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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 14, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. the public inquiry into one of britain's worst disasters in recent times, the grenfell tower fire, gets underway this morning. the fire killed more than 80 people. over the coming months families will learn how it spread, and what role the authorities played in the tragedy. good morning — it's thursday 1a september. also, president trump will visit florida today, to see the damage caused by hurricane irma. the number of residents who died in a care home in the state has risen to 12. good morning. there's a new tenner in town — and it's the only english note with a woman on it alongside the queen. i'll be talking to the chief cashier who's signature is on the notes, —— whose signature is on it a little later. in sport, a kane double gets tottenham
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off to a winning start in the champions league — they beat borussia dortmund in a rare wembley win. just say to the camera a couple of times, ifeel just say to the camera a couple of times, i feel pretty. idle just say to the camera a couple of times, ifeel pretty. idle pretty. i feel pretty. i've been getting some surprising musical tips from comic actor bill murray, as he releases his debut album and matt has the weather. you can't you —— usually accuse uk weather of being boring but you've heard it already this week and you will get the full forecast in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the public inquiry into how a fire engulfed the grenfell tower block in west london, killing at least 80 people, will begin this morning. over the coming months it'll hear evidence about the how the blaze spread, the refurbishment of the 2a—storey block, and wider issues of fire safety in high—rise buildings. families will be able to watch proceedings by video link from a church nearby.
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frankie mccamley reports. it was a catastrophic tragedy that killed at least 80 people. many questions remain unanswered. today, the public inquiry is being launched. it aims to get to the bottom what happened, and find out what can be done to stop something like this happening again. thejudge leading the inquiry, sir martin moore—bick, has set out the terms of reference, which include: but for some, like thomasina, who lost her home, there are still concerns. it won't look at social housing. we don't think it's going to look deep enough into the relationship between arms—length organisation, the tenant management 0rganisation,
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and the royal borough of kensington and chelsea. i'm not sure it will go into depth to identify which individuals are responsible for which decisions, which i think is really important, if we're going to hold them to account. the government says social housing questions will be directed to the housing minister. 105 new homes had been made available within the borough, but out of 196 households, only three have been moved into permanent accommodation. frankie mccamley, bbc news. frankie is outside notting hill methodist church. it is appropriate you are there. one of the places many people have gathered to pay respects to those who died. yes, absolutely, and this is where the public enquiry began the many people
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living both in grenfell tower and the surrounding areas. this is where many people matched the judge leading enquiry for the first time, sirmartin leading enquiry for the first time, sir martin moore—bick, and there was a lot of frustration when he said the terms of reference would be narrow. but that has changed. many have been very accepting of the wider terms of reference that as you saw in my report, there are still concerns surrounding that. a little later, as you said, many will be coming here and watching a live strea m coming here and watching a live stream of sir martin moore—bick‘s statement, that he will be speaking for about 45 minutes. no evidence given at this stage. as for when people will begin to get some of those much—needed answers, that will come ina those much—needed answers, that will come in a preliminary report shall be next easter. and we'll be speaking to a former resident of grenfell tower about his hopes for the inquiry just after seven. also, we are talking to the peter
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kensington. president trump will visit florida today to see the destruction caused by hurricane irma. the number of people who died at a nursing home in the state has now risen to eight. (pres2) meanwhile, borisjohnson has defended the aid response to the damage in the british virgin islands, as sarah corker reports. hit by the full fury of the hurricane, the british virgin islands will need extensive humanitarian support. it's taken a week the sum to get basic supplies and after days of criticism that the uk's response has been too slow, the foreign secretary arrived on the island of tortola to see the full scale of the damage. we just talked to the premier, 0rlando smith, who says they have food and water for two months supplies and obviously what we are doing is intensifying oui’ what we are doing is intensifying our efforts. but the government can't use money from the
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international aid budget to fund the recovery. british overseas territories are deemed too wealthy to qualify and so the treasury will have to foot the bill. and across this region, the trail of destruction is vast. in florida, millions are still without power. eight residents have died at this nursing home in miami police said without air conditioning or electricity, temperatures inside we re electricity, temperatures inside were extremely hot. 115 elderly residents were rescued. we have other patients and critical care. right now the building has been sealed off and we are conducting a criminal investigation inside. we've alive —— we believe it may be related to the loss of power in the storm. president trump is due to wea k storm. president trump is due to weak visit florida later today to witness the devastation first—hand and amid sweltering temperatures, concern is growing for florida's 3.5 million senior citizens as officials struggled to restore power. sarah
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corker, bbc news. a database for police is growing. in his annual report, the biometrics commissioner, paul wiles, said the way it's being used could lead to people being unfairly targeted. the home office said police should delete images of people who are not convicted. a prisoner who was given a io—month sentence for arson, more than 11 years ago, is to be released. james ward was given a sentence known as an "imprisonment for public protection" which meant he wouldn't be released until a parole board decided he wasn't a danger to the public. the government says it's working to process more than 3000 other cases as quickly as possible. that type of sentence was abolished in 2012. the campaign for real ale says that pubs face a ticking time bomb with more beer now being drunk at home. camra says that in the early 19705, britain had 75,000 pubs,
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but more than a third have closed since then. it's warning that recent changes to business rates means that pubs are under threat as never before. one of the largest russian military exercises since the end of the cold war gets underway today. it will last about 10 days and will be watched closely by nato governments because in the past, major russian exercises have mobilised forces that have eventually been used against georgia and for the seizure of the crimea. the cassini probe is preparing to ta ke the cassini probe is preparing to take its final pictures of satin before it crashes into its atmosphere tomorrow. british scientists have played a major role in the mission which has provided a wealth of data about the gas giant. the key discovery has been the possibility of an ocean under the surface of one moon. the satellite will dive into the atmosphere where it will meet a fiery end.
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a new io—pound note comes into circulation today and it features jane austen and is the second plastic note from the bank of england. the old io—pound notes, which picture charles darwin, will be withdrawn in the spring. the note also features raised dots to make it easierfor the blind 0n or partially—sighted to identify. we are lucky enough to say we have to in the studio. sean is looking after them. we get to touch them. the mercury music prize for best album from the uk and ireland will be awarded tonight. nominees include ed sheeran, stormzy and kate tempest — all recognised for their latest albums. (pres) newcomers loyle carner, blossoms and dinosaur have also made the final twelve shortlist. the live ceremony will include performances from artists at the london apollo. chi chi izundu reports. of the 12 shortlisted albums are vying to win one of the most prestigious prizes in british and irish music and £25,000. an aim of
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the mercury prize is trying to bring attention to artists the public might not normally here. for me, this isn't about celebrating, this is about bringing people into our genre, the sort of community a part of which is amazing music which doesn't get this opportunity. agitation, nerves? some of the nominees, it was about holding excitement. this is about getting to where i really want to be. i'm really happy. year after year, the mercury comes under criticism being too worthy or too safe. this year ‘s surprise inclusion at chart topping artists and former mercury prize winners. hotly tipped to win is second time nominee and lesser—known poet kate tempest and her album let
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them eat chaos. and the final task to thejudges is them eat chaos. and the final task to the judges is to decide who has won and that happens today ahead of tonight's ceremony. but it's nice to have something that is judged by people who are real experts. to have that proper critical kind of seal of approval means more than ever, i think. should be exciting stuff. the time is 11 minutes past six. matt, what is 11 minutes past six. matt, what is happening with the weather? you said it was not going to be boring. iama big said it was not going to be boring. i am a big fan of boring. sunshine, clear blue skies, no wind, works for me. i admit, i will go clear blue skies, no wind, works for me. i admit, iwill go to clear blue skies, no wind, works for me. i admit, i will go to that. you can't accuse uk weather of being boring but when you hear the word sun shines, showers over and over again, it does get a bit repetitive.
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to make up fruit, you get spectacular scenes like this. another rainbow day across the uk. this was in cumbria. the story of todayis this was in cumbria. the story of today is sunshine and showers. the odd rumble of thunder possible as well. we do have a zone of thick cloud and a bit more rain on it. that is this area here. eventually to east anglia. continuing to edge a bit further southwards. some heavy showers to start the day. many southern counties of england, the morning commute will start of dried. this is where we will see some occasional rain through the morning. not everyone will see it. back into northern england and some sunny spells. the showers across into scotland. a bit of a breeze as well. that figure cloud pushes across
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southern counties during the morning. just about anywhere will see showers come to the day. heavy on boundary, particularly to england and wales. these are temperatures when he gets the sunshine. knock a few degrees of that dashed off that is the showers go through. a rather cool light tonight as well. a bit like last night, thicker cloud, pushing its way from scotland to northern ireland and wales by the end of the night. temperatures dropping a little lower than last night. tomorrow morning will be that cooler. wales, the midlands, parts of lincolnshire. through southern counties. the breeze coming in from the north, northwest, will continue to bring in a heady mix of sun and showers. note that temperatures. friday afternoon, 14— 16 degrees at
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best. a bit disappointing. there is some sign of change. low pressure close by. a little ridge of high pressure to the north—west. for saturday, sunshine and showers mainly across england and wales. maybe some longer spells of rain but showers becoming less of a feature across parts of scotland and northern ireland. even less so as we go into sunday. many parts of scotland, northern ireland, having a largely dry day. the rest of england, especially the midlands, some sunshine. those showers will be around. temperatures this weekend, there will be one positive sign. we start to head upwards again. with a wind starting to fall a little bit lighter by the time we get the sunday, it might not feel quite so chilly but if you are a big fan of rainbows, the next few days for you.
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if you're wonder whether watching team, plenty of showers around today. heaviest and most frequent across england and wales. some rumbles of thunder and even a bit pale. and they showers go through and have yourjacket. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. a public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire, which killed at least 80 people injune, will officially open later today. president trump will visit florida later, to witness the destruction caused by hurricane irma. ten million people are still without power in florida, georgia and the carolinas. to look at the papers. i am excited about the new £10 note. think it is about the new £10 note. think it is a momentous day. it doesn't happen every day. that we get a brand—new £10 note? all of a sudden you are
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interested... the front page of the times. employment figures making the top of the page here because the figures were showing... the best since the 19705, isn't it? incredible. the best since 1975. 4.3% now. recorded in the same way? i think they have been slight tweaks but generally a like—for—like comparison. front page of the daily telegraph. a united states of europe. he called an even more powerful it european union, that britain would regret brexit. it was mooted as a blueprint for a united states of europe. and disk curious story. £13 billion of foreign aid due to go to various places hit by
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the hurricane, tho5e due to go to various places hit by the hurricane, those places that we wa nted the hurricane, those places that we wanted the money to go to, it turns out that the specific rules for the 0rgani5ation out that the specific rules for the organisation for economic co—ordination and development says that these places are too wealthy. there is a margin you need to reach before you can get foreign aid budget. the daily mirror, an intruder at the school which prince george is attending. a 40—year—old woman has been arrested and there are now calls for reviews of security. more on to the £10 note in a moment but a couple of stories in the telegraph. following up on that story, unemployment falls to new lows but alongside that, the figures saying that wages remain squeezed. pay was up 2.1% on average for everybody in the last year. inflation went up 2.9%. that
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difference that is the problem. a nice picture as well ofjack meagher who owns ali barber. he is doing a michaeljack5on dance to his employees. —— jack ma. michaeljack5on dance to his employees. -- jack ma. that was a difficult question forjeremy corbyn wasn't it? what does it feel like to earn tho5e wasn't it? what does it feel like to earn those wagers, wasn't it? what does it feel like to earn tho5e wagers, because things are getting more expensive. get almost doe5 are getting more expensive. get almost does not matter. what you are actually earning, if you do not feel better off than you did. you cannot purchase as much. and here we go. the jane austen £10 note hit5 purchase as much. and here we go. the jane austen £10 note hits the high street. i have it here somewhere. may i? the take of the times on this. jane austen is an this. it is a plastic notes? polymer, yes. bunting told not to
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try to set it alight... —— i am being told. jane austen is the only woman on a british under an english banknote, other than the queen. 0n the top left left of the front there isa the top left left of the front there is a bit like braille. you cannot see it on camera that you can feel it. that is the first note that can use those bumps. it is not on the £5 note? no. we will be talking to the chief cashier of the bank of england. a lot to talk about, the things that have changed. the £5 note was controversial because it had tallow, animal fat, note was controversial because it had tallow, animalfat, they note was controversial because it had tallow, animal fat, they have still used it in this one as well. it is very shiny. it catches your eye. there are a lot of shiny things
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in it. there is a winter won the riots... he is interested down. 0bviously riots... he is interested down. obviously the chief cashier her signature is always on the. i wonder how many times i have to practise to do the one that goes on the note. is at it they are? i imagine once you get it right, they use it forever. i'll ask you if we have enough time. doesn't it depend on the serial number how much they are? please don't roll that one up... it be worth something. i am doing it for purposes of research. you can do whatever you like with them and making back... look at that. just as chris pither was before... they go back however just they were. chris pither was before... they go back howeverjust they were. you have and out the back. come on! i thought the point was that they maintain theirform. thought the point was that they maintain their form. that was quite disrespectful of money.
