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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 14, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 2pm. the public inquiry into the grefnell tower fire has begun, it's chair sir martin moore—bick says the inquiry must answer "pressing questions". the inquiry cannot undo all that. but it can, and will, provide answers to the pressing questions. of how this could occur in 21st—century london. i think ithinka i think a lot of us are disheartened and don't have a lot of faith in the inquiry. we have to recognise there are other ways you we can achieve the change we are looking for. a man trapped in prison for 11 years, after being sentenced to 10 month sentence for arson is to be released. also in the next hour president trump is on his way to florida to see for himself the damage caused by hurricane irma. 38 people have been killed by
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hurricane irma. eight residents at a nursing home in florida have died following power shortages following hurricane irma. transforming the tender, the release ofa transforming the tender, the release of a new £10 note featuring author jane austen. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire, which killed at least 80 people injune, has opened with a minute's silence to remember the victims. the man leading the inquiry, sir martin moore—bick, said he acknowledges ‘the great sense of anger and betrayal‘ felt by survivors, and he wants to provide answers about how the disaster could have happened in 21st century london. he added that the inquiry
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won't shrink from making recommendations that could lead to civil or criminal prosecutions. frankie mccamley reports. it was a catastrophic tragedy that killed at least 80 people. three months on from the fire at grenfell tower, those affected are still looking for answers. launching the public inquiry into the disaster today, the retired judge sir martin moore—bick, beginning with a minute's silence. he addressed how many have been feeling. thank you very much. followed by a strong reassurance he is working with those affected. i'm well aware that the past few months have turned the world of those who live in north kensington upside down and that former residents of the tower and other local people feel a great sense of anger and betrayal. that is entirely natural and understandable.
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but if the inquiry is to get to the truth of what happened, it must seek out all the relevant evidence and examine it calmly and rationally. the inquiry process is not adversarial. my task is not to decide which of two or more competing parties has the better case, nor is it to punish anyone or to award anyone compensation. it is simply to get at the truth with the help of all those who have relevant evidence to give. after months of speculation and frustration, residents gathered here in this church just metres from grenfell tower to watch sir martin moore—bick‘s statement being live streamed on television screens. the hope, to get a better understanding of what the public inquiry will cover, and more importantly find out whether they think their questions will be answered. we know that there is a lot
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of documents and a lot of papers that need to be studied and that need to be looked at, so i want to be positive and to allow them the time to work out the truth, because at the end of the day this is what we want. i think a lot of us are disheartened and don't have much faith in the inquiry and we also have to recognise there are other ways we can possibly acquire the change, you know, achieve the change that we are looking for. and as far asjustice goes, i think we have to continue scrutinising the processes of this inquiry continually. the inquiry will be carried out in two stages examining issues including the cause and spread of the fire, the design, construction and refurbishment of grenfell tower, how far regulations go in relation to high—rise flats, whether those were followed in the case of grenfell tower, the actions of the relevant authorities before the tragedy and the response after the fire. but for those 196 households who remain homeless there is a more
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immediate concern as only three have been permanently rehoused. for others, though, today will be another reminder of the pain the fire caused 12 weeks ago. frankie mccamley, bbc news. 0ur correspondent sarah campbell is outside where the inquiry is being held in central london. indeed, sir martin moore—bick spoke for around 45 minutes this morning. in the audience were many survivors, victims, victims families, listening to what he had to say, digesting what he had to say. this has been a community response. there were members of the community there who've been helping help those
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affected by grenfell tower to get over it, to work out how they get over it, to work out how they get over such trauma. with me is a volunteer, elena, a trained bereavement counsellor. what was it like in there? very emotional, there we re like in there? very emotional, there were many, many sui’vivoi’s like in there? very emotional, there were many, many survivors and families and their representatives there today. it was very, emotional this morning. for many it was an anxious morning. they were wondering what sir martin moore—bick would say as he outlined the main points of the inquiry. they came seeking reassurance. they were saying it was really important for them to know the reasons for the fire were properly investigated. more importantly, that the community who are affected by this, so deeply traumatised, had a voice as part of
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that inquiry. and that's their views we re very that inquiry. and that's their views were very much represented as part of it, it wasn't just a process that was going to be happening to them. it was about being included. inclusion. you got to know many of the people who are survivors. the ones i spoke to afterwards, there didn't seem to be a sense of reassurance, that sense that their voice was being heard. ijust wonder what you think, as somebody who knows the community, what sir martin moore—bick can do to try and get that sense from them that this is for them. i've already spoken to members of the community engagement... the grenfell inquiry of the importance of community engagement, about coming to grenfell and latimer. to meet those who've been affected by the fire, to really have a much deeper understanding of the impact that this atrocity and disaster has had on their lives.
