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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 12, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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sweat hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and jon kay. theresa may survives her first commons test over brexit since losing her parliamentary majority. the ayes have it. in a late—night vote, mps backed plans to transfer thousands of eu laws onto the uk statute book by a majority of 36. good morning, it's tuesday the 12th of september. also this morning: the clean—up operation in florida begins as the uk sends more help to those devastated by hurricane irma. we'll hear about claims that thousands of critically ill children aren't being given the palliative care they need. good morning. it was ten years ago
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this week that northern rock, the bank headquartered here in newcastle, collapsed and caused chaos for the financial system so i've come back to find out what difference it made to our lives. in sport — roy's return. hodgson looks set to return to football management with crystal palace, fifteen months after resigning from the england job. this is the second time and you get the sense, i'm sweating and quite uncomfortable, to be brutally honest. they're the fighter jets at the forefront of the battle against so—called islamic state, but piloting a typhoon is no mean feat, as our defence correspondent has been finding out. and he tries to hold on to his brea kfast. and he tries to hold on to his breakfast. it looks amazing. compared to yesterday, a little bit drier brighter and a bit warmer. but there is something wet and much windier on the way tonight. all the details 15 minutes. first our main story. one of the government's key pieces of legislation on brexit has won its first vote in the commons.
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the european union withdrawal bill, which would end the supremacy of eu law in the uk, was passed with a majority of 36 in the early hours of this morning. theresa may welcomed the result, saying it would give solid foundations to the ongoing talks with brussels. but labour called the bill an affront to parliamentary democracy. our political correspondent ben wright is in westminster for us to take us through what happened. what is this tell us about theresa may on the plan is going forward? what is this tell us about theresa may on the plan is going forward7m was a late night mps last night as they didn't send a spill over its first big parliamentary test. this bill is crucially important, it's massive and complex and it will affect all of us because what it does is to transfer all the eu law that applies to the uk on to the uk statute book to avoid legal chaos on the day that we leave the european
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union in 2019. both major parties in parliament agreed this bill is necessary. labour's issue is that they say it's transferring far too much power into the hands of ministers, giving them the ability to change law without proper parliamentary scrutiny in the future. it's less about brexit, more about the constitution checks on ministers and that was the big argument as this went through the commons. it has cleared this first hurdle, primarily because no tory mps rebelled. the big question is what happens next. there are months ofa what happens next. there are months of a pretty titanic battle in some conservative mps are mindful to put amendments down and join labour, with concerns about the power of ministers, the final say they say parliament needs to have on the terms of britain's withdrawal, all of this to come into play in the next few months of this bill is by no means simply going to glide
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through. meanwhile negotiations with brussels continue and the government outlined defence plans, and how that would work. another position paper is being produced by the government. these are meant to be shaping the negotiations with brussels, giving an indication to the brush tools negotiators how britain sees particular areas involving. —— brussels. that promise is also a close cooperation in the future, the tone very much cooperation, willing tone very much cooperation, willing to help with future military exercises. the key has always been very conservative and does not want the eu to do anything cutting across the eu to do anything cutting across the role that nato has but this is quite an old branch to brussels, saying we will help in the future and this is part of the negotiating jigsaw. we will speak to the defence secretary just after 730. the florida state governor, rick scott, has urged people not to return to the florida keys
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because of the extensive damage caused by hurricane irma. 6.5 million homes in the state remain without power. the storm is continuing to push inland, bringing torrential rain to alabama and tennessee. sarah corker reports. imagine returning home to find this. irma has ravaged the florida keys, buildings torn apart, belongings strewn along the roadside and boats dumped onshore. a deadly combination of fierce winds and storm surges has left more than 6 million people in florida without power. the authorities said it would take weeks before electricity was fully restored. in some areas, there is little or no fuel. people are being warned to stay put. we got downed powerlines all state, roads that are
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impassable across the state, debris all over the state. miami's financial district has been badly damaged. and just hours after the hurricane struck, looters arrived. night—time cu rfews have hurricane struck, looters arrived. night—time curfews have now been imposed. several cities remain flooded. this is jacksonville. people have been told to watch for alligators and snakes and the floodwaters. hurricane irma may have been downgraded to a tropical depression but it keeps causing misery as it pushes north and further inland. this is the picture in south carolina. next in its path, alabama and tennessee. irma isn't finished yet. as florida begins the clean—up operation, british emergency aid is being sent to the caribbean to help with the relief operation there. 700 troops are already on the islands and overnight raf cargo planes containing medical supplies, emergency shelter kits and clean water set off
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across the atlantic. jon donnison reports. more help is coming but it is taking time. another raf cargo plane was loaded up last night at brize norton en route to the caribbean. 0n loaded up last night at brize norton en route to the caribbean. on board, medical supplies, en route to the caribbean. on board, medicalsupplies, medicalshelter, food and water. and later today, hms 0cean will set sail from gibraltar with a crew of 700 specialising in disaster relief. but it will take around 12 days to cross the atlantic. the government continues to have wants a criticism that it's been too slow to respond. they remain absolutely upmost in our thoughts, we are continuing to send in more police and have already got 700 troops in the area and we are seeing confidence now starting to rise. but not much evidence of that
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confidence on the devastated british virgin islands. —— devastated. this is the queue to get into a local supermarket. people are hungry and helpless. go to the back! some uk troops are already on the ground helping to distribute food and water. but the people here are british citizens and many don't feel they are being treated as such. injust over an hour we'll find out the latest developments in florida with major richard rand from the north miami beach police department. we were speaking to them yesterday and they were talking about live electric wires. in other news this morning: three men, including two british soldiers, have been charged under terror laws with being members of a banned neo—nazi group. they're due to appear before westminster magistrates‘ court this morning. two other men have been released without charge. the united nations security council will impose further sanctions
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on north korea in response to its most powerful nuclear test yet. the measures, which restrict oil imports and ban textile exports, were approved unanimously but only after the united states softened its original proposals to win chinese and russian backing. a woman who was found dead at a festival has been confirmed aas 25—year—old louella michie and was discovered in a wooden area at the bestival site on monday. she's the daughter of holby city and taggart actorjohn michie. there is surprisingly limited evidence that light drinking during pregnancy poses any risk to the baby, according to researchers, but women are still being recommended to avoid alcohol completely. scientists at the university of bristol reviewed existing studies and didn't find any convincing proof that a drink or two a week is harmful. but the team stresses this does not mean it is completely safe and say it's best to follow current government advice. 0ur health correspondent jenny walrond reports.
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drinking heavily in pregnancy is well known to be harmful to babies. but mums to be often ask if there is a safe level. scientists say a lack of evidence has led to inconsistent advice and confusion amongst mothers and health professionals. now analysis by the university of bristol of studies dating back to the 1950s suggests that having one small glass of wine twice a week, orfour units in total, may result in a small increase in the chances of having a small baby or a premature birth. but scientists say there is so little research, it's difficult to be sure. we couldn't come up with a definite yes or no answer as to whether there is any a armful effect of drinking such low levels of alcohol.
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so there is uncertainty as to whether it is therefore safe or not safe for the child to be exposed to this level of alcohol. pregnant women who have had a drink are being reassured that they are unlikely to have harmed their baby, but advice from both researchers and the uk chief medical officer is that it is best to completely abstain while pregnant, or trying to conceive, on the grounds that it is better to be safe than sorry. jenny walrond, bbc news. government efforts to help schools keep hold of teachers and develop their skills does not appear to be working, according to the national audit office. a report by the spending watchdog shows nearly 35,000 more teachers left before retirement than five years ago, and schools are finding it tougher to fill posts. the government said it was tackling the challenges facing schools. apple is set to launch the iphone 8 at it's new headquarters in san francisco later today, marking the tenth anniversary of the first ever iphone. but details of the tech giant's latest smartphone have
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already been revealed in an apparent leak earlier this week. 0ur north america tech correspondent dave lee can tell us more from the hq in california. what do we know, and we shouldn't have known much? good evening. it is just under ten o'clock here in california. there has been a leak. we are expecting three new models. also the mysterious iphone x, or ten. there is a lot of anticipation of what that device would have. it is going to cost in the region of $1000 which will probably be £1000 backin $1000 which will probably be £1000 back in the uk as well. that information came out virally because we think it was an inside job but we will not know for sure. this is the steve jo bs will not know for sure. this is the steve jobs theatre. will not know for sure. this is the stevejobs theatre. and this is apple's new campus, they've been
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building its many years. we are getting the chance to see it for the first time and underground in that room, we will be shown precisely what the news is. playful seals, a pensive squirrel and a seahorse tugging a cotton bud are among the fascinating images from the finalists of the annual contest wildlife photographer of the year. the photos have been selected from around 50,000 entries for their creativity, originality and technical excellence. also this shot of a tiny seahorse. and look at these. the winners will be announced in october and some of the best entries can be seen in a special exhibition at the natural history museum later this year. barrel amateur entries. astonishing. sally is here with sport. frank deburgh, gone. i think that
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decision had been made before yesterday. a new man potentially coming in. an old friend. roy hodgson, hugely experienced, crystal palace. it will be interesting to see how the fans react. it looks as though the former england manager roy hodgson is about to return to football after 15 months. hodgson is expected to become the new crystal palace manager later today following the sacking of frank de boer afterjust four league games. there was relief for slaven bilic on his birthday and his west ham side last night, as they beat huddersfield 2—0 for their first premier league points of the season. and the most expensive footballer in the world is expected to line up against celtic tonight. neymar‘s paris st germain visit the scottish champions in the champions league. and world heavyweight champion anthonyjoshua met his next opponent bulgarian kubrat pulev yesterday. the two will fight under the roof at cardiff's principality stadium next month.