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maintain their form. that was quite disrespectful of moneylj maintain their form. that was quite disrespectful of money. i thought that was the office money. is it yours? it was given to us by the bank of england. they do want it back. mark carney said he wanted back. mark carney said he wanted back as chris pither came by the end of the day. well, make them a little more durable elite of thanks for that, sean. we're looking at the issue of gambling laws this morning, and the devastating effect addiction can have on families. a long—awaited review of betting rules is due in the next month, focusing on industry advertising and the use of fixed odds machines. a recent report by the industry regulator estimated that up to 2 million people in england, scotland and wales have a gambling problem. 0ur correspondent chris buckler has been speaking to one couple whose son took his own life as a result of his addiction. sport was one of the logs of lewis's
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life but hidden from family and friends it was gambling, which was an obsession and an addiction. friends it was gambling, which was an obsession and an addictionm was the life of the party. and underneath it all he was suffering so badly. it was an alter ego. but he kept it hidden, write to the end. he hid it from everybody. he must have been going through torture and thatis have been going through torture and that is what hurt the most. four yea rs that is what hurt the most. four years ago, lewis killed himself after running a gambling debt well in excess of £50,000. he had already twice remortgaged his home. in excess of £50,000. he had already twice remortgaged his homem in excess of £50,000. he had already twice remortgaged his home. in less than a week. they said addiction is cruel. that just. .. the than a week. they said addiction is cruel. thatjust... the banks than a week. they said addiction is cruel. thatjust. .. the banks were throwing the money at him. i know he wouldn't steal a. he was honest, he
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was straight. hejust wouldn't steal a. he was honest, he was straight. he just did not see any way out. he had to gamble. he could not get his fix. he decided to stop. that is obviously what happened at the end. he realised, he thought i am not strong enough to kick 15. -- thought i am not strong enough to kick 15. —— this thing. thought i am not strong enough to kick 15. -- this thing. many debts we re kick 15. -- this thing. many debts were from gambling online. a long delayed government review of laws surrounding the industry is due to be published soon. and looks at publishing as well as fixed odds betting terminals. they are much like fruit machines, available in high—street bookmakers with games like roulette in which people can spend up to £100 in a single spend. there are three areas. affixed betting terminals are insidious. they are in every bookie shop in the uk. it is incredible. they need to
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have a measured reduction on the maximum that. it should be to pound or £5. betting companies point out that they are major employers in an industry that is already regulated. they say they encourage responsible gambling and many firms support sporting events and clubs. sport was one of lewis's passions. his ashes we re one of lewis's passions. his ashes were scattered at hillsborough stadium. he was there all the time. still supporting sheffield wednesday. that was his last wish. his father used to say he should tell somebody else because he would be gone before you. but that was not the case. sadly. thank you to the
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family who helped chris with that report. later we'll be hearing from the mp carolyn harris who wants the government to take a tougher approach and an industry spokesman who thinks current laws are inadequate. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning, charlie meets a hollywood star with a strange request for him... just say to the camera a couple of times ina just say to the camera a couple of times in a row. ifeel pretty. just say to the camera a couple of times in a row. i feel prettylj feel times in a row. i feel pretty.” feel pretty. everything around bill murray is all a bit unconventional. an interview with him goes along the same lines. he has a new album out in which he is singing, in his own way. had his fill this morning? i feel fine, thank you. way. had his fill this morning? i
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feelfine, thank you. -- how way. had his fill this morning? i feel fine, thank you. -- how do you feel fine, thank you. -- how do you feel this morning? good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. detectives investigating a series of phone scams across the capital and the south east, where elderly victims were conned out of hundreds of thousands of pounds, have charged 11 men. the gang are alleged to have committed nearly a0 offences of fraud including posing as police officers. tan dhesi, the mp for slough, has added his voice to the 100 mp5 who are calling for sikhism to be treated as a separate ethnicity in future national census. there are around 85,000 sikhs living in london. the mp5 are concerned that public bodies, which often only monitor ethnic group categories, are failing to address issues specific to the sikh community. for example, he says hate crime against sikhs isn't specifically recorded. the mayor has written to wandsworth council asking them to halt the replacement of 51 trees on tooting common. the council says the trees are diseased and pose a safety risk, but campaigners say that they simply need maintenance and it's not necessary to fell them.
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and sadiq khan now says the council should rethink. i got the impression that the council has its head in the sand. i think they should be pragmatic and find a solution that addresses the concerns of residents like me about having gorgeous oak trees. we understand if there is a health and safety issue or some trees the need action against. you can pick out some of those trees without affecting all of them. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube — there's no district line between upminster and barking at the moment— and because of a signal failure there are severe delays on the victoria line too between victoria and brixton. this is how the fall looks. it is close to east brown atjunction 3. —— the close to east brown atjunction 3. -- the m4. ‘s close to east brown atjunction 3. —— the m4. ‘s westbound traffic on
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the highways is slow approaching roadworks on the of tower bridge. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. the weather today look similar to yesterday. you are likely to see a few more rainbows around and sunny spells with heavy showers at times. it will also be quite breezy and cool it will also be quite breezy and cool. north—westerly wind blowing fleeting shah was three. a chilly start the day with much early brightness around. through the morning we are likely to get an area of cloud drifting down from the north so it will turn cloudy and phil cool underneath that cloud and underneath those showers but pleasa nt underneath those showers but pleasant enough in the sunshine and that will get going again through the afternoon. highs between 16 and 18 celsius. many showers through the afternoon and early evening that will fade away overnight so it will bea will fade away overnight so it will be a chilly night to come, temperatures returning to single figures as we start tomorrow morning. tomorrow looks quite similaragain. we morning. tomorrow looks quite similar again. we have the breeze
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coming in from the north—west, becoming more. a cool wind. more sunny spells and showers with an area of cloud through the middle pa rt area of cloud through the middle part of the day. we are likely see further showers, heavy and thundery this time on saturday. dwindle little lighter, light showers again on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning — pushing themselves past their limits. six people with physical disabilities and big personalities embark on a 900—mile journey through vietnam for a tv show. we'll talk to two of the adventurers later. blondie's heyday may have been in the 19705 but they've never gone out of fashion and are bang up to date with their new album. debbie harry and chris steinjoin us later. sometimes i think the world has gone
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com pletely sometimes i think the world has gone completely mad. they‘ re sometimes i think the world has gone completely mad. they're i think we are going to get on mothers with. labour soda wire, so that why. he's the latest comedy star to grace the famous cobbles of coronation street. jim moir, better known as vic reeves, talks to us about his newest alter ego colin callen. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. a public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire, which killed at least 80 people opens today. it will examine the cause and spread of the fire, high—rise regulations, and the actions of the local authority. the inquiry chairman is formerjudge sir martin moore—bick and he will give a 45—minute statement which will be watched by residents and victims. and we'll be speaking to a former resident of grenfell tower about his hopes for the inquiry just after seven. president trump will visit florida today to see the destruction caused by hurricane irma.
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police are investigating the deaths of eight residents at a nursing home in the state. the facility had been without power and air conditioning since sunday. 115 others have been treated in a nearby hospital — some are in a critical condition. the government has been warned about the rapid growth of a police intelligence database which holds 19 million digital photographs of offenders and suspects. in his annual report, the biometrics commissioner said the way it's being used could lead to people being unfairly targeted. the home office said police should delete images of people who are not convicted. a prisoner who was given a 10—month sentence for arson, more than 11 years ago, is to be released. james ward was given a sentence known as an imprisonment for public protection which meant he wouldn't be released until a parole board decided he wasn't a danger to the public. the government says it's working to process more than 3,000 other cases as quickly as possible. that type of sentence was abolished in 2012. the cassini probe is preparing to
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ta ke the cassini probe is preparing to take its final pictures of satin before it then bashes into the atmosphere tomorrow. british scientists have played a major role, which has delivered a wealth of data about the gas giant. the key discovery is an ocean auntie the icy surface of the moon which may sustain life. nasa is ending the mission because the probe has run out of fuel. it will dive into the atmosphere where it will meet what is expected to be a fiery end. now, there are elections going on, in a city in canada, and there's one candidate who'll be tough to beat. especially since his social media videos are showing everyone, what a good boy he is. tell me about your campaign. finn is an australian cattle dog. his owner and campaign manager, glenn redmond, told the canadian broadcaster cbc, that running for mayor is something finn has been wanting to do for a while.
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he is keen to tackle the issue of potholes in the area and snow cleaning. did you say soundbite deliberately? what do you think, charlie? i think it was accidental because he was so nonchalant. i think it was accidental. who knows? it's a ridiculous story regardless. we will keep an eye on that. see how many we will keep an eye on that. see how ma ny votes we will keep an eye on that. see how many votes he gets. now let's look at the sports news — and tottenham have made an impressive start to their champions league campaign, beating german league leaders borussia dortmund at wembley. there was a win too for manchester city. but liverpool's return to the competition proved less straightforward, as our sports correspondent katie gornall reports. for a club that cries out for a place among europe's's elite, three years out of the spotlight can feel like an eternity. the return of the champions league had anfield amplified. soon it would take
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their breath away. it's no secret where liverpool's weakness lies, and when their defensive frailties surfaced early in the game, sevilla took advantage. the first blow landed after just five minutes. their strength, of course, is in attack and with pace and precision they hit back. roberto firmino making it look simple. now liverpool had a spring in their step. and luck on their side, as mo salah, with a little help, put them ahead. firmino might have had a second before the break, a miss that would later prove costly, as liverpool again allowed sevilla a route through on a night when they were generous hosts. the bright lights of wembley have done little to make tottenham shine in recent years. their form here has led to talks of a jinx, but there is one way to settle the nerves. son heung—min gave them the perfect start. it spurred borussia dortmund into action. undefeated at the top of the german bundesliga, they brought out their best to equalise. but in harry kane, spurs
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have the man for the big occasion and two goals from him either side of half—time were enough for the three points. wembley might be starting to feel like home. over in rotterdam there was no stopping sergio aguero and the tide of sky—blue as manchester city swept aside dutch champions feyenoord. two goals from defenderjohn stones set the tone for a breathless start to their champions league campaign. katie gornall, bbc news. in a uk exclusive interview with the bbc, maria sharapova has responded to criticism she's received from other players following her 15 month doping ban. the 2004 wimbledon champion played in herfirst grand slam since her ban at the us open this month but her return hasn't been welcomed by some players; in april, eugenie bouchard labelled her a "cheat" who shouldn't be "allowed back into the sport".