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rather than it being the other way round, and expecting them to contact the inquiry team, this is a community deeply traumatised. the extent of this situation is now embedding in the community. there is a lot of depression and a lot of the suicidal feelings. also a lack of hope. i think there are some significant questions that the community needs to put to the inquiry team. there is also a feeling they want sir martin moore—bick to understand what their life is like now, how it's transformed from what it was. and there are some survivors, you know, whose lives have changed for ever. i think they want that included as pa rt of
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think they want that included as part of this inquiry. there is a much deeper understanding of what the impact of this community is, rather thanjust the impact of this community is, rather than just about a fire. thank you very much forjoining us. what sirmartin you very much forjoining us. what sir martin moore—bick was outlining, the terms of reference again, getting more detail on that. and the timetable, which is still vague, because, as he said, the task of this inquiry is huge, there will be hundreds of witnesses, thousands of documents of evidence, that will ta ke documents of evidence, that will take time to go through. there will bea take time to go through. there will be a first phase, second phase. he's hoping the first phase there will be some interim report at least by easter. he said the timetable may slip depending on what happens. he said everybody has won a shared goal, that is to get to the truth of what happened. —— everybody has one shared goal. joining me from our westminster studio is daniel thornton, programme director at the institute for government. it's an independent charity that
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works to improve government effectiveness. what are your thoughts about this inquiry? we've heard from quite a lot of the interested parties who are angry, who don't necessarily trust this inquiry. how does the inquiry ove rco m e inquiry. how does the inquiry overcome that lack of trust?|j inquiry. how does the inquiry overcome that lack of trust? i think it's the first issue for the inquiry, to establish credibility with the community. as has been said already, it's got off to a rocky start. some of it isn't down to the inquiry but the context under which it was launched, there was a wobble at national and local level. the prime minister visited the site and didn't meet the residents. this makes it particularly unfortunate that thejudge, sir martin, didn't ta ke that thejudge, sir martin, didn't take questions today. given that the original criticism of the prime minister was that she didn't take questions and meet residents
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originally. before the inquiry was launched. the backdrop for the inquiry, this session today, was gold leaf in the con not rooms. i think it's not ideal, in terms of establishing credibility with the community. there is also the issue about terms of reference, how wide they should be. there is always difficulty with public enquiries, the wider the terms of reference, the wider the terms of reference, the longer, potentially, it takes in terms of time. that's right, it's important for enquiries to maintain their focus. the terms of reference we re their focus. the terms of reference were adjusted in confrontation willett consultation with the community. the inquiry can't address every issue around grenfell and many of these issues are in the lap of the government to address. sajiv javid as communities secretary will,
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i'm sure, continue to announce steps to address the wider issues. i also suspect the chancellor in the budget in november will make announcements on this. there have been calls for something like a royal commission on housing, i'm not sure that's going to happen, but there are clearly issues that sir martin's inquiry won't be able to look at in good time. in more generalterms, what is the track record of public inquiries like this one? they are often criticised for taking too long. but on the other hand they can change the whole social fabric of life in the whole social fabric of life in the country. yes, they can have a big impact. ithink the country. yes, they can have a big impact. i think the first thing is they have to establish credibility with the community in these tragic circumstances. they've got to maintain focus or the inquiry ta kes too got to maintain focus or the inquiry takes too long. chilcott covered so many years, so
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much material. they need follow—up as well. if they make recommendations, they need to make sure, others need to make sure, recommendations are implemented. it's easy to forget about an inquiry onceit it's easy to forget about an inquiry once it has happened. there needs to be that follow—up. once it has happened. there needs to be that follow-up. good to talk to you, thank you very much indeed for being with us. daniel thornton from the institute for government. breaking news coming to us from iraq, we hearfrom the reuters news agency that suicide bombers have attacked a restaurant and a police checkpoint on a road near the southern iraqi city, killing 15 and wounding many. 0ne attacker detonated his explosives vest inside the restaurant while 3—4 other attackers opened fire on people inside, according to the police. that is the latest from iraq. suicide bombers attacking a restau ra nt suicide bombers attacking a restaurant and a police checkpoint.
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more on that as it comes in us. a man who was given a ten month sentence for arson, but has spent more than 11 years in prison, is to be released. james ward was given a sentence known as an ipp — an imprisonment for public protection, which meant he wouldn't be released until a parole board decided he wasn't a danger to the public. 0ur correspondent zoe conway has been following james ward's case, and has this report. for the last 11 years, james ward has been in prison without ever knowing when he would get out. until now. in just a few weeks' time, james is expected to be moved to a hostel. ijust can't believe it. i'll believe it when he walks through the door. and give him the biggest hug he can have. whenjames was 19, he went to prison for a yearfor assault. near the end of his sentence, he set fire to the mattress in his cell.
