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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 12, 2017 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. early images from the florida keys show the power of hurricane irma — a quarter of all homes there were destroyed. france's president emmanuel macron has arrived in the caribbean defending his government's response to the storm. in the turks and caicos, coastal communities are in ruins, but people are determined to rebuild as soon as possible. everyone here is telling us the same thing — tourism is the lifeblood of these communities and without it the suffering will continue. the un votes to step up sanctions against north korea but the measures are watered down to win chinese and russian support. president trump says it's not enough. also on the programme... tens of thousands join protests in france against president macron‘s plans to reform the labour laws. will he succeed where others have failed? and the new iphone recognises your face, and maybe also that look of surprise when you learn of the $1,000 price tag! hello and welcome.
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i'm katty kay in washington and christian fraser is in london. 17,000 people desperately need shelter in the caribbean. it's estimated that 37 people on the islands lost their lives in hurricane irma. the world health organisation says the relief operation is being sorely hampered by the damage to the hospitals and clinics. the cost of hurricane harvey and irma together is put at $200 billion in the united states, but in florida, perhaps a collective sigh of relief that it wasn't much worse, especially when they reflect on the destruction we are seeing in the caribbean. nick bryant reports from the turks and caicos. this church was supposed to protect people from irma — a sanctuary through the storm — butjust hours before the hurricane hit, the plan changed. people went elsewhere, and just as well. like many buildings here, it was destroyed. in the turks and caicos islands, low—lying coastal communities were worst—hit, beach—side homes now unlivable.
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basically, my family, we lost everything, everything. it's going to take some time to get back on our feet again, but, through the strength from god, we will. long bay beach is routinelyjudged to be one of the most beautiful in the world, a bucket list location, but this is what a category five hurricane can do to a five—star hotel. what's striking here is the determination to rebuild — notjust to put roofs over people's heads again, but to reopen restaurants and reopen these hotels as quickly as possible. everyone here is telling us the same thing — tourism is the lifeblood of these communities, and without it, the suffering will continue. so, as queues formed outside this supermarket for clean water and ice, there were pleas, too, for tourists to come back. i want the world to know, turks and caicos is not destroyed. we are open for business.
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we are a fine destination. we are not destroyed. we have some damage, but we are going to rebuild. we have rebuilt from ike and hanna. we are going to rebuild and come back. turks and caicos is open for business. but british holiday—makers stranded here for days were obviously desperate to get out when the airport reopened this morning. we were desperate to get out about four days ago, to be honest, so... finally you're leaving? at last. it has been really hard, but, yeah, we have survived. that's all that matters. as tourists tried to leave, another british military transport plane touched down. there are now 1,000 british military personnel assisting the relief effort in these caribbean uk territories, but they are facing the question, why did they take so long to arrive? as soon as the word came, we were at the door very quickly thereafter, and it isjust the physical distance, the separation. but we got here pretty quickly. what is especially cruel is that the poorest communities here had onlyjust rebuilt from the last hurricane, and that was nine years ago.
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nick bryant, bbc news, the turks and caicos. the destruction, heartbreaking to see some of those pictures. but looking at florida they are still making their way into some of the keysin making their way into some of the keys in the south of the state. the damage is bad but not as bad as it has been in the caribbean. yes, a quarter of homes we think are destroyed in the florida keys. we're getting the first pictures out of there, but it does look at the moment, certainly on the mainland of the united states, that it was not as bad as the caribbean. we can speak to our weather presenter, tomasz schafernaker, who has made his way to tampa. are we right in saying, from what you've seen so far, it looks like mainland united states got off comparatively lightly from this storm?