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for those belts. big belts. three big belts. it feels cold. what is going on? not much warmer today. wind is not as strong as yesterday. fewer showers. get ready for something wet and windy. the first storm of the autumn coming in. there it is on the satellite. just starting to develop. some changes as it comes. at the moment, a lovely start. a few showers to northern ireland and the west of wales and the north of england. those showers will develop into the afternoon. some go east. most will stay dry. things change by
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evening rush—hour. wet in northern ireland by the end of the afternoon and evening. the breeze picking up. dry but coming home in the rain. the east of the pennines and east of scotla nd east of the pennines and east of scotland should be dry. wet and windy in wales and south—west england already by the start of the evening. gale force winds. heavy rain as well. the midlands, rain is coming in at this stage. east anglia and the south—east, you should have and the south—east, you should have a dry return home. this area of low pressure coming in and developing as it goes. 50—60 miles per hour winds. that'll be a long southern counties of england during the first part of the evening. through the night, strengthening winds in north england, north wales, part of the midlands, and norfolk. 70 miles per
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hour. that could lead to disruption. heavy rain. keep up—to—date with the latest weather warnings of the website and application. more details on the morning. a wild night to come. that system gets out of the way to be windy in norfolk tomorrow and some parts of eastern england and some parts of eastern england and scotland. sunshine and showers. like yesterday, fairly frequent showers. driest and brightest in east anglia and the south—east. 13-111. as the east anglia and the south—east. 13—111. as the low pressure pulls away, dragging out from the north for thursday. continuing that feed of cold air. longer spells of rain pushing down eastern counties of england. sunshine and showers for most. cool as showers go through. as we start the day, dry and wet and wild weather to come for the evening and overnight before things go back to sunshine and showers for the rest of the week. i will have more updates for you later. thank you
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very much. tuesday morning. and now we will look at the front pages. the times. they had an interesting phone call between donald trump and theresa may trying to save jobs. an interesting development in the relationship between the two governments on either side of the atlantic. this picture makes the front pages. john and his daughter found dead at a festival. talking about what happened to her. the bbc will ease public service role. it will ease public service role. it will not be required to publicise religious programming and artistic programming. the daily mail looks at
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the chatter —— shadow chancellor using the word in the direction. talking about austerity. using the word in the direction. talking about austeritylj using the word in the direction. talking about austerity. i mentioned john before. the express. talking about the eu bill. what it has cost you. they say they have official figures. a story in the guardian this morning. england are qualifying for the world cup next year. there are fears about cyber security already. the players have been warned not to use wi—fi in hotels, stations, airports, cafes. they think they could be hacked. already they are talking about that! yes. if they are talking about that! yes. if they are talking about that! yes. if they are travelling away from home,
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lots of personal information on phones and photographs and personal things. but also information about training as well. that is what they are worried about. they will have to be careful. i don't know how squeamish you are to be left quickly show this. —— we will quickly show this. those are the stitches in a goalkeeper from this. those are the stitches in a goalkeeperfrom a this. those are the stitches in a goalkeeper from a team. this. those are the stitches in a goalkeeperfrom a team. he this. those are the stitches in a goalkeeper from a team. he was injured for not waiting at the fans. —— waving. steve bennett was yesterday. we were looking at this wonderful rocket. it was launched yesterday. a successful launch. there is a teddy bear on board. it was successful. he said we are really pleased with the rocket. it launched well and went high like it should. then it's better part, which
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is one of the key test parameters. -- it is one of the key test parameters. —— it split apart. is one of the key test parameters. -- it split apart. i think they will do it again with a different teddy bear. i don't know what happened to it. 21 minutes past 6am. care for thousands of terminally ill children in the uk isn't good enough according to new research into palliative care. almost 50,000 children have life—limiting or life—threatening conditions but many of their families struggle to get enough support to care for them at home because the services they need aren'tjoined up. breakfast‘s john maguire reports. the seven—year—old, logan, had brain damage before he was born. during his short life he spent long times in hospital. now, at home, the living room is the only place large enough for his bed. he requires co nsta nt enough for his bed. he requires constant care. even a five—minute chat in the kitchen is interrupted by an alarm. i will get it. it is
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beeping. his parents say the staff who helped them are fantastic, but it isa who helped them are fantastic, but it is a constant battle to make sure logan and the family receive the support they need. we get a package. it is only recently he has been very poorly and we have managed to secure a package of care that is actually starting to make an impact in helping us as a family. even with the care package we have got, she is still housebound, stuck indoors everyday, while i go out to work. she is stuck in all day, every day, day and night. she cannot get out because there is not the facility to go out to give him enough care to make it safe for him. children that once died in infancy are living longer and with more complex needs. there are some fantastic charities
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for fantastic children's hospitals providing support. but what we find too often is that the funding of those organisations is lacking. last year we found there was a 61% cut in funding for children's palliative care. that can only have one thing, a negative impact on it. a report out today by the university for policy research looks at how various aspects of death, dying, and palliative care are dealt with across the uk. it finds disparities in how people are looked after, and says scotland is leading the way, and other nations should follow suit. so far, the evidence shows they are running with a reforming culture. i think part of that is principally to do with actually determining what the welfare state in scotland will look like. this is cradle to grave. we have to make
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sure the citizens are looked after until they die. the department of health in england says it wants all families to receive high—quality and compassionate and tailored care. both wales and northern ireland have recently updated their policies. also the day, the national institute for health and care excellence publishes its standard for end of life ca re publishes its standard for end of life care for children in england and a commitment to better support families who want their children to spend their precious final days in there own home. john maguire, bbc news. —— their own. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using #bbcbrea kfast or follow us for the latest from the programme. it is hard to believe. it was the event that kicked off the financial crisis, the collapse of northern rock. ten years on, steph's in newcastle where the bank was based, to see how it affected the region. hello. good morning, everyone. let
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me explain where i am. it is beautiful down here this morning. i am at the tyne bridge. people were running on it on the weekend. the millennium bridge behind that. and then a brilliant music venue. and across the quayside, the baltic, an art gallery. it was ten years ago this week that northern rock, the bank headquartered here in newcastle, collapsed. it caused chaos for the financial system. i was a producerfor chaos for the financial system. i was a producer for bbc news, chaos for the financial system. i was a producerfor bbc news, and i helped break the story. when it was announced that northern rock had gone to the bank of england to get financial help, that was the story we had on the news. people heard about that and were worried about their money and what would happen to
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their money and what would happen to the savings they had at northern rock. there were pictures of people queueing outside the bank. it was the first time this happened in 1110 yea rs. the first time this happened in 1110 years. that was the start of the credit crunch and the uk are leading to many banks worrying about how much money they had and what there assets were. that is what we will look at this morning. we will take you back ten years to see what happened. we will look at how it has changed our lives and the financial sector and how it affected the money in our pockets as well. but first, let's get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. a very good morning. i'm asad ahmad. whipps cross hospital, which has been in "special measures," is said to be showing signs of improvement. an unannounced inspection by the care quality commission found the hospital in east london, which is part of bart's health nhs trust, to now "require improvement." it was rated "inadequate" last year. the cqc report says more needs top
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be done, but the hospital is moving in the right direction. we have made a lot of progress, which the cqc have recognised. that has made the waiting go from inadequate in the last two actions to requires improvement. where we need progress, and the cqc has acknowledged that, surgery. we recognise improvement has been made, but there is still more work to be done. chelsea football club has vowed to take the "strongest possible action" against any supporters found to have chanted anti—semitic language about the club's new striker alvaro morata. a song chanted on the terraces at chelsea's game on saturday, described spurs supporters, who have traditional links to thejewish community as "yids," a term mostly regarded as offensive. chelsea and morata denounced the chant, with the club working with the police to identify offenders, although there's some question as to whether police will prosecute. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning.
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0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is already slow from blackwall lane. across the river from there, the a13 is building up westbound heading out of dagenham into barking. while in croydon, bedford park is closed eastbound because of a dangerous structure in the one way system. finally, in the city, bishopsgate remains closed south bound from camomile street to threadneedle street for ongoing works just south of liverpool st station. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. for most of us, a dry and bright and sunny start to the day. light wind overnight. less breezy. still the risk of a show at.
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for this morning, it is dry. plenty of sunshine around. later on this morning, cloud increasing from the west. with that, the risk of a shower. fairly breezy today. not as cold as yesterday. 19 degrees. 0vernight, wet and windy for a time. the rain moves away quickly, but the wind continues to strengthen and stays with us on wednesday morning. the minimum temperature, 111. starting off when the first thing on wednesday. —— windy. the wind will gradually fall tomorrow afternoon. 0verall, windy. 17. it will fall lighter on thursday and beyond. a chilly north—westerly for the end of the week, but still, sunshine and showers. va nessa vanessa feltz is on bbc london. i'm
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back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. goodbye. as the caribbean reels. develop vital aid to the region. also this morning, the supersonic fighterjets. dealing also this morning, the supersonic fighter jets. dealing with also this morning, the supersonic fighterjets. dealing with high g forces ta ke fighterjets. dealing with high g forces take some getting used to. shaking their head. make the 100—year—old. how will they fare when they retake their driving test? one of the government's key pieces
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of legislation on brexit has passed its first test in the commons. the european union withdrawal bill — which would end the supremacy of eu law in the uk — was passed with a majority of 36 in the early hours of this morning. theresa may welcomed the result, saying it would give "solid foundations" to the ongoing talks with brussels. but labour called the bill an affront to parliamentary democracy. the vote comes as the government releases its latest discussion paper on brexit in which it suggests the uk should keep contributing to eu defence operations after leaving the eu. the document — published later today — argues for a deep security partnership with the remaining 27 countries but the move has drawn criticism with some saying the uk is employing bullying tactics in the negotiations. the governor of florida, rick scott, has urged people not to return
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to some areas because of the extensive damage caused by hurricane irma. 6.5 million homes in the state remain without power and the authorities say it could take weeks before electricity is fully restored. a relief operation is also underway in the carribean where british emergency aid is being sent. 700 troops are already on the islands and overnight raf. cargo planes containing medical supplies, emergency shelter kits and clean water set off across the atlantic. three men, including two british soldiers, have been charged under terror laws with being members of a banned neo—nazi group. they're due to appear before westminster magistrates‘ court this morning. two other men have been released without charge. there are said to be there is said
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to be surprising evidence that light drinking will not hurt children while pregnant. now is stating back to the 1950s suggests that having one small glass of wine twice a week might result in a small increase of having a smaller baby or a premature birth but researchers say there is little evidence to be sure that is the case. plans to dig a road tunnel near stonehenge have been approved by the government. it's hoped the scheme will ease congestion on the road which passes the ancient stone circle, but campaign groups are concerned it will damage the archaeology of the site and the wider environment. a pilot has had a lucky escape in
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connecticut. the 79—year—old pay —— pilot was taken to hospital with minor injuries. local media suggesting his aircraft had a fuel lea k suggesting his aircraft had a fuel leak which caused it to lose power. losing power does not describe it. just extraordinary. anybody escaped is amazing. warwick davis, kate winslet is and rosamund pike a part of the voices will lend their show to remake of the moomins. it is based on a book by finnish illustrator. it is due to be broadcast in 2019. an all—star cast. do you remember the moomins? sally doesn't like it. i don't remember
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them. nor do i. maybe we are too old. it is one of the other. i'm going to go with the latter. roy hodgson, he is back as well. potentially. don't laugh. 15 months after resigning as england manager it looks like roy hodgson is returning to football — at crystal palace. hodgson is expected to sign a two year contract, his first since his england side lost to iceland at the european championship. he replaces frank de boer, who lasted just four matches— the shortest reign in premier league history. nothing surprised me. i was sacked asa nothing surprised me. i was sacked as a champion, rinaldo was sacked as as a champion, rinaldo was sacked as a champ —— sacked as a champion,
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frank the boer was sacked after several matches in something incredible will happen again so nothing surprises me. there was big relief for west ham and their manager slaven bilic last night, as they secured their first points of the season — beating huddersfield town 2—0. the hammers went ahead thanks to pedro 0biang's deflected shot. a bit of luck with that one, but andre ayew sealed the victory a few minutes later. it moves west ham up to 18th, while huddersfield are sixth. we created maybe a couple of big chances but more than that, we stopped them from creating anything and to be fair, we had corners, we had crosses inside, there were a lot of things happening in that box so it gave as the boost to the second half to continue like this and we got through it, lucky for the first but overall, we deserved three points tonight. it's the return of the champions league tonight — chelsea and manchester united among those sides in action. and the most expensive footballer in the world is expected play at celtic park tonight. neymar‘s paris st germain
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team take on celtic. the brazilian striker cost £200 million in the summer, more than the entire valuation of the scottish champions. they are put together a psg to win this competition, there is no question about that, and what they have been building over the last few yea rs, have been building over the last few years, but us, it is our attitude 12 months ago, getting ready for our first game. i didn't believe the level we would be at right now. england players and staff will be advised not to use public or hotel wi—fi at next summer's world cup in russia over hacking fears. the fa are concerned that sensitive information such as injury, squad selection and tactical details could be exposed — if they qualify. fears of data theft have been heightened following last month's boxing, and anthonyjoshua has been speaking ahead of next month's world title fight against kubrat pulev in cardiff. he is defending his belts against the bulgarian,
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whose only defeat came against wladimir klitschko in 20111. joshua of course knocked out klitschko at wembley but he isn't complacent. that's not something you can train physically, the mind has to keep saying... that was that, i had fun and what's next? we are dealing with it, iam here. this is and what's next? we are dealing with it, i am here. this is not klitschko, this is pulev, his gang, cardiff, so let's rock and roll. joshua's promoter eddie hearn also confirmed that ireland's katie taylor will fight for the wba lightweight title next month on the undercard in cardiff. the olympic gold medallist from london 2012 has won all of her six professional fights so far, four of them by knockout. some of the best cricketers in the world have arrived in pakistan to play the biggest match in the country since a terror attack targeted the sri lanka team eight years ago. tight security surrounds the gadaffi stadium in lahore where a world xi will take
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on pakistan in the first of three t20 matches. there's only been one international series held in the cricket—mad country since 2009. cricket is such a popular sport there are, that is since 2009. did you like my favourite stripped of the morning? neymar is worth more than celtic. they paid £200 million to him. and thank you to everyone for sending me lovely moomin pictures. i am for sending me lovely moomin pictures. iam not for sending me lovely moomin pictures. i am not going to miss out this time. thank you very much. for the ninth time since 2006, the un security council has unanimously voted for new sanctions on north korea in an effort to stop its nuclear programme. so will this latest round deter the regime from further tests or simply increase already heightened tensions? 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is in seoul. so what are these latest sanctions and will they have any effect.