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for doing this, a judge gave him an ipp, or imprisonment for public protection, and said he should serve a minimum of ten months. he's been in prison for more than 11 years. james has been writing to us from prison. this letter was written last month when he'd lost hope of ever being released. on a visit to see him last month, his family were shocked by how ill he looked. because he is on constant watch because of the self harm, he's literally sat behind a cage like an animal, they walk past and point and laugh at him. how is that humane? how is that human rights? the ipp sentence was abolished in 2012, but there remain more
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than 3300 ipp prisoners in england and wales. 85% of them have served more than the minimum term they were given. 278 were given sentences of two years or less but they have served eight years more than that. what needs to happen is the government needs to work closely with the parole board to make sure that these cases are processed as quickly as they can be and that when it is safe to release people, they are released. james has had the news this morning. he told his family he is excited for the future. his sister knows exactly how he shall be greeting him. i will hug him so tight, i think there will be a lot of crying. bill and christine will have to wait a few weeks to see the son who hasn't been home for 11 years. to update you on the breaking news i
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was giving a couple of minutes ago from iraq on suicide bombers who attacked a restaurant and a police checkpoint near the southern iraqi city, we're hearing the death toll has now gone up very quickly, very steeply, to 50 with more than 80 wounded. according to a health official quoted by the reuters news agency. so 50 dead according to reuters after that suicide attack in southern iraq. the latest headlines on bbc news... the public inquiry into the causes of the grenfell tower fire has begun. the chair, sir martin moore—bick says the inquiry must answer ‘pressing questions'. a prisoner who was given a 10—month sentence for arson, more than 11 years ago, is to be released. james ward was given a sentence that meant he wouldn't be released until a parole board decide he isnt a danger to the public. president trump is on his way to
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florida to see the damage caused by hurricane irma. essex close in on their first county championship since 1992 with early wickets against warwickshire. second placed lancashire must avoid defeat at somerset. the fa sent a video to fifa to prove england's midfielder dele alli's middle finger gesture was towards a team—mate, not match officials. maria sharapova says it isn't for critics to have an opinion on her return to tennis. she came back after a 15 month ban but wasn't welcomed back by all. i'll have more on all of those stories at around half past. the human cost of hurricane irma is still emerging in florida —
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it's now known that 8 people died in a nursing home, after it lost power during the storm. 115 others have been treated in hospital, some are in a critical condition. police have begun a criminal investigation. 0ur correspondent richard lister reports. when emergency teams searched this florida nursing home, they made some horrific discoveries. three elderly residents dead, five more dying, and scores of others enduring dangerously high temperatures. we did start getting calls this morning indicating that there were a number of people that needed treatment and as we arrived on the scene with our fire rescue crews, we saw that there were a number of people in respiratory distress. many of those led to safety were dehydrated and suffering heat exhaustion. hurricane irma had cut the electricity and then back—up generators failed. the residents had no air conditioning to combat temperatures pushing into the 30s. a nearby hospital took them in. the scene was chaotic when i arrived.
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when we were called to help, we mobilised at least 50 to a hundred of our employees that left the whole hospital, ran down the street and pulled all of these patients out of the facility and made sure they got to a safe place. staff said when they first rang for help, they got no reply, but the home's safety record has been criticised in the past. right now, the building has been sealed off, we're conducting a criminal investigation inside. that may be related to the loss of power in the storm. we're conducting a criminal investigation, not ruling anything out at this time. one in three florida homes and businesses is still without power. homeowners have begun returning to the florida keys where an estimated 90% of the buildings were damaged or destroyed. the help is arriving. water on its way. but the people here know that this level of damage will take months to put right. i've been through wilma and andrew here. so we know how to survive.
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hurricane irma claimed more than 80 lives in the us and the caribbean. but the lack of power means many survivors are still at risk. the value of the pound has risen on currency markets after hints from the bank of england interest rates could go up in coming months. the bank monetary committee voted today to keep its rate at its historic low ofa to keep its rate at its historic low of a quarter of 1%. it did say if the economy continues to grow a future rate rise would become more likely. the culture secretary, karen bradley, has confirmed that rupert murdoch's bid to take full control of sky through 21st century fox will be referred to the competition authorities. she said the competition and markets authority would investigate the impact of the proposed merger on broadcasting standards and media plurality. 0ur media editor amol rajan joins me now from the rts cambridge television convention.
