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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 16, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the uk terror threat is raised to critical — it's highest level — as the man—hunt for the person behind the parsons green tube bombing continues. as the public would expect, we are increasing our police resources on the streets of london and across the country. police say a thousand armed officers will be deployed across the country and will be supported by the army. 29 people were injured in yesterday's attack which has been claimed by so—called islamic state. this is the scene at parsons green, where the tube station has reopened — we're live there throughout the morning. good morning — it's saturday the 16th of september. also: borisjohnson repeats the controversial claim that leaving the eu would save britain £350
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million a week as he sets out his vision for the country post brexit. his north korea leader kim jong—un vows to complete the country's nuclear programme, as the united states once again warns pyongyang of military action. in sport, it's go defoe. bournemouth have their first points of the season thanks to jermain defoe‘s first goal of the season. and stav has got the weather. i think sunday will be the better day, we have showers will be on the chilly side. good morning. first, our main story. armed police and military personnel are being deployed at key locations across the uk after the terror threat level was increased to critical — the highest possible level. the hunt for the person behind the attack is continuing. 29 people were injured, with many suffering from burns. the raising of the threat level
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means that the government believes a further terror attack may be imminent. the bbc understands that the bomb, described as a homemade device, had been fitted with a timer but failed to fully detonate. let's get the latest report on the situation now from andy moore. curiosity overcame fear as passengers filmed the device still burning on the floor of the tube. that bag is on fire. security sources have told the bbc the device used home—made peroxide type explosive very similar to the manchester arena bomb. police said they had a very detailed briefing on they had a very detailed briefing on the device but refused to make that information public. they said there
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we re information public. they said there were many covert components to their investigation. what is clear is that there is a major man—hunt under way involving hundreds of police officers. the man leading the investigation repeatedly spoken that will about suspects and those responsible. i have asked the government ministers earlier on for permission to use members of the military to free up extra police resources . military to free up extra police resources. what that gives me and my tea m resources. what that gives me and my team is an extra thousand armed police officers largely from nuclear co nsta bula ry police officers largely from nuclear constabulary and extra defence police who are freed up by being backfilled by soldiers. so-called islamic state has claimed responsibility for the attack, saying it was carried out by a detachment of its soldiers. no one is allowed through here. officially, the terror threat level remained the same but last night, the prime minister confirmed it had been raised to critical, the highest possible level. the joint terrorism
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analysis centre, that's the independent organisation which is responsible for setting the threat level on the basis of available intelligence, has now decided to raise the national threat level from severe to critical. this means that their assessment is that the attack may be imminent. the public have been warned they may see more police officers on duty this weekend both armed and unarmed, especially at crowded places and transport hubs. andy moore, bbc news. andy is live for us at parsons green. andy, the tube station re—opened in the early hours of this morning. what's the scene there now? the station reopened about 1:30am. the station reopened about 1:30am. the cordons have been removed, the investigation he has been completed. the police as you can see behind me, they are here to reassure the public. there are two things that
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make this attack different. first is, the device failed to go off so mercifully, there were no fatalities. secondly, a timer device was used which means the bomber did not intend to kill themselves so we have this massive man—hunt, the biggest man—hunt in the uk since the attempt to find the failed tube bombers in 2005 and we have hundreds of detectives working on that investigation. no doubt they have cctv images but they are not being put in the public domain of the moment. so that suggests that perhaps the police know who are now looking for and they don't want to share too much information with the public at the moment because that mightjeopardise their operation. just an update, 29 people were taken to hospital with injuries. at least eight of them have already gone home. we will be talking to you
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throughout the morning. borisjohnson has set out his vision for what he called the uk's "glorious" future outside the european union. writing in today's daily telegraph, mrjohnson, who campaigned for brexit, also repeated the controversial claim that leaving the eu would save around £350 million a week, which could be spent on the nhs. though our it comes just six days before the prime minister gives a major brexit speech in the italian city of florence. the pound has reached its highest level against the dollar since we voted to leave the eu. sterling climbed after a senior bank of england official indicated that there could soon be a rise in interest rates. the pound also went up against the euro. a day after its latest ballistic missile launch, north korea has said its final goal is to match the military power of the the united states. a day after its latest ballistic missile launch, north korea has said its final goal is to match the military power of the the united states. last night, the un security council described the missile test over japan as highly provocative — but no further sanctions
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were imposed. bill hayton reports. north korea is celebrating another successful test for its ballistic missile and kim jong—un was there to congratulate the scientists. he told his aim is to tab —— establish a balance of force in the united states so it cannot threaten his country with military action. but on a visit to an airbase near washington, president trump said the us would never be intimidated. after seeing your capabilities and commitment here today, i am more confident than ever that our options in addressing this threat are both effective and overwhelming. in new york, the un security council discussed the situation for the second time this week. this time, there was no new resolution, only a press statement cops —— strongly condemning the missile launch in