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as far as the sanctions are concerned, they are a watered—down version of what the us would like to have passed is what they wanted was a complete oil embargo to north korea was well as exports and a ban on textile exports from the countries they have got the ban on textile exports in the country but the oil embargo, it's only a on the amount of oil that can be sent to north korea. just a month ago, very stringent sanctions passed against the country including a ban on coal exploits which is the biggest export and analysts have said this has begun to squeeze the country a bit but it's a question of whether or not it can withstand that pressure. there is also questions about whether countries are actually implementing these sanctions fully.
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there have been accusations against china that they find loopholes in the resolution to try and continue trade against north korea. they are north korea's top trade partner. china says it does fully implement sanctions but it must walk a fine balance because it doesn't want north korea to continue its missile testing but does not want political instability in north korea caused by u nrest instability in north korea caused by unrest because of all this economic pressure. thank you very much indeed. it's been a bit wild and went over the past couple of days. matt is looking at the weather prize. any sign of it getting any better? the pictures suggest so. today is not too bad compared to yesterday. some wild and wet weather to come. increasingly so, we could see our first autumn storm of the season but it needs to get there. dry with fewer showers. a chilly start for
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the morning commute. most of the time, dry before the wet and windy weather arrives. it's over the atlantic. it is at the moment surfing is closely monitored as to what it will bring. if you're about to leave the house, it is cool but a dry and bright start to most of you. heavy showers in northern england, the west of scotland. most places are dry. showers will push eastwards but most of you will miss them during the bulk of the daytime. but by the time we get to the evening rush—hour, some changes on the way. northern ireland, wet by the end of the afternoon. cloud increasing elsewhere and a few splashes of rain. rain edging towards northwest england by the time we get to six o'clock. the east pennines, the journey home should be dry. strong to gale force winds along some of these western fringes and they will pick up further into overnight. much
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of the midlands, east anglia and the south—east, the bulk of the day will be drier. not quite as cool as yesterday. here is that system developing across the uk tonight. we could see winds around the irish sea, 60 miles an hour or above that towards some southern english coastal counties and heavy rain as well. the part south of scotland but mainly northern england with minor flooding through the morning and later in the night as the low pressure system put —— pushes out into the north sea, it strengthens further. towards the midlands in norfolk, winds in excess of 70 miles an hour. that will bring a few branches down. some travel disruption into tomorrow morning and some wild conditions for the early—morning commuters. check the warnings on the bbc weather website. into tomorrow morning, we start pretty wild across eastern coastal
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counties of england with the wind easing in the day and not as strong as the winds that have been there through the night. sunshine and showers tomorrow. showers with more frequent than today. a bit of sunshine in between but feeling increasingly cool tomorrow. temperature about 13, 111 degrees at best. some wild and windy weather to come through tonight but before that arrives, john and louise, some dry and bright ones today. would we expect to see any impact from the hurricanes and storms in the caribbean in the days and weeks to come? we always tend to get something from the weeks to come but at the moment, the storms are stating across the us, which is decaying in situ across parts of the united states. it's ten years ago this week since the collapse of northern rock. you might remember the queues outside its branches up and down
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the country as people tried in panic to get their savings out. this morning steph's newcastle where the bank was based. good morning. good morning. absolutely gorgeous this morning. i am on the river tyne. famous sights, the gallery, the bridges. it was here that the home of northern rock was. the bank which essentially kicked off the credit crunch and the uk when they went to the bank of england to ask for financial help. i was one of the team working behind the scenes to break that story. we broke it on tv causing people to worry about what would happen the bank. you saw a run on the bank,
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which hasn't happened for a century. this is the background of what happened. 0ne one of the biggest mortgage lenders needs emergency support from the bank of london. fear has been stalking the streets for months. the fa ct stalking the streets for months. the fact the bank of england has stepped in will worry people tomorrow. people were worried. in will worry people tomorrow. people were worriedlj in will worry people tomorrow. people were worried. i was devastated. i did not know how to manage it. these were the scenes up and down the country. it was the first run on a bank in 1110 years. and down the country. it was the first run on a bank in 140 yearsm they are not in trouble, why do they have to borrow from the government? no one has given an absolute guarantee that the money is safe in this bank. how did it happen? northern rock started as a traditional home building society. in the 90s it turned into a bank and began a rapid expansion programme, offering enticing products like 135% mortgages. at its height, it employs
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6000 staff at its head office in newcastle and even sponsored the local football team. by two continue growing, it in borrowed the american financial markets to be in 2007, worries began to emerge about the health of banks who had been giving home loans to people who could not really afford them. it was the start of the credit crunch. the government was supposed to guarantee the money. eventually, they nationalised the bank. thousands of jobs eventually, they nationalised the bank. thousands ofjobs were lost and branches closed. it finally disappeared from the high street in 2012. but in newcastle, at least, the name will be remembered for yea rs the name will be remembered for years to come. that is the background to the story. i have gone upstairs to give you this great view. i have some guests
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here this morning. dennis, who leads a shareholder activist group, and philip, a banking commentator. we will start with you. take us back ten yea rs will start with you. take us back ten years to what happened. what was it like for you? it was terrible, i think, because i realised that it looks like the bank was being stolen from us. i still have that feeling. i know the suffering of those who lost money, the feeling of being discriminated against. other banks we re discriminated against. other banks were not treated the way we were. the loss of the bank itself, a big and proud thing in this area, the foundation of the charity going with it, a tragedy for the north—east. explain your involvement. you were a former employee. i retired before it all happened. but it is not the money i lost. i put all of my money since 20 years ago in the company share game. many employees did. i left it for my retirement years.
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140,000. i have got nil. but that is not my issue. my worry is the pensioners who lost 6— 10,000 each. they got no compensation whatsoever. my they got no compensation whatsoever. my action group is putting a motion to government to look at it again with the benefit of hindsight and realise there is injustice being done. i know it is something you have written about a lot. take us back to where you were and how significant this was for the banking sector top lip absolutely. i was a banker in the 90s. i felt something was wrong with the banking industry. i could not put my finger on it, but i felt we were misleading shareholders and the public. when that story broke, the penny dropped. i knew exactly what was wrong. it was the most shocking story of my
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business career. it is one of those stories where people ask how could it happen. it started entirely in the city of london and the boardroom of northern rock. the men and women who worked for the company at grassroots level had little to do with it. essentially, for many years, banks had a simple business model. they lent to customers. in the early to thousands, they thought, why don't we borrow more from other financial cushions, lens that out to homeowners, and we will have a fast—growing business. —— institutions. but when america's housing industry fell, so did northern rock. they could not get enough money to keep them going in the bank of england had to bail them out. which had massive ramifications for the entire economy. it has become a lifelong battle to get
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compensation for people. yes. i started at 61. i feel 160 now. compensation for people. yes. i started at 61. ifeel160 now. but it isa started at 61. ifeel160 now. but it is a worthwhile campaign. the system was unprepared for what happened. they mishandled it. i think the government's policy of encouraging all banks to go to this endless well of cheap money and other markets and concentrating risk, telling all of the banks to do it on lending, not on borrowing and funding, that it the issue with northern rock. they could not get the funding because of the problems in america. where were you it? we are ata in america. where were you it? we are at a detailed study. it is a 50 page report. we are saying if you have hindsight, you did not have a resolution scheme which caused problems. look at it again. all of this money is the embedded value of the company. the fact that the bank
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is returning up to £9 billion. that is returning up to £9 billion. that is incredible. that is amazing for a bad bank. why should they keep all of the money when the shareholders we re of the money when the shareholders were completely wiped out? interesting. we will talk later about whether this could happen again and the ramifications of that. thank you very much. more from me later. it is gorgeous and very sunny. no fog on the tyne this morning. thank you very much. we will see you a little bit later to be uk aircraft have flown over 3,000 missions as part be missions as part of the air campaign in iraq and syria and conducted 12—hundred airstrikes against so—called islamic state. the bbc‘s defence correspondent jonathan beale went up in a fighter jet to see how gruelling the job is. this is the raf‘s front—line jet,
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the typhoon. and this is what it is like to fly in. i can already feel the power of thatjet. like to fly in. i can already feel the power of that jet. in the air in seconds, it can climb to 50,000 feet within a matter of minutes and reach a speed of more than 1500 miles per hour. and then there is the g force. it can go nine times the force of gravity. that makes it highly manoeuvrable. i felt a little bit sick there. but it is also punishing on the body. i think it is best not to have breakfast for a second time. you get a sense... i am sweating and quite uncomfortable to be perfectly honest. it is a tough job,
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quite uncomfortable to be perfectly honest. it is a toughjob, and of course, at the moment, raf pilots are flying for eight hours searching for targets in iraq and syria. first designed as an air—to—air fighter, it is being developed to do much more. this testing is designed to make it in more potent weapon, with missiles to hit fast—moving targets and the bunker buster cruising missile. you could fight against enemy fighters on the way to a target. you could then attack that ground target with either the paveway four or the brimstone and fight back out, using the radar. ranging on the target. it may sound easier than it actually is. and so is trying to fly a fast jet. do you have control? i am flying in a
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typhoon. we will make a typhoon pilot of you. no, you won't. whether attacking a base or fighting islamic state, raf pilots are doing this day in and day out, often in the cockpit for hours at a time. this was me after just one hour for hours at a time. this was me afterjust one hour in the air. he has the smile. the typhoon smile is there. jonathan beale, bbc news. it doesn't look like enjoyed it. we are talking about that and then going to the complete opposite scale, talking about drivers still on the road at 100 years old. embrace it. you are watching brea kfast. embrace it. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning. #short and thing and
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wheezy, chronic lung diseasey#. .. morning. #short and thing and wheezy, chronic lung diseasey#. . .l medic turned comic. all of that is still to come. first, the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. a very good morning to you. i'm asad ahmad. whipps cross hospital, which has been in "special measures," is said to be showing signs of improvement. an unannounced inspection by the care quality commission found the hospital in east london, which is part of bart's health nhs trust, to now "require improvement." it was rated "inadequate" last year. the cqc report says more needs top be done, but the hospital is moving in the right direction. we've made a lot of progress, which the cqc have recognised. and that has been reflected
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in the overall rating, from inadequate in the last two actions to requires improvement. where we need progress, and the cqc has acknowledged that, surgery. we recognise improvement has been made, but there is still more work to be done. chelsea football club has vowed to take the "strongest possible action" against any supporters found to have chanted anti—semitic language about the club's new striker alvaro morata. a song chanted on the terraces at chelsea's game on saturday, described spurs supporters, who have traditional links to thejewish community as "yids," a term mostly regarded as offensive. chelsea and morata denounced the chant, with the club working with the police to identify offenders, although there's some question as to whether police will prosecute. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is already slow from blackwall lane.