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i think those are the types of words that will make headlines but this is my career and i faced that will make headlines but this is my career and ifaced it had on and i admitted my mistake and i went about it and i served my suspension and now i am back. james anderson says england's cricketers have the talent to win the ashes. they travel to australia next month, looking to retain the urn, on the back of series victories over south africa and west indies. i certainly think about the potential. we've made good strides this summer. a couple of issues throughout the seven test matches but we've done many good things. we have the talent to do it. it's just about trying to deal with that pressure when we get older and just the conditions as quickly as we can. hundreds of seriously ill and elderly prisoners should be freed to help bring down the jail population in england and wales, a new report suggests. the proposal comes from the centre for socialjustice
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which says 7,000 places could be freed up. the report's co—author is the former cabinet minister and ex—prisoner jonathan aitken, who's in our london newsroom. thank you via time this morning. i wonder if you could establish the scale of the problem. which is why this is so important. the prison service is in an enormous crisis. the overcrowding is worse than it's ever been. the assaults on prison officers, and fellow prisoners and the number of suicides are all at record levels and there is a chronic understaffing problem so somebody would come up with a solution for easing the present crisis. the author's report and judge john samuels, we put forward a series of proposals. 7000 prison places could
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be freed up by quite a sensible list of adjustments. these are already in the pipeline, stuck in the pipeline in the ministry ofjustice, per example. everyone says the ipp prisoners, of whom there are 3200, who have exceeded their tariffs, could quite safely be let out as a matter of justice could quite safely be let out as a matter ofjustice provided the secretary of state is satisfied they are no longer a danger but the onus of proof should be on the secretary of proof should be on the secretary of state and another 3500 prisoners recalled to prison, not because they've committed a crime or been arrested or suspected that because they have made some minor infringement of the conditions of
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release such as turning up late for a probation appointments. one of the other areas you have looked at, those prisoners who are seriously ill elderly. tel is a little about that. we have got an ageing prison population. there are at least another 2000, 3000 prisoners who are very elderly and often very sick or they have dementia and nobody wants to ta ke they have dementia and nobody wants to take the responsibility for letting them out because the original sentences were passed but the sentence review and sentence monitoring, just commonsense, on all kinds of grounds, compassion and commonsense, because they are no longer a danger, you could let out a group of prisoners there and again, ease the prison population. judge john samuels, my co—author, is a renowned expert on what is called
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judicial monitoring orjudicial supervision of early releases and he with all his great experience, has come up with a very good plan, and very well costed plan, saves us £254 million of public expenditure, which could ease up pressure onjails. million of public expenditure, which could ease up pressure onjailsm one of the issues may be now and in the past how hard it is to convince the past how hard it is to convince the public that it's a good thing generally to release prisoners early? there may well be lots of very good reasons for it and they have been discussed many times before but it is one of those issues we re before but it is one of those issues were sometimes, the public is possibly the least able to process the idea that this is a good thing as opposed to people serving our time. the public have got a bigger message which is the prisons themselves are in a state of some considerable danger of erupting into riots and on a daily basis, they
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erupt into attacks on prison officers or fellow prisoners and this is a crisis which needs new ideas to be solved. just saying that, we should never, ever let a prisoner out early under any circumstances is a knee—jerk reaction which is not shared by vast numbers of other jurisdictions, american courts, many other countries courts to put into the hands ofjudges the power to make early releases and it's time we had that here. yours isn't the first report into prison reform and sentencing and how we deal with it. what gives you confidence that anything will change? the prison crisis in the prison safety problems have never been worse. that is one reason why i think this report can
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get a good audience. thejudges themselves, starting with my co—author, judgejohn themselves, starting with my co—author, judge john samuels, are, in increasing numbers, willing to look at new ideas and for example, there is a home office and ministry ofjustice report which has been gathering dust on the shelves saying we should have what are called problem—solving courts or drug courts to deal with the 3% of criminals who commit 40% of the crimes. there are 3000 problem—solving courts which monitor releases and judicial supervision of releases and judicial supervision of releases in north america. there are two in this country. there is a lot of reform which is really quite popular with good judges and with thoughtful people in the system but there just needs to be some political will to get it delivered. thank you very much real this morning. this is breakfast. the main
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stories. a public enquiry into the g re nfell tower stories. a public enquiry into the grenfell tower fire which killed at least 80 people begins today. president trump will visit florida to see the destruction called —— caused by hurricane irma, with 10 million people without power across the region. time to find out what is happening with the weather. it was blustery yesterday. there was so much wind around. another blustery day to day. good morning. 0ne much wind around. another blustery day to day. good morning. one of those difficult days we have seen this week in which you grab a warm jacket and you will need that but the sunshine between fat, you would wonder why you thought that jacket at all. it is another typical day of sunshine and showers. rumbles of thunder. it stretches from wales
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towards lincolnshire and parts of norfolk. some heavy bursts as well. to the south of that, some showers to the channel islands. a lot across the southern counties of england. a dry one. edging towards the m4, just clearing away. lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain. north of central and eastern scotland. comparing with what you have yesterday. a cloudier speu what you have yesterday. a cloudier spell across the south. england and wales most likely to see the heaviest showers. sunshine in between. in those cloudier moments, with the cool breeze, it will be a little on the chilly side. but the direction which is coming. that is
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continuing to feed showers. a cloudy zone pushing through. tomorrow is not going to be hugely different to what you will see today. 0utbreaks of rain pushing towards southern counties. elsewhere, sunshine and showers. coming through quite smartly in the breeze. the odd thundery one possible and if anything, a bit cooler still, 16 degrees. it stays cool into the weekend. high—pressure holding the west and it keeps wins coming from the north but easing down a little bit on what we have seen this week. showers most frequent for england and wales becoming less so in scotla nd and wales becoming less so in scotland and northern ireland but still rather cool. much of scotland, northern ireland and north—west england having a largely dry day.
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my day that you have made my day perfect today. you know that feeling where it sometimes just falls away and you know you will be in a part of the country where the rain will not touch you. it has made my morning! thank you very much! you are aware that it is a prediction, as opposed to fact? no. it is fact. it is not going to rain where i will be in the next few days. let's move along swiftly now to money. literally, to cash. yes. we are discussing the new £10 note. i have a smooth version and the one that charlie screwed up earlier. it has returned almost to its normal state.
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did you i am it? no. not yet. —— did you iron it? let's have a look at what changed. it is made of polymer, a thin flexible plastic film. there area a thin flexible plastic film. there are a few parts where you can see through. it means it contains more security features and it is a bit stronger as well. see how long you can do that for before it split in half. according to the bank of england will survive a hot wash and should last 2.5 times longer than the previous paper version. and it's the first british bank note to include tactile information — raised dots on the left—hand side — to help visually impaired people. let's talk to victoria cleland, director for banknotes and chief cashier of the bank of england. good morning. a brand—new £10 note.
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come if a £10 notes you think are out there of the old paper version? there are not that many but we would like to keep it that way. that is why we are trying to bring in new polymer notes with extra security features to stay ahead of counterfeiters. what is the biggest thing about the new node? the thing thatis thing about the new node? the thing that is hardest to copy. the fact that is hardest to copy. the fact that it has a large see—through window with clever holographic stick you have winchester cathedral on the front, where jane austen is buried. it is gold on the front and silver on the back. it is easy to the public to identify difficult figures. you have had a year of the new £5 note. have counterfeiters had agoat new £5 note. have counterfeiters had a go at it? luckily, not yet. when we decided to move to polymer, my
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tea m we decided to move to polymer, my team today a lot of work testing to see how difficult it would be to counterfeit polymer notes versus paper notes. polymer is far more difficult. it is not impossible but we have not seen any counterfeit £5 notes on polymer yet. you mentioned jane austen on the back of this note. you have been involved in the production of our banknotes for quite a while the bank of england. looking back, was a mistake to have this long period with no women on our notes? in terms of changing over notes it is always quite difficult to getan notes it is always quite difficult to get an absolute match. four months people knew jane austen was coming. knowing that this woman was coming, the public were happy with that and the choice of jane austen has gone down quite well. i don't think that the four months was a problem now that she is here. and how about the conversations with the rest of the bank when winston
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churchill was chosen for the £5 note. did the bank have to reassess its priorities? there was a big campaign to get a woman on the note. you should feel that they are shouldn't need to be a big campaign. to be frank, they did not need to be a campaign to we had already discarded design work onjane austen. we had designed the two nodes in sequencing, it was just at the churchill now was going to come first. the work onjane austen was nearly there any way. we announced it earlier than we would have done but there was a lot of work and jane austen was waiting in the wings. you updated the new pound coin as well. in terms of how that is going, we have heard that businesses are sending bags back with mixed coins. yesterday about three old coins in my change. are you happy with how thatis my change. are you happy with how that is going? it has been busy at
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the bank of england bringing in the £5 note, the £10 note. the coin is the responsibility of the royal mint said that is one thing i do not need to worry about. the old round the pound is still legal tender until the middle of october so there are still plenty of time. finally, victoria. your signature on the top left—hand corner. charlie was worried about this. how much practice did you have to put in until you are happy with that final version that will be there for ever now? well... my job is so busy i could not spend too long—on that vanity. it looks like the one you have been using for years. thank you very much, victoria. there you go, charlie. i have far more important things to worry about the my signature...! things to worry about the my
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signature. . .! thank you very much, john. —— sean. bill murray has always been an actor who's hard to pin down, starring in diverse films such as ghostbusters and lost in translation — so it's maybe not that surprising to hear he's now being creative in a different way. following a chance encounter on a flight with award—winning cellist jan vogler, the pair became firm friends and are now releasing an album which includes bill singing some surprising classics. i went to meet the pair for their only uk tv interview. welcome to both of you. can i get you first, jan. how would you describe bill's singing?” you first, jan. how would you describe bill's singing? i read a review this morning in the headline was that he said he is a great singerand was that he said he is a great singer and extremely entertaining at
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the same time. i think that is well put. # things you are liable to read in the bible # it ain't necessarily so... have you always sung so privately for your own entertainment? people don't know i can sing. i used to take long committed showers and sing in them. i think people were surprised to have a voice left. usually when you become a jeweller like this your voice is already tired out. but i got a lot of rest. some of the songs on the album may surprise people. for example you seeing i feel pretty dick or you have a problem with that, charlie? —— # ifeel pretty ——
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# i pity any girl who isn't me tonight how do you approach something like that? if you just say to yourself, i feel pretty five times, something would happen to you. your body will change. something will happen right away. try that. tell the camera i feel pretty. i would love you to do it. this is a very odd thing to do. i feel pretty. i feel pretty. this is a very odd thing to do. i feel pretty. ifeel pretty. ifeel pretty and witty and bright. and i pity. any girl. who isn't me tonight. there you go. you will get some responses from that. but
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something happens. yarn, what do you think? bill is right. it does change you. just someone saying i feel pretty, it is absurd. you feel, not am? just saying it makes you fund. there is a tag attached to you, of a recluse. at times in your life people say oh he saw disappeared off the scene. just because you do not make movies. and then there is a thing of people saying you do not have an agent, you do not answer the phone. i don't have to be available to everyone and i don't need help. i do need some kinds of help but not all kinds of help. i do not need managers and caretakers. and everyone, i think everyone feels the
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same way. if we could all cut some people out of our life, about 40% of them out of our lives, we would get them out of our lives, we would get the best of them. we would get the best of them and they would get the best of them and they would get the best of them and they would get the best of me. it has been absolutely delightful speaking to both of you this morning. thank you, charlie. do you think you mean when he says thank you, charlie. everything about him... you do wonder what is going on. he is very good company. and his attitude, the way he does his movies, generally directors can't get hold of him. he does not answer the phone, you do not know if he's gotten the message or not. that sounds familiar... his new album is out now. still to come on the programme. . . we're talking to another inspirational businesswoman — we'll find out how emma bridgwater became one of britain's most famous pottery makers despite having no training and turned it into a multi—million pound industry. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. detectives investigating a series of phone scams across the capital and the south east, where elderly victims were conned out of hundreds of thousands of pounds, have charged 11 men. the gang are alleged to have committed nearly 40 offences of fraud including posing as police officers. the mp for slough, has added his voice to the 100 mp5 who are calling for sikhism to be treated as a separate ethnicity in future national census. there are around 85,000 sikhs living in london. the mp5 are concerned that public bodies, which often only monitor ethnic group categories, are failing to address issues specific to the sikh community. a motherfrom hertfordshire — whose son has been diagnosed with a rare disease — has created a cartoon character to try to raise awareness of the condition.