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j j murdoch has been saying the regulator should ignore what he called the noise and politics around this. —— james murdoch. called the noise and politics around this. ——james murdoch. there is a lot of noise and a lot of politics. indeed berries and has been for many yea rs. indeed berries and has been for many years. this is the second time the murdoch family has tried to take full ownership of. in 2011, when it was known as bskyb, they tried to get ownership of 60% of the broadcaster that they don't already own. it was derailed by the phone hacking scandal which led to the leveson inquiry and closure of the news of the world. the political heat got too much. the mood was toxic. they cancelled it. since then a lot has changed. the murdochs have split their company into comics and entertainment vision and news division. the media landscape has changed. facebook and netflix have
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endedin changed. facebook and netflix have ended in a huge way, huge competition and huge choice for consumers. it's the argumentjames murdoch said when he spoke with some gusto earlier this morning. his argument was not only has the landscape changed, but he ought to bejudged on his record. this is what he had to say. the reality here is that the record should matter. as the founder of sky news, we owned 100% of it for many years, there we re 100% of it for many years, there were no issues. when i was chief executive no issues. when i was chairman, and i'm chairman again, no issues. the record has to count for something. whether or not 30 years ago someone has a grievance about a political position that a newspaper took that is no longer part of the business is irrelevant to a process that should be transparent, fact —based, evidence —based, and should get to an answer that makes sense for the uk economy, for the creative economy, and for the thousands and thousands of people who work at sky
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and 21st—century fox, who just want to go and build something great. that was james murdoch. you are there with the greater good of the television industry. what is the word you're hearing? do they think ultimately this deal go through? they will be flattered to be called the great and good, there are lots of punches people here because the tv industry is going through such a people. this merger bid is a sign of it. i think things have changed, when this bid was launched initially people said it will probably get through. some of the arguments made byjames through. some of the arguments made by james murdoch about the changing landscape in media, the split in his company, would be persuasive. but this keeps hitting hurdles. 0fcom said there was possibly an issue on media plurality. now karen bradley the culture secretary said there is an issue in terms of the murdochs having too much power and an issue with broadcasting standards. are they committed to upholding the highest standards? think this deal has changed, it's gone from being
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likely to go through to facing some pretty big hurdles. it's going to ta ke pretty big hurdles. it's going to take at least another six months, more uncertainty for the employees of sky, more uncertainty forjames murdoch. and this ambition he's held for yea rs murdoch. and this ambition he's held for years is proving one massive headache he could without. thank you very much indeed. that is our media editor. a prisoner was murdered by three fellow inmates at pentonville prison in london, as part of a violent feud over control of a lucrative smuggling route into the jail, the old bailey has been told. robert butler, basana kimbembi, and joshua ratner deny murdering jamal mahmoud in october last year. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports from the old bailey. pentonville prison in north london, victorian and close to the road, providing on g wing what the prosecution called a lucrative contra band route into the jail, used for smuggling in knives, mobile phones and drugs with drones and makeshift ropes. jamal mahmoud and his friends had two of the cells on the fifth floor
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of g wing, especially prized, as they had access to that route. in court today the prosecution said that robert butler, basana kimbembi, and joshua ratner murdered jamal mahmoud to make a point and to get control of the smuggling route, and that even after basana kimbembi stabbed jamal mahmoud with a knife pushed aside prison officers and stamped on him and kicked him several times. the prosecutor said of mahmoud that he was killed with brutality by a group of men armed with weapons that went to find him. the prosecution told the jury that the officer in charge of g wing had been warned that day there would be trouble but was persuaded to let the alleged killers out of their cells just before 2:00. by 4.30 21—year—old jamal mahmoud was dead. all three men on trial
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deny the charges. daniel sandford, bbc news at the old bailey. a long awaited review of betting rules is due next month, focusing on the gambling industry's advertising and the use of fixed odds machines. a recent report by the industry regulator estimated that up to 2 million people in england, scotland and wales have a gambling problem. 0ur correspondent chris buckler has been speaking to one couple whose son took his own life as a result of his addiction. sport was one of the loves of lewis keogh‘s life. but hidden from family and friends it was gambling which was an obsession and an addiction. four years ago, lewis killed himself after running up gambling debts well in excess of £50,000. he left a note. itjust said — addiction is cruel. and that just. ..