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across the river from there, the a13 is building up westbound heading out of dagenham into barking. in croydon, bedford park is closed eastbound because of a dangerous structure in the one—way system. finally, in the city, bishopsgate remains closed south bound from camomile street to threadneedle street for ongoing works just south of liverpool st station. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. for most of us, it's a dry, bright and sunny start to the day. the wind has fallen light overnight. so, less breezy, but still the risk of a shower. for this morning, it is dry. plenty of sunshine around. later on this morning, cloud increasing from the west. with that, the risk of a shower. it is still fairly breezy today. the wind, not as strong as yesterday. 19 degrees. 0vernight, wet and windy, at least for a time. the rain moves away quickly, but the wind continues to strengthen
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and stays with us on wednesday morning. the minimum temperature, between 12 and 14 celcius. starting off windy first thing on wednesday. still the risk of a shower. still sunny spells. the wind will gradually fall tomorrow afternoon. 0verall, windy. 17 celcius. it will fall lighter on thursday and beyond. a chilly north—westerly for the end of the week, but still, sunshine and showers. vanessa feltz is on bbc london. she will look at new microflats. they could provide cheap homes for thousands, but they are very small. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. goodbye. hello — this is breakfast,
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with louise minchin and jon kay. the legislation which will transfer thousands of eu laws to britain clears its first parliamentary hurdle. the ayes have it. in a late—night commons vote, the bill passed with a majority of 36 but there could still be more attempts to change it. good morning, it's tuesday the 12th of september. the clean—up operation in florida begins — as the uk sends more help to those devastated by hurricane irma. we'll hear about claims that thousands of critically ill children
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aren't being given the palliative care they need. it was ten years ago this week that northern rock, the bank headquartered here in newcastle, collapsed, causing chaos for the financial system is i will look at what difference it is made in our lives. in sport — roy's return. hodgson looks set to return to football management with crystal palace, fifteen months after resigning from the england job. i'm trying not to have breakfast of the second time, you can sense i am sweating. they're the new fighterjets on britain's front line but what's it like flying a typhoon? 0ur defence correspondent tries to hold onto his breakfast. i think with edited pictures. a bit ofa
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a bit of a cool start out there but the most, it strike the bulk of the day compared with yesterday but that will change this evening and overnight, some wet and windy weather on the way particularly with england and wales. good morning. first our main story. one of the government's key pieces of legislation on brexit has passed its first test in the commons. the european union withdrawal bill, which would end the supremacy of eu law in the uk, was passed with a majority of 36 it in the early hours of this morning. theresa may welcomed the result, saying it would give "solid foundations" to the ongoing talks with brussels. but labour called the bill an affront to parliamentary democracy. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in westminster for us and what does this vote mean for theresa may's government? it was a late night for mps but in the end, this boat was not a nailbiter. that's because no conservative mps rebelled against
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the government. labour mps do is —— defined jeremy corbyn and voted with ministers switch was a relatively co mforta ble ministers switch was a relatively comfortable majority of 36 even though the tories don't have an overall majority in the commons. so it's over its first parliamentary hurdle, spilt, it's a hugely important piece of legislation, big and complex, and what essentially does is to transfer years worth of eu laws that apply to the uk onto the british statute book to avoid legal chaos and all parties in parliament except that a bill like this is needed. the argument is over how it is drafted and conceived and labour and some tory mps are really worried, particularly about the powers that gives ministers in the future to change the law without full parliamentary scrutiny and that is the source of the real argument at the moment and even though the spill has got over its first hurdle,
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as soon as it was done, labour and some tory mps rushed to the vote office to stick down amendments. they are going to try and change this bill to limit the powers that ministers had to change the law in the future, to ensure that parliament has a vote on the final terms of the brexit agreement and more. this is going to be a titanic struggle, i think, more. this is going to be a titanic struggle, ithink, this more. this is going to be a titanic struggle, i think, this bill, more. this is going to be a titanic struggle, ithink, this bill, even though it's clear this first hurdle will be surmounted comfortably. we are seeing a series of position papers from the uk and today's one is about security. what does that tell you? position papers are sketching out what it wants to see with the eu. you remember, in the eu referendum, believe campaign certainly were making a lot about the idea of the european army in the future, that was something they were very opposed to. in this position paper today, the uk government are
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saying that going forward, they were very much like to see close defence and security cooperation with the eu, always making sure that nato is the prime guardian of european defence cooperation but it is considering tone the uk government are making today and in terms of the actual detail, we will wait to see what is in the paper will let saying they want to see close defence cooperation with the eu and that will be welcomed by brussels because britain is one of the largest military powers in your. dashed in europe. dashed in europe. and we'll be speaking to defence secretary michael fallon just after seven—thirty this morning. the governor of florida, rick scott, has urged people not to return to some areas because of the extensive damage caused by hurricane irma. 6.5 million homes in the state remain without power. the storm is continuing to push inland, bringing torrential rain to alabama and tennessee. sarah corker reports. imagine returning home to find this. irma has ravaged the florida keys,
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buildings torn apart, belongings strewn along the roadside and boats dumped onshore. a deadly combination of fierce winds and storm surges has left more than 6 million people in florida without power. the authorities said it would take weeks before electricity was fully restored. in some areas, there is little or no fuel. people are being warned to stay put. we've got downed powerlines all across state, roads that are impassable across the state, debris all over the state. miami's financial district has been badly damaged. and just hours after the hurricane struck, looters arrived. night—time cu rfews have now been imposed. several cities remain flooded. this is jacksonville. people have been told to watch for alligators and snakes in the floodwaters.
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hurricane irma may have been downgraded to a tropical depression but it keeps causing misery as it pushes north and further inland. this is the picture in south carolina. next in its path, alabama and tennessee. irma isn't finished yet. as florida begins the clean—up operation, emergency aid is being sent to british overseas territories. it's been confirmed this morning that the foreign secretary borisjohnson will be travelling to the region this morning to meet those leading the recovery work. 700 troops are already in the caribbean and overnight raf cargo planes set off across the atlantic carrying medical supplies, emergency shelter kits and clean water. jon donnison reports. more help is coming but it is taking time. another raf cargo plane was loaded up last night at brize norton en route to the caribbean. on board, medical supplies, medical shelter, food and water.
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and later today, hms 0cean will set sailfrom gibraltar with a crew of 700 specialising in disaster relief. but it will take around 12 days to cross the atlantic. the government continues to receive criticism that it's been too slow to respond. they remain absolutely utmost in our thoughts. we are continuing to send in more police and have already got 700 troops in the area and we are seeing confidence now starting to rise. but not much evidence of that confidence on the devastated british virgin islands. on the island of tortola. people are hungry and helpless. go to the back! some uk troops are already on the ground helping to distribute food and water. but the people here are british citizens and many don't feel they are being treated as such. three men, including two british soldiers,
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have been charged with terror offences including membership of a banned neo—nazi group. they‘re due to appear before westminster magistrates‘ court this morning. two other men have been released without charge. a 28—year—old man is being questioned about the death of a woman at a festival. (tx 00v) 25—year—old louella michie was discovered in a wooded area 25—year—old louella michie was discovered in a wooded area at the bestival site on monday. she is the daughter of holby city and taggart actorjohn michie. there is surprisingly limited evidence that light drinking during pregnancy poses any risk to the baby, according to researchers, but women are still being recommended to avoid alcohol completely. scientists at the university of bristol reviewed existing studies and didn‘t find any convincing proof that a drink or two a week is harmful. but the team stresses that this doesn‘t mean it‘s completely safe, so pregnant women should follow current government advice. 0ur health correspondent jenny walrond reports. drinking heavily in pregnancy
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is well known to be harmful to babies. but mums to be often ask if there is a safe level. scientists say a lack of evidence has led to inconsistent advice and confusion among both mothers and health professionals. now analysis by the university of bristol of studies dating back to the 1950s suggests that having one small glass of wine twice a week, orfour units in total, may result in a small increase in the chances of having a small baby or a premature birth. but scientists say there is so little research, it‘s difficult to be sure. we couldn‘t come up with a definite yes or no answer as to whether there is any a armful effect of drinking such low levels of alcohol. so there is uncertainty as to whether it is therefore safe or not safe for the child
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to be exposed to this level of alcohol. pregnant women who have had a drink are being reassured that they are unlikely to have harmed their baby, but advice from both researchers and the uk chief medical officer is that it is best to completely abstain while pregnant, or trying to conceive, on the grounds that it is better to be safe than sorry. jenny walrond, bbc news. apple is set to launch its new iphone today. but some details of the normally secretive tech giant‘s latest smartphone have already been revealed in an apparent leak earlier this week. 0ur north america tech correspondent dave lee is at the company‘s headquarters in california. what do we think we know about the new phone? it's it‘s embarrassing for apple. they
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hired former government workers tasked with keeping secrets but somehow, this information has leaked out. perhaps someone leaked this to some parts of the blog writers. there are expected to be three new iphones, eight, eight plus and x, the mysterious sex. we don‘t know much about what that device is going to have. there is a lot of anticipation because the iphone is by far apple‘s most successful product. they are relying on this new iphone to create a lot of excitement and continue that success for as many as possible. thank you very much. now if you fancy yourself a bit of an amateur snapper take a look at these pictures. they have been selected from around
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50,000 entries for the annual wildlife photographer of the year. they include these seals swimming playfully and this incredible shot of a seahorse holding on to a cotton bud with its tail. the winners will be announced in october and some of the best entries can be seen in a special exhibition at the natural history museum later this year. those remote safari type pictures in the middle of the jungle. those remote safari type pictures in the middle of thejungle. domestic animals, it‘s amazing. the extent of the damage from hurricane irma is starting to become clear as the clean up operation begins in florida. several cities remain flooded, roads are impassable and homes have been destroyed. 6.5 million people are without power and it could be
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weeks before electricity is fully restored. let‘s speak now to major richard rand from the north miami beach police department. good morning to you, major. we spoke to on the programme to find out things. you‘ve been on patrol, how is it looking? we have a lot of boots on the ground, a very eerie feeling. ayce just drove around north dade county and police cars have their overhead lights on. we are out there in full force protecting the residents. we still have very large areas without power. we have very large trees which are down. we offered the homeowner assistance. the local neighbourhood
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has gotten together. the act of kindness we are seeing here is just absolutely incredible. the demands of your help must be enormous. 0ur goal is to preserve life. the preservation of life is our number one goal so any call that has anything to do with the threat of life, that is a protocol. the next thing down is a livewire down. their associates, and if it is safe, we usually like it somehow. we get a ticket number and then it is prioritised. their partners have been doing an incrediblejob
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restoring power to these neighbourhoods. what you told us yesterday about the danger of the power lines coming down and even the wind and rain. is that beginning to be resolved? they are beginning. we are a long way away. it will take weeks to get back up away. it will take weeks to get back up and running and get back to normal life. the minutes, hours and days that ticket on. we are restoring a normal way of life slowly. the school has been cancelled because all of our schools have been turned into shelters. there are a lot of neighbourhoods still under water and a lot of people can‘t get home. a lot of bridges are closed because the barrier islands have had really sustained damage. i think that a lot of people are still really listening
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to us and we have had very good cooperation from our community. you are going to get people that come out and drive a round and look around because people have been locked in their homes days and it is only natural people want to come out and have a look. what about you, richard? you and have a look. what about you, richard ? you have and have a look. what about you, richard? you have to work for rat —— for very long hours i assume. how does it impact on your life and family? i had a phone call from a neighbour that was convert —— concern for me that i haven‘t been home. i sent my wife and children up to palm beach because i didn‘t think the storm would go up that way and i thought they would be safe there. they turned out to be safe, thank god. i got three hours of sleep yesterday. i couldn‘t sleep because they had to come back. i love my city, a love what i do. i think first responders have had a bad rap over the last ten years. a lot of
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the american news is against the police but i stand for the badge. i stand for the badge and public safety a nd stand for the badge and public safety and first responders. i am trying to lead the way and show the world that the police department is here to help and we are willing to risk our lives to save your lives. i‘m sure many people in your community will be grateful for your dedication. thank you forjoining us when i know you have so much more going on there. we appreciate you explaining how things are looking this morning. all the best. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. it isa it is a bit cold out this morning. good morning. definitely some autumn in the air. a few showers around and through the bulk of the day. make the most of any brightness through today because overnight it is going today because overnight it is going to turn in increasingly wet and windy. this is the cloud that will
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bring about a change. a low pressure system developing at the moment and could develop rapidly. northwest england and wales and the south—west but not as many as yesterday, the showers. the vast majority will spend the bulk if not all of the day dry until we get to the afternoon and evening. it turns wet in northern ireland and by then evening rush hour, it will go to scotland. much of the east will stay dry. the isle of man and into northwest england, we will see heavy rain pushing in. east of the pennines, drive for seven or eight o‘clock for the vast majority. notjust wet to go into the evening for wales and the south—west. it is ready getting into gale force. into east anglia and the south—east, only isolated showers, most will spend the day
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dry. here is our area of low pressure it could see gusts of 60 mph across the coast as we go through the evening. as the low pressure system develops and pushes it weighed into the north sea, the greatest concern is heavy rain for the northern ireland —— northern england and the strong wind. we could see gusts of up to 70 mph which could bring the odd tree down. it will cause travel disruption for the first part of tomorrow‘s rush—hour. a pretty wild night on the way. england and wales is even worse. wednesday it is back to sunshine and showers once again. showers frequent and heavy and
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thundery. east anglia and the midlands will be driest. further north, only temperatures of 13 or 14 degrees. with winds going a more northerly direction for wednesday and thursday, a chilly feel will continue. further west, sunshine and showers but with temperatures in the mid—teens for many, i think that annual start of battlelines is draw. it ensures the thermostat? —— who controls the thermostat? i was wondering what you are going to say! i definitely control it. thousands of terminally ill children in the uk are not getting good enough palliative care, according to researchers today. almost 50,000 children have life—limiting or life—threatening conditions but many of their families struggle to get enough support to care for them at home because the services they need aren‘tjoined up.