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yes, that's absolutely right. we have been driving around florida for the last few days, finding out how people have been preparing for the storm, and we ended up in tampa. the tampa bay area around saint petersburg, and the kind of destruction we have seen around here is mainly to trees. behind me there is mainly to trees. behind me there isa is mainly to trees. behind me there is a clear is mainly to trees. behind me there isa clearup is mainly to trees. behind me there is a clear up operation of a tree which fell on a house. what you cannot see immediately is that there isa car cannot see immediately is that there is a car crushed underneath the tree. this isjust a microcosm of what's happening around the area. fortunately a lot of the debris has already been cleared off the road, so already been cleared off the road, so things are slowly... i wouldn't necessarily say back to normal because many parts of florida, in fa ct a because many parts of florida, in fact a large chunk of florida, still without power but people are trying to get about normal lives. but to the south of florida that is where the south of florida that is where the storm surge has really affected the storm surge has really affected the region, around miami, where we have seen that footage of the
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floodwaters going down into downtown. and we are yet to access the damage closer to the golf course, around fort myers, where the core of the storm went through. —— around the gulf coast. explain to us, i was hearing before it hit where you are now in tampa that there could be storm surges of ten to 15 feet but i did not happen. you are a weather expert, sitars why not. what was out on the modelling? first of all, storm surges are very difficult to forecast. like a weather forecast, when it comes to wind and rain, trying to forecast the level of the water is also very conjugated. at the moment it appears, and this will be looked into further, but at the moment it appears that as the storm was roaring on the gulf coast of mexico, the northern edge of the storm was far more powerful than the southern
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edge. what does that mean? it means that on the northern edge of the storm where the winds were coming out of the north and off land, that wind actually pushed the water further out to sea. so in tampa we, rather than have water piling in, we had a negative storm surge were dc actually decreased. —— vc decreased. the thinking was once the storm moved through and the winds would swing in the other direction, because the storm swing rande brown, that the water would come back brushing and again of the gulf of mexico, but i did not materialise. that isjust mexico, but i did not materialise. that is just around tampa mexico, but i did not materialise. that isjust around tampa here. what happened a bit further south around fort myers and labels we have yet to determine. thank you, our reporter in tampa. fascinating what we have learned in the last few days about how the storm ‘s work from meteorologists like yourself. thank you. american lawmakers are calling for a "supercharged" diplomatic response to north korea. it's really not entirely clear to us
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what that means but it's probably more than the latest round of sanctions passed by the un. the white house says the new cap on the import of crude oil and the ban on the sale of north korean textiles are the most punishing sanctions yet, but they had to downsize their demands to accomodate the russians and the chinese. this was president trump's reaction earlier. we had a vote yesterday on sanctions, and we think it'sjust another very small step, not a big deal. rex and i were just discussing... not big, i don't know what it has any impact, but... certainly it was nice to get a 15 to nothing vote, but those sanctions are nothing compared to what ultimately will have to happen. you have to say the president has a point. when you look at how effective the sanctions have been... here's an illustration of the six tests pyongyang has conducted since 2006 when sanctions were first introduced. you can see from the incremental
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size of these circles, which represent the size of the nuclear test blasts, that sanctions thus far have really done nothing to restrict pyongyang's nuclear programme. and to put it in context, the hiroshima bomb of 1945 created a yield of 15 kilotonnes. that circle there at the end represents 70 kilotonnes. with me is shinichi iida. he's the minister for public diplomacy at the japanese embassy here in london. that is a really good illustration of just how ineffective that is a really good illustration ofjust how ineffective sanctions have been. we have a slightly different view from a certain approach to the security that was unanimously adapted yesterday. under the new resolution, in addition to the existing economic sanctions, if they are altogether fully and limited, it should reduce north korea's revenue by billions of dollars and that is
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huge. if it is thoroughly plummeted, certainly it would have a huge impact on north korea and the area. your right to refer to china. currently, china and north korea's external trade in value terms, 90% is with china. china has a political role to play but i must emphasise that they agreed to this sanction this time around. is the debate shifting injapan? you have had an alarming few months with missiles coming of a japanese territory. the white house is saying that perhaps a military response short of bombing north korea is to put nuclear weapons injapan and south korea. is that sort of debate unfolding injapan? not at all. you would not welcome nuclear w we would not welcome nuclear weapons injapan. we we would not welcome nuclear weapons in japan. we have we would not welcome nuclear weapons injapan. we have three non—nuclear principles based on our horrific experiences of hiroshima and nagasaki. there is no intention
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whatsoever within the government, let alone amongst the people, to introduce nuclear weapons to the japanese soil. it does seem, though, on the point that the japanese are gently moving away from the idea that is inscribed in your constitution of being a totally pacifist nation, because of the threat from north korea, explain to me what happened on september the 3rd one that missile went over the country. how nervous did it make the japanese and how much did it make them rethink the concept of pacifism for the country? the concept of pacifism is one thing, but our fear the concept of pacifism is one thing, but ourfearand the concept of pacifism is one thing, but our fear and worry against the north koreans' nuclear missile, that development is quite another. you are right there when the missile flew overjapanese territory and when north korea detonated a hydrogen bomb, the japanese are terrified and north korea is a neighbour ofjapan. that
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is the reason prime minister abe tells the japanese people that are taking every measure to ensure the safety of the japanese people and self defence forces have been deploying ballistic missile defence mechanisms. we have been doing everything we can but that is not a shift of pacifism, but self defence. good to see you and thank you for being with us. thank you. let's speak now to gordon chang, author of "nuclear showdown: north korea takes on the world". i want to pick up on what donald trumpjust i want to pick up on what donald trump just said, that the sanctions which werejust agreed trump just said, that the sanctions which were just agreed by the un are, he says, nothing compared to what will have to happen. what will have to happen? i think that essentially the united states has quit after shift gears. we have outsourced our north korea policy to the security council and that will not work. —— the us must shift gears. there are things we can do, like communicating with china.
