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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 13, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. good morning. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. on the eve of the inquiry into the grenfell disaster, a bbc breakfast investigation reveals the state of council—owned tower blocks across the uk. our figures reveal that just 2% of them are fully covered by sprinkler systems, something london's fire chief says needs to change. we know that they save lives, we know they save properties, and make a lot of difference. so, 2% is a shockingly low number. good morning. it's wednesday the 13th of september. also this morning; the pressure grows on the government to reveal its plans for public sector pay, after it confirmed the long—standing cap will be lifted, but only for some. good morning. more news on pay. we
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find out if average wages are keeping up with the cost of living. foreign secretary, boris johnson, arrives in the caribbean, as british holidaymakers affected by hurricane irma start to arrive back in the uk. in sport, celtic are humbled in the champions league by paris st germain, and the world's most expensive player, neymar. 5—0, the score in glasgow. there were wins for manchester united and chelsea, though. and matt has the weather. good morning. storm irene is now in the north sea. the wind is dying down. a blustery day with sunshine. all the details coming up. thank you very much. a bbc breakfast investigation has found thatjust 2% of council—owned downing street says the cap on public sector pay increases will be lifted in 2018. ministers have already announced salary rises for police and prison officers in england and wales that are above the 1% limit, but unions say it
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doesn't go far enough. our political correspondent, leila nathoo, is in our westminster studio this morning. the government is lifting some sections of the pay cap. there is already criticism. there is. there has been recognition for some time and the government that the public has had enough of austerity after they lost the majority in the election. there has been a stepping up election. there has been a stepping up of rhetoric from the unions in recent day threatening co—ordinated strike action. now we have an announcement from ministers that police will get a i% announcement from ministers that police will get a 1% bonus and pay rise. prison officers will get a 1.796 rise. prison officers will get a i.7% pay rise this year. whyjust those two? it is independent pay review bodies that make recommendations to the government. those two were yet to report this year. next year there will be a whole new round of recommendations
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covering all public sector workers. that is when this cap will no longer be in plays. the i% that is when this cap will no longer be in plays. the 1% cap has been in place for a long time. the government says they have to recognise the public sector while being fairto recognise the public sector while being fair to the taxpayer. unions have reacted angrily. they said they wa nt have reacted angrily. they said they want 2.9%. they said public sector is have had a pay cut for many years in real terms. all of the money will be coming from existing department budgets. labour is calling for pay rises across the board, saying this isa rises across the board, saying this is a divide and rule strategy among different workplaces. this is the end of the cap, the automatic limit of i%. but next year when all
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salaries are up for review again, i think we will not hear the end of the argument. thank you very much, leila. we will speak to you again throughout the morning. we'll speak to shadow chief secretary to the treasury, peter dowd, atjust after 7am. we will also speak to david livingstone. a bbc breakfast investigation has found thatjust 2% of council—owned tower blocks in the uk are fully covered with sprinkler systems. the findings are from a freedom of information request covering around half of the tower blocks in the uk. a public inquiry into the fire at grenfell tower, which didn't have a sprinkler system fitted, begins tomorrow. breakfast‘s graham satchell is in west london for is this morning. i support retrofitting. if you can save one life, it is worth doing. this cannot be optional not nice to have, it is a must have. it must be
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in place in the future to protect people. in 15 minutes you can see the whole of the special report about that on breakfast. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has arrived in the caribbean to visit the worst hurricane—hit british overseas territories. mrjohnson will see the relief effort first hand, visiting affected communities and meeting local officials. it's understood he will travel to the british virgin islands and anguilla. the trip follows criticism from people in the caribbean and senior mps that the uk's response was too slow. meanwhile, the first british holidaymakers stranded in the us and the caribbean will start arriving back in the uk this morning. since last week, more than 12,500 flights, including thompson, british airways, and thomas cook, have been cancelled. our reporter, dave guest, is at manchester airport where some of those passengers are due to arrive. good morning to you. good morning. yes, well, of course, it is still a
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chaotic situation in florida, as we have been seeing. 10 million people are without power. a quarter of a million properties destroyed by hurricane month. there is still disruption to flights to be some people will be disappointed because a flight has been cancelled. there was going to be a thomas cook flight into terminal1 at was going to be a thomas cook flight into terminal 1 at 740 was going to be a thomas cook flight into terminal1 at 740 this morning. that has also been cancelled. the first flights now we are expecting here will be the p 45 thomas cook flight. -- 845. here will be the p 45 thomas cook flight. —— 845. that here will be the p 45 thomas cook flight. -- 845. that will here will be the p 45 thomas cook flight. —— 845. that will arrive in an hour. we will have a camera checking out the passengers as they arrived. this is a developing situation. the situation in florida is very chaotic. irma brought havoc
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to the caribbean, causing 37 people to the caribbean, causing 37 people to be killed. four deaths in florida. widespread disruption. it will take some time to restore power to them. the infrastructure has taken a battering. it is not surprising there is still disruption to flights. they are doing everything they can to get thousands of british holidaymakers home as soon of british holidaymakers home as soon as of british holidaymakers home as soon as possible. hopefully some will be arriving at 720. strong winds are being forecast for lincolnshire and east anglia this morning as storm aileen makes its way across the country. we will have more on that later. celebrities from the world of film
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and music have come together for a benefit concert to help raise money for the victims of hurricanes harvey and irma. beyonce, george clooney, and irma. beyonce, george clooney, and leonardo dicaprio, were amongst the stars that lent their voices to the stars that lent their voices to the hour long telethon featuring live appearances, performances, and taped tributes. we will try and find out how much they made as well. strong winds are being forecast for lincolnshire and east anglia this morning as storm aileen makes its way across the country. gusts as high as 70 miles per hour hit south—west england and south wales overnight, but no serious damage has been reported yet. it's definitely not a hurricane. thank goodness. matt will have more details in the weather shortly. the national audit office says the government's welfare reforms are likely to have contributed to rising levels of homelessness in england. its report claims that in the last six years, there's been a 60% rise in the number of households in temporary accommodation, including 120,000 children. the department for communities
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and local government says tackling homelessness is a complex issue. chi chi izundu reports. homelessness in england is on the rise and the reasons are varied, from lack of social housing to less affordable private rental properties, and even a reduction in housing benefit are being blamed. the number of families in temporary accommodation is up 60% since 2011, while rough—sleeping has more than doubled to over 4,000 counted in one autumn evening. but this report paints a picture of a system that isn't fit for purpose, being overseen by ministers who have little interest in tackling it. even simple things like assessing the impact of how welfare reforms could exasperate the problem. well, what we're seeing is a rise in all measures of homelessness in urban areas of the country so what we'd like to see is a proper
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co—ordinated cross—government approach between central government to try and tackle this, because it's very expensive for the public purse and it's a tragedy for households as well. and while homelessness costs more than £1 billion a year usually administered by councils, the report criticises ministers as paying little attention as to how that money is spent. in a statement, the department for communities and local governments said they will continue to invest £550 million tackling the issues until 2020, but it will shortly outline plans to eliminate rough—sleeping entirely. martin newman, bbc news. the government has won a vote that will ensure the conservatives have a majority on key committees despite not having a majority in the commons. the leader of the house, andrea leadsom, said the arrangement with the dup meant the government had a working majority and should be
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able to make progress with legislation. labour accused ministers of a "power grab." a fatberg weighting a 130 tons has been found blocking a sewer in east london. if you're having breakfast, i suggest you turn away now. the solid mass of congealed fat, wet wipes and nappies is 250 metres long and is one of the biggest thames water has ever seen. the company said it would take three weeks to remove the blockage. get ready, everybody. here we go. that is where it starts. it ends a long way beyond that. 0nce that is where it starts. it ends a long way beyond that. once they get rid of that blockage, it will be a lot better. we could show you more,
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there are rats involved, but maybe not a good idea this early in the morning. where do we go with that one? what are people doing flushing nappies down the toilet? do you remember a few months ago when they showed us wet wipe mountain. the steaming... nota disney showed us wet wipe mountain. the steaming... not a disney movie. brendan rodgers said paris saint—germain have been billed for the nearly. —— built for the premier league. celtic suffered their worst ever home defeat in europe last night, after paris st germain and their record signing, neymar, thrashed them 5—0 in the champions league. the world's most expensive player scored the opening goal as celtic‘s campaign got off to the worst possible start. chelsea made an emphatic return to the champions league after a season away, courtesy of a 6—0 thrashing of the azerbaijan side fc qarabag.
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meanwhile, there was also a comprehensive 3—0 win for manchester united at home to fc basel. former england boss roy hodgson has been appointed as the new manager of crystal palace just a day after the sacking of frank de boer. it's hodgson's first managerial post since england's exit from euro 2016. england captain, steph houghton, says the whole squad are behind manager mark sampson. he was accused of discrimination by striker eni aluko but was cleared of wrongdoing by two investigations. we will have a little more on that coming up injust a few minutes' time. thank you very much for that, sal. will you hang around for a bit? you cannot get rid of me yet. i am like that "fatberg." don't be mean. ijust got a like that "fatberg." don't be mean. i just got a horrible like that "fatberg." don't be mean. ijust got a horrible image in my head. we will talk about something else! the first named storm of the season, storm aileen, has brought heavy rain and strong winds overnight. matt's here with more detail.