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he hid it from everybody and he must have been absolutely going through torture and that's the thing that hurts the most. much of lewis's debts were from gambling online. a long delayed government review of the law surrounding the industry throughout great britain is due to be published soon. it's looking at advertising and also what are known as fixed odds betting terminals, or fost for short. they are much like fruit machines, available in high street bookmakers with games like roulette, in which people can spend up to £100 in a single spin. there are three areas, the fost — fixed odds betting terminals, are just insidious, they are in every bookmaking shop in the uk. it's incredible. they need to have a major reduction on the maximum bet. it should be instead of £100, it should be maybe £2, £5. that would be definite. the one that gets me
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most is being a sports person, watching sky television. there are at least ten major betting companies who are there at every break. betting companies point out that they are major employers in an industry that is already highly regulated. they say they encourage responsible gambling and many of the firms support sporting events and clubs. if you look at the strides the bookmaking industry has made injust the last three or four years, you can see the investment and you can see the drive. we want a sustainable business and that means people viewing it as a leisure pursuit and spending the amount of money they can afford to lose in a betting shop. sport was one of lewis keogh‘s passions. his ashes were scattered at hillsborough stadium, the home of his favourite football team. so he's there all the time. still supporting sheffield wednesday.
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that was his last wish. his dad used to say, well, you'd better tell somebody else because i'll be gone before you. but it wasn't the case. sadly. lets have a look at the weather with lucy martin. we'll we' ll start we'll start to see more settled weather over the next few days. to date a mixture of sunny spells and showers. dry weather around but those showers have the potential to be heavy, carried through on a brisk north—westerly breeze. temperatures struggling. this evening and overnight this focus of showers pushing south through scotland into northern england and part of northern england and part of northern wales. showers in land
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becoming confined to western coasts. temperatures were really a few degrees cooler than this. a fresh start of the day, good spells of sunshine. as we get going through the day starting to see showers bubbling up. feeling fairly cool, though it'll feel a touch warmer than today with slightly lighter winds and highs of 16, 17 degrees. as we move into the weekend, holding on to some fairly cool temperatures, particularly overnight, we could see ground frost. the wind will start to ease and will seek a mixture of sunny spells and showers. this is bbc news.
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the headlines: the head of the grenfell public inquiry says the investigation will answer "pressing questions" about the disaster. retired judge sir martin moore—bick has been giving an opening statement. a minute's silence was also held. i'm well aware that the past few months have turned the world of those who live in north kensington upside—down but if the inquiry is to get to the truth of what happened it must seek out all the evidence and examine it calmly and rationally. a prisoner who was given a 10—month sentence for arson, more than 11 years ago, is to be released. james ward was given a sentence that meant he wouldn't be released until a parole board decided he wasn't a danger to the public. the culture secretary, karen bradley, has confirmed that rupert murdoch's bid to take full
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control of sky through 21st century fox will be referred to the competition authorities — due to concerns over broadcasting standards and media plurality. and the fa's inquiry into sexual abuse has been told that ex—aston villa manager graham taylor was warned about the abuse of young players in the 1980s — but allegedly advised one victim to "sweep it under the carpet". right, we are going to get a look at all of the latest sports news for you at the bbc sports centre. it isjohn watson. cricket and essex are edging towards their first county title for 25 yea rs, their first county title for 25 years, reducing warwickshire to 77 for 7. they are 100 runs behind with three wickets remaining. if essex
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win and lancashire lose then essex will be champions. follow it on the bbc sports site. the fa have sent a video to fifa to show that delhi alice gesture was to his team—mate, not an official. this was caught last week, the players have given evidence to the fa, who have asked fifa to know if the decision will be made before the next england game in october. arsenal, and the europa league this season. they begin at home. sanchez and jack wilshere are set to play with first—team players. it is one of 2a europa league matches on thursday. everton feature. forthe details and the build—up head over the website.
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northern ireland have climbed to 20th in the fifa world rankings, the highest ever position. germany pushed out brazil to theton. and portugal are third. wales, england are currently outside of the top a0. shah maria sharapova has returned to the tour in april after 15 months doping ban. it was placed on the banned list in 2016. the canadian player bruschard banned list in 2016. the canadian player bruscha rd branded banned list in 2016. the canadian player bruschard branded her a cheat. andy murray said he was surprised that so many top level athletes had heart conditions. it is not for them to have an opinion as they don't have the fa cts . opinion as they don't have the
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facts. those are the words that will make headlines and used at head lines but this is my career. ifaced it head on and i admitted my mistake and went on about it and served my suspension, and now i'm back. the canadian player, said you were a cheater, you should not be allowed back into the sport. what do you think of that? i think that is not based on fact. is that the fact, that you are not a cheater? exactly. the full interview is on the bbc news channel tomorrow at 9.30pm. the uk and the united states say that the ioc‘s filature to hold russia to account for the doping scandal has endangered the future of
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the sport. injune, the bbc revealed that athletes had written to the ioc, claiming that bob slater was bullying. paris lost out forbids in 2008 and 2012 games, they were up against los angeles where the olympics is to be held in 2028. and while we have been on air, essex have grabbed another wicket, reducing warwickshire from 82—8.