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urging compliance with existing sanctions. and russia says the us has to get serious about talks with north korea. but as russia and china urge patience, the us says it is running out of time. it wants an end to north korea's missile and nuclear programmes but with those programmes making rapid progress, the choices facing world leaders are becoming more difficult. a campaign group is calling for a 50% reduction in air passenger duty to boost the uk economy, after britain leaves the european union. air tax paid by people leaving the uk ranges from £13 to £450. here's our business correspondent joe lynam. we all like to travel but few will last know how much of our airfare includes a special tax called a passenger duty. now research campaign group has underlined the additional tax burden uk travellers have to pay it can better european
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countries. air passenger duty as a vital departing uk flights, depending on the distance and ranges from £13 up to £450 per flight. this research says the duty amounts to an additional tax burden of £400 million on british travellers.“ you are a uk consumer and you want to travel abroad this makes your holiday much more expensive for you and yourfamily and if you are a consumer coming from abroad, it makes it more expensive to come and visit britain and they mayjust choose to visit elsewhere and not bother with the uk and that would be a real shame. this group whose members include airlines and airport operators in the tourism sector wa nts operators in the tourism sector wants the government to cut the tax in half, something which it says will benefit consumers and businesses. treasury spokesperson —— spokesperson says they do not have to pay duty or the tax on ticket city at passenger duty ensures the sector contributes its ayrshire towards funding public services. cutting taxes is always popular but
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faced with a £45 billion budget deficit and demands to pay public sector workers more, the government probably can't afford to cut an income stream worth £3.4 billion any time soon. a british man has died in sri lanka after being attacked by a crocodile. 24—year—old paul mclean who worked the financial times had been on holiday and was washing his hands in the lagoon when he was killed. in a statement, the paper said it was heartbroken over his death. gamekeepers in argyll and bute have expressed concern after more than 11,000 farmed salmon escaped into local rivers. they say there's real concern over how crossbreeding would affect the wild fish. anyone fishing in the area has been told to kill the farmed salmon if they are caught, rather than return them to the river. the american actor harry dean stanton, known for his roles in the godfather ii, alien and twin peaks, has died at the age of 91. he appeared in over 100 films and tv shows over 6 decades,
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and was well known in hollywood circles for his showbiz lifestyle. his most recent film, lucky, is due to be released later month. the world's top ballet dancers will perform in hull tonight for a special gala performance, which is also something of a homecoming. breathe principles all began their careers at a small dance school in the city. i think it's a very ——i think it's a very special day for whole and the dance world. it's nice to be back here. how long since you last dans in huu? how long since you last dans in hull? it must have been rows little
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kid before i went to the royal ballet school, i think. this is a story of ballet and an extraordinary homecoming. our young ballerinas here are following in some export on the steps. joseph kaylee is now a principal dancer with the english national ballet. and notjust him, elisabeth harrod, the artistic director, even the kyat —— the choreographer, they all started out here. right leg, left leg,. so many successful ballet stars started here in this little sidestreet in hull with vanessa hooper. parish was just a 21st arrived and is now the first ever british principle of russia's mariinsky. i can't believe it. ever british principle of russia's mariinsky. ican't believe it. iget to see all my beautiful baby is all grown up, to see all my beautiful baby is all grown up, dancing together. you look really well. i'm looking forward to this. and finally backstage, the reunion. lizzie, demelza, xander.
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the head of the royal ballet wanted to return to his hometown and give ita.a to return to his hometown and give it a. a celebration of ballet that began here. i bet they love seeing him back there. a quick look at some of the front pages. many pages are devoted to the events in london yesterday. the daily mail looking about where this information comes from. bomb—making, suggesting theresa may wa nts bomb—making, suggesting theresa may wants the internet giants to clamp down on extremism. the coverage continues the many pages. also on the front of the daily mirror. more
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on that bucket form, which is what they are calling it. that bucket on said to be made from an explosive duffed the mother of satan, ignited during the rush hour in parsons green in west london, injuring 29. on the front page of the sun newspaper, the man—hunt for the bomber is continuing today. making reference to the fact that the terror threat is up to its maximum level which is critical which suggests that a number —— and other terror attack may be imminent. the daily telegraph is gone with a story about boris johnson daily telegraph is gone with a story about borisjohnson because he's done a big piece of it is picking up again at number, at £350 million which is a big part of the campaign, voting to leave the european union. borisjohnson has voting to leave the european union. boris johnson has done voting to leave the european union. borisjohnson has done 4000 words inside a paper today. and we will talk about that later. the times has
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chosen to make their lead story not the bomb in london yesterday, they have a story in connection with the queen. they say one the queen's most senior staff forced out in a struggle between buckingham palace and the prince of wales. a quick look through some of the front pages. a full review of the papers coming up later. good morning. it is a bit chilly. i've been resisting putting my central heating on because it is september, you would think it would bea september, you would think it would be a little bit warmer. things will warm up towards next week from the south—west but this weekend it will be cool. northerly winds. the showers will gradually ease and after a chilly night tonight i think sunday is the better day of the two, more sunshine. this low pressure will generate the showers again.