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matt, how much of an impact has storm aileen has so far? tha nkfully thankfully it hasn't caused too much disruption and is now pushing into the north sea. but it did bring winds of about 70 mph to the west of bristol and across england and wales there are lots of threes and twigs down at the moment. a bit of disruption on rail services into london. an update coming up with your local news in about ten minutes. let me show you where it has been. the strongest winds have beenin has been. the strongest winds have been in the southern flank and that's pushing eastwards. it is moving into the north sea, but certainly over the next hour or two parts of lincolnshire and east anglia will see the strongest gusts. 40- 50 anglia will see the strongest gusts. 40— 50 mph possible before they ease. wherever you are a blustery staff, the exception is northern scotland. sunshine and showers elsewhere. the winds along the
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eastern coast will is down. it will still remain blustery. showers pushing across quickly for england and wales. sunshine in between. longer spells continue in central and southern scotland. noted temperatures, only 12— 13 degrees. maybe up to 17— 18 further south. tonight the rain is linked to this weather front, which will push into england and wales. wet for a tiny northern england, eventually wales into thursday. either side of that clearer skies and slightly lighter winds. a chilly night. temperatures into single figures in many towns and cities. we opened the door to even more north, north—westerly wind is. a clear day in the midlands, southern england and wales. elsewhere, sunshine and showers throughout the day tomorrow, but the wind still remain blustery and it still remains rather cool. temperatures struggling to get into
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the big teams across some parts of scotla nd the big teams across some parts of scotland and even parts of england —— midteens. low pressure across scandinavia. flow of winds across friday. the story of sunshine and showers all week. that could be longer spells on friday, just pushing into eastern counties of england. elsewhere, if you have been dodging the showers, maybe the odd rumble of thunder. 0nce dodging the showers, maybe the odd rumble of thunder. once the showers are with you even temperatures across southern parts of the country by this stage only about 15— 16 degrees at the best. not feeling particularly warm at all. as far as the storm is concerned it is now pushing into the north sea. the winds easing across the country, are still a blustery day this morning. thanks very much. we can attest to the fact that it was blustery out there. i nearly got knocked off my
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feet! we will have the papers in a moment. the main stories this morning: only 2% of council owned tower blocks in the uk are fully covered with sprinkler systems, according to a bbc breakfast investigation. unions have reacted angrily to the government's announcement it's lifting the 1% public sector pay cap, but only for police and prison officers. let's have a look at the papers. i can apologise for a slightly crumpled front page of the times. i sat on it. women told hrt doesn't lead to an early death. and this is a bit of cold from part of an exhibition that the british museum at the moment. the front page of the daily telegraph. they are talking already about the winter flu and we aren't even there yet. hospitals are
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expecting twice the number of usual cases. and there was a new phone launch by a so—called phone company yesterday, as many of you will be aware. apple founder steve jobs... there's the chief executive. this was the grand launch they do every few months. he is dwarfed by the picture of steve jobs. few months. he is dwarfed by the picture of stevejobs. and here, bobbies on the beat will be cut to fund 2% pay rise. we will talk about that later. it is the daily mirror. the nhs chief says we face a huge food —— flu crisis, pushing hospitals to the brink. i watched flu crisis, pushing hospitals to the brink. iwatched it last flu crisis, pushing hospitals to the brink. i watched it last night, flu crisis, pushing hospitals to the brink. iwatched it last night, it is liar. the front page of the mail, they are talking about the son of this holby
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city actor who died at a festival of the weekend. steph. we were just talking about the apple new phone launch and obviously loads of people are watching all around the world... quite a lot of pressure. what happened? so the boss was demonstrating the facial recognition system demonstrating the facial recognition syste m o n demonstrating the facial recognition system on it and it didn't reckon night his face. —— recognise. and the share price fell at that point. it is the wealthiest company in terms of market capitalisation, so it's terms of market capitalisation, so its huge. for them they were thinking this doesn't look good. if the boss can't even get into work the boss can't even get into work the launch. they probably practised it quite a few times. he did recover. yes, because then they went on and it did work. the other thing i wanted to pick up on is gambling companies are often criticised. you
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know the bandit machines, what they call the fixed odds betting terminals, where they make most of their money, they say a lot of makers will lose money in revenues because of the plans that they will curb some of the betting machines because they are seeing as being really addictive for people. that's interesting. that's in the ft this morning. speaking of facial recognition, we recognise this little face? this is roy hodgson after signing his contract with crystal palace yesterday. look at him! he's on his own, in his car, just leaving. he's grimacing, holding his new crystal palace scarf. may be feeling slightly awkward. i just thought that was a cute little picture. 0ne awkward. i just thought that was a cute little picture. one more story. we mentioned the england women's manager short time ago. lots of the papers have this picture. an awkward
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moment between mark sampson and lucy bronze at training yesterday. it looks like he is trying to direct her and she quite clearly doesn't wa nt her and she quite clearly doesn't want him to do that and is not happy about it at all. you can see she com pletely about it at all. you can see she completely shrugs him. this is the sort of scrutiny that the england women's team will have to get used to at the moment because of the situation mark sampson has been in. it interesting with photos. you can pick the moment that tells a story that may not be what happened. but everyone is watching closely. he has been asked about it and he says he doesn't even remember the incident. grandparents who take their names chosen for their grandchildren. a p pa re ntly chosen for their grandchildren. apparently 9% will refuse to use the grandchild's name do it like it. some of them say it is odd, unconventional. these are some of them. laura, elijah, finn, lindsay,
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noah tabitha, charlotte, jack and sally. sally? what should we call them instead ? lots of those names are a bit more wacky. i wouldn't say sally is a —— an odd name. neither is charlotte orjack. it is almost boring! how many times have you insulted her? i would like to formally apologise. see you later. good morning. let's take you back to our main story. london's fire commissioner has told us that the g re nfell tower commissioner has told us that the grenfell tower fire must be a turning point in fire regulation, calling for sprinters in all high—rise council flats. a calling for sprinters in all high—rise councilflats. a bbc investigation has found thatjust high—rise councilflats. a bbc investigation has found that just 2% have sprigged systems and of those
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only 68% have just one staircase through which to evacuate the building. tomorrow a public enquiry begins and it will look at how the fire started, why it spread so quickly and whether changes to the cladding and a scripless system could have saved lives. —— sprinkler system. it is three month since the fire at g re nfell tower it is three month since the fire at grenfell tower and it remains uncovered. a daily reminderfor residents. still there are memorials everywhere and the anger of survivors, like this man, isjust as strong. somebody has to pay for what they did to us. myself, i could be ashes inside the building. my hope is that there will be a change in policy and also the safety of the people. the public enquiry which opens tomorrow will look at how the fire started, why it spread so quickly. the cladding and whether a sprinkler system would have saved lives. in a freedom of information
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request, local authorities across the uk, we found just 2% of residential tower blocks have a sprinkler system fitted. we know they save lives, we know they can save properties and we know they make a real difference, so 2% is a shockingly low number. good morning, everybody. this man led the fire service at grenfell tower. the regulation should be that it mandatory to fit sprinklers in all new builds, especially in places like high—rises and schools. new builds, especially in places like high-rises and schools. what about retrofitting? i support it. where you can save one life that it's worth doing. this can't be optional. it is something that must happen and it must be in place for the future to protect people. recommendations to fit sprinklers have been made before. this is like more house in london. six people we re more house in london. six people were killed in a house here in 2009. the recommendation by the coroner in the inquest was ignored and absolutely nothing happened. it is
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very clear that we have a system of regulation over the fire safety of tower blocks that is simply systemically not working and the enquiry needs to get to the bottom of why that is and what's gone wrong. this is a sprinkler test. it is triggered when heat directly underneath reaches a certain temperature. a study by the national fire chiefs council shows where sprinklers are fitted they distinguish or controlled by the % of fires. —— extinguish. so why aren't they fit in more homes? the main reason is cost. in croydon, for example, the local authority plans to fit 25 tower blocks with london ata to fit 25 tower blocks with london at a cost of £20 million. who pays? they want money from central government and the government says it is the response ability of central council. in wales the law change last year. newly built homes
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or converted flats must be fitted with sprigged assistance. sprinklers have been around since 1886 and the building industry haven't used them successfully, said if you are not going to use them in goodwill then we will mandate for you to use them to keep people safe. the westminster government ordered an independent review of building regulations and fire safety and says it will consider the findings of the public enquiry. but every fire expert we've spoken to says red—cell has to be a turning point and recommendations this time must be acted on —— grenfell. and a scripless system is just one of the things the grenfell tower enquiry will look out, as well is the design, construction, refurbishment, regulations to do with high—rise buildings and also the response to what happened on that night. so there are a number of things the enquiry will look at. a number of changes have happened in
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different places over the years. in england, will this construct that since 2007 which are higher than 30 metres have to have sprinklers. northern ireland is the same. in scotland, all buildings above 80 metres have to have sprinkler is. in wales, last year they passed new regulations requiring sprigged assistance to be installed in every new and converted residential property, that houses and flats. so some interesting elements. we will talk about that later with an expert in fire safety. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. for the first time, police have begun targeting eurostar terminals in an operation aimed at protecting children at risk of female genital mutilation and other harmful practices. passengers at st pancras stations were met by officers from the metropolitan police,
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british transport police and camden social services. in the past, airports, including heathrow and gatwick, have been targeted. it is the end of the school holiday and we are intervening to try to identify hospital that are kept back from school that might have needed that additional time to heal if fgm has taken place. a developer is being forced to meet the cost of clearing a site a queen elizabeth olympic park. which was illegally occupied by a group of travellers. they moved onto land where new homes are being built at the end of august and stayed for two weeks. last week, a high court order was issued to remove them, and it was enforced with help from the met police. let's have a look at the travel situation now. well so far there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the trains a few issues because of heavy winds overnight. there are speed restrictions
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on virgin trains east coast between kings cross and peterborough. there are also reduced speeds on great northern trains via welwyn garden city and south—western railway via eastleigh. 0n the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. and in edgware, whitchurch lane is closed at canons park due to fallen trees near the underground station. local buses are on diversion. let's have a check on the weather now. storm aileen continues to bring stronger the win around 4am this morning. at heathrow, just over 60 mph. still causing disruption. trees we re mph. still causing disruption. trees were down and brunches and it is still going to be windy today. it is a day of sunshine and showers. the wind at least for this morning fairly strong, but gradually in the afternoon it will fall a bit
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lighter. it won't dissipate completely. it —— there will be a couple of heavy ones potentially. the maximum temperature about 18 celsius. we still have showers into the evening and overnight. gradually they will become fewer and further between. the breeze will continue to fall lighter. by dawn on thursday the minimum temperature getting cooler, about nine celsius in towns and cities. showers move south through the first part of thursday. they'll continue through the afternoon. sunshine and showers. the wind gradually coming from the north—west. it will feel chillier through thursday. temperatures reaching about 60— 17 celsius. the wind continues to fall light, but it comes from the north—west. so it will stay unsettled and feeling cool i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello.
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this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. as new figures suggest an increase in racial abuse of black or ethnic minority employees, we'll discuss what more can be done too tackle workplace bullying. the cap on public sector pay is to be lifted, but only for police and prison officers in england and wales. we'll ask justice secretary david lidington if there are plans to lift the cap for all public sector workers. the renowned restaurant reviewer and accomplished jazz pianist, jay rayner, is here to tell us how his career as a food critic has shaped the repertoire of his first live jazz album. jason watkins and tori amos here as
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well. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. a bbc breakfast investigation has found thatjust 2% of council owned tower blocks in the uk are fully covered with sprinkler systems. the findings are from a freedom of information request covering around half of the tower blocks in the uk. we found that 68% of tower blocks have just one staircase and 30% have some form of cladding. a public inquiry into the fire at grenfell tower begins tomorrow. the london fire brigade commissioner told us the figures are "shockingly low" and says if the inquiry doesn't recommend retrofitting sprinklers to all tower blocks it will have failed. we will get more from graham satchell. good morning. when the public enquiry opens tomorrow it will ask basic questions, how did the fires start, why did it spread quickly and kill so many people, and crucially, how can we make sure we
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never have won again? there are around 4000 council owned tower blocks around the uk. the freedom of information account said 68% of council owned blocks only have one staircase, 30% have some form of cladding, and just 2% have a full sprinkler system. cladding, and just 2% have a full sprinklersystem. daniel cladding, and just 2% have a full sprinkler system. daniel cotton, the woman who led the response, said the enquiry needs to be a turning point, and it is now time to retrofit all council blocks with sprinklers. i support retrofitting. if you can save one life, it is worth doing. this cannot be optional not nice to have, it is a must have. it must be in place in the future to protect people. we have had enquiries and inquests
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before that have made that suggestion, but it is largely ignored because of the cost, £2000 per flat. will that change after the enquiry? the government said it has ordered a review of regulations and fire safety and will consider the findings of the public enquiry that opens tomorrow. thank you very much, graham satchell, really good to talk to you this morning. and later on we will talk to someone who knows about fire safety to talk about the effectiveness of sprinklers. that a little bit later. downing street says the cap on public sector pay increases will be lifted in 2018. ministers have already announced salary rises for police and prison officers in england and wales that are above the 1% limit. but unions say it doesn't go far enough. we'll speak to shadow chief secretary to the treasury, peter dowd, atjust after 7am. and we will also speak to the justice secretary about an hour after that.
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the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has arrived in the caribbean to visit the worst hurricane—hit british overseas territories. mrjohnson will see the relief effort first hand, visiting affected communities and meeting local officials. it's understood he will travel to the british virgin islands and anguilla. the trip follows criticism from people in the caribbean and senior mps that the uk's response was too slow. holidaymakers from the uk stranded in america will start coming back this morning. strong winds are being forecast for lincolnshire and east anglia this morning as storm aileen makes its way across the country. gusts as high as 70 miles per hour hit south—west england and south wales overnight, but no serious damage has
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been reported yet. matt will have more details in the weather shortly. we will find out what you can expect across the uk very soon. 0ne one of the most prolific opera singers in the uk said she will never sing again. she has appeared at all of the concert halls. she did well at the world cup as well. she isa well at the world cup as well. she is a very talented lady. that is dame kiri te kanawa, 73 years old. could it have been worse for celtic? they held the reins. they were not terrible at the start. they were
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playing against the mighty psg, a very expensive team built for the champions league. celtic were thrashed 5—0 by paris st germain in the champions league last night, their worst ever home defeat in europe. psg's new talisman, the superstar neymar, got the opener in glasgow. and the world's most expensive player also set up the second for kylian mbappe before an own goal and two from edinson cavani sealed an impressive win for one of the favourites to win the entire competition this season. for me, the thing i said to the players is that at this level you have to have the belief. you need to get into each game and competition to play. we recognise the level we are at. we need to perform better. they'd been away from the competition for more than a year, but chelsea eased back into the champions league lifestyle with a 6—0 thumping of fc qarabag. pedro put the premier league
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champions in front before this effort from new signing davide zappacosta. a flurry of second—half goals ensured it was an easy night for antonio conte's side, who top their group after the first round of matches. a good start. a great start for us. to play the first game in the champions league and to win with a good result, to score many goals, and to finish the game with a clean sheet. and, umm, yeah, isawa lot of positive things. manchester united enjoyed a comfortable return to the champions league with a 3—0 win over swiss champions basel. the europa league champions looked untroubled on a soggy evening at old trafford, with goals from maruoanne fellaini, romelu lukaku and this from marcus rashford pushing united top of group a. i think 3—0 is a little bit against the wave of the game in this spirit.