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that is it for now. i'm back with the sport in half an hour. john, many thanks. the public inquiry into the fire at grenfell tower, which killed at least 80 people injune, has begun its work today. opening the investigation, the retired court of appealjudge sir martin moore—bick, acknowledged there was a "great sense of anger and betrayal" felt by survivors of the tragedy. the inquiry, which is expected to publish its interim findings by easter, will look at the cause and spread of the fire. the design, construction and refurbishment of grenfell tower. how far regulations go in terms of high—rise flats. and whether they were followed in the case of grenfell tower. and finally the actions of the relevant authorities before the tragedy — and their response after the fire. in his opening statement, sir martin moore—bick addressed calls from survivors for local residents to be appointed to the inquiry team. i know that many of the survivors would like me to appoint someone
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from among their own number or perhaps another local resident as one of my assessors. many of them can of course provide a valuable many of them can of course provide valuable evidence and i shall ensure that all evidence is heard and carefully considered. but to appoint as an assessor someone who had had direct involvement in the fire would risk undermining my impartiality in the eyes of others who are also deeply involved in the enquiry. i have therefore come to the conclusion that i cannot take the course they would wish me to adopt. as a result i have approached a number of people all completely independent of those whose conduct may have to be investigated. who have expertise of
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a social and administrative nature that enables them to provide me with the assistance i need to provide my task to completion. i shall also need the assistance of people who can give me expert advice in more technical areas in particular the development of fires in high—rise residential buildings, and the intricacies of the building regulations, with particular reference to protection against fire. i'm currently in discussions with several people, who in my view have the expertise necessary to fill those roles and i am pleased to say that those discussions are making progress. i hope to be able to announce the appointment of the first group of assessors within the next week or so. sir martin moore—bick there at the start of proceedings this morning. suicide bombers and an attacker has
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detonated a bomb inside a restau ra nt, detonated a bomb inside a restaurant, south—west of nassaria. no group has claimed responsibility. russian state media say two russian submarines in the mediterranean sea have fired missiles at islamic state targets in syria. the russian reports, which quoted the defence ministry, said the targets included command—and—control posts, and arms depots, in areas controlled by is southeast of the city of deir al—zour. the defence ministry said seven cruise missiles were deployed and that "all the targets" were destroyed. a record number of people were detained on suspicion of terrorism—related offences in england, wales and scotland in the year to june. home office figures show there were nearly 380 arrests — including
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dozens in the wake of the terror attacks in london and manchester. we know that the uk threat level is severe. it has not changed but since march there is a shift. so the tempo has increased, there are more people out there that wish to do us harm. we will be just as relentless in breaking that momentum and ensuring we are arresting and disrupting as many terrorists as possible. a senior executive, has said he is ashamed by revelations of abuse at an immigration detention centre run by his company. yvette cooper is hearing from management at gas after filming by
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panorama, which revealed violence, and chaos at brook house near gatwick airport. would you have been aware of many of these things or taken action on them had there not been a panorama programme? i was ashamed of what we saw and was very sorry for what we saw, if i were aware of any of that behaviour, i would saw, if i were aware of any of that behaviour, iwould have saw, if i were aware of any of that behaviour, i would have taken action. since the panorama programme we have ta ken action. since the panorama programme we have taken action. we have suspended ten members of staff and dismissed three of those members of staff and there are ongoing investigations into the conduct of the other people involved. we have informed the police and provided all of the evidence that we can to assist them with their enquiries. we are also undertaking an immediate action plan to make sure that this cannot happen again. we take these events seriously indeed. there is no
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place for behaviour like that in our business. but it did happen. you were not aware of it. and you clearly had no systems in place to ensure that if anything like any of those incidents happened, that they are reported, that senior management is aware of it and to prevent it happening. so you clearly have a system failure to allow those things to happen in the first place. 100 years ago the russian revolution brought greater freedoms for women in russia. they got the vote, abortion was legalised and the ussr sent the first female cosmonaut into space. today, russian women are fighting discrimination again over appearance and ability. we have this report. at aeroflot slim is in. this is the look russia's national airline wants to present.