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lucy patterson has named the kawasaki kid after the illness, which affects her two—year—old son stanley's heart. he'll need daily injections and medicine for the rest of his life, but if children are diagnosed quickly, they can make a full recovery. i'm hoping that with creating the kawasaki kid that we can raise some funds to help research. because there is just not much known about kawasaki disease. i would not want another child to go through what we went through. it was awful. 0n the tube — there's no district line between upminster and barking at the moment— and because of a signal failure there are severe delays on the victoria line too between victoria and brixton. the roadworks at tower bridge are causing a problem. you can see the queues down their. they are queueing through a whopping. eastbound delays on the m4.
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it's closed eastbound atjunction 3 for heston tojunction 2 for brentford — roadworks have overrun. the weather today looks similar to yesterday. you are likely to see a few more rainbows around and sunny spells with heavy showers at times. it will also be quite breezy and cool. north—westerly wind blowing fleeting showers through. a chilly start to the day with much early brightness around. through the morning we are likely to get an area of cloud drifting down from the north so it will turn cloudy and feel cool underneath that cloud and underneath those showers but pleasant enough in the sunshine and that will get going again through the afternoon. highs between 16 and 18 celsius. many showers through the afternoon and early evening that will fade away overnight so it will be a chilly night to come, temperatures returning to single figures as we start tomorrow morning. tomorrow looks quite similar again. we have the breeze coming in from the north—west, becoming more northerly.
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a cool wind. more sunny spells and showers with an area of cloud through the middle part of the day. we are likely see further showers, heavy and thundery this time on saturday. light showers again on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the public inquiry into one of britain's worst disasters in recent times, the grenfell tower fire, gets underway this morning. the blaze killed more than 80 people. over the coming months families will learn how it spread, and what role the authorities played in the tragedy. good morning. it's thursday the 14th of september. also this morning, president trump
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will visit florida today, to see the damage caused by hurricane irma. the number of residents who died in a care home in the state has risen to 12. good morning. there's a new tenner in town, and it's the only english note with a woman on it alongside the queen. i'll be having a close—up look and talking to the person who's signature is on it, a little later. in sport, a kane double gets tottenham off to a winning start in the champions league. they beat borussia dortmund in a rare wembley win. i've been getting some surprising musical tips from comic actor bill murray as he releases his debut album. and matt has the weather. just say to the camera, i feel pretty. i feel pretty. nothing is ever conventional around bill murray. i will be getting some unusual musical tips from the comic actor as he releases his debut album. i am not sure the weather is so pretty. good morning. i don't know, it looks pretty at times.
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rainbows in the forecast. another day of sunshine, showers and a cool breeze. i will have all the details in15 breeze. i will have all the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the public inquiry into how a fire engulfed grenfell tower in west london, killing at least 80 people, will begin this morning. over the coming months it'll hear evidence about the how the blaze spread, the refurbishment of the 24—storey block, and wider issues of fire safety in high—rise buildings. families will be able to watch proceedings by video link from a church nearby. frankie mccamley reports. it was a catastrophic tragedy that killed at least 80 people. three months on, many questions remain unanswered. today, the public inquiry is being launched. it aims to get to the bottom what happened, and find out what can be done to stop something like this happening again. thejudge leading the inquiry, sir martin moore—bick, has set out the terms of reference, which include: but for some, like tomasina,
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who lost her home, there are still concerns. it won't look at social housing. we don't think it's going to look deep enough into the relationship between arms—length organisation, the tenant management 0rganisation, and the royal borough of kensington and chelsea. i'm not sure it will go into depth to identify which individuals are responsible for which decisions, which i think is really important, if we're going to hold them to account. the government says social housing questions will be directed to the housing minister. 105 new homes had been made available within the borough, but out of 196 households, only three have been moved into permanent accommodation. frankie mccamley, bbc news. and frankie mccamley is outside
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notting hill methodist church for us this morning where a video stream of the public inquiry will be shown, what will happen today? yes, that's it. this is a place the public enquiry really began for many people, both living in the tower and in the surrounding area. it was the first time many local residents had the chance to meet sir martin moore—bick for the first time, the judge who is leading the enquiry. it is where he said this enquiry might have a very narrow is where he said this enquiry might have a very narrow scope. is where he said this enquiry might have a very narrow scope. but since that, or when he said that, people here showed their frustration, showed their anger out that, and since then we know that the terms of reference have been broadened. people here have been very accepting of that. as you saw in my report,
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they still have many concerns. a little bit later on, lots of people from the local community will be coming here to watch sir martin moore—bick‘s 45 minute speech being livestreamed. there will be no evidence given today, he willjust be launching the enquiry. as for when people will begin to get a nswe rs when people will begin to get answers here, well, there is a preliminary report expected in easter next year. and just a reminder, in a few minutes we will be speaking to a former resident of g re nfell tower be speaking to a former resident of grenfell tower about his hopes for the enquiry. that's coming up short. —— shortly. president trump will visit florida today to see the destruction caused by hurricane irma. the number of people who died at a nursing home in the state has now risen to eight. -- to 12. meanwhile, boris johnson has defended the aid response to the damage in the british virgin islands, as sarah corker reports. hit by the full fury of the hurricane, the british virgin islands will need extensive humanitarian support. it's taken a week for some to get basic supplies and after days of criticism that the uk's response has been too slow,
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the foreign secretary arrived on the island of tortola to see the full scale of the damage. we just talked to the premier, 0rlando smith, who says they have food and water for two months supplies and obviously what we are doing is intensifying our efforts. but the government can't use money from the international aid budget to fund the recovery. british overseas territories are deemed too wealthy to qualify and so the treasury will have to foot the bill. and across this region, the trail of destruction is vast. in florida, millions are still without power. eight residents have died at this nursing home in miami. police said without air conditioning or electricity, temperatures inside were extremely hot. 115 elderly residents were rescued. we have other patients in critical care. right nowm the building has been
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sealed off and we are conducting a criminal investigation inside. we believe it may be related to the loss of power in the storm. president trump is due to visit florida later today to witness the devastation firsthand and amid sweltering temperatures, concern is growing for florida's 3.5 million senior citizens as officials struggle to restore power. sarah corker, bbc news. the government has been warned about the rapid growth of a police intelligence database which holds 19 million digital photographs of offenders and suspects. in his annual report, the biometrics commissioner said the way it's being used could lead to people being unfairly targeted. the home office said police should delete images of people who haven't been convicted. scotland yard says it's working with prince george's new school to review security arrangements, after an intruder broke into the building. the four—year—old prince started at the £18,000—a—year private school last week. police are questioning a 40—year—old
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woman on suspicion of attempted burglary. one of the largest russian military exercises since the end of the cold war gets underway today. it will last about 10 days and will be watched closely by nato governments because in the past, major russian exercises have mobilised forces that have eventually been used against georgia and for the seizure of the crimea. the cassini probe is preparing to take its final pictures of saturn, before it crashes into the planet's atmosphere tomorrow. british scientists have played a major role in the 13—year mission, which has delivered a wealth of data about the gas giant. a key discovery has been an ocean under the icy surface of the moon that may sustain life. nasa is ending the mission because the probe ran out of fuel and its final mission will see it dive into the atmosphere, where it will meet a fiery end. 13 years on one of fuel tanker,
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quite impressive. —— on one fuel tank. so, sean, the bank of england is meeting today? yes, a big decision that they have to make on a thursday every month about whether interest rates go up or down. it feels like quite a while now. they are about to make a difficult decision because rates have been low for a long period of time. they were cut one year ago. that 2.5% now. one of the headlines in the papers this morning was unemployment improving to levels not seen since 1975, i think. wasn't this one of the issues, one of the factors, that the bank of england governor said they would be keeping an eye on? yes, it feels that a long time ago now. this is when mark carneyjoined the bank of england back in 2013, he said if the unemployment rate fell below 7%,
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they would start considering raising rates. which effectively led to a lot of headlines in the papers to say things like, right, interest rates may well go up when the unemployment rate goes below 7%. it we nt unemployment rate goes below 7%. it went below 7% very quickly, much more quickly than they expected. it continued to fall to where we are today, 4.3%. at no point has there beena today, 4.3%. at no point has there been a rate rise. it is because other things came into play. the bank of england thought wages would go bank of england thought wages would 9° up bank of england thought wages would go up quicker if the unemployment rate fell. all of a sudden that starts having an effect on the economy and prices. that has not been happening and that is what we are talking about. a complicated world, for the bank of england to decide whether to raise rates. and £10 note? charlie is not allowed to touch it. yes, keep it well away from him. the new £10 note, out today. it is staying flat, because charlie decided to crumple up the last one. there is always one. the
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a p pa re ntly last one. there is always one. the apparently uncreasable banknote, which is now very creased. it has lots of new security features, little holograms and things. we will be speaking to victoria cleveland, she will explain to us how the changes have been made to stop counterfeiting. i think the fact that it has a very large see—through window, and in that we have some very clever holographic 's, so on the fund, you have winchester cathedral, where jane austen is buried, and it is gold on the front, and you turn it over and it is silver on the back. that is easy for the public to identify the buried ethical for the counterfeiters. —— but very difficult for the counterfeiters. fascinating. you can see through it, and it shines like a hologram. that is a security feature, not giving it to charlie. see you later, sean. the mercury music prize for best album from the uk and ireland will be awarded tonight. nominees include ed sheeran, stormzy and kate tempest, all recognised for their latest albums.
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newcomers loyle carner, blossoms and dinosaur have also made the final 12 shortlist. the live ceremony will include performances from artists at the london apollo. chi chi izundu reports. there are 12 shortlisted albums are vying to win one of the most prestigious prizes in british and irish music and £25,000. an aim of the mercury prize is trying to bring attention to artists the public might not normally here. for me, this isn't about a sort of gloating or celebrating thing, this is about bringing people into our genre. the sort of community that we're a part of is full of amazing music which doesn't get this opportunity. agitation, worry, nerves? for some of the nominees during rehearsals yesterday, it was about holding down their excitement. music is doing itsjob, like... it's like...i'm getting to where i really want to be. so i'm really happy. year after year, the mercury comes under criticism for either being too worthy or too safe.