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but as i was saying before, i think this group, orany but as i was saying before, i think this group, or any team can take points from another team. i think all these results can happen. it is an open group. roy hodgson says he didn't want his managerial career to be remembered for england's humiliating defeat against iceland at euro 2016. hodgson's back in management, taking over at crystal palace just a day after the sacking of frank de boer. he's been out of work since that england defeat in france last year. he's signed a two—year deal at the club where he started his playing career. hodgson says he feels palace have huge potential. they're bottom of the premier league after four straight defeats. the england women's manager mark sampson has told the bbc that he's not a racist. it follows allegations of discrimination and bullying made against him by striker eni aluko. he was cleared in two separate investigations of any wrongdoing. the investigation has gotten under
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way, which i cannot comment on because i was not a part of it. from my point of view, in my opinion, every time i have stepped foot in this environment since mark has been in charge, i have enjoyed it. we have been allowed to be ourselves and be individuals and push ourselves to be the best player and person that we can be here. and finally, mind the windows. a new cricket initiative was launched yesterday on one of the most famous streets in the world. it is downing street! street cricket aims to show that cricket can be played anyway, so where better to show it off
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than downing street? theresa may came out to see what all the fuss was about too. it is quite an enclosed space. you have to watch yourself. but a p pa re ntly have to watch yourself. but apparently the windows are bullet—proof. apparently the windows are bullet-proof. i was wondering about that. did you discourage them? i was hoping they would try it out. we got pretty close. that is great. she offered a tenner if they hit them. i don't think anyone did. just over a week ago, the caribbean islands were devastated by hurricane irma. among the worst affected was the british overseas territory of anguilla. four people were killed, and the island is still without power and sanitation. blondel cluff is the government of anguilla's representative to the uk and eu and joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. give us the latest situation from the island.
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what is going on in and what are the priorities? the main priority is getting life back to normal and things back on track. a lot of effort has been put into making sure people can access funds from their atms, the supermarkets are stocked, going as far as miami and puerto rico to get goods. 0n the fuel situation, we only have two distributors on the island, one has been downed. fuel is being rationed at the moment. with any of these services, there is a voucher system for those in need. what is the greatest need? for those in need. what is the greatest need ? i for those in need. what is the greatest need? i have heard of people having to live off of tinned food. is there enough food? for me, asa food. is there enough food? for me, as a mother, i am concerned about the lack of fresh food. a concerted effort is being made by the chief
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minister and government and military to access food from places like puerto rico. the issue is that both of those locations themselves were hit by the hurricanes. tell us about the destruction. how bad is it? to sum it up in the words of the former chief minister and current chief minister, we have a catastrophic destruction of the entire island. 90% of the housing stock has been com pletely 90% of the housing stock has been completely damaged. it is now recognised and accepted that the only hospital on the island, a small one at that, will have to be rebuilt. i know you have been working with dorisjohnson, that he is there right now. —— boris. has the uk response been quick enough? this situation in the caribbean with the uk these days is not the same as the uk these days is not the same as the french. the french have huge islands further afield that were struck. in places like st martin
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they are deemed mainland france. they have a different governance. democracy over there is focused in paris as opposed to within the hands of anguilla. the response from the uk, bearing in mind the logistics, it has been swift. we accept that underground. looking ahead, a meeting on sunday, some of the results on the island will not be able to open for some time. —— resorts. that is the real catastrophe in terms of going forward , catastrophe in terms of going forward, the livelihood of the island is have been completely wiped out. —— livelihoods of the islanders. at the time, it was reported two major resorts will be closed for over a year. we knew another would be closed anyway for refurbishment. i learned another
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last night the biggest will be closed for six months. that is a catastrophe in itself. thank you very much were talking to us this morning. let's get an update on the weather. the first stormont this season has brought heavy rain and strong winds overnight. —— storm of the. matt has more. it is an improving picture. many had a sleepless night across england and wales due to the wind atjust over 70 mph in some places. gust of wind close to 60 mph across parts of eastern england so far in the past storm of —— hour or two. take it easy on the roads this morning. a few delays on the trains. a local travel updates coming up in over ten minutes. it is pushing into the
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north sea now. this cloud here, the strongest winds on the southern flank. not as strong in northern ireland. the rain easing away a little. 0ver ireland. the rain easing away a little. over the next hour or two still some strong and gusty winds in lincolnshire and east anglia before the winds die down. still a blustery day. showers elsewhere to the west of england and wales, northern ireland. longer spells into scotland and the north—east of england. that will come and go through the day. 0ne will come and go through the day. one of the wettest spots through scotla nd one of the wettest spots through scotland and the north—east of england. elsewhere, sunshine and showers through wednesday, blustery winds and feeling cool, especially with the showers and rain. about 13 celsius in parts of scotland. it is all linked to this weather front, which will move southwards overnight. we decide we have clearly spells, a couple of showers and the
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coolest conditions into single figures. much lower in rural parts. the cloud and rain starting tomorrow morning. a wet commute for wales, the midlands, lincolnshire, east anglia, pushing in the southern parts, before fragmenting. a blustery day across the board. not as windy as last night. some areas avoid the showers during thursday, at showers become more frequent in the northern ireland and northern and western scotland later. still the temperatures only struggling around the midteens for the northern half of the country. high pressure to the west and low pressure to the east bringing the winds down from the north. we have longer spells of rain and wet conditions across eastern counties of england but for most of the uk it is the story as we've seen all week. sunshine and blustery showers. hail and thunder at times. in the sunshine the wind does have some strength, but 15— 16
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is probably the best we can muster on friday. the cool conditions continue into the weekend. at least the winds will ease and in the sunshine maybe not as chilly by sunday, but plenty of showers to ta ke sunday, but plenty of showers to take us through the weekends. thank you very much. the autumn migration of trampolines has a p pa re ntly migration of trampolines has apparently started. all sorts of stuff is moving around. iam turning all sorts of stuff is moving around. i am turning down the thermostat in my house! later today we will find out if average wages are keeping up with the cost of living. steph has more. you're tight! frugal! i like your techniques. it is a week of statistics. yesterday official figures showed the cost of living went up by close
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to 3% in august. the highest for five years. clothing and footwear prices rose by nearly 5%, when you compare this year to last. that's mainly because of what's been going on with currencies, so the fall in the value of the pound has driven up the cost of imports and we import a lot of clothes. what's really put pressure on people is that pay has not been keeping up with the rise in the cost of living. the last set of stats showed that weekly earnings went up 2% in the three months tojune compared with a year earlier and that's obviously a long way short of the rise in prices. we'll get more statistics later this morning about how that's change, the rise in the cost of wages. let's talk to alan clarke, an economist at scotiabank. what's going on here? this is a lot to do with the currency market, putting pressure on the cost of importing things? absolutely. it
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seems many moons ago that the pound started to die, but it takes a long time for that to feed through. shipping and clothing from asia is far afield. the good news is that i don't think inflation will go much higher than we are today. although there is a squeeze on living standards, it probably doesn't get much worse and we aren't far off the point where wages start to overtake prices, but that's probably next year. part of the problem is even if average wages did start to increase above the cost of living, there is a long way to catch up before anyone will feel any better. there is. the bank of england is intensely going up, so we bank of england is intensely going up, so we can bank of england is intensely going up, so we can buy more with our spare cash but if they go too high we will give it all back again with high mortgage rates. are there any signs that interest rates are going 7 signs that interest rates are going hey signs that interest rates are going up? they have been so low for so long. a couple of the members of the
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bank of england interest—rate committee already want to increase the interest rates and we will find out on thursday how the rest of the committee feels. there was speculation that we might have another person voting for interest rate hikes. i don't think it will happen until the middle of next year, but if wages pick up, like i think they will, it could come sooner think they will, it could come sooner rather than later. it is an interesting time to talk about wages, given what we've heard about public sector wages and the pressure on people. how much of a squeeze it -- is it on people. how much of a squeeze it —— is it putting on people? on people. how much of a squeeze it -- is it putting on people? to be fair, a yearorso -- is it putting on people? to be fair, a year or so ago we had virtually no inflation and wages are —— were going up 1% or 2%. obviously it hurts now. the last 6— 12 it has heard, with prices getting close to 396 heard, with prices getting close to 3% and wages in the public sector 1.596. 3% and wages in the public sector 1.5%. but it has been a prolonged period since austerity started so it
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does hurt, fingers crossed it should come to an end early next year. the using things will start to feel better soon for people?|j using things will start to feel better soon for people? i do. wages will pick up, starting today, and inflation will top out about october and november and fall next year. we will see if you are right! thanks so much for your time. that's it from me for now. this is breakfast. "racism still haunts the british workplace and employers must take a zero tolerance attitude", according to the tuc general secretary frances 0'grady. tuc research suggests more than a third of black or minority ethnic workers are victims of differential treatment in the workplace. the union is calling for every complaint to be taken seriously and properly investigated by employers. 0ur reporter tim muffett has spoken to one woman who was racially abused at work. it had a huge impact on me mentally, physically... this woman worked in a charity shop. she wanted retail experience while helping a good
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cause. what she got was racial bullying and abuse from other staff. they would mock my appearance, they would mock the food i would eat, the fa ct would mock the food i would eat, the fact that i was fasting for ramadan. my fact that i was fasting for ramadan. my manager was very unkind. she wasn't very tolerant of my culture and my religion and family and she often took the mick out of me and what i ate, what i dress like. so you didn't report this behaviour. why not? i didn't report it because it on the guy would be taken seriously enough. a lot of people are put off reporting it because they think, what if my future interweave find out? if it goes on my interweave find out? if it goes on ? interweave find out? if it goes on my cv? what if people don't hire me because of his cremation or other issues at work as mac or then a third of black or minority workers have been bullied, abused or singled out at work according to new research published by the tuc. out at work according to new research published by the tucm more than 40% of places it is claimed a direct manager was the person responsible. do you fear this is more widespread than any people realise? yes. i think it is not
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talked about enough. i've had racism in the university setting and i've never had that taken seriously, never had that taken seriously, never had that taken seriously, never had the bullying taken seriously while i was growing up in education. that added to the fact of why i didn't report these incidences in the workplace because if i had been to —— haven't been taken seriously for my entire life why would i be taken seriously now as an adult? so many interesting points there. we'rejoined now by miranda brown, who is the founder of the miranda brawn diversity leadership foundation, which aims to increase diversity and equality in the workplace. just tell us your experience. what other things you are concerned about? it's great that we are actually discussing racism within the workplace because it is something that is the elephant in the room and something that is not discussed enough. the report has highlighted racism in the work place, it has highlighted bullying and harassment. i've not personally
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experienced racism, but when you look at research and report it is clearly highlighting the fact that there are racism, bullying and harassment and things that we can do in terms of actually eradicating thatis in terms of actually eradicating that is speaking up. i think it is really important for not only are the managers, employees, clients, to actually speak up about racism. this training, —— there are training, policies and procedures that need to be put in place as well. i think the government also has to get involved. it also stems outside the workplace. we've got to look at before we even enter the work base and that's one of the reasons why i founded the foundation, to actually helped to inspire and close this erased adversity gap that we currently have within the workforce. the review that came outlast week highlighted the discrimination that we've got
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from a race perspective within the criminal justice system. from a race perspective within the criminaljustice system. why aren't we better at this? why are there still these issues? why do people still these issues? why do people still feel an contador talking about it? i think it the case that... to be honest i'm not too sure why we aren't where we should be. but in terms of what we can do, i think we can put it on the agenda. the bbc highlighted the gender pay gap you've got at the moment. i think with transparency and having all of the reporting and stated that with currently got a moment, adding all of that is helping us to realise that we have a problem. with racism now, it's not as direct as it was in the 60s and 70s. it is more indirect, so it is hard sometimes to tell whether or not someone isn't getting a promotion or that pay increase because it is down to their race. that's what i wanted to ask
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you about. it's those differentials that aren't opaque. using transparency could shine a light on that? definitely. ithink transparency could shine a light on that? definitely. i think that's the way to go, with reporting data. but we need to talk about the race pay 93p- we need to talk about the race pay gap. that is another key aspect. we need to start having this discussion andi need to start having this discussion and i think once we start to have these discussions that's when the actions can also follow. but we need to get the schools involved and i'm doing a lot of work with universities as well, like the university of brighton, just to bring everybody together. this isn't something that people from black asian minority or ethnic background face on the road, we all need to come together to close this gap and eradicate racism in the workplace. thank you very much. lovely to talk to you. the headline is coming up. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm claudia—liza armah. for the first time police have begun targeting eurostar terminals in an operation aimed at protecting children at risk of female genital mutilation and other harmful practices. passengers at st pancras stations were met by officers from the metropolitan police, british transport police and camden social services. in the past, airports, including heathrow and gatwick, have been targeted. a developer is being forced to meet the cost of clearing a site a queen elizabeth olympic park, which was illegally occupied by a group of travellers. they moved onto land where new homes are being built at the end of august and stayed for two weeks. last week, a high court order was issued to remove them. let's have a look at the travel. well so far there's a good service on the tubes this morning.