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breakfast‘s john maguire reports. the seven—year—old, logan, had brain damage before he was born. during his short life he spent long times in hospital. now, at home, the living room is the only place large enough for his bed. he requires constant care. even a five—minute chat in the kitchen is interrupted by an alarm. i‘ll get it. it is beeping. his parents say the staff who helped them are fantastic, but it is a constant battle to make sure logan and the family receive the support they need. we‘ve fought a long time to get a good package. it is only recently he has been very poorly and we have managed to secure a package of care that is actually starting to make an impact in helping us as a family.
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even with the care package we have got, she is still housebound, stuck indoors everyday, while i go out to work. she is stuck in all day, every day, day and night. whether there are carers here or not, she cannot get out because there is not the facility to go out to give him enough care to make it safe for him. medical advances mean that children who once would have died in infancy are living longer with more complex needs. there are some fantastic charities for fantastic children's hospitals providing support. but what we find too often is that the funding of those organisations is lacking. last year we found there was a 61% cut in funding for children's palliative care. that can only have one thing, a negative impact on it. a report out today by the university for policy research looks at how various aspects of death, dying, and palliative care are dealt with across the uk. it finds disparities in how people are looked after, and says scotland is leading the way, and other nations
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should follow suit. so far, the evidence shows they are running with a reforming culture. i think part of that is principally to do with actually determining what the welfare state in scotland will look like. this is cradle to grave. we have to make sure the citizens are looked after until they die. the department of health in england says it wants all families to receive high—quality and compassionate and tailored care. both wales and northern ireland have recently updated their policies. also the day, the national institute for health and care excellence publishes its standard for end of life care for children in england and a commitment to better support families who want their children to spend their precious final days in their own home. john maguire, bbc news. thanks to logan‘s family for telling
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us thanks to logan‘s family for telling us their story. it is ten years ago since the beginning of the financial crisis here in the uk. 0f since the beginning of the financial crisis here in the uk. of course it is the collapse of northern rock, that was the moment when people realised how serious things were. step has gone back to newcastle where the bank was based. —— steph. a glorious morning. the famous rich, hundreds of people running across it on sunday as part of the great north run. you have the millennium bridge and the flour mill which is being converted into an art gallery. 0bviously, all of the famous sights of newcastle but one of the big businesses here was
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northern rock. it was ten years ago when they faced it. i was one of the people that broke the story back then that northern rock went to the bank of england ‘s to get help. they didn‘t have any money in the bank to support all of the investments they had going on. this led to people being really worried about all of their savings and you saw the famous pictures of people queueing up outside of the bank to get their money out and that kicked off the credit crunch here in the uk. i will be talking about this throughout the morning, looking at what impact that had on our financial system and the economy as a whole. we will talk to people that formerly worked for northern rock, shareholders, and look at the great picture of what this meant for all of us. first, let‘s get the news, travel and weather where you want this morning. —— where you are.
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good morning. i‘m asad ahmad. whipps cross hospital, which has been in "special measures," is said to be showing signs of improvement. an unannounced inspection by the care quality commission found the hospital in east london, which is part of bart‘s health nhs trust, to now "require improvement." it was rated "inadequate" last year. the cqc report says more needs top be done, but the hospital is moving in the right direction. we‘ve made a lot of progress, which the cqc have recognised, and that has been reflected in the overall rating, going from "inadequate" in the last two actions to "requires improvement." where we need progress, and the cqc has acknowledged that, surgery. we are sorry that not as much improvement has been made on that. we recognise improvement has been made, but there is still more work to do. chelsea football club has vowed to take the "strongest possible action" against any supporters found to have chanted anti—semitic
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language about the club‘s new striker alvaro morata. a song chanted on the terraces at chelsea‘s game on saturday, described spurs supporters, who have traditional links to thejewish community as "yids," a term mostly regarded as offensive. chelsea and morata denounced the chant, with the club working with the police to identify offenders, although there‘s some question as to whether police will prosecute. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s good service on the tubes this morning. and trains in and out of paddington are running with delays of 15 minutes following signal problems — with heathrow connect services and trains in and out of paddington are running with delays of 15 minutes following signal problems — with heathrow connect services suspended. 0n the roads, there are anticlockwise delays on the m25 from j17 maple cross to j15 m4 following an earlier collision. traffic on the a12 is queueing w/bnd from gants hill
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into the nth circular road at the redbridge rbt. finally, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich rd flyover. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. for most of us, it‘s a dry, bright and sunny start to the day. the wind has fallen light overnight. so, less breezy, but still the risk of a shower. for this morning, it is dry. plenty of sunshine around. later on this morning, cloud increasing from the west. with that, the risk of a shower. it is still fairly breezy today. the wind, not as strong as yesterday. maximum 19 degrees. 0vernight, wet and windy, at least for a time. the rain moves away quickly, but the wind continues to strengthen and stays with us on wednesday morning. the minimum temperature, between 12 and 14 celcius. starting off windy first thing on wednesday. still the risk of a shower. still sunny spells. the wind will gradually fall tomorrow afternoon. overall, a windy day. 17 celcius.
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it will fall lighter on thursday and beyond. a chilly north—westerly for the end of the week, but still, sunshine and showers. the showers are still definitely with us. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay. one of the government‘s key pieces of legislation on brexit has passed its first test in the commons. the ayes, 326. the noes, 290. the european union withdrawal bill — which would end the supremacy of eu law in the uk — was passed with a majority of 36 in the early hours of this morning. but labour called the bill an affront to parliamentary democracy.
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and we‘ll be speaking to defence secretary michael fallon in about 10 minutes. and we‘ll be speaking to defence secretary michael fallon in about 10 minutes. the vote comes as the government releases its latest discussion paper on brexit in which it suggests the uk should keep contributing to eu defence operations after leaving the union. the document — published later today — argues for a "deep security partnership" with the remaining 27 countries and highlights the important role britain plays in europe‘s safety. but critics say this is part of the uk‘s bullying tactics in the negotiations. the governor of florida, rick scott, has urged people not to return to some areas because of the extensive damage caused by hurricane irma. 6.5 million homes in the state remain without power and the authorities say it could take weeks before electricity is fully restored. a relief operation is also underway in the carribean where british emergency aid is being sent. it‘s been confirmed this morning that the foreign secretary boris johnson will be travelling to the region this morning to meet those leading the recovery work.
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700 troops are already on the islands and overnight raf cargo planes containing medical supplies, emergency shelter kits and clean water set off across the atlantic. three men, including two british soldiers, have been charged with terror offences — including membership of a banned neo—nazi group. (tx 00v) they‘re due to appear before westminster magistrates‘ court this morning. two other men have been released without charge. the united nations security council will impose further sanctions on north korea in response to its most powerful nuclear test yet. the measures, which restrict oil imports and ban textile exports, were approved unanimously but only after the united states softened its original proposals to win chinese and russian backing. a 28—year—old man is being questioned about the death of a woman at a festival. 25—year—old louella mickey was discovered in a wooded area at the bestival site on monday. she is the daughter of holby city and taggart actorjohn mickey.
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there is "surprisingly limited" evidence that light drinking during pregnancy poses any risk to the baby, according to researchers, but women are still being recommended to avoid alcohol completely. analysis by the university of bristol of studies dating back to the 1950s suggests having one small glass of wine twice a week may result in a small increase in the chances of having a small baby or a premature birth. but they say there‘s so little research it‘s difficult to be sure. government efforts to help schools keep hold of teachers and develop their skills do not appear to be working, according to the national audit office. a report by the spending watchdog found that tens of thousands of teachers are leaving the profession every year. but the government says there are now 15—thousand more teachers than in 2010, and it is spending "significant sums" on recruitment. plans to dig a road tunnel
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near stonehenge have been approved by the government. (tx 00v) it‘s hoped the scheme will ease congestion on the road which passes the ancient stone circle, but campaign groups are concerned it will damage the archaeology of the site and the wider environment. a pilot has had a lucky escape after his plane clipped a tree and crashed into a car park. it happened in connecticut in the united states. the 79—year—old pilot was taken to hospital with just minor injuries. local media suggests his aircraft had suffered a fuel leak which caused it to lose power. he ran out of fuel apparently which caused him to lose power but there we go. a lucky escape. 0ne caused him to lose power but there we go. a lucky escape. one very fortu nate we go. a lucky escape. one very fortunate man. everybody else was ok as well. if you haven't gone out
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already, it feels a little bit chilly. it does a bit. sally is here with sport and somebody is back. but i will start with a quiz question. how many septuagenarian managers have been the premier league? ten, three. can you think or they might have been? it‘s quite easy. the most famous perhaps ever. sir alex. well done. and sir bobby. and now roy hodgson. coming back to football. rejuvenated. 15 months out of football. it looks like roy hodgson is returning to football — at crystal palace. hodgson is expected to sign a two year contract, his first since his england side lost to iceland at the european championship. he replaces frank de boer, who lasted just four matches, the shortest reign in premier league history. the news didn‘t come as a shock to many in the game. nothing surprised me.