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china has laundered money for the north koreans and supplied equipment for their ballistic missile programme. perhaps the technology for north korea's most advanced missile, semi—processed ballistic material for the nuclear weapons programme, and china is responsible for helping the north korean economy, and of course being the main diplomatic supporter. if we wa nt main diplomatic supporter. if we want to move china away from that we have to change its structure. up until now we have not done that. 0ne until now we have not done that. one example and i know you have talked about it is the possibility of unplugging a chinese bank. that would have major implications but, for the chinese economy and also the american economy as well, potentially, there was retaliation. do you think the white house is moving in that direction? they are moving in that direction because they have to do. whenever we think about our north korea or china policy, we have to enforce us law, and the chinese banks have been using the us financial system to
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achieve criminal purposes. i don't ca re achieve criminal purposes. i don't care if you are laundering money for a north korean dictator or a colombian drug lord, it's got to stop. we have no choice but to go after the larger chinese banks, which have been laundering money. for instance, bank of china, named ina 2016 for instance, bank of china, named in a 2016 un report for devising and operating a money—laundering scheme, and perhaps even larger chinese banks. bank of china is the fourth—largest bank in the world but there is a larger chinese bank which is also suspect in this criminal activity. the united states must do something about it. the white house said last week it would consider again trading with countries that trade with north korea, and last week up on twitter topped a list of countries still trading with north korea. it would be surprised to see the likes of germany and also france, a un security council member, on that list. why are they still trading with north korea ? because the us for the last eight years or so because the us for the last eight years or so and because the us for the last eight years or so and even because the us for the last eight years or so and even during the period of george w bush was not good
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in getting countries to stop trading with north korea. indeed a number of the initiatives of the bush administration fell into disuse during the 0bama administration. we saw for instance increased trade from china to north korea, notjust of normal commercial items but also military equipment, and that was banned by the security council long ago. i think we will see... and this is reallyjust a response to the sense of is reallyjust a response to the sense of urgency is reallyjust a response to the sense of urgency that now exists in washington... we will see going after all of these countries that have been trading with the north koreans on and off illicit terms. thank you, gordon chang. reading the washington post this morning i saw a headline which alerted me to how committed the international community is. i don't love we can show people that headline but it is likely talking about the smuggling. there we go. it sort of speaks that
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well be security council has voted in favour of these sanctions, there are plenty of countries who are committed to it. yes, andi committed to it. yes, and i had been hearing... interesting that headline popped up to date, because the last weeks i have heard it from national security people here in washington that they are looking at russia. we just to gordon chang about china but what happens at russia is the news boiler —— the new spoiler on north korea? whether they are muscling in a powered and north korea are messing with the united states and europe, who knows? but there are smuggling routes they have just opened, a ferry service this year into north korea. there is evidence that china is not only trying to trade but exerting its own influence in a new sphere. it will be interesting if the united states must deal with two superpowers when it comes to china
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—— when it comes to north korea. china and russia as well, campbell getting things further. let's talk about france and insomnia. one night, if you have trouble sleeping you could try reading the french labour laws — there are a mind—numbing 3,448 pages of them. they might be a great cure for insomnia, but they've been a huge burden on the french economy over the years. unemployment is at 9.5% — that's twice the level in germany. one of the first things president macron promised to do in office was to reform those laws. today is his first big test. protests were held in cities across france with as many as 4,000 strikes called. the bbc‘s hugh schofield has more. they warned him he could notjust rewrite labour relations without their say—so, well, here they are. just one of the big unions, but the other two stayed away, much to the relief of president macron, but the message is clear. the new labour code stats work against worker and must be stopped. everyone here in france will not
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have the same protection everywhere. it is like to have a law in each company... so it is totally a big problem for us. there is a school of thought which says this classic display of union muscle is good for president macron because it shows that something, old france he would call it, is hurting. and it is true. the reform is not a tinkering at the edges of the french social contract but has real potential to change the way companies operate. translation: potential to change the way companies operate. translatiosz may seem that scene from the outside it does not look like a revolution because it is complex but in reality it isa because it is complex but in reality it is a revolution. until now it was the law which regulated the rules of the workplace but from tomorrow business managers and unions can negotiate new rules and unions can negotiate new rules and that everything upside down. emmanuel macron has a weak spot and thatis emmanuel macron has a weak spot and that is a certain arrogance that invites opposition. he was at it