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northerly winds and high pressure wa nts to northerly winds and high pressure wants to come in and it will do through sunday. showers to start this morning in the channel islands. certainly draped across northern and eastern and western coasts of the country. central areas start dry. quite chilly. temperatures in low single figures. but at least we have the sunshine. the same in central and southern scotland. the northern ireland it's a cloudy start and here we have fairly frequent showers. they will merge together for longer spells of rain. the windies lighted today as well, so as temperatures rise in the sunshine it won't feel too bad. from late morning onwards the showers become widespread again. the odd heavy one may be. across western scotland and northern ireland and towards wales the south—west becomes more wet. turning very wet in the south—west towards the end of the day. a bit of a wet and into the evening and the
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south—west. it takes a while to clear away. elsewhere, under clear skies and light winds it will turn quite chilly. these are the larger towns. we will have a touch of frost across central and northern parts. the low pressure starts to pull away. it matters in from the north and west, so will settle things down. apart from the odd shower it is looking pretty good. it will feel a little bit warmer. in the next week we hold onto high pressure, so things are set to stay calm and dry. carmen is a good word for us! thank you and see you in a bit. —— calm is a. time now for the film
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review. hello there, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. what do we have this week? we have victoria and abdul in whichjudi dench returns to the role of queen victoria. we have the villainess, an insanely kinetic action movie. and mother, darren aronofsky‘s crowd—dividing epic. victoria and abdul, yet another film about victoria, and of coursejudi dench. yes. because she was in mrs brown, about victoria's friendship with john brown, her ghillie. this is about a later life friendship with abdul karim, which i have to say i didn't know about. the story is that he is brought over from india, first to
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perform an official ceremony. she is lonely at the beginning of the film. we see her being isolated, cut off from her surroundings. and she immediately forms a bond, a friendship, with him. much to the outrage of firstly her son, bertie, played by eddie izzard, and all the attendant officials. here's a clip. but the piece de resistance is the peacock throne. an exact copy. now i really do feel like the empress of india. i thought she was supposed to be dying. it really is a remarkable addition to the house, your majesty. we have abdul to thank for the whole idea. to celebrate, a little surprise for your majesty. what is this?
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a mango, your majesty. one moment, your majesty. it's... sir henry, this mango is off. it looks like a terrific performance as usual from judi dench. yes, and ali fazal is very good as abdul as well. it's a very likeable film not least because the performances are very likeable. from the outside it looks rather fluffy. it looks like a good—looking film that will appeal to the people that loved mrs brown, also people who went to see the best exotic marigold hotel, which was such a big hit. you scratch the surface however and it is a more serious film underneath about an indian muslim's very close friendship with the monarch who is head of the church of england, this
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and what you find is that they have a huge amount in common. that they have enormous shared interests. and their friendship becomes something which, because everybody else around is so concerned by it, seems to threaten the stability. in fact it is actually giving her a great solace and comfort. i think the real scene stealer for me is adeel akhtar, who plays abdul‘s sidekick, unwitting sidekick. and he was so great in the big sick. and here he plays a character, he is an incidental character, who doesn't really want to get involved in all this. at first this character is comic and has an element of pathos and then later on this character becomes the voice of subdued anger underneath the film. it is something which is enjoyable. it's fairly broadly played. it says at the beginning it's inspired by real events, mostly. although weirdly enough some of the things that you think must be dramatic do actually turn out to be true. but it's funny. it's very well played. the cast are enjoying themselves. i don't think it's earth—shattering by any means but it does have a serious story underneath it.