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0n the trains, lots of issues because of the heavy winds overnight. chiltern railways is suspended between marylebone and wembley stadium due to a fallen tree on the line. meanwhile, greater anglia is suspended between witham and braintree. that's also because of a fallen tree. south—western railway is suspended between hounslow and barnes also because of a tree falling on a line. trains may be diverted via richmond. 0n the roads, there are westbound delays for traffic on the highway heading through wapping towards tower hill. that's because traffic lights aren't working at the tower bridge junction. and in edgware, whitchurch lane is closed at canons park due to fallen trees near the underground station. local buses are on diversion. let's have a check on the weather now. storm aileen continues to bring
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strong gusts of wind around 4am this morning. at heathrow, just over 60 mph. still causing disruption. trees were down and branches down and it is still going to be windy today. it is a day of sunshine and showers. the wind at least for this morning fairly strong, but gradually in the afternoon it will fall a bit lighter. it won't dissipate completely. there will be a couple of heavy ones potentially. some brighter spells in between. the maximum temperature about 18 celsius. we still have showers into the evening and overnight. gradually they will become fewer and further between. also that breeze will continue to feel lighter. by dawn on thursday the minimum temperature getting a little bit cooler, about nine celsius in towns and cities. we have showers moving south through the first part of thursday. they'll continue through the afternoon. sunshine and showers, but the wind gradually coming from the north—west,
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so it'll feel chillier through thursday. temperatures reaching about 16—17 celsius. the wind continues to fall light, but it comes from the north—west. so it will stay unsettled, sunshine and showers, and feeling cool. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello. good morning. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. 0n the eve of the inquiry into the grenfell disaster, a bbc breakfast investigation reveals the state of council—owned tower blocks across the uk. 0ur figures reveal that just 2% of them are fully covered by sprinkler systems, something london's fire chief says needs to change. we know that they save lives, we know they save properties, we know they make a lot of difference, so 2% isa they make a lot of difference, so 2% is a shockingly low number. good morning.
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it's wednesday the 13th of september. also this morning; the pressure grows on the government to reveal its plans for public sector pay, after it confirmed the long—standing cap will be lifted, but only for some. it will be lifted by 2018. foreign secretary, boris johnson, arrives in the caribbean, as british holidaymakers affected by hurricane irma start to arrive back in the uk. good morning. the value of second—hand diesel cars is falling, down 6% so far this year. what should you do if you own one? in sport, celtic are humbled in the champions league by paris st germain, and the world's most expensive player, neymar. 5—0, the score in glasgow. there were wins for manchester united and chelsea, though. this is the on line game sensation that has people thought. but
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minecraft has sparked privacy concerns. stampy will be here to talk about it. and the weather. strong winds in england and wales overnight. easing today. a little bit of rain and sunshine today. the full forecast coming up. a bbc breakfast investigation has found thatjust 2% of council—owned tower blocks in the uk are fully covered with sprinkler systems. the findings are from a freedom of information request covering around half of the tower blocks in the uk. a public inquiry into the fire at grenfell tower, which didn't have a sprinkler system fitted, begins tomorrow. breakfast‘s graham satchell is in west london for is this morning. good morning. behind you still stands grenfell tower. what more can
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you tell us? good morning. when the public enquiry opens tomorrow it will ask better questions, why did the fire start, why did it spread so quickly and kill so many people, and how do we make sure it does not happen again? there are around 4000 council owned tower blocks. the response from local authorities says 68% of council owned tower blocks have just one 68% of council owned tower blocks havejust one single 68% of council owned tower blocks have just one single staircase and 30% of tower blocks have some form of cladding. and as you said, most unbelievably, just 2% have a full sprinkler system. the woman who looked after the fire here, she says that this enquiry does need to be a turning point and that sprinklers
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need to be retrofitted in all council owned locks. -- blocks. i support retrofitting. if you can save one life, it is worth doing. this cannot be optional not nice to have, it is a must have. it must be in place in the future to protect people. we have had enquiries like this before and they made similar recommendations. it has not happened because of the coast and who pays for it. will change this time? the government says it has ordered a review of fire safety and says it will consider findings of the public enquiry which opens tomorrow. thank you very much indeed, graham satchell. we have a special report on all of that in 15 minutes on brea kfast. downing street says the cap on public sector pay increases
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will be lifted in 2018. ministers have already announced salary rises for police and prison officers in england and wales that are above the 1% limit, but unions say it doesn't go far enough. 0ur political correspondent, leila nathoo, is in our westminster studio this morning. good morning. what is happening? is the government bowing to pressure? are they being accused of not doing enough? that is correct. there have been signals for some time since the election result, really, that the government was willing to move on this issue. it was a recognition of the public having enough of austerity, this 1% cap on public sector pay rises, a key part of that programme. there has been pressure from the conservative backbenchers. the unions have stepped up rhetoric and co—ordinated strike action against this. now we have seen this movement on prison officers and police officers getting a pay rise of more than 1%. and next year, when
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all public sector salaries are up for review again, downing street has said that this automatic cap of 1%, the limit on pay rises, will no longer be there. thejune have reacted angrily, saying this is simply not going far enough. —— unions. they have called for a 5% pay rise across the entire public sector, saying inflation stands at 2.996, sector, saying inflation stands at 2.9%, and 1% is not enough. labour is saying this is a divide and rule strategy of singling out police and prison officers first. the government says they need flexibility across different workplaces and they have to balance recognition of the service public sector is provided with what is fair and affordable to the taxpayer. so we have seen the end of this cap, the 1% cap, in force for many years, but it does not mean the public sector workers will automatically get a massive pay rise next year.
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there will be many more arguments on that to come. thank you very much for that this morning. we'll speak to shadow chief secretary to the treasury, peter dowd, atjust after 7:10. we will also speak to david livingstone. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has arrived in the caribbean to visit the worst hurricane—hit british overseas territories. mrjohnson will see the relief effort first hand, visiting affected communities and meeting local officials. it's understood he will travel to the british virgin islands and anguilla. the trip follows criticism from people in the caribbean and senior mps that the uk's response was too slow. meanwhile, the first british holidaymakers stranded in the us and the caribbean will start arriving back in the uk this morning. since last week, more than 12,500 flights, including thompson, british airways, and thomas cook, have been cancelled. 0ur reporter, dave guest, is at manchester airport where some of those passengers are due to arrive.
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good morning. good morning. yes, they are due to arrive this morning. i have to tell you a couple of flights we have been expect in were cancelled. it is not surprising when you think of the devastation and destruction and disruption brought by the hurricanes across the caribbean and florida. 10 million people in florida are still without power. it is not surprising flights are still disrupted. the first flight are still disrupted. the first flight arriving will touch down at terminal 2 flight arriving will touch down at terminal2 in flight arriving will touch down at terminal 2 in ten minutes. it is a virgin flight from orlando. hopefully it is coming. they said 7:20. we will find out from passengers what they experienced. as you said, there has been criticism from british people in the caribbean with the reaction of the uk, some saying it was too slow, some saying
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tour companies did not do enough to help them. that has been refuted by the foreign secretary, boris johnson, saying they have done all they can be he is their visiting all of the islands to see for himself what happened. —— he is visiting. at home, people are welcoming back relatives this morning. they are keeping their eyes on the boards to check for cancellations. 0ne keeping their eyes on the boards to check for cancellations. one is coming in from cuba this morning. some from florida are facing delays. things are farfrom some from florida are facing delays. things are far from normal at manchester airport this morning. when they arrive, we will get back to you. thank you. strong winds are being forecast for lincolnshire and east anglia this morning as storm aileen makes its way across the country. gusts as high as 70 miles per hour hit south—west england and south wales overnight, but no serious damage has been reported yet. matt will have more details in the
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weather shortly. as you are leaving the house this morning, you will notice it is really coming down, with the wind being strong as well. the national audit office says the government's welfare reforms are likely to have contributed to rising levels of homelessness in england. its report claims that in the last six years, there's been a 60% rise in the number of households in temporary accommodation, including 120,000 children. the department for communities and local government says tackling homelessness is a complex issue. marta newman reports. homelessness in england is on the rise and the reasons are varied, from lack of social housing to less affordable private rental properties, and even a reduction in housing benefit, are being blamed. the number of families in temporary accommodation is up 60% since 2011, while rough—sleeping has more than doubled to over 4,000 counted in one autumn evening. but this report paints a picture of a system that isn't fit for purpose, being overseen by ministers who have little interest in tackling it. even simple things like assessing the impact of how welfare reforms could exasperate the problem.