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again at the weekend when he said enemies of his reforms work do nothings and cynics. translation: cynics... he does not seem to worry that that might rile people. he knows that unpopularity in the short—term is inevitable. president has to use his legitimacy and take the risk of losing popularity, but if he gets the results, then popularity will come. if you have just... if you don't do anything, people will protest, but at the end you will be fired. macron‘s france is a place where there is virtually no political opposition, so the forum for those who want to stop his reform is here on the street. to do that, though, you need to bring out the people, lots of people. this demo is big, but big enough to turn back the president? doubtful. but the unions say it is a long campaign. after the
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labour code there are five more yea rs of labour code there are five more years of planned macron reforms and at some point they think the country will cry, stop. bbc news, paris. senator helene conway—mouret is a french socialist senator for french citizens abroad and joins us now from paris. good to see you again. when i used to tourup and good to see you again. when i used to tour up and down the country when i was the paris correspondent, employers said to me, look, we can't ta ke employers said to me, look, we can't take people on because we can't buy them. they wanted some freedom. surely would not doubt that labour reform is needed. nobody doubted but i think it is a paradox to say that we are going to with this reform come down from this massive amount of pages... over 3000 pages for the labour law... in fact, i think the reform will add another 150 pages, which is what is being proposed. no, there is
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simplification, and indeed for employers, there is flexibility that is being introduced that is needed. and it is wanted. but of course by introducing flexibility and some rights and protections —— some rights and protections —— some rights and protections are being lost in favour of portability. it is natural people are worried because in parliament... to put that through... we are discovering what is in the text, but without having the chance to amend it. it is a shame. let's pick up on that because your boss, francois lond, did not do well at pushing through labour reform and back down. —— francois hollande. he clearly has a mandate, though, president macron, and he has given himself executive powers to do it. is that why there has been no debate? but if you present radical and fundamental change in labour law, a couple of weeks will not make a huge
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difference. the president has five years and it is true that he wants to move fast. he is determined to get it through, but i think it is a shame that such an important text is not being amended, and maybe just softened a little bit so that we are better off having some debate in parliament. better to have debates in parliament and violence in the streets. i don't understand what you're saying. is it a shame because there could be a more politically expedient way to get the reforms through that france really does need, or are you saying it is a shame because people will lose rights and protections and these reforms shouldn't happen? if it is the latter, that is what france will have to accept. some rights and protections will have to go. indeed, but people are prepared for that. as you rightly said in your report, we cannot continue living with10% report, we cannot continue living with 10% unemployment rate. it is
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just not sustainable. so everybody agrees that reforms are needed, but at the same time, i think the couple of days will not make a difference to explain what is being done and why it is being done and people are realistic and expected. it isjust... it isjust... it isjust... it is not what is being done by the manner in which it is being pushed through. is are you saying if president macron took a few more days and spent more time explain, suddenly all of france would be happy to accept the reforms? i think they would be accepted in a better way. what is amazing is that president macron was then minister for the economy and he's the one who should have carried the piece of legislation that put so many people in the streets under president holland's presidency and we saw many strikes. and now what he is presenting is actually going much further than the first piece of legislation we should have been carrying, and yet he is expecting
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that it carrying, and yet he is expecting thatitis carrying, and yet he is expecting that it is going to go through smoothly. so it is a chance he is taking, but he's determined go through. thank you very much. you know france very well. what do you think? to you by that everyone would come round to the idea of reform and theyjust need more time? —— do you buy that? no. i don't believe that. it is a divisive issue. the balance for any french president is trying to create jobs and greater freedom french president is trying to create jobs and greaterfreedom in french president is trying to create jobs and greater freedom in the workplace for employers and also not getting to a position that france and germany and britain have found themselves in with manyjobs in 0—hour contracts which don't give higher salaries necessarily or the welfare that workers are looking for. it is finally a balance but also a political game. looking at the numbers through the summer, what he lost, 14 points in august, ten points injuly, he lost, 14 points in august, ten
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points in july, only 14% he lost, 14 points in august, ten points injuly, only 14% said they are satisfied with president macron. you will try to force it through but at the end of the day polls count, don't they? summary said to me, a person who invest in france, the french want to change but they don't want to change. it means he has got to do this fast before his poll numbers fall any further, don't you think? and why would you when you have a 35 hour week. i can hear the french writing in. it is a myth. not everybody works 35 hours but the socialists try to create employment through the 35 hour week and it did not work. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news: you may never have heard of hope hicks, but she's just been appointed the white house director of communications. we'll look at what she'll bring to team trump. and from one woman in a position of power to perhaps the most powerful woman in the world. we'll find out how angela merkel is planning to win a fourth term as the chancellor of germany. hello.