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but when it linked flight attendants' pay to their dress size it came unstuck. evgenia tells me aeroflot first stopped issuing bigger uniforms. so you had to add this bit? it's my little secret. this is to make it big enough. then she realised it wasn't just her dress that had shrunk, it was her salary. translation: i was in shock at first. it made no sense. how could they cut your page because of your dress size? but an aeroflot document said the success of a stewardess depended on her size. of course that really offended me. this job was a childhood dream for evgenia but it's gone sour. aeroflot denies discrimination. but she says hundreds of women had their pay cut and were moved to lower paid domestic flights. judged, as they say themselves, too old, too fat, or too ugly. sexual equality is a principle soviet russia once prided itself upon. but years later russian women are once again battling discrimination. they are not onlyjudged
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on the way they look, they are also barred from almost 500 professions just for being female. that's why svetla na tells me she was banned from captaining a boot. russian law supposedly protects it women's reproductive health. but the list ofjobs judged too dangerous includes driving trucks and trains, and even carpentry. svetlana is now fighting the ban in court. translation: i don't think there's equality in russia. it's a very patriarchal country. maybe they name women to some state positions but this list speaks for itself. evgenia took aeroflot to court too. there its lawyers tried to defend the pay cut, saying every extra kilo of weight costs more fuel. but the judge ruled against them. and evgenia notched up one victory in a much bigger battle for equal rights. sarah rainsford, bbc news, moscow. is
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in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc news: the public inquiry into the causes of the grenfell tower fire has begun. the chair, sir martin moore—bick says the inquiry must answer "pressing questions". a prisoner who was given a 10—month sentence for arson, more than 11 years ago, is to be released. james ward was given a sentence that meant he wouldn't be released until a parole board decide he isnt a danger to the public. president trump is on his way to florida to see the damage caused by hurricane irma. the bank of england's monetary policy committee has voted to hold the interest rate at its historic low of 0.25%. we'll have more on this shortly. the first rise in more than a decade
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was likely to be needed in the coming months. fox's bid to take control of sky will be referred to the regulator. culture secretary karen bradley has confirmed she will seek advice from the competition and markets authority. it now has six months to investigate the merger and its implications for the media market before a final decision is taken on whether or not the merger can proceed. profits atjohn lewis are down more than 50% after the retailer was hit by the cost of restructuring and paying out to staff made redundant. it's also blamed a sharp fall in the value of the pound since last year's brexit vote, and rising inflation which has forced shoppers to cut back on spending. 0xeze puds saw that there haas being
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a gluts with equifax. —— there has been a problem with a glitz with equifax. what more do we know? there is a certain piece of software used by equifax and several other companies. in march there was a vulnerability discovered. a catch that they had to close. that patch was made available backin close. that patch was made available back in march. many firms rushed to be able to update their information but it seems that equifax was not as quick to update the information, it was left vulnerable for a longer period of time. what more do we know about whether
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uk customers have been affected. many are still in the dark about this? that's right. so there is still a lot of question on the part of the uk customers about how much of the uk customers about how much of their information has in fact been breached. for american customers, what people here can do they can go to the website, you put in some information and it let's you now how likely it is that your information has been compromised. but key to be able to find out that information is using what is called a social security number that is unique to people only in the united states. people residing in the uk do not have social security numbers, so really that website is of no use to them. so there is still a lot of questions when it comes to uk customers and how they can find out whether or not their information has been breached. so still a lot of confusion surrounding the breach. what are the
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investors making of the way that the firm equifax has handled the crisis? there are a lot of questions as to how the firm handled the crisis. there vn missteps since the breach was found out about. we heard that executives sold 2 million shares between the time of the breach and when the consumers found out about it the us law makers want federal investigation into that. and of course the part about how customers would still have to pay equifax to have credit scores protected. and again, a lot of american consumers we re again, a lot of american consumers were upset about that as the data breach was not in their control. so certainly a lot of questions about how a company like equifax can come back from something as damaging as this. that's a story we will be following closely. ten yea rs
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ten years ago northern rock were forced to ask for help. it had huge implication force the banking industry and led to many changes. some say that they don't go far enough. changes to the rule ons letting property could force landlords to quit the market. the royal institution of chartered surveyors says that two thirds of landlords would exit the market rather thanjoining it. landlords would exit the market rather than joining it. investors have been hit by changes to stamp duty and tax relief. auction wagon have recalled vehicles relating to air safety bags. air bags made by the brunt auto parts maker have been linked to at least 16 deaths and 180 injuries