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well, what we're seeing is a rise in all measures of homelessness in urban areas of the country so what we'd like to see is a proper co—ordinated cross—government approach between central government to try and tackle this, because it's very expensive for the public purse and it's a tragedy for households as well. and while homelessness costs more than £1 billion a year usually administered by councils, the report criticises ministers as paying little attention as to how that money is spent. in a statement, the department for communities and local governments said they will continue to invest £550 million tackling the issues until 2020, but it will shortly outline plans
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to eliminate rough—sleeping entirely. marta newman, bbc news. a fatberg weighting a 130 tons has been found blocking a sewer in east london. if you're having breakfast, i suggest you turn away now. the solid mass of congealed fat, wet wipes and nappies is 250 metres long and is one of the biggest thames water has ever seen. the company said it would take three weeks to remove the blockage. downing street's announcement that it will lift the cap on public sector pay in england and wales has prompted an angry reaction from unions. prison officers will receive a 1.7% pay rise. while police officers will get a 1% increase plus a 1% bonus. the government's pay restraint policy dates back to 2010 when public sector pay was frozen for two years. the freeze turned into a 1% cap
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in 2013, which was below the rate of inflation. the treasury says it is now taking a more "flexible approach" but unions say the decision is "derisory" and "unacceptable" and are warning of strike action. this is what some public sector workers at the tuc conference had to say about it. i think if they don't end the pay cap across—the—boa rd for all workers, i think there is justification for industrial action. parents are in favour of teachers being happy and will paid and the well— being of teachers. being happy and will paid and the well—being of teachers. we come first as teachers. when we are well looked after, we look after the children. we're joined now from our westminster studio by
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the shadow chief secretary to the treasury, peter dowd. a 1.796 1.7% pay increase. what would the labour government have given them? —— labour government. labour government have given them? -- labour government. we set aside £4 billion net per year out of our spending plans, set out fairly clearly for anyone to see, that this would go into lifting the pay cap and it would be for the bodies, the public review bodies, who cover half the public sector of which there are 4 million people. the other half is local government and it would be a matter for them to discuss how that figure was in a sense allocated. so it wasn't for me to say what the percentage would we, we would try to set aside a resource to lift the pay cap during the election. you save £4 billion. the unions want 5%. nurses, teachers, all of the people in those
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sorts ofjob. 5% equates to £9 billion. so you are a long way short. it depends how you work out the figures. there's a danger that you get into the detail of of these figures. that's the net easier because when people... their salary, pa rt because when people... their salary, part of that is the tax they pay, national insurance, so the net figure would be about £4 billion. i don't want to get into the detail of that. what i'm trying to say is we set aside in our plan is quite a substantial amount of money, identified in a transparent way how that would be funded and then it's a matter for those waddies to decide —— those bodies to decide how that is best allocated. i think it is important from the other side of the negotiations and discussions take place. that's the option, rather
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than having this two—year freeze and then a five—year 1% pay cap. it's best to try to do it in a constructive and positive way. you also say your plan is to delegate public sector pay the pay review bodies and a pay review body is recommending 1.7% for prison officers, which is in line with what the government doing. not really. what the government actually said at the time is it said to the public review pay bodies and the local government, we are going to provide you with 1%. that's what they said to the pay review bodies. the pay review bodies then get this 1% and say there is nothing more we can do and it's pointless suggesting anything more than that. when they suggest the 1% the government come back and say, yes, we follow their recommendation, which is rather circular, sterile argument. can i get clarity on this? your figures still falls short of what the union is requesting. are you saying your figures come close to that, or are
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you admitting that they aren't paying their request at the moment? look, i haven't had the negotiations with the trade unions. what we are saying is we set aside the figure, a net figure from our manifesto and future documents, and it is therefore everyone to see. that's a matter for the negotiations and discussions with trade unions and public review bodies as appropriate. would you agree that that if labour we re would you agree that that if labour were in government you would still be at risk of co—ordinated strike action because of your policy?” don't think we would. the difference between us and the tories is we are prepared to talk and discuss with people on the basis that we set aside resource. we don't want the conflict. it isn't a question of at any price, it's a question of we've had a government who for seven years have just told the public sector workers in effect, you are valued. you are entitled to a pay rise and
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if you get what it will be 1%. it doesn't matter what you say to us, what arguments make about retention and the stresses and strains you've had in the public services. the atrocities with had, the emergency services being there and the government still says it doesn't matter. that's a different approach than the one we would take and it's as simple as that, really. thank you very much for your time. and thank you for all of your comments that you've been sending in as well on this issue of public sector pay. kylie says the police haven't got a 196 kylie says the police haven't got a 1% pay rise, they got 1% and a bonus, so there could be looking at lower pay the following year. another says, what about the private sector where workers have india would cut to protect theirjobs? another said, i emergency ambulance technician and earning £1000 a year more than in 2006. time for a decent pay rise. if you've got any more comments on that or any other story,
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get in contact with us via the usual channels. and in about one hour we will speak to the justice secretary david livingstone about those points. the first named storm of the season, storm aileen, has brought heavy rain and strong winds overnight. lots of you have been reporting what's been going on where you are. matt's here with more detail. good morning. the strongest winds are easing away at last. we saw the west of bristol, along the south—west of wales, close to 70 miles an hour. 0ver south—west of wales, close to 70 miles an hour. over the past alan lincolnshire, norfolk, about 60 mph. that's for lots of trees down in england in particular. a few delays on the trains. an update coming up in the next ten minutes. that storm is starting to push away. this book on the cloud is working into the north sea —— hook. we still have
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gale force gusts in parts of lincolnshire and east anglia, lots of dry weather this morning for your morning commute in parts of the midlands, east anglia and the south—east. heavy showers towards the south—west and wales. sunshine either side. you might be lucky to get dry weather but it might not stay that way. heavy showers in part of north—west england. there are gaps we might avoid them, but lots of big puddles around. rainjust off the east coast of northern england. showers from northern ireland. in scotland, heavy rain around aberdeenshire and the murray serve. the clarity of conditions in eastern scotland, north—east england. sunshine and showers elsewhere. in the sunshine it doesn't feel bad but in the breeze mystically cool. images may get to about 18— 19 in the south—east corner. 12— 14 at the very best. a day for the warm jacket
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and a waterproof. the wettest weather will push through northern england, wales, the midlands through the night. clear skies either side. a couple of showers and a distinctive cool like to take us into tomorrow morning's mute. temperatures into single figures, especially away from towns. a wet start in wales, lincolnshire, perhaps norfolk. the rain spreads across southern parts of england and wales through the morning rush—hour. clearing away and back to sunshine and showers. the wind maybe not as strong, but still blustery and still cool when a showers come through. maybe feeling a little bit cooler than across some parts of eastern england. with a high pressure to the west and low pressure to the east, west and low pressure to the east, we have winds through the north—west through the week. longer spells the eastern coast but for most it's a story of sunshine and showers. where we see the showers it could be heavy
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and thundery. 0nce we see the showers it could be heavy and thundery. once the showers come through a distinctly chilly field to friday. even temperatures in southern parts of england and wales struggling to get to about 15— 16 degrees. thank you very much. steph is here to talk about diesel. they are lovely trousers! thank you. we are talking about the value of diesel cars. the value of second hand diesel cars has fallen by nearly 6%. that's because of the new charges come in and this is all off the back of lorries about car emissions. and we'll talk about this in the next half—hour. we found out yesterday that inflation was up 3% in august. it was clothing and footwear which
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saw the biggest increases in price, merely because the import a lot of them and the fall in the value of them and the fall in the value of the pound is making them more expensive for retailers to buy them. pay has not been keeping up with the cost of living and we will get the latest stats of this at 9:30am this morning. apple had a bit of a party last night and it unveiled three new phones, including the iphone x which cost over £1000. it features facial recognition. there was an embarrassment at the launch when the boss was demonstrating the facial recognition and it worked. awkward! i'll talk more about diesel cars in about half an hour. thanks very much. london's fire commissioner has told this programme that the grenfell tower fire must be a "turning point" in fire regulation, calling for sprinklers in all high rise council flats. a bbc breakfast investigation, which focused on half the uk's council and housing association—owned tower blocks,
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has found that just 2% have full sprinkler systems, 68% have just one staircase and 30% have some form of cladding. tomorrow, a public inquiry into what happened at grenfell begins. it will look at how the fire started, why it spread so quickly and the actions of public authorities before and after the fire. terry mcdermott from the national fire chief council joins us now. thank you very much for your time today. why are we behind many other countries when it comes to regulations about where we put sprinklers and how they are used in buildings? it's the fact that we are somewhat different than the rest of the uk. we have been promised a review of different governments and that's now been announced, that it will take place. there's been a call for information to support that review and we welcome it as well.
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talk to us about how much. sprinklers aren't the only answer, in some ways they are a last resource. how in some ways they are a last resource. how much in some ways they are a last resource. how much difference can they make? sprinklers are the most effective way of suppressing or even extinguishing fire before the fire and rescue services even arise. but they are part of an overall fire safety solution involving the building regulations, fire alarms, fire doors, all the things you would expect. but they are the most effective way of suppressing fires. if they were to retrofit these buildings, is it expensive? that's the perception. yes, fire spread the systems do cost money. there are differences of opinion about how much that is and there are different reports. i've heard £2000 per flight, reports. i've heard £2000 per flight, i've had otherfigures quoted. there are differences
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between new and retrofitting in terms of the cost. but what i would say is you asked me about how effective are sprinklers. 0ver say is you asked me about how effective are sprinklers. over the last couple of years, before the g re nfell tower last couple of years, before the grenfell tower incident, a group looked at research to provide evidence to support the review of building regulations and the wider use of sprinklers. in our research we looked out nearly 3000 real fires in buildings that have been fitted with sprinklers and we've researched these individual fires and with sprinklers and we've researched these individualfires and been with sprinklers and we've researched these individual fires and been able to determine the odds are the two questions. 0ne, as pink was —— are spread was reliable and are they effective? importa ntly, these spread was reliable and are they effective? importantly, these are real fires effective? importantly, these are realfires in real buildings, with all of the variances you can have. 0n all of the variances you can have. on 94% of occasions this sprinklers operated they did work and where they did operate on 99% of occasions
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they did operate on 99% of occasions they either controlled or extinguished the fire. briefly, we've got the haunting image of g re nfell tower we've got the haunting image of grenfell tower behind us. we spoke about how there was a cladding and installation issue. would sprinklers have made a difference there? the thing with grenfell tower, it is subject to a public enquiry and there will be an extensive research piece about it. but if you just look at the research we've done, and this isa at the research we've done, and this is a theoretical research, its actual real fires, is a theoretical research, its actual realfires, some is a theoretical research, its actual real fires, some are is a theoretical research, its actual realfires, some are in high—rise buildings and purpose—built flats and in our report it says that in purpose—built flats the spring"100% effective. so based on that alone if you wanted to draw a conclusion from that in advance of the investigation you would have to say that it would have had a positive effect. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. and we have got the government
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statement which says public safety is paramount, which is why following the grenfell tower tragedy the government established a comprehensive building safety programme to ensure a fire like this can never happen again. it goes on. there is an independent review of building regulations and fire safety which will consider this issue in the light of the recommendations of this review and the findings of the public enquiry. we are little bit late. but it has been an important thing to deal with. that's three much amcu in a few minutes after the news, travel and weather were ever you are. —— thanks very much amcu in a few. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. for the first time police have begun targeting eurostar terminals in an operation aimed at protecting children at risk of female genital mutilation and other harmful practices. passengers at st pancras stations were met by officers from the metropolitan police, british transport police and camden social services. in the past, airports, including heathrow and gatwick, have been targeted. in the past, airports,
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including heathrow and gatwick, have been targeted. a woman in her 70s is fighting for her life after a collision with a cyclist on oxford street. emergency services were called late yesterday afternoon. she was taken to a hospital in central london with severe head injuries. police say the cyclist did stop at the scene. enquiries are continuing. well so far there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the trains, lots of issues after the heavy winds overnight. chiltern railways is suspended between marylebone and wembley stadium due to a fallen tree on the line. greater anglia is suspended between witham and braintree. that's also because of a fallen tree. southern trains are suspended between redhill and tonbridge, again because of a fallen tree, on the line at godstone. replacement buses are being arranged. and on thameslink there are delays of 15 minutes via shortlands. lots of fallen trees this morning.
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this one fell on the line near beckenham hill. 0n the roads, westbound delays for traffic continue on the highway heading through wapping towards tower hill following earlier traffic light problems at tower bridge. and in edgware, whitchurch lane is closed at canons park due to fallen trees near the underground station. local buses are on diversion. storm aileen continues to bring strong gusts of wind around 4am this morning. at heathrow, just over 60 mph. still causing disruption. trees were down and branches down and it is still going to be windy today. it is a day of sunshine and showers. the wind at least for this morning fairly strong, but gradually in the afternoon it will fall a bit lighter. it won't dissipate completely. there will be a couple of heavy ones potentially. some brighter spells in between. the maximum temperature about 18 celsius. we still have showers into the evening and overnight. gradually they will become fewer and further between. also that breeze will
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continue to feel lighter. by dawn on thursday the minimum temperature getting a little bit cooler, about nine celsius in towns and cities. we have showers moving south through the first part of thursday. they'll continue through the afternoon. sunshine and showers, but the wind gradually coming from the north—west, so it'll feel chillier through thursday. temperatures reaching about 16—17 celsius. the wind continues to fall light, but it comes from the north—west. so it will stay unsettled, sunshine and showers, and feeling cool. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello.