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i was sacked as a champion, raineri was sacked as a champion, frank deboer is sacked after four matches and next season, something incredible will happen again so nothing surprises me. there was big relief for west ham and their manager slaven bilic last night, as they secured their first points of the season — beating huddersfield town 2—0. the hammers went ahead thanks to pedro 0biang‘s deflected shot. a bit of luck with that one, but andre ayew sealed the victory a few minutes later. it moves west ham up to 18th, while huddersfield are sixth. we created maybe a couple of big chances but more than that, we stopped them from creating anything and to be fair, we had corners, we had crosses inside, there were a lot of things happening in tjeor box so it gave us the boost for the second half to continue like this and we got the reward, lucky for the first but overall, we deserved three points tonight. it‘s the return of the champions league tonight — chelsea and manchester united among
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those sides in action. and the most expensive footballer in the world is expected play at celtic park tonight. neymar‘s paris st germain team take on celtic. the brazilian striker cost £200 million in the summer, more than the entire valuation of the scottish champions. but brendan rodgers said his side are ready to take on one of the favourites. they have put together a psg to win this competition, there is no question about that, and what they have been building over the last few years, but us, it is our attitude 12 months ago, getting ready for our first game. i didn‘t believe the level we would be at right now. england players and staff will be advised not to use public or hotel wi—fi at next summer‘s world cup in russia over hacking fears. the fa are concerned that sensitive information such as injury, squad selection and tactical details could be exposed if they qualify. fears of data theft have been heightened following last month‘s fancy bears hack regarding the use of banned medicines in football. boxing, and anthonyjoshua has been
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speaking ahead of next month‘s world title fight against kubrat pulev in cardiff. he is defending his belts against the bulgarian, whose only defeat came against wladimir klitschko in 2014. joshua of course knocked out klitschko at wembley but he isn‘t complacent. that‘s not something you can train physically, the mind has to keep on saying, that was that, i had fun and what‘s next? we are dealing with it, i am here. this is not wembley, not klitschko, this is pulev, his game, cardiff, new arena, new goals, so let‘s rock and roll. joshua‘s promoter eddie hearn also confirmed that ireland‘s katie taylor will fight for the wba lightweight title next month on the undercard in cardiff. the olympic gold medallist from london 2012 has won all of her six professional fights so far, four of them by knockout. some of the best cricketers in the world have arrived
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in pakistan to play the biggest match in the country since a terror attack targeted the sri lanka team eight years ago. tight security surrounds the gadaffi stadium in lahore where a world xi will take on pakistan in the first of three t20 matches. there‘s only been one international series held in the cricket—mad country since 2009. the city has been closed down around this area. to put it into context, there will be 8000 security staff on duty for this match. there is temporary hospital built 200m away from the pitch. ambulances on standby. they are so concerned about
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the possibility of a terror attack. thou determined. the cricketers are saying, we have to play a match. that awful terror attack. six policemen killed. the driver in the tea m policemen killed. the driver in the team minibus was killed. it made lots of people very frightened about going there. people there love their cricket. a moment of great pride. currently, the queues that tickets stretch about three days on. it‘s taken three days the most general people who want to go and get a ticket to the match. it‘s cost them a huge amount of money in terms of their weekly wage. amazing. i have it all goes well. thank you very much indeed.
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gunboat diplomacy — that‘s how critics have described the government‘s latest brexit negotiating paper, which highlights the crucial role the uk‘s military plays in ensuring european security. once again britain and the eu seem at odds over what any future relationship might look like. but, back at home, the government is one step closer to resolving some of the legal challenges, after mps backed the eu withdrawal bill in the house of commons. joining us now from westminster is the defence secretary sir michael fallon. thank you to joining others. thank you tojoining others. let‘s talk about that vote last night which went through. many people, even people in your own party, are concerned about excessive powers of ministers. what would your response be? first, it was a good result last night. a good majority that the
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government. that gives us, despite labour‘s attempt to wreck the bill, clarity and certainty to get on with these negotiations. parliament needs to scrutinise what is going on in the negotiations and they want to look in detail at the bill but we had a majority, second reading on the principal boat and that clears the principal boat and that clears the way for us to get on and negotiate the successful exit. you talk about scrutiny. as far as i understand, there will be eight hours of debate that this is a large bill. there are going to be hours of debate on this. hours of debate. david davis has been reporting regularly to parliament, almost every week a statement or a debate. the bill itself will have plenty of time in both houses of parliament. you are going to hear a lot more about the detail of this before we are through but parliament needs to
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be involved, that‘s quite right and government needs to listen. we will be listening to the point is that are made by backbenchers but equally, we are very clear, the public decided on this and that he voted to leave or amain, the public wa nts voted to leave or amain, the public wants is to get on with this, to give people certainty and to get on with the successful exit. should parliament get a final vote on the terms? parliament will be asked to debate the end package at the end of this process. there are going to be plenty more opportunities for parliamentary involvement in the committees, as this bill goes through, regular reports from the brexit secretary of state david davis. parliament is going to be fully involved. we have talked about the various different position papers which have been used as part of these negotiations. talking about security, defence, you argue for a
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deep security partnership with the eu. what do you mean by that?l series of proposals as to how we see the partnership the day after brexit. we are very clear that we need to continue our security relationship. we want to go on working with the european union on the threats to europe and our continent, it still affects us, whether it is terrorism, mass migration, piracy off the coast of africa. we‘ll still co—operate with the european union and worked together internationally, imposing sanctions on north korea or on russia so although we are leaving the european union, we are determined to co—operate and co—ordinate as closely as possible with the rest of the european union after we leave. will we be safe after we leave. will we be safe after we leave. will we be safe after we leave? we've got to make sure we are safe. we are facing threats that having tested —— intensified so it‘s all the more
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important that we work on it together, we have the largest defence budget in europe, the biggest navy, large armed forces and aware there are threats to our continent, we are determined to have the right partnership in place but we will go on working alongside the french navy, the other european missions. can we talk about the effects of the hurricane and the response has been criticised. we have been hearing stories coming out about tourists foraging for coconuts. should that be happening? we responded quickly. we had a ship they are already. it was not by chance. the ship has been helping since thursday in the british virgin islands and anguilla. we had 900 troops out there now. we have three helicopters out they‘re and the aid is under way across our
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own territories and turks and caicos and anguilla, but there are other british nationals on other islands belonging to other countries and we have consular staff getting in touch with them to see how they can be brought out and how they can get relief there as well. we are all working together on this. we are working together on this. we are working with the americans. the french have asked us to help getting aid to some of their citizens. the dutch are also involved. this is an international effort and britain is playing its part. if you are talking to other countries, why are people being turned away from french aircraft when they tried to get back to the uk? we have seen reports of that and that is not the case. we are not discriminating against particular nationalities. we are all helping us —— we are all working together. we are working together as allies on this and i want to
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reassure you we have consular staff in the region trying to get in touch, some of the communications are down, trying to get in touch with british tourists and british nationals who happen to be on the other islands when derek is no direct british responsibility. —— where fairies. boris johnson is on his way and emmanuel macron as well. the prime minister and i are working back home as well meeting every day and we are starting work on the longer term reconstruction that is going to be needed. this was a devastating hurricane on a scale that we simply haven‘t seen for generations. we have got to work now on how we bring long—term relief to these islands, better shelter, asia resources . these islands, better shelter, asia resources. that work is in hand at the moment and is being led by the prime minister and myself.
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matt is suggesting that we might have to be putting on the central heating. a bit ofa a bit of a cool start and a cool days —— like all few days to come. here is a lovely shot from cornwall. fewer showers around this morning compared with yesterday but it will change by the end of the day. wet and increasingly windy weather pushing in from the west. it is all coming from this area of cloud and it isa coming from this area of cloud and it is a developing system. we see from the satellite imagery, good gaps in the cloud. isolated showers southwest england and western parts of scotland. compare to yesterday, the showers are not as heavy. many
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will spend the entire date dry but notice that by the end of the afternoon, six o‘clock, rain will be more and more expensive. you will be coming home in the rain. in scotland, the same, too, across north—west england. you still have showers at the moment of the morning commute there. wales and the south—west, it becomes more persistent. good part of the midlands, depending on how east you are, hopefully the journey home will be dry. the low pressure pushes in this evening. parts of north—west england, north wales as well as southern coastal counties of england, 50— 60 mph gusts possible. parts of northern england would like to see the worst of that. as it
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continues east would, by the end of the night, parts of northern england, north wales, the midlands and east anglia, because the winds gusting in excess of 70 or 75 mph. that is enough to bring a few branches down, maybe bring a few trees down and cause disruption for tomorrow. blustery across—the—board with the exception of northern scotland. there may be problems around for the commute tomorrow. keep up—to—date on the radio, the website and the aacta. —— app. blustery starts to wednesday. the rain and wind pulls away and could be stormy across parts of denmark. showers are most frequent in the north and west and feeling distinctly cool. the battle lines for the thermostat will be. what
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will be more? the battle over the remote control for the television or the thermostat? a big battle. ten years ago this week marks the collapse of the bank northern rock. you‘ll remember those queues outside its branches up and down the country as people tried in panic to get their savings out. ten years ago this week marks the collapse of the bank northern rock. you‘ll remember those queues outside its branches up and down the country as people tried in panic to get their savings out. this morning steph is newcastle where the bank was based good morning, everybody. it is beautiful here this morning on the river. you can see the famous tyne bridge where thousands of people will be going across on sunday. beautiful concert venue over there at gateshead. lots of fabulous landmarks but of course one of the big businesses here was the northern rock and at its peak it was
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employing something like 6000 people in the area. it certainly hit hard when the bank collapsed and of course, led to the uk credit crunch and caused the ramifications in the financial sector. we have some guests here. first of all, neck who is leader of the city council. take us back to how it was ten years ago. when the northern rock went into real difficulties, there were queues of people lining the streets, waiting to get their money out. it wasn‘t just a signal the waiting to get their money out. it wasn‘tjust a signal the bank was collapsing but a real sense of shock that an institution we were really proud of in this region, had done such great work for the region, was under serious threat. losing the northern rock was notjust the colla pse northern rock was notjust the collapse of the bank but a big psychological blow to the region‘s self—identity and confidence. psychological blow to the region‘s self-identity and confidence. and it is still part of your life now,
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trying to help those affected by it? yes, and the northern rock gave money to its foundation. 5% of its profits went to local charities. that was a huge amount of money over a12u that was a huge amount of money over a 12 u period, nearly £40 million. if the government is going to make a profit from the sale of northern rock now, i am asking them to honour the original commitment that northern rock had when it floated on the stock market, to give 5% of those profits back into local and the city is doing well and recovering but we helping us tackle. it was such a big part of this area. james from the north—east chamber of commerce, tell us what it meant for businesses disadvantaged areas that the northern rock was really helpful in helping us tackle. it was such a big part of this area. james from