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as you may already have heard, we are in storm season here in the british isles. we have, moving into the western side of the british isles, storm aileen. it does not look like very much on that satellite imagery, but there is sufficient concern for the met office to have already issued an amber warning, the second tier of warning, about the strength of the wind, and there are further warnings about the intensity of rain. through the course of the evening and overnight, it will push aileen ever further towards the east. notice the number of isobars, particularlyjust on its southern flank. the heaviest of the rain may well be found around about this way, where we could see a couple of inches or so. the gusts of wind in that core there, right across the north of england and north wales, could well be pushing towards 75mph. so disruption is distinctly possible, with that combination of very wet and very windy weather indeed. let's see how we start the new day on wednesday. and there will be showers if not longer spells aplenty here across a good part of scotland. a scattering of showers,
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and not much more than that for northern ireland. the last of the overnight rain just about getting away from eastern shores of the north—east of england. by this stage the winds, for the most part, will have begun to weaken quite significantly. however, the disruption from that system may well linger on. power lines could be down, and travel could well be affected. further south than that scattering of showers, but quite a lot of sunshine around. noticeable, but not the strength that we will have seen in some areas overnight. as we get on into the afternoon, perhaps showers becoming ever more widespread across the northern half of the british isles, but some spots in the south could see very few showers indeed. top temperature on the day around 17 or 18 celsius. that area of low pressure continues its journey of into scandinavia. high pressure building out in the atlantic. that leaves us through thursday and on into friday with this run of north—westerly winds. and there will be plenty of it as well, so it lasts most of day. persistent rain just flirting
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with the eastern side of england as a little feature just works its way through the north sea. elsewhere it is that combination again sunny spells and showers. i suspect i will be the way of it, too, as we get on towards the weekend. this is beyond 100 days, with me, katty kay, in washington. ‘s christian fraser's in london. aid and government agencies are moving into the hurricane—hit caribbean. in the turks and caicos, coastal communities are in ruins. they are pledging to rebuild. everyone here is telling us the same thing, tourism is the lifeblood of the communities and without it, the suffering will continue. the un votes to step up sanctions against north korea but the measures are watered down to win chinese and russian support. coming up in the next half hour — the new white house communications director is a familiar face in the trump administration.
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but can hope hicks help manage the message? the iphone turns ten with a major makeover. we'll show you the just—announced changes which customers will be lining up for, but they don't come cheap. important announcement at the white house. spicey has gone, the mooch has gone. but there is hope. hope hicks. she is the new white house communications director. she had been in the post several weeks serving on an interim basis but she was confirmed today. so who is mr trump's third communications chief? well she's just 28 years old and a former model. a trump loyalist, she worked on public relations during his campaign. in fact there have so been so many ins and outs in the trump white house — that hope hicks is already the longest—standing political aide
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to the president. i'm joined by our north american reporter. hope hicks someone who might not be very well—known around the world because she lacks some of the world because she lacks some of the of her predecessors. does this mean we're heading for a drama free white house? time will tell but she is one of the more trusted aides, she's been there since the beginning with donald trump and she is moving into a position that has had such turnover. the tenure is short and the exit is normally unceremonious. donald trump knows her, trusts her. communications director, that shouldn't be the person in front of the camera, it is the one managing the camera, it is the one managing the press secretary and the communications team and she has a lot of experience of knowing what donald trump wants. 28 years old and she is the communications director.
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how old are you? 44. you haven't got there yet! her loyalty is to president trump, she isn't known as an ideologue. do you think she. the tweeting that even his supporters say has got out of hand? tweeting that even his supporters say has got out of hand ?|j tweeting that even his supporters say has got out of hand? i don't think anything is going to change his twitter habit. whenever we see a story about how he's being criticised for his tweets, you say him -- criticised for his tweets, you say him —— see him tweeting out saying this is how he communicates. hope understands that this is how he communicates. there is a messaging problem and hope hicks understands that. i think they may work better together than an outsider like scaramucci. she's even older than you are? i know, i no. -- she is younger than you. many of his close
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aides are retaining lawyers as the russian investigation continues and one of the headlines was about his closest adviser, jared kushner, who was closest adviser, jared kushner, who was part of the investigation. he has appeared in congress. some lawyers would have preferred that he resign. that's what we've heard from a wall streetjournal article recently. the concern was that eric kush and had had contacts with russia over the course of the campaign. he was one of the people in the now infamous trump tower meeting in june where jared in the now infamous trump tower meeting injune where jared kushner and some campaign aides met with russian representatives and lawyers. kushner had a meeting with a russian banker in december after trump won the presidency. there was some sentiment among lawyers in the white house that they should cut kushner free, that having him in the room with trump, handling the russian
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crisis, involvement in these meetings, could jeopardise the presidency. obviously donald trump did not take the advice. kushner is still firmly ensconced in the white house. his family, i think, still firmly ensconced in the white house. his family, ithink, the still firmly ensconced in the white house. his family, i think, the one thing we've learned about donald trump is that he trusts his family and keeps them close. the white house is a family business, donald trump ran his real estate empire like a trump ran his real estate empire likeafamily trump ran his real estate empire like a family business. what about the dinner tonight at the white house? three senior democrats and three senior republicans. is this the president showing that he is bipartisan? we'll find out, this could be interesting. the first time we've seen senior democrats involved in policy negotiations. they will talk about tax reform, cutting corporate and personal taxes, which could be an issue where the moderate democrats coming into the meeting could find some common ground with republicans. whereas obamaca re
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repeal and health care reform were something that the democrats were in lockstep on. this could be the first sign thatjob is being the deal—maker but you may see him on twitter pushing the democrats into opposition against him. that's how this presidency has gone so far. interesting times. hope hicks, catty, in a prominent position in the white house and you have sarah sanders as the spokeswoman. there are women around the president in senior positions. the attorney general is that he has appointed, only one out of 40 is a woman. general is that he has appointed, only one out of 40 is a womanm you look at the cabinet there are a couple of women, education and transport, but we showed a slate yesterday showing people who have moved out of the white house over the course of this summer and i think it was clear, they were quite wrote middle—aged white men. this presidency to surround himself with
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more men. women's groups are saying that on policy issues he has wrote back women's rights as well. a lot of women's groups not happy with this administration at the moment. donald trump is meeting malaysia's prime minister najib razak at the white house. mr trump said the talks will focus on trade pacts and a deal involving boeing jets. he also praised the malaysian leader's efforts in the fight against terrorism. mr najib is expected to seek us support to end the violence against the ethnic rohingya in myanmar. in the uk, plans to replace the supremacy of european union law have passed their first major test in parliament. after more than eight hours of debate late into monday night, lawmakers agreed to consider the proposals in further detail. the bill would cut the uk's political, financial and legal ties with brussels. one of the greatest names in british theatre, sir peter hall, has died. he was 86. he founded the royal shakespeare company at the age of 29 and went on to become the director of the national theatre.