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this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. a bbc breakfast investigation has found thatjust 2% of council owned tower blocks in the uk are fully covered with sprinkler systems. the findings are from a freedom of information request covering around half of the tower blocks in the uk. we found that 68% of tower blocks have just one staircase and 30% have some form of cladding. a public inquiry into the fire at grenfell tower begins tomorrow. the london fire brigade commissioner told us the figures are "shockingly low" and says if the inquiry doesn't recommend retrofitting sprinklers to all tower blocks it will have failed. i support retrofitting. if you can save one life, it is worth doing. this cannot be optional not nice to have, it is a must have. it must be in place in the future to protect people. later you can see the whole of the special report
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about that on breakfast. some of the uk's biggest unions are threatening to strike, after describing the latest public sector pay rises in england and wales as "derisory" and "unacceptable. " the government's announced a 1.7% increase for prison officers. while police officers will get 1%, plus a 1% bonus. ministers are to lift the cap next year. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has arrived in the caribbean to visit the worst hurricane—hit british overseas territories. mrjohnson will see the relief effort first hand, visiting affected communities and meeting local officials. it's understood he will travel to the british virgin islands and anguilla. the trip follows criticism from people in the caribbean and senior mps that the uk's response was too slow. meanwhile, the first british holidaymakers stranded in the us and the caribbean will start arriving back in the uk this morning. since last week, more than 12,500 flights, including thompson, british airways, and thomas cook have been cancelled.
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officials in florida say a quarter of homes in the florida keys area have been destroyed. myanmar‘s civilian leader, aung san suu kyi, has cancelled plans to attend the united nations general assembly to deal with the rohingya refugee crisis. ethnic violence has forced hundreds of thousands of rohingya muslims to flee to bangladesh. critics have called for her to be stripped of her nobel peace prize forfailing to do more to halt the strife. dame kiri te kanawa, one of opera's most celebrated stars, has told the bbc she will never sing in public again. dame kiri, who is 73, says she gave her last performance in australia a year ago but did not make her decision public until now. she has appeared at all the world's major opera houses and concert halls. 600 million people heard her sing at the wedding of the prince and princess of wales in 1981. we were saying the rugby world cup
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as well earlier. a wonderfully talented lady. thank you to everyone updating me through the night. in sheffield it was very windy. what is it like out of your window this morning? do you know what i did the other day? i made the paperfor being a person trying to shelter from the rain in manchester because i had my coat over my head and my umbrella and my bag. many people recognise my coat. shall we talk about celtic? not brilliant but could have been worse. paris saint—germain thrashed them. celtic were thrashed 5—0 by paris st germain in the champions league last night,
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their worst ever home defeat in europe. psg's new talisman, the superstar neymar, got the opener in glasgow. and the world's most expensive player also set up the second for kylian mbappe before an own goal and two from edinson cavani sealed an impressive win for one of the favourites to win the entire competition this season. for me, the thing i said to the players is that at this level you have to have the belief. you need to get into each game and competition to play. we recognise the level we are at. we need to perform better. they'd been away from the competition for more than a year, but chelsea eased back into the champions league lifestyle with a 6—0 thumping of fc qarabag. pedro put the premier league champions in front before this effort from new signing davide zappacosta. a flurry of second—half goals ensured it was an easy night for antonio conte's side, who top their group after the first round of matches. a good start. a great start for us.
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to play the first game in the champions league and to win with a good result, to score many goals, and to finish the game with a clean sheet. and, umm, yeah, isaw a lot of positive things. manchester united enjoyed a comfortable return to the champions league with a 3—0 win over swiss champions basel. the europa league champions looked untroubled on a soggy evening at old trafford, with goals from maruoanne fellaini, romelu lukaku and this from marcus rashford pushing united top of group a. i think 3—0 is a little bit against the wave of the game in this spirit. but as i was saying before, i think this group, or any team can take points from another team. i think all these results can happen. it is an open group. the england women's manager
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mark sampson has told the bbc that he's not a racist. it follows allegations of discrimination and bullying made against him by striker eni aluko. he was cleared in two separate investigations of any wrongdoing. a new cricket initiative was launched yesterday on one of the most famous streets in the world. street cricket aims to show that cricket can be played anyway, so where better to show it off than downing street? theresa may came out to see what all the fuss was about too. just watch where you're aiming. it is quite an enclosed space. you have to watch yourself. but apparently the windows are bullet—proof. i was wondering about that.
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did you discourage them? i was hoping they would try it out. we got pretty close. they are playing with a taped ball, a tennis ball covered in tape.” have a brief story about downing street. i had to interview david cameron. i came out of the door and i had two big bags of camera equipment. for some reason i looked very shifty left and right and then ran as fast as i could. it looks like i was looting. did you steal anything? where was the security? more than 10 million people in the uk play video games online, and one of the most successful titles for children is minecraft.
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the company behind the construction game is about to launch a new update but it has raised some concerns about parental controls and privacy settings. newsround's ricky boleto has been finding out more. minecraft, it is one of the most popular games on record. since it was released in 2009, it has sold more than 120 million copies. in 2014, microsoft paid £1.8 billion to mojang, the swedish creator based in stockholm. and later this year, the developers will launch better together, a new version raising questions. it allows fans to play on different devices like the xbox1 and nintendo switch. are people
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worried about safety? always. on line safety is so important to us. we have tools and parental controls in place for parents to take a look at who the children are playing with. but the onus is still on the pa rents with. but the onus is still on the parents and children to change settings, which isn't always straightforward. if someone is bothering you, just lock them. there are other services and ways you can block players. like many on the market, minecraft is becoming more social. players can access different servers to share builds, sometimes with strangers. blocking communication is just one way to deal with the problem. what about the amount of time children are spending playing the game? you can definitely put a limit a number on it. i think that number would be different for different people.
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ricky boleto, bbc news. we're joined now byjoe garrett, also known as "stampy cat," whose minecraft youtube videos are viewed by millions around the world. many people are excited you are with us many people are excited you are with us this morning. can i call you joe? i will call you stampy, sorry. that will make everyone confused! what is it... we will start with minecraft. what makes it popular? the reason it has become so popular is the social side of it. the community built around the game hasjust elevated it so around the game hasjust elevated it so high. and the fact it is not you going home and playing by yourself, you go on line and play with mates and hang out and do whatever you wa nt and hang out and do whatever you want ina and hang out and do whatever you want in a virtual world, literally playing normal games like hide and seek inside the game. you don't get that in other games. the changes mean you were able to play in different devices. what is the
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difference? essentially they are bringing the pocket edition, the version on pocket devices, they are bringing it to xbox1 version on pocket devices, they are bringing it to xbox 1 and nintendo switch. that is the same version. they can play together. there are many different ones at the moment. different consoles and platforms. they are similar but all slightly different. this is the first step towards having just one, the same game no matter what you are playing on. lots of criticism on the changes. this person says i am worried young children will have to see words and phrases they shouldn't have to. how can they stop mojang from doing that? the big difference with this new version is that the old one, playing on line, you could only play with people you already knew and mini games on line playing a game with no communication. this
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new one has servers. this one has servers that lets you talk to people on line. you can turn it completely off. there are settings you can use on the console restricting playing on the console restricting playing on line completely and restricting all communication. by default you communicate to whether you want. that is where the problem is for pa rents. that is where the problem is for parents. children might be talking to people they don't know, adults, for example. do you see those concerns? definitely. i have seen situations myself i know should not be going on. there are moderators. they can ban certain words. people can always get around it. the game is so big and open it is impossible to police it at this point. do you
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think parents are an educated about it and how do we know what's going on? do we need to be playing the game? what do you recommend? not all pa rents. game? what do you recommend? not all parents. many parents play minecraft with their kids. a lot of parents are scared because it seems daunting, to be able to move around and control the game. i'm always encouraging parents to play with their children. and then they can see what's going on and perhaps more of the dangers? they'll deftly get an understanding of the types of situations the child can be in. when the child talks about something they've experienced, they'll have a better understanding and can give better understanding and can give better advice. there we go, you've heard it from stampy himself. and plenty more information on our facebook page as well. thank you very much. the first named storm of the season,
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called aileen, has brought heavy rain and wind overnight. a lot of pictures of trees down and branches across roads. yes, lots of debris down. these are the strongest winds we've seen. aileen is now pushing off towards denmark and the netherlands. still some lively gusts in lincolnshire, but even here the winds will ease down. at least it's a dry start in east anglia, much of the midlands and the south—east. a few showers across the hills of wales. the showers not on the heavy side. eastern side of the pennines, cloudy, heavy rain along the north—east coast is easing offshore. sunshine and showers from northern ireland. if you are heading out drab a jacket. across scotland, cloudy
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and more persistent rain around the murray firth and aberdeen area. still cloudy in scotland. for the rest of the country it's a mix of sunshine and blustery showers. when you see the showers come through, it could be heavy with hail and thunder and of course those temperatures. they've been trending down all week. 0nly they've been trending down all week. only about they've been trending down all week. 0nly about 12— they've been trending down all week. only about 12— 14 degrees in scotla nd only about 12— 14 degrees in scotland and northern ireland. for the first part of the night the rain will will move further south. the wettest conditions tomorrow morning across wales and the midlands, towards lincolnshire and yorkshire. a chilly start for many. temperatures into single figures. for early rises the rain is initially in the midlands, lincolnshire, outbreaks of rain for the rush—hour and as that clears it is back to sunshine and showers. the showers most frequent in the north and west. elsewhere, still a bit of warmth and when showers come through it is distinctly chilly. thank you!