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this year's surprise inclusion are chart—topping artists like ed sheeran, grim artist stormzy and former mercury prize winners the xx. # i thought i had you on hold... hotly tipped to win is second—time nominee and lesser—known poet kate tempest and her album let them eat chaos. # but look how the traffic‘s still moving... and the final task for the judges is to decide who has won and that happens today ahead of tonight's ceremony. i think it's nice to have something that is judged by people who are real experts and stuff. to have that proper critical kind of seal of approval means more than ever, i think now. it is 7:13 a.m.. exactly three months ago, in the early hours of the 14th ofjune, a fire started at grenfell tower, a 24—storey block in north kensington. the blaze destroyed 151 homes, and police say that at least 80 people died, although the true figure won't be known until the end
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of the year. this morning the public inquiry into the cause of the disaster will get underway, led by the former appeal courtjudge sir martin moore—bick. the inquiry‘s purpose is to discover what happened, and to make recommendations to prevent a similar tragedy occuring again. meanwhile a separate criminal investigation is ongoing. police believe there are reasonable grounds to suspect that corporate manslaughter may have been committed, with organisations involved liable to unlimited fines. we can speak now to miguel alves, who was a resident of g re nfell tower. good morning, miguel. thank you for your time this morning. then you tell us your situation now? where you are living, yourfamily? tell us your situation now? where you are living, your family? we are still in the hotel in else caught. me and my wife and my son and my
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daughter. —— earl's court. your daughter, particularly, we have seen her before because she actually had to ta ke her before because she actually had to take an exam that day after the g re nfell tower? to take an exam that day after the grenfell tower? yes, on the same day, because you know, it was in the morning on the same day, just with no sleep, yeah. and she did very, very well, but of course now she is starting —— studying, yourfamily needs settling. how are you coping? imean, it needs settling. how are you coping? i mean, it is difficult for us. we have to feel like a family. in the hotel it is difficult to be like family, because, you know, we are in different rooms. we have to meet in the lounge of a hotel, or in one of our rooms. it is not a nice thing to do, anyway. but! our rooms. it is not a nice thing to do, anyway. but i assume in the next few days there is going to be something for me. have you been offered accommodation? have you been looked after? yes. yes, i have
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accommodation, i had a look, i am keen to may be accepted. what has the delay being in being rehoused? it has been three months. i think, like an omelette that can not be made without eggs, i don't know if they had enough flats for us. my case slightly different because i am a leaseholder. ok. so you have other issues. lets talk about what is happening today. where you are now, the notting hill methodist church, residents will watch a live feed of the enquiry later today. who will be there and what residents want to hear today? what we want from the enquiry is
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just as. justice is the most important thing. to find the people guilty, notjust the people or the institutions. it is very important for us that they will come out with some outcome, somejustice for us that they will come out with some outcome, some justice on that. what does justice look like? is it somebody being blamed and at fault? maybe not some one but there may be several responsible. this happened because there was a misleading somewhere. that kind of problem is not just one somewhere. that kind of problem is notjust one person. not even one institution. that did not do the thing right, i mean. there have been
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many recollections, stories from residents saying that their concerns about safety were ignored. do you feel that now they are being listened to, or this is an opportunity for their concerns to be raised again? i think this is the opportunity. a big opportunity for things to change in the near future because if we save lives from now on, at least that is something we can look forward to. it has been a pleasure talking to you. thank you very much. i hope the enquiry rings you what you hope for. we will be speaking to the mp for kensington, the labour mp for kensington, the labour mp for kensington and a little later on this morning. it is 18 minutes past seven and time for a look at the weather. this shot behind these from
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a weather watcher yesterday. whistles and rainbows across the country again, a similar story today. for that you need a mixture of sunshine and showers. wherever you are, you will see both. cloudy weather through wales and the midlands towards east anglia and lincolnshire. that will see outbreaks of rain. to the south, parts into the channel islands and the southern counties of england, a couple of isolated showers. many will get through the morning rush—hour driving for the clouds thicken up. again, outbreaks of rain is through wales and towards east anglia. things will brighten up around lincolnshire. to bolster northern england, a few showers around here and there. in northern ireland. many start the day ona dry northern ireland. many start the day on a dry now. as the temperature rises and with the chilly breeze the showers will get going. clouds below the southern counties of england through the second half of the morning and then sunshine and showers possible anywhere. england and wales will shiver in the breeze but here he be had de mchale and
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thunder cannot be ruled out. these are the temperatures when the sun is out, 14, 18 degrees. when the showers come, not let down by three orfour showers come, not let down by three or four degrees. showers come, not let down by three orfour degrees. 0vernight showers come, not let down by three or four degrees. 0vernight cloud and outbreaks of rain from scotland and northern ireland pushes into north england and wales. either side of it in the clear sky it will be a touch cooler. temperatures reaching single figures. tomorrow morning, a zone of wet weather at three lincolnshire. the edges towards the southern counties in the middle part of the day. sunshine and showers for the rest of the uk. the bristol coming in from the north, north—westerly direction so when the showers come your way temperatures may be lower than today. 11— 16 degrees across the uk but there will be sunshine between the showers for many. 0n the weekend, low pressure close by. a rigid high—pressure trying to build across the north and west of the country temporarily. it does look like it is on improving fixture.
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saturday, strong winds down the eastern counties of england. we will see frequent showers, england and wales had the. a few showers to scotla nd wales had the. a few showers to scotland and northern ireland and on sunday, scotland and northern ireland, perhaps the north—west of england and western parts of wales, great chance of staying dry through the day. the midlands eastern england, here, there will be sunshine but also the chance of a shower cropping up again. heavy with hail at times but at least by sunday with light winds it may feel a touch warmer. a relieved story through the rest of the week into the weekend, one of sunshine and showers here in the uk. before i go, let's go to the pacific and another big storm on the cards. this is typhoon talim. a major typhoon on the scale of what was in the caribbean. that is winding itself up by the time get to
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this weekend that could be edging its way into western parts of japan. and least some in quieterfor us here in the uk. how long before it hits land? it looks like late on sunday it should arrive in the western parts of japan. sunday it should arrive in the western parts ofjapan. it sunday it should arrive in the western parts of japan. it could sunday it should arrive in the western parts ofjapan. it could be a nasty storm with a huge storm surge and torrential rain. we're talking a lot about— from hurricanes at the moment. it is the season. thank you very much, matt. we're looking at the issue of gambling laws this morning, and the devastating effect addiction can have on families. a long—awaited review of betting rules is due in the next month, focusing on industry advertising and the use of fixed odds machines. a recent report by the industry regulator estimated that up to 2 million people in england, scotland and wales have a gambling problem. 0ur correspondent chris buckler has been speaking to one couple whose son took his own life as a result of his addiction. sport was one of the loves of lewis's life but hidden from family and friends it was
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gambling, which was an obsession and an addiction. he was the life of the party. and underneath it all he was suffering so badly. it was an alter ego. but he kept it hidden, right to the end. he hid it from everybody. he must have been going through torture and that is what hurt the most. four years ago, lewis killed himself after running up a gambling debt well in excess of £50,000. he had already twice remortgaged his home. he left a note and said addiction is cruel. that just. .. the banks were throwing the money at him. i know he wouldn't steal.
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he was honest, he was very straight. he just did not see any way out. he had to gamble. he could not get his fix. he decided to stop. that is obviously what happened at the end. he realised, he thought "i am not strong enough to kick this thing". many debts were from gambling online. a long delayed government review of laws surrounding the industry is due to be published soon. and looks at publishing as well as fixed odds betting terminals, known as fobts. they are much like fruit machines, available in high—street bookmakers with games like roulette in which people can spend up to £100 in a single spend. there are three areas. fixed betting terminals, fobts, are insidious. they are in every bookmaker shop in the uk. it is incredible. they need to have a measure
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of reduction on the maximum bet. it should be £2 or £5. betting companies point out that they are major employers in an industry that is already highly regulated. they say they encourage responsible gambling and many firms support sporting events and clubs. sport was one of lewis's passions. his ashes were scattered at hillsborough stadium, home of his favourite team. so he is there all the time. still supporting sheffield wednesday. that was his last wish. his father used to say he should tell somebody else because he would be gone before lewis. but that was not the case. sadly. that was chris buckler speaking to peter and sadie keogh, the parents of lewis.
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later we'll be hearing from the mp carolyn harris who wants the government to take a tougher approach and an industry spokesman who thinks current laws are adequate. —— inadequate. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning... pull, pull, pull, pull... pushing themselves past their limits. six people with physical disabilities and big personalities embark on a 900 mile journey through vietnam for a new tv show. we're talking to two of them later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. detectives investigating a series of phone scams across the capital and the south east, where elderly victims were conned
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out of hundreds of thousands of pounds, have charged 11 men. the gang are alleged to have committed nearly 40 offences of fraud including posing as police officers. the mp for slough, has added his voice to the 100 mp5 who are calling for sikhism to be treated as a separate ethnicity in future national census. there are around 85,000 sikhs living in london. tan dhesi is among 100 mp5 concerned that public bodies are not addressing certain issues, such as hate crime, that affect the sikh community. london's mayor has written to wandsworth council asking them to halt the replacement of 51 trees on tooting common. the council says the trees are diseased and pose a safety risk, but campaigners say that they simply need maintenance and it's not necessary to fell them. and sadiq khan now says the council should rethink. i get the impression that the council has its head in the sand.
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i think they should be pragmatic and find a solution that addresses the concerns of residents like me about having gorgeous oak trees. we understand if there is a health and safety issue or some trees that need action against. you can pick out some of those trees without affecting all of them. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube — the district line has severe delays westbound between upminster and earl's court and eastbound between tower hill and upminster and the victoria line has severe delays between victoria and brixton. here's how it looks. westbound traffic on the highway is queueing through wapping towards the limehouse link. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. the weather today looks similar to yesterday. you are likely to see a few more rainbows around and sunny spells with heavy showers at times. it will also be quite breezy and cool.
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north—westerly wind blowing fleeting showers through. a chilly start to the day with much early brightness around. through the morning we are likely to get an area of cloud drifting down from the north so it will turn cloudy and feel cool underneath that cloud and underneath those showers but pleasant enough in the sunshine and that will get going again through the afternoon. highs between 16 and 18 celsius. many showers through the afternoon and early evening that will fade away overnight so it will be a chilly night to come, temperatures returning to single figures as we start tomorrow morning. tomorrow looks quite similar again. we have the breeze coming in from the north—west, becoming more northerly. a cool wind. more sunny spells and showers with an area of cloud through the middle part of the day. we are likely see further showers, heavy and thundery this time on saturday. light showers again
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on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire, which killed at least 80 people opens today. it will examine the cause and spread of the fire, high—rise regulations, and the actions of the local authority. the inquiry chairman is formerjudge sir martin moore—bick and he will give a 45—minute statement which will be watched by residents and victims. president trump will visit florida today to see the destruction caused by hurricane irma. police are investigating the deaths of at least eight residents at a nursing home in the state. the facility had been without power and air conditioning since sunday. 115 others have been treated in a nearby hospital, some are in a critical condition. scotland yard says it's working with prince george's new school
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the government has been warned about the rapid growth of a police database which holds 19 million digital photos of offenders and suspects. in his annual report, the biometrics commissioner said the way it is being used could lead to people being unfairly targeted. the home office said police should delete images of people who have not been convicted. scotland yard says it's working with prince george's new school to review security arrangements, after an intruder broke into the building. the four—year—old prince started at the £18,000—a—year private school last week. police are questioning a 40—year—old woman on suspicion of attempted burglary. one of the largest russian military exercises since the end of the cold war gets underway today. it will last about 10 days and will be watched closely by nato governments because in the past, major russian exercises have mobilised forces that have eventually been used against georgia and for the seizure of the crimea. the cassini probe is preparing to take its final pictures of saturn, before it crashes into
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the planet's atmosphere tomorrow. british scientists have played a major role in the 13—year mission, which has delivered a wealth of data about the gas giant. a key discovery has been an ocean under the icy surface of the moon that may sustain life. nasa is ending the mission because the probe ran out of fuel and its final mission will see it dive into the atmosphere, where it will meet a fiery end. a new 10—pound note comes into circulation today. it features jane austen and is the second plastic note from the bank of england. the old 10—pound notes, which picture charles darwin, will be withdrawn in the spring. the note also features raised dots to make it easierfor visually impaired people to identify. it is also supposed to be impossible to crease, a must your name is charlie stayt. well, i wasjust giving it a bit of a scrunch. it was
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fine. we were given those in good faith and you have crinkled them. fine. we were given those in good faith and you have crinkled themm is all right, it is ok. now, you can judge this story for yourself. the race to be mayor in the small canadian city of stjohn's is heating up as finn the dog officially begins his campaign for the topjob. tell me about your campaign. (dog barks) he's an australian cattle dog and his owner and campaign manager, glenn redmond, says running for mayor is something finn has been thinking about for a while. he's particularly keen to tackle the issue of potholes in the area and snow clearing. that is another big issue that the dog is interested in while running for mayor, in the city of stjohn in canada. we have had discussions about whether or not we needed to tell that story. well, you know. the
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producer likes it, the producer says yes, it goes. we love each other really. we a re yes, it goes. we love each other really. we are a team. good morning, jess. how are you? very well. harry kaneis jess. how are you? very well. harry kane is in great form at the moment. a brilliant performance from him in the champions league last night. collective of a fantastic performance by tottenham in general against borussia dortmund. —— representative of a fantastic performance. he said before the match he wanted to enter that world—class bracket, and with two goals last night he is certainly on his way to doing that. it was a really impressive start for tottenham, they beat borussia dortmund 3—1 at wembley. there was a win too for manchester city. but liverpool's return to the competition proved less straightforward, as our sports correspondent katie gornall reports. for a club that cries out for a place among europe's's elite, three years out of the spotlight can feel like an eternity. the return of the champions league had anfield amplified. soon it would take their breath away. it's no secret where
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liverpool's weakness lies, and when their defensive frailties surfaced early in the game, sevilla took advantage. the first blow landed after just five minutes. their strength, of course, is in attack and with pace and precision they hit back. roberto firmino making it look simple. now liverpool had a spring in their step. and luck on their side, as mo salah, with a little help, put them ahead. firmino might have had a second before the break, a miss that would later prove costly, as liverpool again allowed sevilla a route through on a night when they were generous hosts. the bright lights of wembley have done little to make tottenham shine in recent years. their form here has led to talks of a jinx, but there is one way to settle the nerves. son heung—min gave them the perfect start. it spurred borussia dortmund into action. undefeated at the top of the german bundesliga, they brought out their best to equalise. but in harry kane, spurs have the man for the big occasion
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and two goals from him either side of half—time were enough for the three points. wembley might be starting to feel like home. over in rotterdam there was no stopping sergio aguero and the tide of sky blue as manchester city swept aside dutch champions feyenoord. two goals from defenderjohn stones set the tone for a breathless start to their champions league campaign. katie gornall, bbc news. manchester united will be without midfielder paul pogba for between four and six weeks. he injured his hamstring in their champions league win over basel on tuesday. he'll also miss crucial world cup qualifiers for france. in a uk exclusive interview with the bbc, maria sharapova has responded to criticism she's received from other players, following her 15—month doping ban. the 2004 wimbledon champion played in herfirst grand slam since her ban at the us open this month, but her return hasn't been welcomed by some players. in april, eugenie bouchard labelled her a "cheat" who shouldn't be "allowed back into the sport".