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he also directed opera and films, and was a campaignerfor public funding of the arts. the us secretary of state rex tillerson will meet his russian counterpart sergei lavrov next week. the russian foreign ministry says the meeting will take place on the sidelines of the united nations general assembly in new york. those two men have a lots to discuss. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — apple unveils its tenth anniversary iphone — and plenty more besides. we'll take a first look at how the tech giant is giving itself its very own upgrade. the future of one of england's oldest monuments could be a little calmer after the british government approved a scheme to build a tunnel for the main road which passes within metres of stonehenge. more than 25,000 vehicles drive past the ancient stone circle each day. but not everyone is happy with the plan, as duncan kennedy reports.
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from the thunderous blight of this... to the wondrous sight of this. the a303 and stonehenge have long been unhappy partners in this world heritage landscape. but now there is this. the government's plan to put 1.8 miles of the a303 into a tunnel as it passes the stones. the £1.6 billion project has the support of english heritage and the national trust. but even for them it is a qualified welcome for today's news — so delicate are the archaeological challenges of protecting this unique site. we will support this scheme as long as and subject to it being designed and delivered in a way that does protect it. proposals for a tunnel past stonehenge were first announced in 1989, but were repeatedly dropped because of rows about the cost and the route. if you stand by the stones you're
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interested in looking at the stones. and there are still many who fear the new tunnel option may protect stonehenge but not the surrounding countryside — also rich in neolithic remains. the tunnel will take the road away from the central part of the world heritage site. but as unesco points out, the whole site is important, and for its archaeology. the tunnel cuttings will destroy archaeology. having road next to ruins has been a dilemma — not quite 5,000 years in the making — but one that now has a firm if controversial solution in sight. you're watching beyond 100 days. let's go to germany now where the chancellor, angela merkel, has addressed parliament for the last time before voters go to the polls in less than two weeks. mrs merkel is on course to win the general election but,
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as our berlin correspondent jenny hill reports, there could be unprecedented change at the bundestag. she is used to mingling with the world's most powerful leaders. angela merkel must play to the home crowd now. for this parliament, the end of term. germany's political landscape, perhaps the end of an era. angela merkel will most likely continue to run the show but the anti—migrant party, afd, is expected to enter parliament. for the first time since the second world war, mps from the far right will sit in this chamber. a certain part of our society still isn't confidence with the performance of the current government and certainly the
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refugee, the migration crisis accelerated this attitude. rebuilding trust and regaining confidence, i think it's one of our main topics. one man still hopes to topple angela merkel. although martin schulz, former president of the european parliament, has little chance of victory. the social democrats are well behind mrs merkel‘s conservatives in the polls. translation: i'm somewhat undecided, i'm not 100% sure yet but without doubt when it comes to security or european politics, merkel is the best choice. given the problems we've had she's doing a decentjob. and there is the problem of the alternatives, there aren't any in the other parties. without doubt angela merkel did a good job but we
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are sceptical that she will make it through four or years. it looks as if she'll be the next chancellor although you never know. we were surprised by trump too. trump, brexit, north korea. in a transient world of global politics, there is, it seems, is one constant. mrs merkel‘s strength is due in part to the fact that for many german voters she represents the ability in a shifting world. but german politics is changing too. the next parliament will most likely contain more parties, more opposition. a house that prides itself now on achieving consensus and compromise is likely to become a far more fractious place all stop multiple challenges await. there are coalitions to construct, alliances to forge. but germany's rotors, it seems, will choose a familiar foundation on which to build this country's future.