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that's a lot of rain. it is gusty in places, so do take care this morning. the value of second hand diesel cars has fallen by nearly 6% this year after the widespread crackdown on polluting vehicles according to new figures. steph's been finding out what it means for diesel car owners. it is interesting how the tide has turned on diesel cars. good morning. it's all to do with new charges come infor it's all to do with new charges come in for diesel cars and worries about the environmental impact of emissions. for example, in october drivers of older diesel cars will have to pay a so—called t—charge to drive into central london. there are predictions that other cities could do the same. if you look at the figures, sales of new diesel cars fell by more than one fifth in august, part of an ongoing trend. this morning a comparison site said the start of the year the value of second—hand
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ca rs the year the value of second—hand cars has fallen by nearly 6%, with some models falling by a quarter. let's talk to steve huntingford who is editor of what car? give us a bit more detail on the changes. that's part of the problem. we don't exactly know what this are coming and that inevitably means people are unsure and if you want to buy a diesel car that's a problem. what should you do if you have a diesel car? the taxes are aimed at older diesel cars. the reason why is because those are the ones that don't have the modern emissions equipment and those are the ones that cause that —— the breathing problems. effectively everyone is pushed into a diesel car, starting many years ago. the reason why is because they have lower c02 emission. that was seen as the big apple the time. what wasn't taken into account is that they have hired
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an ounce of other emissions. so the latest european tax rules have seen this tackle but the older ones on the streets are still a problem. this tackle but the older ones on the streets are still a problemm is interesting how there has been a real change in the feeling of diesel ca rs real change in the feeling of diesel cars and how they are seeing as a better alternative but now it's not. they were sort of promoted as the a nswer to they were sort of promoted as the answer to all of our problems and now this seems the cause of them and there's never somewhere in between. we've talked a lot on this programme about the scrappage schemes that some manufacturers are bringing in. what are your thoughts? they are potentially good, especially few have an older car that would be worth a lot. the only thing to bear in mind is to make sure the money they are saying they will give you isn't in exchange for a discount because you should expect a discount on your new car. it is interesting. a lot of people are able to talk down the price of a car, so whatever
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price you see you can talk it down. we look at it every month, we look at every mainstream car and the average discount is about £3000. on that scrappage, i spoke about it last time, someone tweeted in and said, had we make sure companies are scrapping these cars and not selling them on? they aren't all scrapping schemes. if you look at some of them, like vauxhall and ford, they say they will definitely be scrapped. but the bmw scheme, for example, they say they will scrap the older ones but they sell some of the older ones but they sell some of the new ones. very interesting. thanks very much. that's it from me for now. we have a warning for you now. the vibrant purple colour of the portuguese man o' war could entice you to take a closer look. but this seemingly delicate jellyfish—like creature delivers a painful and sometimes fatal sting. record numbers have washed up on beaches in cornwall, which have been closed this week as a safety precaution. the wildlife trust has received 144
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reports of sightings in just three days, compared to only three received in 2016. so what exactly is the man o' war and what does it looked like? you are not a fan of them, are you? they are fascinating but spooky! we're joined now by emily baxter, a senior marine conservation officer at the wildlife trust. tell us a little bit about these creatures, because they are not jellyfish. they are not the true jellyfish. they are not the true jellyfish that most people know, which have the distinct gnome—shaped bell, with the tentacles underneath, although they look similar. they are actually not one animal but a colony of genetically identical clones at all function together as one animal. 0k, all function together as one animal. ok, this is good. where have they come from? they are open of -- open
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ocean drifters and live on the high seas and they are probably coming in because we have had the south—westerly winds and as they get close to the sure they can't fight the currents. they are very beautiful. tell us a little bit about their tentacles, because they can be an extraordinary size. they can be an extraordinary size. they can extend for about ten metres. that's quite normal. what do you do if you see one on a beach and you are swimming nearone? if you see one on a beach and you are swimming near one? if they are washing up on the beaches than probably steer clear of going swimming in those areas because they can give you a painful sting, but by all means go and have a look at them washing up on the beach, but try not to touch them. if you do get a sting what's the best way to treat them? the best way is to try to scrape off the remaining tentacles with something like a credit card, this move sweep down the arm or wherever
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you have been stunned and then wash it with seawater. vinegar can only really work with certain types of jellyfish stings and it could make it worse. they can potentially be lethal. in what sort of circumstances? there have been a few recorded fatalities but they are quite rare and that's probably more due to the individual‘s reaction. are they likely to stay around for a while? 0r are they likely to stay around for a while? or will they float away with the wind? possibly when the wind changes we won't see them on the sure any more. the bubble on the top is like a sail and when the wind is so is like a sail and when the wind is so strong they can't fight against the wind. but we could see them washing up for a few more weeks. thank you very much indeed. absolutely fascinating. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia—liza armah. for the first time police have begun
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targeting eurostar terminals in an operation aimed at protecting children at risk of female genital mutilation. and other harmful practices. passengers at st pancras stations were met by officers from the metropolitan police, british transport police and camden social services. four children were identified as having safeguarding issues. in the past, only airports including heathrow and gatwick have been targeted. a woman in her 70s is fighting for her life after a collision with a cyclist on oxford street. emergency services were called late yesterday afternoon. she was taken to a hospital in central london with severe head injuries. police say the cyclist did stop at the scene. enquiries are continuing. a developer is being forced to meet the cost of clearing a site a queen elizabeth olympic park which was illegally occupied by a group of travellers. they moved onto land where new homes are being built at the end of august and stayed for two weeks. last week, a high court order was issued to remove them. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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storm aileen is causing lots of trees to fall on the overground and it is partly suspended because of a tree falling on the headlines. and on thameslink there are delays of 15 minutes via shortlands. a tree fell on the line near beckenham hill. 0n the roads, the a406 is slow westbound towards green lanes with tailbacks to the fore street tunnel in edmonton. in edgware, whitchurch lane is closed at canons park due to fallen trees near the underground station. local buses are on diversion. and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. storm aileen continues to bring strong gusts of wind. around 4am this morning, at heathrow, just over 60 mph. still causing disruption. this was a few hours ago.
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trees were down and branches down and it is still going to be windy today. a day of sunshine and showers. the wind at least for this morning still fairly strong, but gradually in the afternoon it will fall a bit lighter. it won't dissipate completely. there will be a couple of heavy ones potentially, but some brighter spells in between. the maximum temperature about 18 celsius. we still have showers into the evening and overnight. gradually they will become fewer and further between. also that breeze will continue to feel lighter. by dawn on thursday the minimum temperature getting a little bit cooler, about nine celsius in towns and cities. we have showers moving south through the first part of thursday. they'll continue through the afternoon. sunshine and showers, but the wind gradually coming from the north—west, so it'll feel chillier through thursday. temperatures reaching about 16—17 celsius. the wind continues to fall light, but it comes from the north—west. so it will stay unsettled, sunshine and showers, and feeling cool. i'm back with the latest
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from bbc london news in half an hour. now it's back to louise and dan. good morning. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a bbc breakfast investigation finds thatjust 2% of council owned tower we know they save lives. we know they can save properties and we know they can save properties and we know they make a real difference. so 2% isa they make a real difference. so 2% is a shockingly low number. that was the commissioner of the london fire brigade who tells us this morning that the inquiry into the grenfell tour we which starts tomorrow and all council owned blocks must be retro fitted with sprinklers. hello, this is breakfast,
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with dan walker and louise minchin. we will try and keep you up—to—date with everything that's happening. the cap on public sector pay will be lifted by 2018. rises have been confirmed for police and prison officers, but unions say they aren't enough. the foreign secretary, boris johnson, arrives in the caribbean as british holiday—makers affected by hurricane irma start to return to the uk. good morning. the value of second—hand diesel cars is falling. down by nearly 6%. i will be looking at what you should do if you own one. in sport, celtic are humbled in the champions league by paris saint germain, and the world's most expensive player — neymar. 5—0 the score in glasgow. there were wins for manchester united and chelsea though.
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it's the online game sensation that has millions hooked — but we'll discuss why an update to minecraft has sparked privacy concerns — minecraft master stampy will be here to talk about it. and matt has the weather. after a windy night for england and wales storm aileen is off into the north sea. some heavy showers too. i have got the full forecast in 15 minutes. a bbc breakfast investigation has found thatjust 2% of council owned tower blocks in the uk are fully covered with sprinkler systems. the findings are from a freedom of information request covering around half of the tower blocks in the uk. a public inquiry into the fire at grenfell tower begins tomorrow. the london fire brigade commissioner told us the figures are "shockingly low" and says if the inquiry doesn't recommend retrofitting sprinklers to all tower blocks it will have failed. breakfast‘s graham satchell is in west london for is this morning.
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you have been looking at the sprinkler system. what more can you tell us? good morning louise. well, when the public inquiry into the g re nfell tower when the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire opens tomorrow it will be trying to answer some fundamental questions, why did the fire start? how did it spread so quickly and kill so many people and of course, how do we prevent a fire like that happening again? there are around 4,000 council owned blocks in the uk and our freedom of information request got information from half and it found that 68% of council owned blocks have one single staircase. that 30% of council blocks have some form of cladding and as you say, thatjust 2% have a full sprinkler system. the commissioner of the london fire brigade danny cotton says the g re nfell tower brigade danny cotton says the grenfell tower inquiry needs to be a turning point and she says that
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buildings like schools and particularly council owned tower blocks must now be retro fitted with sprinklers. i support retro fitting clearly. where you can save one life then it's worth doing. this can't be optional. it can't be nice to have. this is something that must happen and it's something that must be in place for the future to protect people. well, we have had inquiries and inquests into fires before and they have made that recommendation before. it has been largely ignored because of the cost. it costs about £2,000 to retro fit each flat with a sprinkler system who pays? will it change after this inquiry? well, the government says it has instituted a full review of building regulations and fire safety and it will consider the findings of this public inquiry which opens tomorrow. graham, thank you very much indeed. we will be talking about this as well in the next ten minutes or so. we have got a further look at our investigation into the figures. and you can see more in our special report — that's in about 15 minutes' time.
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downing street says the cap on public sector pay increases will be lifted in 2018. ministers have already announced salary rises for police and prison officers in england and wales that are above the 1% limit, but unions say it doesn't go far enough. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo is in our westminster studio this morning. leila, is the government bowing to increased pressure? i would imagine they're getting criticised whatever they do? that's right, dan. there has been pressure on the government really since the election, a result theresa may's reduced majority and the public have had enough of austerity. it has been in place for many, many years. now, so in place for many, many years. now, so today, we have seen in light of pressure from the conservative backbenchers, in light of a growing stronger rhetoric from the unions, threatening co—ordinated strike action over the issue, so the
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government has announced that prison officers and police officers will be the first to get above 1% pay increases this year and then next year, when salaries across the public sector are reviewed, there will be no automatic limit of 1% on public sector pay rises. now, the government are saying it is a way of balancing the recognition the service of public sector workers give with what is affordable and fairto give with what is affordable and fair to taxpayers, but unions have been calling for a 5% pay rise across the public sector. they say for many years public sector workers faced a real terms pay cut with inflation standing at 2.9% and they have reacted angrily. labour are calling for public sector pay rises across—the—board, criticising calling for public sector pay rises across—the—boa rd, criticising the divide and rules strategy as they see it of the governmentjust targeting prison officers and police officers this year. but this is the beginning of the end of this pay
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cap, the government has breached that and said that next year it will not be in place, but there are plenty of arguments to come over what the level of those pay rises should be, whether they're equal across workplaces so i think this is the not end of the argument. we got the not end of the argument. we got the labour response at 7.10am and we will be speaking to thejustice secretary in a few minutes time on brea kfast. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has arrived in the caribbean to visit the worst hurricane—hit british overseas territories. mrjohnson will see the relief effort first hand, visiting affected communities and meeting local officials. it's understood he will travel to the british virgin islands and anguilla. the trip follows criticism from people in the caribbean and senior mps that the uk's response was too slow. we have a catastrophic destruction of the whole island. 90% of housing
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stock has been destroyed. the hospital, which is the only hospital on the island will have to be rebuilt. meanwhile, the first british holiday—makers stranded in the us and the caribbean will start arriving back in the uk this morning. since last week, more than twelve and a half thousand flights, including thompson, british airways and thomas cook have been cancelled. officials in florida say a quarter of homes in the florida keys area have been destroyed. myanmar‘s civilian leader, aung san suu kyi, has cancelled plans to attend the united nations general assembly in new york later this month. ms suu kyi has come under increasing criticism for her failure to act or speak out about a military operation which has driven nearly 400,000 rohingya muslims into neighbouring bangladesh. the government in myanmar has been accused by the un of ethnic cleansing. mums who go into labour early should be given antibiotics to prevent passing on any potentially deadly infections to their babies. that's according to new guidelines from the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists. group b strep is the most common cause of life—threatening infection
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in premature babies. 500 infants contracted it in 2015. strong winds are being forecast for lincolnshire and east anglia this morning as storm aileen makes its way across the country. gusts as high as 70mph hit south west england and south wales overnight, but no serious damage has been reported yet. matt will have more details in the weather shortly. the national audit office says the government's welfare reforms are likely to have contributed to rising levels of homelessness in england. its report claims that in the last six years, there's been a 60% rise in the number of households in temporary accommodation, including 120,000 children. the department for communities and local government says tackling homelessness is a complex issue. marta newman reports. homelessness in england is on the rise and the reasons are varied from a lack of social housing to less affordable private
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rental properties and even a reduction in housing benefit are being blamed. the number of families in temporary accommodation is up 60% since 2011, while rough sleeping has more than doubled to over 4,000 counted in one autumn evening. but this report paints a picture of a system that isn't fit for purpose, being overseen by ministers who have little interest in tackling it from simple things like assessing the impact of how many welfare reforms could exacerbate the problem. well, what we're seeing is a rise in all measures of homelessness in urban areas of the country. so what we'd like to see is a proper co—ordinated cross government approach between central and local government to try and tackle this because it's very expensive for the public purse and it is a tragedy for the homeless households as well. while homelessness costs more than £1 billion a year, usually administered by councils,
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the report criticises ministers as paying little attention to how the money is spent. in a statement the department for communities and local government said they will continue to invest £550 million tackling the issues until 2020, but it will shortly outline plans to eliminate rough sleeping entirely. a fatberg weighting a 130 tonnes has been found blocking a sewer in east london. if you're having breakfast i suggest you turn away now! the solid mass of congealed fat, wet wipes and nappies is 250 metres long and is one of the biggest thames water has ever seen. the company said it would take three weeks to remove the blockage. a charming thought. it is 8.11am.