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i don't think it is for them to really have an opinion because they do not have the facts. you know, i think those are the types of words that make headlines and they will be used as headlines but ultimately this is my career and ifaced it head—on and i admitted my mistake andi head—on and i admitted my mistake and i went about it and i served my suspension, and now i'm back. james anderson says england's cricketers do have the talent to win the ashes. they'll travel to australia next month, hoping to retain the urn, on the back of series victories over south africa and west indies. i certainly think we have the potential. we have made good strides this summer. a couple of slipups in the test matches, but i think we have done some very good things. we definitely have the talent to do it. it is just about trying to deal with that pressure, and adjust to the conditions as quickly as we can. serena williams has posted the first pictures of her daughter
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alexis 0lympia junior on social media, almost two weeks after her birth. the tennis star and her fiance alexis welcomed their little girl on the first of september, at a clinic in florida. we had a lot of complications, but look who we got? we got a baby girl. the 23—time grand slam winner shared the video clip and photo we've just seen there on her instagram and facebook. isn't that just wonderful? it brings a tear to your ire. she has been through so much, won so many things, and now she has had so muchjoy in her life with this young little baby. the question everybody will ask is when she is going to be competing again. well, knowing serena and how immense she as an athlete, i wouldn't bet against her coming back for the australian open, which is in january. coming back for the australian open, which is injanuary. i could really see it happening. in the same
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breath, she is one of those people who will do what she wants to do, you know? she doesn't do what other people think is a good idea, she won't be swayed by what others think. she will do what is right for her. even through her pregnancy she was still playing and training up until, i think it was about seven and a half months. we will see. see you later on. and you tend pound note begins —— a new £10 note enters circulation today. it's plastic, just like the new 5 pound note but this one features jane austen, making her the only woman on a bank note, other than the queen. joining us now is richard beale who specialises in valuing coins and banknotes, and their history. good morning. good morning. a banknote is a banknote, a £10 note isa banknote is a banknote, a £10 note is a tempo and note? this one has changed a lot from the previous one. it has that material in it which will last longer, and that is what it is all about, really. you value
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notes, is that correct? yes. how does that work? £10 note must be worth £10. it is all about the inns and outs, really. what collectors wa nt and outs, really. what collectors want the first issue of notes. traditionally the first one is given to the queen, prince philip as number two, theresa may has number three. then they get given out to dignitaries and royalty, then there is an auction in london on the sixth of october were members of the public can buy low numbered banknotes. just to put this in context, because we have already been through this process with the £5 note, and some of them have already been auctioned off, with the low numbers. and they are worth an awful lot of money. things are worth what people will pay for them. for instance, number 17 of the first five with churchill sold to £17,000. —— first fiver. that is just because somebody wanted to pay for it. and
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ak47, if that is on the serial number it goes for a lot as well? there is actually 1 number it goes for a lot as well? there is actually! million would be ak47 prefix. as far as we are concerned, being specialist auctioneers, they are just worth £5. that people can put them online on auction sites and have fun with things like that. give us a couple of exa m ples things like that. give us a couple of examples of some bank those which have fetched surprising amounts, well, i think many of us would be surprised to see how much they fetch. as i said, we do see lots of interesting banknotes. we have one from the 19905 missing the queen's head. we got £100 for that. it means you can have a lot of fun with not much money. that is it there. that's it. how does that even managed to get into circulation? it shouldn't do. they print billions of these things so it does happen on a regular basis, but usually it gets picked up in the process. it didn't, in this case. if you think that is worth £100 when it is 20 odd years
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old, it is not that unusual. the mystery bank has just delivered this crisp, brand—new £10 note to us in the studio. —— and banker. talk us through some areas of potential interest about this note? in common with the £5 note, you can see through it. which is special to polymer notes. it has raised dots which means that partially sighted people can recognise its value. that is up here? yes, you can feel it. there is the hologram, in that little plastic slip, it is all to stop people from forging them, really. what would make it special in terms of... just a low number, a low serial number, as far as we are concerned. there are all kinds of things and outs. people talk about birthdates and things like that. people have fun with that. this polymer that they are made of, they
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will last forever? because one of the joys of bankers previously, presumably, was that the really old ones, not many of them existed. which gives them value. this appears... please don't crease it again. it willjust carry on existing? they say they expect them to do about five years in service. five? about five years. if you have a banknote, you fold it up and put it in your pocket, they do take lots of punishment. 0bviously it in your pocket, they do take lots of punishment. obviously the uk is not the first country to have polymer notes, and that is what they have found when they have used these and other countries. it has been good to talk to you. thank you very much. so money, there is more to it than just its face value. it is 7:43am. let's talk to match. —— matt. -- matt. good morning. nota bad
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good morning. not a bad start to the day in much of the country. a nice sunrise here. quite a bit of cloud for one or two at the moment. the story of the day is very familiar to what you have seen so far this week. a cool breeze bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers. warm jacket needed one minute, the next minute the sun is out and it doesn't feel too bad. lots of clouds, and a cool breeze in wales and east anglia. some dry moments. southernmost counties of england, 12 isolated showers. many of you should get through rush—hour dry. it will cloud over during the second half of the morning. with that cloud on the move southwards, the north midlands will brighten up. a bit of sunshine across northern england. 0nly brighten up. a bit of sunshine across northern england. only one of the showers here there. much of central and eastern scotland will have a big improvement in yesterday. still quite chilly in the breeze. that will be the story today.
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whenever you see the showers coming through, the temperatures will drop. those showers are possible just about anywhere. england and wales most likely to see the heavy ones in the afternoon. thunder cannot be ruled out. but they are zipping along in the breeze, so you won't have to wait too long until something dry comes along. it will cloud over a crossfire northern scotla nd cloud over a crossfire northern scotland later. —— across far northern. tonight the breeze will still be noticeable. showers fading away at the start of the night, and rainfall coming in is england and the midlands in tomorrow morning. clear skies on either side of it, temperatures down well into single figures. here is a look on friday. it starts work in wales, the midlands, lincolnshire and east anglia. that cloudy, wetter weather pushes across southern counties in the middle of the day and then really, sunshine and showers again. showers get going as the sunshine stars to warm things up a touch. not warming it up a great deal. 14— 15
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degrees, the northerly wind making itself known as it does into the start of the weekend. low pressure, which is the feeding ground for the showers close by to the south and east, but a ridge of high pressure building in the north and west. 0n saturday, england and wales will be prone to heavy and sundry showers again. windiest on the eastern coast of england. scotland and northern ireland, a few showers originally, easing off in the day. on sunday, without high pressure intojust about most of the country, england and wales should have a dry day with fewer showers forecast. still some showers for england, especially central and eastern areas. the odd heavy one. not as heavy as the showers we will see today and tomorrow. when you do see them, they could come with hail and thunder. sunshine and showers, the rainbow spotters will be happy. they will be. i think we should ask lots of rainbow pictures of some good ones come in. i am sure that the weather watchers will oblige. over the last few months we've been speaking to some of the uk's
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most inspirational businesswomen. today, emma bridgewater. good morning. i know it's awkward for you to flip around but thank you for being in here. i won't hijack any more of the interview. thank you very much. there is plenty to talk about. you might know the brand — but what's the story behind the name? with me today is an entrepreneur who started her business in 1985, had no formal training in design, ceramics or business. 30 years on her pottery company employs around 300 people in its factory in stoke, turning out 25,000 items a year. let's talk to ceramics designer and businesswoman, emma bridgewater. good morning. thank you for coming in. if we can somehow return to that 1984 period where it was a different
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world and you did not have 300 employees at. no. i had no job and no income and there i was in london where my friends were going into banks and! where my friends were going into banks and i was wondering what i would do. i was looking for an idea for a business. it was my mother 's birthday. probably only a few days before her birthday in august and i we nt before her birthday in august and i went into a china shop thinking that i would get her teacups and sources. it is such a nice thing to give to somebody. a nice way to say that i love her and i somebody. a nice way to say that i love herand i miss herand we will be sitting down and chatting together soon. i stood in the china shop and had a revelation. thing i was looking for, nobody was making. and there was my business idea. so interesting that you want to do business. some people say it comes out of nothing but you are looking foran out of nothing but you are looking for an idea. so once you had it, and
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you are for an idea. so once you had it, and you a re clearly for an idea. so once you had it, and you are clearly ready to go, how do you are clearly ready to go, how do you then start to turn it... it was people have many ideas. where did you go next? i had no training in any of the skills they needed but i did have a burning vision, and it really was inspired by my mother 's kitchen which was a lovely cosy and welcoming place. her style was relaxed and mismatched. as i stood in the shop i thought that it was interesting. the industry is not talking to me. there must be a whole lot of people like me who would really love some colourful everyday china. iasked... this really love some colourful everyday china. i asked... this idea was moving around my head. i thought of a grown—up friend of mine and i asked what i should do. told him i wa nted asked what i should do. told him i wanted to make some kitchen crockery. he literally patted his
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pockets and had a card. he said to write down a number... so you get that and you have an introduction and you are on your way. you then end up growing a business and after a few years i would imagine it had far more turnover than you may have expected to begin with. all of a sudden you are in charge of people, you are working with your husband... was it stressful? yes. there were two or three years when i was on my own doing it. i think it was funded stressful. that we view our. i got the smell of success quite quickly. i could tell that this was the right thing to guy showed samples to buyers on to my friends and family andi buyers on to my friends and family and i could tell the people loved it. there was a way to go before they became a business. days, years when you were not making money? there was a long time where i was
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living on tuppence halfpenny. sleeping on the sofas of friends. the first part is quite tough. my stepfather‘s accountant implored me to stop trading. the start was shaky but for me, that first trip to stoke to cease salmon talk about the idea, that changed everything. i did not know enough to know what troubled industry was in. ijust know enough to know what troubled industry was in. i just saw a glamorous past. that is interesting. the troubled industry was in. fast forward to today and now you can campaign, bea forward to today and now you can campaign, be a figurehead. how do you end up using that to help the industry? you do your best but i think... firstly, making jobs. industry? you do your best but i think... firstly, makingjobs. to me, the greatest, the single thing that i never lose doubt of, the fact
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that i never lose doubt of, the fact that i never lose doubt of, the fact that i am now employing and training on people to come into the industry ina on people to come into the industry in a city that has had more than its fairshare of hard in a city that has had more than its fair share of hard knocks, that feels like a solid thing that i am a lwa ys feels like a solid thing that i am always glad to be doing. and, briefly, is a light at the end of the tunnel there now? briefly, is a light at the end of the tunnelthere now? it is briefly, is a light at the end of the tunnel there now? it is a fantastic place. i don't know when millions of people are not coming in doing the same thing. what i discovered was that london was choked and when i got to stowed there was, for me, a strong feeling of opportunity and that is what i feel all the time. thank you very much for that. interesting how you said that london choked. many people feel that way at the moment. emma bridgewater who runs bridgewater. thank you very much. is that emma bridgewater of emma bridgewater? yes. you may have heard of emma
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bridgewater. just so we are clear. bill murray has always been an actor who's hard to pin down, starring in diverse films such as ghostbusters and lost in translation — so it's maybe not that surprising to hear he's now being creative in a different way. following a chance encounter on a flight with award—winning cellist jan vogler, the pair became firm friends and are now releasing an album which includes bill singing some surprising classics. i went to meet the pair for their only uk tv interview. welcome to both of you. can i get you first, jan. how would you describe bill's singing? i read a review this morning and the headline was that he said he is a great singer and extremely entertaining at the same time. i think that is well put. # things you are liable to read in the bible #it ain't necessarily so...