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worldwide. tesselaar is likely to unveil its electric articulated lorry, according to the boss, e loshgs musk. he wanted to branch out into cars, dominated by heavy duty diesel vehicles but the industry say. let's check in with the financial markets now. the pound jumped by over a cent against the dollar and yields of gilts. uk government bonds also rose, after that warning from the bank of england that rates were likely to rise for the first time in more than a decade in the "coming months". that pushed the ftse100 sharply lower due to the inverse relationship with the pound. that's because as sterling rises, the overseas earnings
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of multinationals listed on the index will fall. retail stocks were the market movers today. next upgraded its forecasts for full—year sales and profits after seeing "encouraging" trading over the past three months. and morrisons, britain's number four supermarket, reported a 12.7% rise in first—half profit and a seventh straight quarter of underlying sales growth. that's put pressure on the share price down by nearly 7%. a new ten pound note has entered circulation. it features an image of the novelist jane austen — and for the first time in the uk, has raised dots on it, to make it easierfor visually impaired people to identify. 0ur personal finance correspondent simon gompertz has more details. early this morning, from a few selected banks and cash machines to start with, the first of the new tenners. immediately you notice the plasticky feel, and the bank of england have persevered with plastic notes despite objections from vegan and some religious groups about the animal fat tallow that is used in making it. but the plastic enables them to have various security features, changing colours, changing shapes,
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a clear plastic window with winchester cathedral, gold coloured, on it. and that's the last resting place of jane austen there. 0n the back of the note. plastic is now the future for banknotes. if it's anything like the £5, i'm not a big fan of it. why? it's just the way that you fold them, they don't really, i don't know, i'm not a big fan of the £5 note, i'm not a big fan of the whole plastic note. because of the materials that are used making it. for forgery, what do you use? i'm a vegetarian, and maybe that's a bit gross. you don't like the idea of tallow used in it? not particularly. if you have a severe visual impairment, like fashion blogger emily davison who writes about how these issues affect her life, the new £10 is particularly exciting. it's a lot more smoother now. because in the top left corner are two clusters of bumps
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to distinguish it from other notes. as someone who works in retail, it's not very good etiquette to start holding a note up to see whether it's a certain note and i could explain to the person i'm working with, i'm not doing it because i don't think your note is legitimate, i'm doing it because i can't see what note you've given me. this will help? yes, definitely, i think this will help like with the new £5 note, feeling it on the edge, it will make it a lot quicker to know what note you're holding. you can carry on using the old paper tens until the spring. then it will be out with the old and in with the new. it's time for a look at weather pros pets now with lucy martin. with storm airline queen out of the way, there will be quieter weather. the area of high pressure pushing in from the west. there are tightly packed isobars so, a brisk
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north—westerly breeze. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. whilst the showers are heavy, a lot of dry weather. the showers are moving quickly, thanks to the brisk north—westerly breeze. good spells of sunshine. for much of england and wales, the showers have the chance to be heavy. the odd rumble of thunder not out of the question. the temperatures struggling to reach the mid—teens. a good scattering of showers over the south—west of the england. for wales, the showers are focussed in the far north and the west. the risk of seeing a shower anywhere where, though. into the north—west of england and southern scotland, a little shelter so fewer showers, for parts of northern ireland and north—west scotland, the greater focus of the showers. the temperatures struggling into the mid—teens. this evening, the showers edge towards the south. inland showers becoming confined to western coasts. a wet night for wales and
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the south—west. clear spells in the south—east of england. i coal night, south—east of england. a coal night, temperatures a few degree cooler than we are seeing here. a coal and a bright start tomorrow. good spells of sunshine. showers bubbling up. temperatures coal for the time of the year. the wind lighter than today, so feeling warmer in sheltered spots. highs of 16 to 17 celsius. that takes us into the weekend. coal weather. chilly nights. the winds easing with a mixture of sunshine and showers. here is what is going on in the charts. the high pressure is pushing in from the north—west. settling things down for saturday over northern ireland and scotland. fewer showers and more in the way of drier, brighter weather. england showers and more in the way of drier, brighterweather. england and wales and still the risk of seeing one or two showers with a north—easterly breeze, focussed the further east you are. coal in the
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mid—teens. feeling pleasant in any sunshine. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 3pm. the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire — which killed around 80 people — has begun. the chair, sir martin moore—bick said he understood the enormous pain survivors are still suffering. the inquiry cannot undo any of that. but it can, and will, provide answers to the pressing questions. of how a disaster of this kind could occur in 21st—century london. i think a lot of us are disheartened and don't don't have much faith in the inquiry.
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we have to recognise there are other ways we can achieve the change we are looking for. a man who's spent more than a decade in prison — despite being sentenced to only 10 months — is finally to be released.

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