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0k. and if you're looking for something rather different, totally different, it is the villainess, i suppose, about a trained assassin. yes, the villainess is an absolutely insane south korean action movie about a femme fatale who is forcefully recruited at a young age to become a trained killer. in the opening scene there is a sequence in which she makes her way through a building full of baddies which makes the corridor sequence from oldboy look like some kind of low—key character study. there is a very similar narrative to nikita, the idea of somebody who was taken at a young age who is trained. in fact there is a scene in the villainess which very specifically seems to recall the bathroom scene from nikita. the film has an operatic narrative. it is something which is histrionic, it is overcooked. the plot is labyrinthine and occasionally you can't follow the plot. but you can always follow the fight sequences because they are choreographed so well. it is a film with real visual panache. i sat there in a screening room with people who were gasping. apparently when it played the festival circuit it was getting standing ovations and you can see why because it is choreographed with real visceral power.
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it's called the villainess. and it is quite something. did you gasp? everyone else was gasping. idid. the opening sequence, it is turned up to 11 and then some. bear in mind this is the week in which darren aronofsky‘s mother comes to cinemas. everybody will know that this has caused an awful lot of controversy. darren aronofsky, who made black swan, which i know you are a big fan of. yes, fantastic. it was a big hit. i have to say black swan was rather more accessible than this. this basically as an archetypal story. jennifer lawrence is the mother of the character. she is a woman living with her older husband, a poet, played byjavier bardem, in this remote house which she is doing up, which she is trying to turn into a paradise for both of them. he is blocked. he is a writer but he can't write. and then at the door turns up ed harris who then also brings with him his wife, played
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by michelle pfeiffer, who is garrulous and garish, and immediately starts to invade their privacy. bardem's character is absolutely thrilled. jennifer lawrence's character is not pleased. here is a clip. why don't you want kids? excuse me? you are not going to be so young forever. have kids. then you'll be creating something together. that's what keeps a marriage going. this is alljust setting. oh, you do want them. a great director, a great cast, a stellar cast, i have to say. is it a great film? it is an extremely polarising film. what happens is it turns from a paranoid nightmare, something like rosemary's baby, into something closer to apocalypse now, a home invasion movie. it's very allegorical. on the one hand you can see this invasion as the invasion
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of mother earth, being despoiled by mankind treating it badly. you can see it as a story about the way in which older men prey on younger women. you can also see it as a biblical story which has a creator, which has an adam and eve, which has a cain and abel, and obviously if you think about the director, he made noah, he took the book of genesis and turned it into a story with a bunch of fighting rock monsters. it is an extreme cinema experience. whilst i was watching it i found myself feeling profoundly claustrophobic. so much of the film is right on jennifer lawrence's face. we see everything from her point of view. it's subjective cinema. it becomes more and more insane, crazy, over the top, it moves towards a third act... there have been talks about walk—outs. you can either be disgusted and walk out, or you can laugh at the film, or laugh with the film. it is a garish black comedy and everything is massively over cranked.
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whilst i was watching it i found it very oppressive. but as distance has come with it, i've started to see more and more things in it. i'm very impressed by it. it really does grab you. it never lets you go. i can't say it is a pleasant viewing experience because it doesn't. it's incredibly intense. panofsky has referred to exterminating angels, but horror fans will see david lynch and david cronenberg. it is a very full on experience that will leave you massively disorientated and you need to give yourself at least a week afterwards before deciding what to think about it. and i'm not kidding. it is a week it will take to settle down. i thought you were going to say to take a week off work. all right. let's talk about the best out at the moment. i really like it. as you probably know this has become a record—breaking horror success, although it's more of a horror adventure than a horror. based on a novel by stephen king. there was a tv miniseries before. this i think works because of the affection for the losers, the central misfit kids,
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who take us on this journey. it's a film that references the goonies. references to poltergeist. people who are fans of stranger things will find an awful lot in it. when it needs to be scary, it has some scares, but it's much more a coming—of—age adventure. which is true of much of stephen king's writing. and it has a terrific incarnation of pennywise the clown, which i think gives tim currry‘s version of pennywise, which i thought was definitive, a run for its money. it is very good. it is very enjoyable. it is a real roller—coaster ride. and best dvd? a very impressive british film called chicken. it is directed byjoe stephenson. it is a story about a young man who is trying to find his place in a world which is often very hostile. there are certain elements of ken loach‘s kes there. it was one of those films i knew nothing about before i saw it and it really drew me in.