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the north—east chamber of commerce, tell us what it meant for businesses as nick mentions what it was like to individuals but it really rocked the confidence of business as well.m really was at the heart of everything that we do. this region's economy was in such a big strength that then that had such an emotional impact everywhere. how are things now? we are back to functional employment it had such an emotional impact everywhere. how are things now? we are back to functional employment. that is more advertised. this region is really grated exporting. we have strong automotive sector advertised. this region is really grated exporting. we have strong automotive sector, a strong section for pharmaceuticals, offshore oil and gas and the region is in great shape right now.|j offshore oil and gas and the region is in great shape right now. i will bring in fillip. is in great shape right now. i will bring infillip. i is in great shape right now. i will bring in fillip. i know you have written a lot about what happened. section for pharmaceuticals, offshore oil and gas and the region is in great shape right now. i will bring in fillip. is in great shape right now. i will bring infillip. i is in great shape right now. i will bring in fillip. i know you have written a lot about what happened. -- fillip. -- written a lot about what happened. —— fillip. —— banks banks are ten yea rs —— fillip. —— banks banks are ten years ago. they hold more capital than they were ten years ago. they hold more they are watched more know what to do about it if they go into trouble, we know what to do about it
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but there is or complacency, unsecured lending is running at very near us. the banks are saying look, you can trust us, youare —— we are on top of the situation and that is a danger signal to me. the one thing to remember in banking is that risk never rest, it merely changes shape. yes, you have to have your eye on the ball. i will leave you with another little view before we leave this. i love showing off this area. you can see over there the old flour mill which is now one of the art galleries. that is over a gateshead side. lots of people saying, don‘t forget! you are on the newcastle side! you are a cross from gateshead. lots of people travelling over there this morning. an absolutely stunning day there today. you are watching breakfast. wa ry wary you from? bbc. impartial, free and fair. it has been a year in american politics. very few have expected it and our north american editorjohn
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sobel will be heated talk about clashing with president trump on the other side of the atlantic. time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching us. we will have the headlines at eight. good morning. i‘m asad ahmad. whipps cross hospital, which has been in "special measures," is said to be showing signs of improvement. an unannounced inspection by the care quality commission found the hospital in east london, which is part of bart‘s health nhs trust, to now "require improvement." it was rated "inadequate" last year. the cqc report says more needs top be done, but the hospital is moving in the right direction. we‘ve made a lot of progress, which the cqc have recognised, and that has been reflected in the overall rating, going from "inadequate" in the last two actions to "requires improvement" on this one. where we need progress, and the cqc has said that, is in surgery. chelsea football club has vowed
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to take the "strongest possible action" against any supporters found to have chanted anti—semitic language about the club‘s new striker alvaro morata. a song chanted on the terraces at chelsea‘s game on saturday, described spurs supporters, who have traditional links to thejewish community as "yids," a term mostly regarded as offensive. chelsea and morata denounced the chant, with the club working with the police to identify offenders, although there‘s some question as to whether police will prosecute. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s good service on the tubes this morning. and trains in and out of paddington are running with delays of 15 minutes following signal problems — with heathrow connect services suspended. 0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich rd flyover. there are anticlockwise delays on the m25 from j17 maple cross to j16 m40 following an earlier collision at j15 m4. on the a20 eltham road is causing westbound delays back
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—— finally, to south—east london, and an accident on the a20 eltham road is causing westbound delays back to westhorne avenue at the yorkshire grey roundabour. —— roundabout. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. for most of us, it‘s a dry, bright and sunny start to the day. the wind has fallen light overnight. so, less breezy, but still the risk of a shower. for this morning, it is dry. plenty of sunshine around. later on this morning, cloud increasing from the west. with that, the risk of a shower. it is still fairly breezy today. the wind, not as strong as yesterday. maximum 19 degrees. 0vernight, wet and windy, at least for a time. the rain moves away quickly, but the wind continues to strengthen and stays with us
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on wednesday morning. the minimum temperature, between 12 and 14 celcius. starting off windy first thing on wednesday. still the risk of a shower. still sunny spells. the wind will gradually through tomorrow afternoon will fall a bit lighter. overall, a windy day. 17 celcius. it will fall lighter on thursday and beyond. a chilly north—westerly for the end of the week, but still, sunshine and showers. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay. the legislation which will transfer thousands of eu laws to britain clears its first parliamentary hurdle. so the ayes have it. in a late night commons vote the bill passed with a majority of 36, but there could still be more attempts to change it. hello, good morning —
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it‘s tuesday, the 12th september. also on breakfast this morning: the clean—up operation in florida begins, as the uk sends more help to those devastated by hurricane irma. and speak to one of the scientist and new research into the effects of drinking alcohol during pregnancy. good morning. it has been ten years since the northern rock bank in newcastle collapsed so i have come here to find out what impact it had on the economic system in the uk, and also what difference it has made our lives. to our lives. in sport: roy‘s return — hodgson looks set to return to football management with crystal palace, 15 months after resigning from the england job. 0k, look down at your feet. look at
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the area where you stop. is it ok? meet the uk‘s eldest motorists. we are on the road with them as they refresh their skills! and matt has the weather. some driving rain on the way tonight, but before we get the bulk of the day will be dry with sunny spells and just a few isolated showers. all the details coming up inafew showers. all the details coming up in a few minutes. i will see you then. thanks, matt. good morning. first our main story — one of the government‘s key pieces of legislation on brexit has passed its first test in the commons. the european union withdrawal bill — which would end the supremacy of eu law in the uk — was passed with a majority of 36 in the early hours of this morning. theresa may welcomed the result, saying it would give "solid foundations" to the ongoing talks with brussels. but labour called the bill an affront to parliamentary democracy. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in westminsterfor us — what does this vote mean for theresa may‘s government? what does it tell us about the
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government plans for brexit? good morning. it was a late night for mps in westminster. the government got its bill through, over the first hurdle, fairly comfortably in the end, even though labour were trying to block it, and the reason was because no tory mps rebelled. in fa ct because no tory mps rebelled. in fact seven labour mps defied jeremy corbyn and voted with the government so that ministers had majority of 36, and theresa may will be left feeling that this bill, this hugely important bill, remains on track. what it does essentially is to tra nsfer what it does essentially is to transfer all eu law that abides in the uk into uk statute, to avoid legal chaos on brexit day. but the story doesn‘t end there. this will ta ke story doesn‘t end there. this will take months and there is huge concern, labour benches but also some tories as well, about what this
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bill does, in particular that it hands ministers for too much power to change future laws without proper parliamentary scrutiny. already, just last night, labour and tory mps put amendments down at the root of this here that they want to be voted uponin this here that they want to be voted upon in the coming weeks and months —— puts down at the vote office. i think they know they will have to make some concessions to get this legislation through. and the government is still ongoing with those negotiations with brussels, isn‘t it, too, with the deal for life after brexit? the defence secretary this morning has been talking about where that would leave british defence in relation to the eu. that's right. the new relationship britain will have with the eu is notjust about trade. clearly another part of the current relationship, defence and security, that needs to continue after brexit, and today the government or publishing a position paper on how they envisage that relationship working in the future. we‘ll see the
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details of that a little later today. it is really important i think in terms of the overall negotiations because i think the government are making it clear that they are willing to continue to cooperate on defence and security issues, but that has to be seen within the context of the whole negotiation. so far that you have not been particularly impressed with the position papers the government have produced. they think they are pretty thin, so we will see how they respond to this one. ben, for now, thank you very much indeed. it‘s been confirmed this morning that the foreign secretary boris johnson will be travelling to the region this morning to meet those leading the recovery work. 700 troops are already in the caribbean and overnight raf cargo planes set off across the atlantic carrying medical supplies, emergency shelter kits and clean water. jon donnison reports. more help is coming, but it‘s taking time. another raf cargo plane was loaded up last night at brize norton, en route to the caribbean. on board, medical supplies, emergency shelter, food and water. and later today hms 0cean will set sailfrom gibraltar, with a crew of 700 specialising in disaster relief. but it will take around 12 days
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to cross the atlantic. the government continues to have to answer criticism that it‘s been too slow to respond. the foreign secretary is going out there straightaway to report. the prime minister and i are working here back home, with the cobra emergency committee meeting every day, and we are starting work now on the longer—term reconstruction that is going to be needed. the british virgin islands have been devastated. this is a queue to get into a local supermarket on the island of tortola. people are hungry and helpless. some uk troops are already on the ground helping to distribute food and water, but the people here are british citizens, and many don‘t feel they‘re being treated as such. jon donnison, bbc news.
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the governor of florida, rick scott, has urged people not to return to some areas because of the extensive damage caused by hurricane irma. 6.5 million homes in the state remain without power. the storm is continuing to push inland, bringing torrential rain to alabama and tennessee. as sarah corker reports. imagine returning home to find this... irma has utterly ravaged the florida keys — buildings torn apart, belongings strewn along the roadside, and boats dumped onshore. a deadly combination of fierce winds and storm surges has left more than 6 million people in florida without power. the authorities said it would take weeks before electricity was fully restored. in some areas there is little or no fuel, and people are being warned to stay put. we‘ve got down power lines all across the state, we‘ve got roads that are impassable
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still across state, we‘ve got debris all over the state. miami‘s financial district has been badly damaged, and just hours after the hurricane struck, looters arrived. night time curfews have now been imposed. several cities remain flooded. this is jacksonville. people have been told to watch for alligators and snakes in the floodwaters. hurricane irma may have been downgraded to a tropical depression, but it keeps causing misery as it pushes north and further inland. this is the picture in south carolina. next in its path, alabama and tennessee. irma isn‘t finished yet. sarah corker, bbc news. 0n the tourcaptain
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0n the tour captain pedre and is heading back to the caribbean, very shortly —— heading back to the caribbean, very shortly -- and we can speak to captain pedre who is heading to the caribbean very shortly. three men, including two british soldiers, have been charged with terror offences — including membership of a banned neo—nazi group. they‘re due to appear before westminster magistrates‘ court this morning. two other men have been released without charge. the united nations security council will impose further sanctions on north korea in response to its most powerful nuclear test yet. the measures, which restrict oil imports and ban textile exports, were approved unanimously but only after the united states softened its original proposals to win chinese and russian backing. a 28—year—old man is being questioned about the death of a woman at a festival. 25—year—old louella mickey was discovered in a wooded area at the bestival site on monday. she is the daughter of holby city and taggart actorjohn mickey. there is "surprisingly limited" evidence that light drinking during pregnancy poses any risk to the baby, according to researchers, but women are still being recommended to avoid alcohol completely.