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have you always sung privately for your own entertainment? people in hotels know i can sing. i used to take long committed showers and sing in them. i think people were surprised i have a voice left. usually when you become mature like this your voice is already tired out. but i got a lot of rest. some of the songs on the album may surprise people. for example you sing i feel pretty. you have a problem with that, charlie? no! # i feel pretty # i pity any girl who isn't me tonight. how do you approach something like that?
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if you just say to yourself, i feel pretty five times, something would happen to you. your body will change. something will happen right away. try that. tell the camera i feel pretty. i would love you to do it. this is a very odd thing to do. i feel pretty. i feel pretty and witty and bright. and i pity. any girl. who isn't me tonight. there you go. you will get some responses from that. but something happens. jan, what do you think? bill is right. it does change you. just someone saying i feel pretty, it is absurd. you feel, not am?
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just saying it makes you fun. there is a tag attached to you, of a recluse. at times in your life people say oh he's disappeared off the scene. just because you do not make movies. and then there is a thing of people saying you do not have an agent, you do not answer the phone. i don't have to be available to everyone and i don't need help. i do need some kinds of help but not all kinds of help. i do not need managers and caretakers. and everyone, i think everyone feels the same way. if we could all cut some people out of our life, about 40% of them out of our lives, we would get the best of them. we would get the best of them
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and they would get the best of me. it has been absolutely delightful speaking to both of you this morning. thank you, charlie. sometimes with those interviews you just don't know where they will go. bill murray and jan vogler‘s album is called new worlds. did he tell you to embrace feeling pretty? feel it, charlie. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. detectives investigating a series of phone scams across the capital and the south east, where elderly victims were conned out of hundreds of thousands of pounds, have charged 11 men. the gang are alleged to have committed nearly 40 offences of fraud including posing as police officers. a73
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a 73 rob woman has died after being struck by a cyclist on 0xford street. the pedestrian suffered a head injury in the crash on tuesday afternoon. police say the cyclist stopped at the scene and has not been arrested. a motherfrom hertfordshire — whose son has been diagnosed with a rare disease — has created a cartoon character to try to raise awareness of the condition. lucy patterson has named the kawasaki kid after the illness, which affects her two—year—old son stanley's heart. he'll need daily injections and medicine for the rest of his life, but if children are diagnosed quickly, they can make a full recovery. i'm hoping that with creating the kawasaki kid that we can raise some funds to help research. because there is just not much known about kawasaki disease. i would not want another child to go through what we went through. it was awful. 0n the tube — the district line has severe delays westbound between upminster and earl's court and eastbound between tower hill and upminster. minor delays on the 0verground between stratford and richmond and clapham junction.
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and the victoria line has severe delays between victoria and brixton. here's how the blackwall tunnel‘s looking. northbound traffic slow as usual from the woolwich road flyover. in from the woolwich road flyover. stjohn 's in from the woolwich road flyover. stjohn '5 wood, causing in stjohn '5 wood, roadworks causing delays south bound through the 1—way system. and westbound traffic on the highway is slow approaching the roadworks on the north side of tower bridge. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. the weather today looks similar to yesterday. you are likely to see a few more rainbows around and sunny spells with heavy showers at times. it will also be quite breezy and cool. north—westerly wind blowing fleeting showers through. a chilly start to the day with much early brightness around. through the morning we are likely to get an area of cloud drifting down from the north so it will turn cloudy and feel cool underneath that cloud and underneath those showers but pleasant enough in the sunshine and that will get going again through the afternoon. highs between 16 and 18 celsius.
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many showers through the afternoon and early evening that will fade away overnight so it will be a chilly night to come, temperatures returning to single figures as we start tomorrow morning. tomorrow looks quite similar again. we have the breeze coming in from the north—west, becoming more northerly. a cool wind. more sunny spells and showers with an area of cloud through the middle part of the day. we are likely see further showers, heavy and thundery this time on saturday. light showers again on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the public inquiry into one of britain's worst disasters in recent times, the grenfell tower fire, gets underway this morning. the blaze killed
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more than 80 people. over the coming months families will learn how it spread, and what role the authorities played in the tragedy. good morning — it's thursday the 14th of september. also this morning: good morning — it's thursday the 14th of september. also this morning: president trump will visit florida today to see the damage caused by hurricane irma. good morning. there's a new tenner in town, and it's the only english note with a woman on it alongside the queen. i'll be having a close—up look in a moment. in sport, a kane double gets tottenham off to a winning start in the champions league — they beat borussia dortmund in a rare wembley win. # 0n, you pick me up again... #.
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# when i'm down, you pick me up again... #. they've been entertaining us for more than 40 years. debbie harry and chris stein from blondie will be here to tell us about their latest album. i've been getting some surprising musical tips from comic actor bill murray, as he releases his debut album. and matt has the weather. we could never accuse the british weather of being boring, but it is a mixture of sunshine, showers, cool breeze. i will have all the details coming. thanks, matt. good morning. first, our main story. the public inquiry into how a fire engulfed grenfell tower in west london, killing at least 80 people, will begin this morning. over the coming months it'll hear evidence about the how the blaze spread, the refurbishment of the 24—storey block, and wider issues of fire safety in high—rise buildings. families will be able to watch proceedings by video link from a church nearby. frankie mccamley reports. it was a catastrophic tragedy that killed at least 80 people. three months on from the fire at grenfell tower, many questions remain unanswered.
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today, the public inquiry is being launched. it aims to get to the bottom what happened, and find out what can be done to stop something like this happening again. thejudge leading the inquiry, sir martin moore—bick, has set out the terms of reference, which include: but for some, like tomasina, who lost her home, there are still concerns. it won't look at social housing. we don't think it's going to look deep enough into the relationship between the arms—length organisation, the tenant management 0rganisation, and the royal borough of kensington and chelsea. i'm not sure it will go into depth to identify which individuals are responsible for which decisions, which i think is really important, if we're going to hold them to account. the government says social housing questions will be directed
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to the housing minister. 105 new homes have been made available within the borough, but out of 196 households, only three have been moved into permanent accommodation. frankie mccamley, bbc news. and frankie mccamley is outside notting hill methodist church for us this morning where a video stream of the public inquiry will be shown. frankie, where you are has been one of the focal points, although there have been a few, but one of the focal points for residents to gather and share their thoughts about community? yes, absolutely. this is where the public inquiry really began for many residents. many people living in the tower in the local area as well. it was where people first met the judge leading the inquiry, and where many vented
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their frustration when he said the scope of this inquiry could be extremely narrow, just focusing on the fire itself. we have heard the terms of reference and it is much wider. the community have said to me they do accept this, they feel pleased and that they have been listened to, although you heard in my report there are still concerns that the inquiry might not go as far as many had expected. later on today people will here, watching the live stream, the 45 minute speech from sirmartin stream, the 45 minute speech from sir martin moore—bick, who will be coming from central london location, and they will be gathering to hear what he has to say. he will not be giving any evidence so as doing that when people get those answers they so desperately need there will be a preliminary report due around easter next year for that. frankie, thank you. and shortly we'll be speaking to the mp for kensington on her hopes for the inquiry. president trump will visit florida today to see the destruction caused by hurricane irma. at least eight people have died at a nursing home in the state. meanwhile, boris johnson has defended the aid response to the damage in the british virgin islands,
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as sarah corker reports. hit by the full fury of the hurricane, the british virgin islands will need extensive humanitarian support. it's taken a week for some to get basic supplies, and after days of criticism that the uk's response has been too slow, the foreign secretary arrived on the island of tortola to see the full scale of the damage. we just actually talked to the premier, 0rlando smith, who says they have food and water for two months, supplies, and obviously what we are doing is intensifying our efforts. but the government can't use money from the international aid budget to fund the recovery. british overseas territories are deemed too wealthy to qualify and so the treasury will have to foot the bill. and across this region, the trail of destruction is vast. in florida, millions
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are still without power. eight residents have died at this nursing home in miami. police said without air conditioning or electricity, temperatures inside were extremely hot. 115 elderly residents were rescued. we have other patients in critical care. right nowm the building has been sealed off and we are conducting a criminal investigation inside. we believe at this time it may be related to the loss of power in the storm. president trump is due to visit florida later today to witness the devastation firsthand, and amid sweltering temperatures, concern is growing for florida's 3.5 million senior citizens as officials struggle to restore power. sarah corker, bbc news. the government has been warned about the "rapid" growth of a police intelligence database which holds 19 million digital photographs of offenders and suspects. in his annual report, the biometrics commissioner said the way it's being used could lead to people being unfairly targeted. the home office said police should delete images of people
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who haven't been convicted. a prisoner who was given a 10—month sentence for arson, more than 11 years ago, is to be released. james ward was given a sentence known as an "imprisonment for public protection" which meant he wouldn't be released until a parole board decided he wasn't a danger to the public. the government says it's working to process more than 3000 other cases as quickly as possible. that type of sentence was abolished in 2012. one of the largest russian military exercises since the end of the cold war gets underway today. it will last about ten days and will be watched closely by nato governments because in the past, major russian exercises have mobilised forces that have eventually been used against georgia and for the seizure of the crimea. the cassini probe is preparing to take its final pictures of saturn, before it crashes into the planet's atmosphere tomorrow. british scientists have played a major role in the 13—year mission, which has delivered a wealth of data about the gas giant. a key discovery has been an ocean under the icy surface of the moon
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that may sustain life. nasa is ending the mission because the probe ran out of fuel, and its final mission will see it dive into the atmosphere, where it will meet a fiery end. a new £10 note goes into circulation today. we have about this a bit. yes, charlie said hello to me, as he sprinted past, not whether he had a... yes, the biggest news is it is going into circulation today. a lot of the same traits as the 5.0 hard, a few holograms and things like that, but a few different things. a slightly raised part here for
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those with visual impairment, so you can tell it is ten per note. when eventually there is a new 20, it will have it, a different set of tactile... is this bigger than the £5 note? yes -- so people can tell it isa £5 note? yes -- so people can tell it is a £10 note. there is winston. you quite like the see—through houses of parliament and the queen's face. all of this is security measures. the idea is to have it tougherfor measures. the idea is to have it tougher for counterfeiters to reproduce. was —— spoke to the chief cashier earlier and her signature is on all of these notes and she explained why they have made these changes. i think the fact it has a very large see—through window, and some very very large see—through window, and
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some very clever hull graphics, so we have winchester cathedral where jane austen is buried. gould on the front, and if you turn it over the silver on the back, very easy for the public to identify but desperately difficult for counterfeiters — — desperately difficult for counterfeiters —— very clever holographics. there were a period of four months were no women were on any english banknotes butjane austen is on the £10 note now. it was a big controversial campaign. there were lots of protest about it and the reaction to those protests was particularly controversial. sean, thank you very much. i'lljust keep you safe for you! thank you. i'lljust these keep you safe for you! thank you. exactly three months ago, in the early hours of the 14th ofjune, a fire started at grenfell tower, a 24—storey block in north kensington.
