky morgan, tom tugendhat, aza m chairs nicky morgan, tom tugendhat, azam walliston. and they include limiting the so—called olivier powers, giving parliament the final say on the withdrawal agreement. amendments that we expected? there had been some talk in this debate where people were saying that they felt that some rights might not be protected once these legislations we re protected once these legislations were through. the current chair of women were through. the current chair of women in the qualities committee raise concerns about the future of
12:48 am
rights under equality law if the charter for rights under equality law if the charterforfundamental rights under equality law if the charter for fundamental rights was not dealt with in the way she wanted in this bill. sarah wollaston had talked about acting amendments and obvious what has happened now, because this bill had gone through, this is an opportunity for people to start tabling a movement. and obviously they have gained, or have tried to gain support for it. so it isa tried to gain support for it. so it is a significant move if you have a lot of conservative mps who chaired these very influential select committees, because these are obviously quite senior conservatives, and it gives a lot of argument. and they might be able to attract cross—party support. this is attract cross—party support. this is a sign of the legislative battle that the government has got to come. it has got its bill over the first parliament in total, if you like, but it certainly does not mean that the bill is going to finish the course the bill is going to finish the course in exactly the same shape it is tonight. absolutely not. they give forjoining us, sean curran.
12:49 am
that is the very latest background to the important vote this evening on the great repeal bill. now we will move on with some of the other news, now. what is happening to the wreckage of muslims in myanmar seems to bea wreckage of muslims in myanmar seems to be a textbook example of ethnic cleansing, according to the un. —— rohingya. but the president of myanmar says it has been provoked into using military force after rohingya militants were accused of attacking police stations in rakhine state. after the military response, many have fled to bangladesh and are in desperate condition. what is happening from —— in my and
12:50 am
my question huge clouds of smoke filled the sky. —— looking across from bangladesh, huge clouds of smoke fill the sky. military boats patrol the river border. the army is accused of setting fire to muslim rohingya villages and of planting landmines in the paths of fleeing people. it denies that it is targeting civilians. but we have found evidence to suggest otherwise. this small hospital in cox‘s bazar has been coping with large numbers of rohingya casualties. in the last week, it‘s had an influx of critically injured people blown up by landmines as they escaped. this person is one of them. he‘s 15 years old and unlikely to make it to 16. he arrived at the hospital a week ago with his legs destroyed. he suffered a terrible loss of blood but doctors have no more to give him. his brother in another hospital suffered the same fate.
12:51 am
translation: i can't go back to myanmar, we are not safe. i will beg here in bangladesh and that will be better. i used to pray to allah to give me a son but now my sons are gone. their injuries are so bad, it‘s as if they are dead. it‘s better that allah takes them. they‘re suffering so much. this woman will pull through, although she too has lost both her legs. she fled myanmar because she said the military had been targeting her community. she was crossing the border with her three sons when she trod ona landmine. translation: they had already gone ahead and i was behind them, and that‘s when the explosion happened. we had been fired on, shot at, and they planted mines. we have escaped to bangladesh because we have nowhere else to go.