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analysis by the university of bristol of studies dating back to the 1950s suggests having one small glass of wine twice a week may result in a small increase in the chances of having a small baby or a premature birth. but they say there‘s so little research it‘s difficult to be sure. and we will be speaking to the lead researcher of the study minutes‘ time here on breakfast. government efforts to help schools keep hold of teachers and develop their skills do not appear to be working, according to the national audit 0ffice. a report by the spending watchdog found that tens of thousands of teachers are leaving the profession every year. but the government says there are now 15,000 more teachers than in 2010, and it is spending "significant sums" on recruitment. plans to dig a road tunnel near stonehenge have been approved by the government. it‘s hoped the scheme will ease congestion on the road which passes the ancient stone circle, but campaign groups are concerned it will damage the archaeology of the site and the wider environment. now if you fancy yourself a bit
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of an amateur snapper, take a look at these pictures. they have been selected from around 50,000 entries for the annual wildlife photographer of the year. they include these beautiful seals swimming playfully and this incredible shot of a seahorse holding on to a cotton bud with its tail. people using that one to point out the rubbish that is in our oceans. yes, and those clownfish there. the winners will be announced in october and some of the best entries can be seen in a special exhibition at the natural history museum later this year. some stunning photographs. back to our main story. 900 uk troops, 50 police and over 20 tonnes of aid have been sent to the caribbean islands devastated by hurricane irma. today, hms 0cean will set sail from gibraltar tojoin the relief effort, loaded with medical
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supplies, emergency shelter kits, rations and clean water. we can speak now to captain robert pedre, commander of hms 0cean who joins us from gibraltar. good morning to you, captain. thanks for joining good morning to you, captain. thanks forjoining us this morning. when you off? double—mac that will depend on how long it takes to pack the pallets to ready the ships, so we can maximise humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. —— can maximise humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. -- yes, well that will depend. we need to be there in 11 days‘ time, but work has been conducted with royal marines from the very outset. we had a ship pre—positioned to be able to respond but of course given the unprecedented scale of this natural disaster this of course has required an unprecedented response, hence the dispatch now of the fleet flagship to render maximum support. can you talk us through some of this. we are
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seeing pictures now of bags, and we saw pallets a moment ago going on board, but what is that kit, what is the material you will take to help with that relief operation?m cove rs with that relief operation?m covers the full panoply of requirements, vaccine kits, portable water, purification systems, tractors, and we have also got already on the ship nine helicopters, four landing craft, and of course lots of four—wheeled vehicles. we have the capability to manufacture some 300 tonnes of water organically on the ship, but also very importantly we can stay on task for long periods of time without any recourse to home nation support. i can sustain some 8500 miles on one tank of fuel, so very well placed. a lot of these islands are very dispersed, some 53 square kilometres between the british islands. so we are ideally suited to render support. you talk about making
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water, is that making sea water drinkable? yes, i can manufacture 300 tonnes of water a day, far in excess of my requirements on board. we also have vast quantities of bottled water ready to distribute as required. i know it is not your decision, when and where you are deployed, that comes from above, but it must be frustrating in a way for you and your crew on board that you are not closer now to be able to give that help when it is more urgently needed, ie immediately? give that help when it is more urgently needed, ie immediately7m course we are in very urgently needed, ie immediately7m course we are in very close communication with mounts bay, who are doing very sterling work. of course we would like to be there no, but as i have said before this is an unprecedented natural disaster, which has not been seen for an exceptionally long period of time, andi exceptionally long period of time, and i think the very fact we are being dispatched no determination to maximise support, we are ready to make a real difference as soon as soon as we have arrived. unprecedented, and yet forecast for some time. well,
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it isa it is a difficult. clearly i am not an expert on hurricanes, but the strength of this hurricane, sustained winds, 185 mph, it is indeed unprecedented, hence the unprecedented response, so we are just determined to get on scene as quick as we can and maximise support because it is notjust about the here and now. it will be a long recovery operation and we will be very well placed to assist with that reconstruction. the building materials on board, the timber, it will go a long way towards assisting and that recovery. we can see pictures now of people trying to get their houses back into some sort of semblance of order. you talk about being on scene. do you know where you are headed yet? of course we will be responding to the fed and other authorities on the ground to get this much—needed aid to where it is needed —— responding to orders from food. i believe your off later today but thank you very much indeed and hopefully we will learn about
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your efforts there in the caribbean and you will get their later today. yes, water, tractors on board, sorry things that are needed. it is quarter past eight. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. it is not a bad start to the weather here in the uk. lots of dry and sunny weather around. a cracking shot just sunny weather around. a cracking shotjust outside sunny weather around. a cracking shot just outside leeds sunny weather around. a cracking shotjust outside leeds in 0tley. there are a few showers in the forecast. most will get a morning commute being a dry one. this is the area of cloud responsible. nothing to do what is happening over in the usa, but it is a developing weather system that will work towards us. clearer skies means the sunshine is out. a few showers in the west. many northern west england and west wales and western parts of scotland. most dry. most of you will spend the bulk
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of day dry. but that does change into the west later. rain into northern ireland through the afternoon. so a thoroughly soggy rush hour. some heavy bursts of rain to go with it and that rain edges into western parts of scotland as well by six. the same too for the isle of man. you will probably get away dry until we head into the evening. the same too across the eastern half of the midlands, but towards the midlands and through western wales and south—west england, notjust western wales and south—west england, not just wet, western wales and south—west england, notjust wet, but windy. gale force gusts developing by the time we hit the rush hour. isolated showers. not the storms we had yesterday. most will have a dry commute to the end the day as we begin. the low pressure works it‘s way in. gusts of wind in excess of 50mph, 60mph, north—west england and north wales and along the southern coastal counties. heavy rain persistent in northern england. that could give minorflooding, it is
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north wales and the midlands and parts of east anglia especially norfolk, as that area of low pressure develops we could see start to see winds whip up further in excess of 70mph, maybe 75mph. that‘s enough to bring branches down and cause disruption into tomorrow morning‘s rush hour. the met office are likely to issue further weather warnings throughout the day. the latest is on the bbc weather website an the bbc news channel. a wild night to come. strongest of the winds eastern coasts of england first light. that area of low pressure spreads into the netherlands. blustery winds. the fewest of the showers towards the south east corner. more showers to the north and the west. some heavy and thundery and temperatures 11 to 14 celsius. it will be a rather cool wednesday. back to you both. thanks, matt. hellojon.
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hello jon. good morning, louise! we have spoken about the issue of drinking during pregnancy. now researchers at the university of bristol say a lack of evidence has led to inconsistent advice and confusion among both mothers—to—be and health professionals. there is a new report out today. from bristol, we arejoined by one of the report‘s co—authors, luisa zuccolo. you have looked at lots of different evidence and what did you find? we did a study of studies. we looked at over 5,000 papers to start with and narrowed it down to 26 that hadle releva nt narrowed it down to 26 that hadle relevant data and we wanted to find out whether drinking small amounts of alcohol during pregnancy, we‘re talking about glasses of wine a week or two pints a week of beer compared to not drinking at all, whether that caused any harm to the baby or the
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mum or the pregnancy. so we looked at many different outcomes, short—term and also longer term. and what we found was that there wasn‘t many studies published on this topic. we anticipated a lot more studies being published the same as more moderate drinking and heavy drinking, but really for drinking what you said is right, there is a lack of evidence on what effects it might have on the pregnancy and the baby. now the two outcomes for which we found some evidence are babies being born early, so premature birth, before 36 weeks of gestation and babies being born small for their gestational age. so lots of people will be watching you and thinking right, what does this mean people should do? so, the department of health in the uk has changed president guidelines on drinking in pregnancy back injanuary 2016. currently, the guidance suggests not
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to drink any alcohol during pregnancy. we completely agree with this stance and our study confirms that that‘s the most sensible approach to take. it‘s best to be safe tha n approach to take. it‘s best to be safe than sorry. it‘s recommended that people, if they can, abstain from alcohol when they‘re pregnant and when they‘re trying to become pregnant. and from what you're saying, it sounds like there has been lots of studies into heavier drinking for example. do you think it would be valuable to have a study into this type of drinking, light drinking? so, we definitely think that more research is needed hence more work for me and my colleagues, but at the moment as well as collecting all of the evidence from previously done studies we‘re also trying to run our own original new studies on the topic and it‘s a really important topic to study and it is quite tricky because as opposed to many other subjects where
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in the medical discipline where you can conduct an experiment and randomise people taking statins and not taking statins, you cannot do that with drinking in pregnancy. of course, a very good that with drinking in pregnancy. of course, a very good point. thank you very much for your time. lots of people sending us in messages. thank you very much indeed for that. and susan says, "if nobody actually knows isn‘t it more sensible and common sense to simply abstain. no harm can be done from that." viv is talking about the way advice has changed. 40 years ago when she was pregnant the advice was that a small amount of alcohol was good for the baby. the chief medical officer, we heard about that, saying total abstinence is the safest policies. jackie says it is no big deal to abstain from alcohol for nine months, why risk it? it takes years to train as a pilot
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in one of the typhoons. what‘s it like to fly inside? we set that challenge to jonathan like to fly inside? we set that challenge tojonathan beale. he has been to see if he has got what it ta kes to been to see if he has got what it takes to travel faster than the speed of sound. it‘s not top gun this, is it? he's not, no. this is the raf‘s front—line jet, the typhoon. and this is what it is like to fly in. i can already feel the power of thatjet. in the air in seconds, it can climb to 50,000 feet within a matter of minutes and reach a speed of more than 1500mph. and then there is the g force. it can pull nine times the force of gravity. that makes it highly manoeuvrable. i felt a little bit sick there. but it‘s also punishing on the body.
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i think it is best not to have breakfast for a second time. you get a sense, i am sweating and quite uncomfortable to be perfectly honest. it is a toughjob, and, of course, at the moment, raf pilots are flying for eight hours searching for targets in iraq and syria. first designed as an air—to—air fighter, it is being developed to do much more. these tests are designed to make it a more potent weapon with missiles to hit fast—moving targets or the bunker buster cruising missile to hit things on the ground. you could fight against enemy fighters on the way to a target. you could then attack that ground target with either the paveway four or the brimstone and fight your way back out using the radar.
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i am lazer ranging on the target. it may sound easier than it actually is, and so is trying to fly a fast jet. you have control. i am flying in a typhoon. we will make a typhoon pilot of you. no, you won‘t! whether attacking a base or fighting islamic state, raf crews are doing this day in and day out, often in the cockpit for hours at a time. this was me afterjust one hour in the air. he has a smile. the typhoon smile is there. tom cruise! it is one of those
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assignments which sounds great at the time. well done, jonathan beale. it was the event that kicked off the financial crisis — the collapse of northern rock. ten years on, steph‘s in newcastle where the bank was based to see how it affected the region. good morning. yes, good morning, lou, good morning jon. good morning everybody. i‘m on the river tyne. it isa everybody. i‘m on the river tyne. it is a bit windy, but it is a very beautiful morning here. you can see the famous tyne bridge. thousands of people running across that on sunday doing the great north run and you have the sage venue. but it was here where northern rock had its headquarters and it was ten years ago this week when we found out, i was one of the team who was working behind the scenes breaking the news, that the bank had gone to the bank of england to get financial help. they were struggling. they were worried about money. so they needed a financial injection to help them. we brought this story on the news
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and of course, that then panicked a lot of people who were wondering what that would mean for their savings in the bank. lots of people we re savings in the bank. lots of people were taking their money out and the famous queues that we saw. so ten yea rs famous queues that we saw. so ten years on, i‘m looking at what impact it has had on this area, but also on the global economy because it kicked off the credit crunch here, but first let‘s get the news, travel and whether you are this morning. do and where, so some deep low— pressure do and where, so some deep low—pressure sitting out in the atla ntic low—pressure sitting out in the atlantic which will move into a gradually to the course of the day. head of that for many us it is a fine start with some sunshine. we will keep that sunshine into the afternoon across eastern areas. one of two showers cropping up but they are nowhere near as heavy or as frequent as they were yesterday. towards the west you see the cloud increasing and with that some outbreaks of rain coming in and maximum temperatures of 16—19. it is to this evening this area of low pressure, as it moves across the uk, as the eyes of bars are getting tighter together, it will give us some strong winds. they will
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initially be around the bristol channel and the english channel but then they will be elsewhere across then they will be elsewhere across the uk. 0vernight tonight, some heavy rain and perhaps severe gales with some disruption. these are the areas with the strongest winds initially, 55—60 mph gusts, then 75 mph through the night around wales, and these moving into the midlands. these clear out during wednesday when we are left with some sunny spells and scattered showers. the most frequent of those showers are towards the north and west. top temperatures, 13—18 degrees. then the low pressure will move into the continent into thursday, and a northerly wind sets up across the uk making it feel quite chilly, i suspect, on thursday. some showers around throughout the day and briscoe winds on the east of england making it feel distinctly chilly year —— brisk winds. highest temperatures up to 17 degrees. then
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that northerly wind, perhaps feeling a little bit chilly from time to time, then on saturday it should be mostly dry with some sunny spells as well. more details on the website. that is it from me. hello, this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. president macron faces the wrath of french workers — its biggest union launches strike action today bringing disruption across the country. action today bringing live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday the 12th of september. deja vu? the protests in france are against the president‘s moves to reform the labour market, making it easier to sack workers and water down collective bargaining. we get an expert view
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on whether macron will succeed
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