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another ever present now... for 10 years now they've been so much more than a phone. for many of us, your phone is your diary, a map, your gym buddy, your alarm clock, or for some of us a simple way to keep your kids occupied for a few minutes. and now apple has launched the 10th—anniversary edition of its mobile, the iphone x. it's expected to be the biggest single upgrade the handset has seen since its launch — with a revamped design and facial recognition id system to name a couple of the new features. apple is also launching the iphone 8 in china — this is how some are reacting to the news there. translation: i think it definitely isn't convenient. every time they make changes it gets more and more inconvenient. i don't know why it's getting worse and worse but i'll buy it anyway. because it is apple, it's that simple! as for the iphone
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eight, i've heard it will have a full—screen display. i'll wait and see what it's like first. i read online that it will be more than 8,000 yen. this price is ok but i wa nt 8,000 yen. this price is ok but i want to see if it is worth buying. there are many full—screen display phones on the market. i'm not going to buy the iphone eight and i would like to support domestic brands. i would like to use something simple, practical and convenient. i think that's enough. we can speak to the technology journalist dan ackerman, who's editor at the technology magazine cnet. hello to you. thank you forjoining us. hello to you. thank you forjoining us. stevejobs, hello to you. thank you forjoining us. steve jobs, he hello to you. thank you forjoining us. stevejobs, he was a man who created something that we didn't know we needed, this supercomputer in our pocket. i'm just wondering whether apple can reinvent something that we don't then we need or is it a continuation, this? that's what they are trying to push, that they
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are reinventing the smartphone. after ten yea rs are reinventing the smartphone. after ten years we used to that supercomputer in your pocket so much so that the handset has plateaued, they all look and feel the same. how do you move it forward? what apple is doing is adding a lot of features that a lot of competitors have added, just to catch up. two things i like about the iphone, one thing i don't like. i like the face technology so that when my daughter picked it up, it will switch off and another thing i don't like, it is glass on the front and on the back. i'm already smashing the front of my phone and now i have to worry about the back. you're not going to lock out by dropping it and having it land on the back any more. you're like me and will have to get a large case that is going to cover it up anyway. the face id is interesting although it replaces something that people like, the fingerprint unlocking. they are actually taking
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it out, the fingerprint unlocking, on the iphone ten. this was done in technicolor today, a big glitzy open and the face recognition, let's see what happened. the iphone x. unlocking it is as easy as looking at it and swiping up. let's try that again. ibe! let's go to the back—up... —— ooh! again. ibe! let's go to the back-up. .. -- ooh! ok, again. ibe! let's go to the back-up... -- ooh! ok, you have to feel sorry for him there. are people going to buy it? it is something like $700 minimum, some people talk about $1000. they are going to want the facial recognition to work better than it did there. are people going to spend that much money?” have sympathy for anybody who does these live tech demos, there is
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a lwa ys these live tech demos, there is always one mistake. or even live television! that's right. the regular iphone eight and eight plus are going to be 700, $800, the same price they have always been but the x which has this facial recognition, we think that's going to be about $1000. the presentation is going on, they will end with the price. it is tough to cross the line but if anybody can get people to do it it is apple. i hate the idea of glass on the front and back because it is one more thing for my kids to break. the real test for apple, presumably comes from the fact that other smartphone companies, as you suggested, are introducing a lot of these features. what can apple do to make itself, in this much more competitive market, the outstanding product it was ten years ago when it was first launched ? product it was ten years ago when it was first launched? that's the
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problem, many of these things, the edge 2—edged max green, even facial recognition, the dual cameras, these are things you can find in phones from samsung and other people. apple makes them easy—to—use, intuitive, i give them credit for that and they make sure that you stay in the apple ecosystem, the walled garden of ios, the apps and media store. when you are there it is hard to leave. similarto are there it is hard to leave. similar to facebook, when you have a lot of things going on with the platform they make it difficult to walk away. is the problem that in re ce nt walk away. is the problem that in recent years the iphone hasn't and france in great leaps? i have the iphone six, i didn't think i needed the seven and i probably don't need the seven and i probably don't need the x. that's the problem they have. yes, the sixth of the six s, the seven and now the eight are the same phone, in terms of look and feel. you can talk about the camera spec
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as the processor, but people are buying them partly for the look and feel, it is part of your personality, people see it and that is why we have hit this design plateau and they hope to break it with the x which at least looks different and has the all over screen which people seem to want to have these days. are you going to give up and get it? i'm like you, i have the six combined data wait and see how much it costs and how long i have to wait to get one.” see how much it costs and how long i have to wait to get one. i will check my piggy bank. thank you. i put mine in to be repaired this week, ijob put mine in to be repaired this week, i job of put mine in to be repaired this week, ijob of the kids at school and usually, i don't look at the view, i look at my phone on the walk to the train station and i didn't know what to do with my hands. it was as know what to do with my hands. it was as if i'd lost my right arm. yeah, it is mad, ten years and we live in a world where we bump into things, we don't talk to each other at dinner, kids are completely
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addicted, we don't know what it's doing to our brains and relationships and work habits. here we are, about to fork out $1000 plus on the newest version of what is a bit like crack in our lives. i can't get my kids off these things. we've tried a policy where we have three nights a week without it and it is almost impossible. in the old day, kids used to be under the duvet with a torch and a bug and now i have to check the room for the iphone an to make sure she isn't hiding it. last night she was, so make sure you put it away! put it down, kids! now, winning the lottery always sounds like a good proposition and for abdi nor the prize was a green card to the united states. afterfleeing somalia he ended up in one of kenya's worst slums. then his ticket to the united states offered new opportunities but it also came with struggles. three years after arriving we caught up abdi to hear what he thinks of his adopted homeland.