12:52 am
this five—year—old plays with her little brother. she was shot while being carried by her father as the family escaped. the same bullet that hit her killed him. she still cries out for him. she has five other siblings, but in the confusion they were separated. her desperate mother now can‘t find them. translation: i'm in a terrible situation right now. i‘m really worried. i haven‘t got all my children together and i‘ve lost my husband. i‘ve lost my house. where do i go? there‘s only unhappiness for us. down the road at the larger central hospital, there are more casualties,
12:53 am
crammed into a ward. people on the floor, people in corridors, every space taken. half of these patients are rohingya muslims. this hospital has been inundated since the crisis started just over two weeks ago, and it is struggling to cope. we need medicines, we need surgical equipment, we need manpower, we need everything. and do you not have these? no, no, our government supply is limited. the innocent can‘t comprehend what‘s happening to them, but the rohingya people are suffering miserably in this conflict, whatever the myanmar government says. reeta chakra barti, bbc news, bangladesh. the parents of a six—year—old child
12:54 am
are threatening to sue his school. they have taken their children out. the school has not been named. these pa rents the school has not been named. these parents have withdrawn their six—year—old son. they say he was confused and another male pupil came to school wearing a dress. they say it is wrong to encourage very young children to embrace transgenderism. we wa nt children to embrace transgenderism. we want a dialogue about it so it is not pushed into school. you don't know what the full ramifications of it can be. it'sjust too young. let childrenjust be
12:55 am
it can be. it'sjust too young. let children just be children. the church of england school wrote to them urging them to accept it when male children came to school wearing dresses. the school has the backing of the diocese say that the schools are inclusive environments where schools learn to respect diversity of all kinds. among other things, this link schools need to accept the wishes of their children and their families with regard to gender identity. campaigners for lesbian, 93v, identity. campaigners for lesbian, gay, bisexual and tra nsgender identity. campaigners for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights said mrand mrs gay, bisexual and transgender rights said mr and mrs rowe had thisjudge this as children with chants gender issues need sympathy to avoid being bullied. —— transgender issues.|j have a child that took a lot of bullying on my behalf and that bullying on my behalf and that bullying was exactly the same. it was parents to say we have a right to have an opinion and they told their children their opinion and having told their children their opinion, they thought it was open season on bullying my son. mr and
12:56 am
mrs rowe who are devout questions here on the isle of wight say they have received lots of hate messages on social media that they say this is about parents rights and those christian values, both of which they now want tested in the courts. two yea rs now want tested in the courts. two years ago, the couple withdrew another of their sons were different male pupil arrived wearing a dress. they say they are not transferred bit and will teach their two sons at home even though the school and the church save our attitude is lacking in modern—day understanding and sensitivity. duncan kennedy, bbc news, the isle of wight. hello. as was the case on the weekend, we have had a rather breezy day with quite a variety of weather on essa. as ever, captured by our weather watcher is. the conditions dipped away if you happen to get tangled up in the showers but as they passed and because of the breeze, the conditions in between
12:57 am
went too bad. it was always going to be that way because we were dominated by an area of low pressure, dominated by an area of low pressure, keeping the westerly breeze coming across leonard —— many parts. the prospect of showers rattling in either around the centre or the low or if you are fully exposed by the north—westerly winds, you will see the showers drifting in off the western shores and may be running into some inland areas. clearer skies at east could see the temperatures dipping the way 25, six, seven degrees, perhaps. and then we‘re off and running into tuesday. a different beast because average tuesday. a different beast because average of high pressure will be tried to top end of the atlantic, king —— tending to kill off some of the showers at least. out west, different story. the crowd filling in and eventually there will be a lot of rain getting into northern ireland and initially. it is all tied in by what we expect will be a very vigorous tied in by what we expect will be a very vigorous area tied in by what we expect will be a very vigorous area of low pressure, throwing that rain towards the north
12:58 am
and east. that is only part of the story. yes, the rain is heavy enough in its own right but it is the strength of the wind that could cause significant disruptions as we get through tuesday night and indeed the first part of wednesday because anywhere from the southern parts of scotla nd anywhere from the southern parts of scotland to the eve of —— eastern parts of northern ireland will be looking at strong gusts. there could bea looking at strong gusts. there could be a core of wind that sees them getting up to 75 mph. the system moves away getting up to 75 mph. the system moves away and eventually we are left with another day of sunny spells but yes, again there will be that threat of some pretty blustery showers. having established something of a west north—westerly wind across the british isles. as we get into thursday and friday, the north—westerly is the dominant flow. by north—westerly is the dominant flow. by friday, we are opening up the isobars at touch and by that stage after a blustery and showery day on thursday, there could be fewer showers and less in the way of breeze but given the direction, i
12:59 am
suspect we still won‘t see much of a heatwave. goodbye. i‘m sharanjit leyl, in singapore. the headlines: the un accuses myanmar of ethnic cleansing, as the exodus of rohingya muslims continues. many are victims of gun attacks and landmines. translation: i have lost my husband, i have lost my house. where do i go? there is only unhappiness for us. the un security council unanimously backs another round of sanctions against north korea — ramping up the pressure on pyongyang. these are by far the strongest measures ever these are by far the strongest measures ever imposed on north korea. it gives us a better chants to halt the regime from fuelling its
1:00 am
nuclear programme.

26 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on