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the blaze killed at least 80 people. this morning the public inquiry into the cause of the disaster will get underway, led by the former appeal courtjudge sir martin moore—bick. the inquiry‘s purpose is to discover what happened and to make recommendations to prevent a similar tragedy happening again. we can speak now to emma dent coad, the mp for kensington, whojoins us from notting hill. just so people understand, emma, you are standing at the methodist church where people will be able to watch this morning's events unfold live. there is a really of events being played there. firstly, there are many elements to this, and we will come onto some of the wider elements ina minute, come onto some of the wider elements in a minute, but firstly this is a very important personal moment for any of those affected. very important, yes. they want to hear what is going to happen, if there are to be answers that they need, and in some cases they will, but i do feel there is a gap between the terms of the inquiry under criminal investigation, and that will not be dealt with. those are what the questions people want to hear. yes, a real concern for people. we spoke
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to miguel alves, one of the residents who has now been moved out with his family. when we asked him what he was hoping for, he said he wa nted what he was hoping for, he said he wanted some form ofjustice. i'm not even sure in his own mind what that means exactly, but that is the thing people are looking for, isn't it? absolutely. are we going to find out who is accountable? they will be picking through the 62 different who worked on the tower and all of those other issues, all the technical aspects of what was done, who chose what, whether or not the installation was done correctly, who gave those instructions, all of those things i hope we should be able to find out. who actually is accountable and why this was allowed to happen, that is the justice side, which many of us feel we are not going to have the answers to. right at the beginning of this process, when the inquiry was announced, sir martin moore—bick was asked about what he would be looking at, the scope of the inquiry, and there was a lot of anger initially, locally and elsewhere, about what might form
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pa rt and elsewhere, about what might form part of the inquiry, and how clear are you at this stage, as we are about to begin the process, just what form it will take? well, i'm sure there is going to be a very thorough technical review of everything that has happened, i'm sure that will be very thorough, but asi sure that will be very thorough, but as i see all the broader issues, economic, political and social situation which allowed this to happen, you know, and they are going to upgrade the fire regulations, which is fantastic, but how did we get in this situation in the first place? are we going to change the funding of social housing? 0r those broader questions, and the question of how social housing tenants are seen by wider authority, by society and by the government, will the review those issues? i don't think so. even though there are a lot of people who treat social tenants very pirelli, less than human, and there have been some appalling comments from some senior politicians about
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these people, and they are not "these people", they are our people —— people who treat social housing te na nts very —— people who treat social housing tenants very poorly. so you have some confidence that within what this inquiry is trying to achieve, looking actually at what happened, the sequence of events, you have some confidence in that. it is the wider issues that you think will remain untouched ? yes, ido, but yes, i do, but that is what i fear. within those narrow technical terms, we should be able to get answers, but all the wider issues of why this has happened and the whole of society, why did we allow this to happen in the richest borough in the universe, the council member actually said that, how could this have happened in 2017 in the richest borough in the universe? i still don't understand that, and i have been righted the thick of it. thank you very much for your this morning.
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emma dent coad is the mp for kensington. just looking ahead to the grenfell tower inquiry which sta rts the grenfell tower inquiry which starts this morning. it is 16 minutes past eight. sunshine and showers for many of us this morning. matt has all the details. the sunshine and showers story doesn't just continue today the sunshine and showers story doesn'tjust continue today but also through much of today. let's take a look at the details. we do have a zone of thicker cloud, plenty of rain across parts of wales through the midlands towards east anglia. in the midlands towards east anglia. in the south, a few showers developing a little more widely. the cloud steadily increasing by the time we get to ten o'clock across southern counties, but you might get to the rush—hour dry. across the north midlands in lincolnshire, much brighter. for northern ireland,
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northern and western scotland, a few showers around but not as many as yesterday. central and eastern scotla nd yesterday. central and eastern scotland will have a much brighter day than yesterday. thicker cloud pushing into northern scotland. it is heavy and thunderyjury pushing into northern scotland. it is heavy and thundery jury after pushing into northern scotland. it is heavy and thunderyjury after no. that chilly breeze will blow into the north—western pushers through quite quickly. temperatures when the sun is out will not feel too bad. but once the showers come through, temperatures will drop by three or four celsius. that takes us into the night, and showers will continue across western areas, and the zone of thicker cloud will push its way southwards, so by the time we get to tomorrow morning, parts of west midlands and wales will have a zone of thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain. morning sunshine tomorrow for your morning commute, and a chilly start once again. really another story of sunshine and showers. if
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anything, it might feel a little cooler tomorrow as the showers go through, especially in the south, only 15 or 16 celsius the higher here. low pressure is close by through the weekend which helps to build the low clouds. there will be high pressure trying to build into the north and west, so saturday, england and wales most likely to see the showers develop widely. into sunday, scotland and northern ireland, potentially north—west england and western parts of wales should be largely dry, and it is the midlands and eastern england most likely to see the showers by this stage. sunshine and showers wraps it up, and this weekend, those injapan will be keeping a very close eye on what is happening to the west of them. we have seen the major hurricanes across the united states, and this is a severe typhoon. you can see the well—developed i just
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the north—east of taiwan. the north—east of taipei. can see the well—developed i just the north—east of taipei. that will hit western parts of japan later this weekend. that is how it is looking, back to naga and charlie. thank you very much. it is 19 minutes past eight. the ho chi minh trail in vietnam stretches for almost 900 miles, through gridlocked cities and mountainous rural tracks. it's a challenge for anyone but our next guests were tested more than most. vicky balch lost a leg in the alton towers rollercoaster accident, and steve brown is the former captain of the british paralympic wheelchair rugby team. they are both with us this morning. in order that we give people a sort of sense of what they went through. let's take a look at them on theirjourney through vietnam for a new bbc documentary. the team must now get to grips with the muddy track that climbs up to the mouth of the cave. so i'm going to have one person on the back, and then two people at the top with the rope. i hope you all had your shreddies this morning!
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are you ready? 0k, pull, pull, pull. pull... come round. keep pulling. easy peasy! this is not a holiday. this is an adventure. this is no put yourfeet up and chill out and relax and sit by the pool. this is hard graft. you can hear the giggling, but it wasn't all giggles. steve brown and vicky balchjoin us now. did you know each other before? no, we didn't. is it fair to say you are friends now? yes, being over there
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and going through what we have done, it would be challenging for anybody, but the way that we had to pull together to get through some of those circumstances like you saw there, it brought us all so close. but it is not easy to ask for help from someone you don't know very well. it is not easy, but we got to know each other so quickly, because we had to. so we all had different difficulties, and we all helped each other in different ways, so it was really easy, surprisingly. i thought that might have been difficult, but it was great. given what both of you has been through in terms of obstacles and overcoming things at the pass, what about the highs and lows of a trip like this? were their point at which you were seriously challenged? there were a lot of challenges, and some for me were a lot more challenging than they were for others, and it wasjust one big challenge, but it wasn't for those challenges, we wouldn't have enjoyed it so much. give us an idea of
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particular situations where you are challenged. the most challenging for me was when the car brakes failed... you need to break the picture! who is in the car? me, steve and mary in the car, i was driving, so it would happen to me, and as we were going down a bit of a slow and there was a corner. she is underestimating the slope a little bit, it was down the side of a mountain! there were funny noises from the car, and then the brakes when steph, the steering went stiff, and i said, it has gone, i don't know what to do, so steve leaned over and help me steer, and after that ijust burst into tears. we need to also explain, why were you two on this trip and what was the purpose? in totalthere you two on this trip and what was the purpose? in total there are six of us, all with different disabilities. the ho chi minh trail would be difficult to any group of
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six, and the things that we did wasn't your tourist, let's go and see vietnam's. this was hard, really hard, and taking six people with different disabilities, the thing that i got out of it the most, although i have empathy for other disabilities, i didn't understand the different struggles that maybe they have, you know? there was a situation where i could get down a hill very easily in my wheelchair, that vicky really struggled to get down, whereas i wouldn't have thought that an amputee would struggle with that. and those were the things that brought us together and made us understand each other more, and ultimately, they weren't the only challenges that we had, the heat, the traffic, the lifestyle, the different things that anyone would have struggled with, they were on top of that. can i do to get some history? how long have you been in a wheelchair? 13 years now, and i'm 36. so you have some relative experience compared to vicky, because you have been an amputee for... ? two years. so i suppose for
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you it was, you had fewer preconceptions, perhaps of how different disabilities, people with different disabilities, people with different disabilities, people with different disabilities cope with a different disabilities cope with a different situation? so did anything surprise you? i think it was the different disabilities with all had, we we re different disabilities with all had, we were completely separate. like steve said about the empathy, i didn't understand how louise, who is deaf, i did well i difficult it would be for her, and it was really touching and shocking, and because we got to know each other so well, every one of us was having those difficulties and i know it touched me and! difficulties and i know it touched me and i was like, what can i do to make them smile again? some of the obvious practical challenges that you faced are unique to the conditions that you have. but i guess some of the things are just the same as any group of people when you go on a trip, which is clashes of personality, different kinds of
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personalities and the way you go about who you are. were there some of those, too? of course there was, charlie. we went over there as a group of people with different disabilities, but that was only one layer of the cake. you've still got the heat, the troubles of meeting new people, the personality clashes, spending that much time in each other‘s pockets. spending that much time in each other's pockets. who was bossy? um... she is looking at me! who was the marmont dad of the group?” think you and louise were the people that we would go to for that.” think you and louise were the people that we would go to for that. i was the youngest, and i would have been kofta by going to any of them, and i felt like at the time, in the car, i was upset, steve was like, you were great, you are amazing, and then mary came behind me and cuddled me andl mary came behind me and cuddled me and i was like, this is mum! and is
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steve bit gung ho, does hejust charge into things? yes! and it wasn't just that, i charge into things? yes! and it wasn'tjust that, i spoke about a few clashes of personality which will all be in the show, but it was the other end of that scale as well where we did come together and we did find strength in each other, and those different personalities, they complemented each other. it wasn't just a different personalities clash. what do you hope that people will get from this? it is called without limits, and there is always a debate about whether or not whether we should in this place in our culture be having programmes like this to prove people with disabilities are not restricted.” can remember when i was lying in my hospital bed, and while i was in my hospital bed, and while i was in my hospital bed, and while i was in my hospital bed, i saw that london was going to be hosting the 2012 paralympic games, and i can remember lying in my hospital bed thinking to myself, good luck to whoever is part
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of that, that would be fantastic to be part of, and by the time it was 2012, i was captain of the wheelchair rugby team that was there. and i think it is about giving people the opportunity to have aspirations, people to look up to, to be inspired by. and it isn't just that people in a wheelchair would be inspired by somebody in a wheelchair, it is just about pushing yourself and making the most of it, and realising that opportunities are there, and the decisions you make will make a difference to the person you become. you both have very inspiring stories. is it sometimes ha rd to inspiring stories. is it sometimes hard to get you to shut up wears blue yes! i had a sense of that. you paint the picture very well, so thank you very much. without limits sta rts thank you very much. without limits starts tonight on bbc one at eight o'clock. and you are going to be putting on the invictus games. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. and is afraid he might hear us
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weather watchers talking about over the next few days —— sunshine and showers is a phrase you might hear. a bit of rain this morning across central and eastern areas which is clear then we are left with this rash of showers right across the uk. some will be heavy, possibly even thundery at times across england and wales. cloud and rain moving its way into scotland, the north—east of scotland, later on this afternoon. it will be quite cool, though, maximum temperatures about mid
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teens. with further showers this evening around coastal areas and temperatures for many of us down to about 10 celsius. so i bit of friday n so about 10 celsius. so i bit of friday —— so friday may be a repeat performance, a scattering of showers into the afternoon and again feeling pretty cool. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. panic on the high street — it was britain's first bank run in 150 years, but a decade on, have the lessons of northern rock been learnt. live from london, that's our top story today, on thursday 14th september. following the money ten years on from the collapse of northern rock — who are the winners and losers? we will find out more on that front,
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the first bank run in 150 years.

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