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when i found out that i was going to the united states it was a mixed feeling. it was like america, wow. to me it was like going to mars, seriously. so, when i was quite true years old, the militia took over the city and it was horrible. i left somalia because i realised i was at the age where there was only one place to go to, to be recruited into the militia. i fled to to, to be recruited into the militia. ifled to kenya to, to be recruited into the militia. i fled to kenya and to, to be recruited into the militia. ifled to kenya and i to, to be recruited into the militia. i fled to kenya and i was a refugee for four years until i won the green card lottery and moved to the green card lottery and moved to the united states. the best thing about america is the piece, it is a peaceful country, a place where you can wake up in the morning and do
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whatever you want to do. i'm saying this because i don't remember one day in somalia when i woke up and thought everything is going to be fine. maine does not represent america to me, there aren't many people and there isn't much diversity. the worst thing about america is the racism. the black people being stereotyped, the muslims, people of colour. the biggest struggle i face here in maine is convincing people that i'm not who they think i am. people are so suspicious, they trust trump over who we are. i think trump hates who iam.| who we are. i think trump hates who i am. i can't believe that an american president would do that to us. american president would do that to us. the first year i kind of
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struggle, but now i'm getting used to it. i'm making friends. it's a friendly place as well. i don't think i consider myself an american yet. the reason is, i'm still dreaming and all of my dreams are back home. the food, the taste of the food, the taste of the air where i grew up at its own distinct smell. on top of that i really miss my family. i wish they were here. it ta kes my family. i wish they were here. it takes maybe quite a long time to be an american. but i think i'm slowly integrating, adjusting, getting to know the system. it's only three yea rs know the system. it's only three years and that's not enough to be an american. some breaking news we're getting.
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spanish police in barcelona have cordoned off the sagrada familiar, the cathedral in the heart of barcelona and the number one tourist attraction. we understand that the station has been evacuated and the police are moving people away from the site. we will keep you up—to—date. a lot of nerves after what happened on las ramblas in august and they won't be taking any risks. keep in touch with us. barcelona on edge, and spanish police too. a look ahead to tomorrow's show — when we'll find out what might be in store for this man, john huntsman, who'sjust become america's ambassador in russia. get in touch with us using the hashtag, #beyond100days. that is the hashtag now. thank you for your kind words but
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please use the hashtag. we will be back tomorrow. thanks for watching. as you may already have heard we are in storm season here in the british isles. looming to the western side we have storm aileen. it doesn't look much on the satellite imagery but there is sufficient concern for the met office to have issued the amberwarning, the met office to have issued the amber warning, the second tier of warning, about the strength of the wind and we have a further warning about the intensity of the rain. through this evening and overnight, aileen being pushed further east. notice the number of isobars, especially on the southern flank. the heaviest rain may be around
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scotland. the wind around the north of england and north wales may be towards 75 mph. this rubbish and is distinctly possible with that combination of very wet and very windy weather. starting the new day on wednesday, showers if not longer spells across a good part of scotland. a scattering of showers in northern ireland. the last of the overnight rainjust northern ireland. the last of the overnight rain just about getting away from eastern shores. by this stage the wind for the most part will have begun to weaken quite significantly. however disruption from this system may well linger on, power lines may be down and travel may be affected. further south, a scattering of showers, quite a lot of sunshine. the breeze will be quite noticeable but not the strength we have seen in some areas overnight. into the afternoon sun showers becoming more widespread
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across the northern part of the british isles but spots in the south may see a few showers, top temperatures of 17, 18 degrees. that low pressure continues its journey into scandinavia. i pressure building in the atlantic leaving us through thursday and into friday with a run of north—westerly wind and there will be plenty of it. a blustery day. persistent rain flirting with the eastern side of england as a feature works through the north sea. elsewhere the combinations of sunny spells and showers and i suspect that will be the way of it as we get onto the weekend. this is bbc news. i'm julian worricker. the headlines at eight: the public sector pay cap is to be scrapped. police and prisoner officers will be the first to benefit from pay rises. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, is due to arrive in the caribbean amid criticism of britain's response
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to hurricane irma. nine members of a traveller family from lincolnshire are given long jail sentences for slavery offences. could lithium help to power the cornish economy? it's hoped the county's old mines could be a source of the valuable metal used in batteries for mobile phones and cars. and apple says its new iphone x will set the path for technology.
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