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downing street's announcement that it will lift the cap on public sector pay in england and wales has prompted an angry reaction from unions. prison officers will receive a 1.7% pay rise. police officers will get a 1% increase plus a 1% bonus. the government's pay restraint policy dates back to 2010 when public sector pay was frozen for two years. the freeze turned into a 1% cap in 2013 which was below the rate of inflation. the treasury says it is now taking a more "flexible approach" but unions say the decision is "derisory" and "unacceptable" and are warning of strike action. this is what some public sector workers at the tuc conference had to say about it. i think if they don't end the pay cap across—the—boa rd for all workers i think there is justification for industrial action. they are in
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favour of teachers being happy and well paid and the well—being of teachers. we come first as teachers when we are well looked after. we look after the children. joining us now from our studio in westminster is thejustice secretary david lidington. good morning thank you. thank you very much indeed. why police officers and prison officers and not nurses and teachers? well, the police and the prison officers pay review bodies were the last two pay review bodies were the last two pay review bodies were the last two pay review bodies to report in this current year's pay round. those reports came in earlier this summer and yesterday we announced that the government was going to accept those reports, the recommendations for the pay increases that the pay review bodies had come up with. in the case of prison officers, they said more than, up to more than the 1% overall, but theyjustified their recommendation by reference to the retention problems that we were having with senior staff and you
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know, that persuaded treasury ministers as well as me and my team that was the right thing to do. to accept the pay review body's recommendations. what can nurses, teachers, public sector workers, when can they expect to see this kind of rise? well, next year, 2017/2018, we will be moving forward with a pay review bodies again, but they will have a different remit. the details are now under discussion between the treasury and spending departments including mine and the way we're going to approach this is to say let's look department by department, where are the pressure points in terms of recruiting the right quality staff, of motivating and retaining the right quality staff and then overall how do we balance that in a way that's fair to public sector workers whom, you know, every minister wants to see enjoying an improved standard of living, we want to recognise the ha rd living, we want to recognise the hard work and the professionalism they show every day, at the same time it is fair to taxpayers who
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have got to fund any pay increases and you can't just have got to fund any pay increases and you can'tjust say, "we'll borrow some money from the next generation " borrow some money from the next generation." each time you add to debt it has got to be paid off and paid off by the next generation of workers. you talked it, part of the decision about recruitment. you mentioned hard work. what about rewarding hard work? if you look at the prison officers pay review report, one thing they pointed out, because of the way pay scales are structured and organised, some of the most experienced staff haven't had a pay rise at all for some time. they recommended that every prison officer should get at least a £400 cash increase in their annual salary, and that added up over to 1.7% addition to the pay bill. these are things that pay review bodies do look at. let's look
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at the1.7%, and review bodies do look at. let's look at the 1.7%, and police officers as well, the rises are below the rate of inflation, do you accept they are a real terms pay cut, and is that enough? they are less certainly than the workers would want. less probably than all of us would want in an ideal world where there are unlimited sums of money, pots of gold somewhere, but there are not. any response will government has two strike a balance between what we wa nt to strike a balance between what we want to do to recognise the dedication and professionalism of public service workers. and taxpayers themselves, ordinary working people, are able to afford out of their hard earned income. let's talk about where the money is coming from. we have had responses from the police to say it will come out of other budgets. what do you make about? the pay review body looked at affordability, they look at that across the piece, every report on every public sector profession. when it came to the
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police, we reckon that to meet the review body's report will cost about £50 billion, for what the home treasury secretary would have. around the country, there are total reserves that add up to £1.8 billion. so if you look at the £50 million in that overall context, i think it is reasonable to say that the money can be found within that budget. "without extra government funding, the latest award would inevitably impact on our ability to deliver policing services and maintain staffing levels," in contrast to what you say. the reserves that police forces have amount to 1000 £800 million. 0ne amount to 1000 £800 million. one more point as well, we have heard on the programme, jeremy corbyn said this is divide and rule
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in some ways. some people are being given a pay rise, and some not.” think that it is right that when we look at public sector pay, first of all, we have independent review bodies that report to government and make recommendations. they are not obliged to accept that. but then, we do look profession by profession, because there will be different pressures in terms of recruitment and retention of staff, depending on where in the public sector that you are looking. 0ne where in the public sector that you are looking. one reason we are moving away from this 1% cap overall is that, while it was a necessary discipline in the early days, in trying to get an unsustainable deficit that we had inherited, we have accepted that it is a blunt instrument when you apply it across so instrument when you apply it across so many public sector professions.
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so we are moving towards a tailored approach, which is sensitive to the particular needs and particular retention and recruitment challenges of individual parts of the public sector. thank you for your time on brea kfast, sector. thank you for your time on breakfast, thank you. it's 8:19 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. lots of pictures this morning of wheelie bins on the moves, trampolines, matt can give us an update. storm aileen has left ferocious ease on the sussex coast. we saw some strong winds in england and wales last night. 70 mph to the west of bristol. recently, 60 mph across parts of east anglia and lincolnshire. it has left a future ease and branches, causing opens on the roads this morning. this is one tree outside barnsley. check the
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travel news, an update is coming up in the next ten minutes. wind starting to ease down, a blustery morning and cool, but strong winds, drive—through east anglia and the south—east. showers in the south—west, also through wales, some sitting with sunshine at the moment. heavy bursts of rain in north lancashire and cumbria. lots of cloud in the north after a wet night. showers for northern ireland through the day, eastern areas, persistent rain through aberdeenshire and murray firth area through today. that will give minor flooding later on. it stays wet throughout. elsewhere, sunshine and showers. some of you avoiding showers. some of you avoiding showers. in the sunshine, the sun is strong enough to feel warmth. but out of it, breeze, with showers, and a coolly taken recently, 12—14 in
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scotland, northern ireland and northern england. we finish with persistent rain in scotland, working south. by the end of the night, wales, the midlands, yorkshire and the midlands, either side clear skies, into the morning these are the temperatures in rule parts on thursday. temperatures down well into single figures. the breeze not helping, but for early risers, wet wales, southern counties of england and wales, as we go through the morning, clearing back to a story of sunshine and showers. showers frequent tomorrow in north and west scotland, northern ireland. gaps in showers elsewhere, but showers could be heavy, and temperatures similar to today's. with high pressured to the west, low pressure to the east, as we go through thursday to friday, wind from the arctic, not a particularly warm day. lots of cloud in the east with outbreaks of rain. away from that, sunshine and showers, as the week has been so far. blustery with showers, some
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showers heathery and thundery. —— heavy and thundery. two bridges tomorrow at the best around 15 or 16. at least storm eileen is getting out of the way now. the fully in autumn. thank you. you have helped me out. it is difficult when yourjob is to talk on the tellers as in and you can't talk.” know the feeling well! london's fire commissioner has told this programme that the grenfell tower fire must be a "turning point" in fire regulation, calling for sprinklers in all high rise council flats. a bbc breakfast investigation which focused on half the uk's council and housing association—owned tower blocks has found thatjust 2% have full sprinkler systems. tomorrow a public inquiry into what happened at grenfell begins, it will look at how the fire started, why it spread so quickly and the actions of public authorities before and after the fire.
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this morning, we're looking in more detail at sprinkler systems and the difference they can make in containing a fire, something else the inquiry will explore. graham satchell reports. it's three months since the fire at grenfell tower and it remains uncovered. a daily reminder for residents. still, there are memorials everywhere and the anger of survivors, like miguel alves, is just as strong. somebody, they have to pay for what they did to us. myself, i could be ashes inside of the building. my hopes is that there will be a change in policies around the fire and also the safety of the people. the public enquiry, which opens tomorrow, will look at how the fire started, why it spread so quickly, the cladding and whether a sprinkler system would've saved lives. in a freedom of information request to local authorities across the uk, we found that just 2% of
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residential tower blocks have a sprinkler system fitted. we know they save lives, we know they can save properties, and we know they make a real difference, so 2% is a shockingly low number. good morning, everybody... dany cotton led the fire service at grenfell tower. the regulation should be that it's mandatory to fit sprinklers in all new builds, especially in places like high—rises and schools. what about retrofitting? i support retrofitting, clearly. for me, where you can save one life, then it's worth doing. this can't be optional. this can't be something nice to have. it's something that must happen and it must be in place for the future to protect people. recommendations to fit sprinklers have been made before. this is lakanal house in london. six people were killed in a fire here in 2009. the recommendation by the coroner in the lakanal
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inquest was simply ignored and absolutely nothing happened. it's very clear that we have a system of regulation over the fire safety of tower blocks that is simply systemically not working, and the enquiry needs to get to the bottom of why that is and what's gone wrong. this is a sprinkler test. it's triggered when heat directly underneath reaches a certain temperature. a study by the national fire chiefs council shows where sprinklers are fitted they extinguish or control 99% of fires. so why aren't they fitted in more homes? the main reason is cost. in croydon, for example, the local authority plans to retrofit 25 tower blocks with sprinklers at a cost of £10 million. who pays? croydon wants money from central government and the government says it's the responsibility of the council. in wales, the law changed last year. every newly built or converted house and flat must be fitted with a sprinkler system. wales the first country in the world to make that change.
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sprinklers have been around since1886 and the building industry haven't used them successfully, so if you're not going to use them in goodwill, as we have done in wales, then we'll mandate for you to use them to keep people safe. the westminster government has ordered an independent review of building regulations and fire safety and says it'll consider the findings of the public enquiry. but every fire expert we've spoken to says grenfell has to be a turning point and recommendations this time must be acted on. graham satchell, bbc news. experts do tend to agree that if other fire safety measures are right ina building, other fire safety measures are right in a building, sprinklers are the last line of defence. we have tori amos on the way, jason watkins, and a bit of jay rayner
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coming your way as well. jason watkins will be here at 8:50. he is talking about his role in a thriller. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. storm aileen moved through overnight and gave many of us through overnight and gave many of us debris on the roads. some of the strongest winds were around the south—west. recently we have had strong gusts of wind around lincolnshire and skegness, gusting up lincolnshire and skegness, gusting up to 53mph. storm aileen is clearing away. it will move towards
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southern areas of scandinavia, but things improving throughout the morning. some strong gusts around for a morning. some strong gusts around fora time, morning. some strong gusts around for a time, but it will ease and we are for a time, but it will ease and we a re left for a time, but it will ease and we are left with a lot of showers across many parts of the uk. some heavier rain across the north and the east of scotland. into the afternoon it stays cloudy, wet across much of scotland and pretty cool across much of scotland and pretty cool. maximum temperatures at best about 12 or 13 celsius. if you're stuck beneath the rain for much of the day it will feel cooler. a scattering of showers in northern ireland and across england and wales as well. but there will be some lengthy dry spells in between the showers with sunshine at times. and maximum temperatures about 15 to 17 celsius. so, again, feeling a little bit fresh through the course of the afternoon. now, through this evening and tonight, we have got a weather front which is going to move its way southward and that's going to introduce rain spreading towards the south of england and into the early hours of thursday morning. behind it, we have got a northerly air
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stream. so things will turn chillier over the next few days. temperatures overnight down to nine or ten celsius. but that rather brisk northerly wind will push that rain away to the south. so things improving a little bit in terms of we will have sunshine and scattered showers throughout thursday, but maximum temperatures 12 to 13 celsius and 16 to 17 celsius in the south. more details are on the website. that's it from me. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. does the new iphone 10 get ten out of ten? apple's latest money spinner is unveiled with much fanfare, but is it worth its $1,000 price tag? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 13th september. apple's "core" product gets
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a makeover, but is iphone 10 more evolution than revolution? we get an expert view. also in the programme — no britain — no problem. the commission president is calling for greater integration
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