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as i said — a small film but with a big heart and lots of ambition. and i think it's really very touching and affecting and i really liked it. it's called chicken and it's well worth checking out. all right. thank you. just a quick reminder before we go that you will find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that's it. thank you for watching. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before seven, stav will have the weekend's weather forecast for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. armed police and military personnel are being deployed at key locations across the uk after the terror threat level was increased to critical — the highest possible level. the hunt for the person behind yesterday's parsons green tube attack is continuing. 29 people were injured. our correspondent andy moore
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is at the scene for us this morning. there is a major man—hunt. meanwhile, parsons green tube station has been reopened a few hours ago. you can see quite a large police presence behind me. that is to reassure the public. cordons have been lifted. frantic examination of this station is finished. but there are two things which make this attack different from so many of the ones we have seen in the uk this year. firstly, the device failed to detonate properly means mercifully there were no fatalities. secondly, there were no fatalities. secondly, there was a timer attached to the bomb which means the bomber didn't wa nt to bomb which means the bomber didn't want to kill themselves. that's why we have this massive man—hunt ongoing at the moment. the biggest man—hunt since the search for the
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failed tube bombers injuly 2000 five. police have been trawling through hundreds of cctv images that so far, none of those have been placed in the public domain. it suggests perhaps police know who they are looking for. they don't wa nt to they are looking for. they don't want to jeopardise the operation by telling the public too much. the assistant commissioner spoke about certain covert components to this operation. perhaps he's keeping a lot of things close to his chest. borisjohnson has set out his vision for what he called the uk's "glorious" future outside the european union. writing in today's daily telegraph, mrjohnson, who campaigned for brexit, also repeated the controversial claim that leaving the eu would save around £350 million a week, which could be spent on the nhs. it comes just six days before the prime minister gives a major brexit speech in the italian city of florence. a day after its latest test—firing of a ballistic missile,
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north korea's leader kimjong un has said his goal is to match the military power of the united states. the united nations security council described the missile test over japan as highly provocative. washington has again warned pyongyang of military action if current sanctions don't work. but russia and china say diplomacy is the only solution. campaigners are calling for a 50 percent reduction in air passenger duty to boost the uk economy, after britain's withdrawal from the european union. the fair tax on flyers group says air tax amounts to an extra £400 million a year for uk passengers. a british man has died in sri lanka after being attacked by a crocodile, his employer has confirmed. 24—year—old paul mcclean, who worked for the financial times, had been on holiday and is believed to have been washing his hands in a lagoon when he was killed.
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in a statement the paper said it was heartbroken over his death. a woman injamaica who's believed to have been the oldest person in the world has died at the age of 117. violet brown was born on march 10, 1900, and said the secret to her long life was to eat everything except pork and chicken and not to drink rum. here she is receiving an award from the jamaican prime minister. the oldest person in the world is now believed to be nabi tajima from japan, who is also 117. os like hearing that advice about what you should and shouldn't have the reach 117. no rum, eat everything except pork and chicken. good to know. defoe, rolling back the years, i remember covering him
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asa the years, i remember covering him as a teenager. another heroic knight back on the south coast. a really important when the bournemouth. it looked as though they were heading for a fifth straight defeat in the premier league, when solly march put brighton ahead — but they levelled and defoe gave them their first points of the season. they're still at the wrong end of the table, of course, but it's a start. this is the goal to send the fans wild. a lot of different emotions and relief as the biggest one. got to be honest when you start the season, you want to first win, ideally in the first game if not the second game and it's taken us longer than we wanted. we had tough fixtures, we are aware of that is today is really important in the real achievement from the players is to go 1— nil down the start that we had to respond in a manner that we did was very special. roy hodgson takes charge of crystal palace, for the first time later today.
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they welcome southampton to selhurst park, and they do so, as the premier league's bottom club, having lost all four, of their matches so far: i certainly get the feeling that there is no doubt in the players minds about the important of this game, there is no doubt in our minds about how much it will be a good game to win and it's really up to them now, these people are selected to show they are on the field of play. in scotland, rangers' stand—in skipper, graham dorrans came to their rescue. he took the captain's armband, when lee wallace, was injured early in the game and his goal gave them, a 2—all draw at patrick thistle. that takes them, up to third in the table. the crowd at chester le street have been disappointed, even before the start of england's t20 game against west indies. many of them bought tickets to watch local favourite ben stokes at his home ground — durham used him to market the match but he's been left out. england say he needs a rest. guys want to see him play. if there
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wasn't an injury risk down the line ora wasn't an injury risk down the line or a huge ashes tour coming up, potentially might be able to play but it is unfortunate that has to be a game at his home ground but forgot to stay strong with the decisions are plans that have so potentially down the line, so that we don't forget —— regret playing him in a one—off game. forget —— regret playing him in a one-off game. that is the night race setting for the singapore grand prix. it looks beautiful. the lights come on at the marina bay track, and the whole place sparkles. holding the race at night, also helps lessen the effects of the humidity. but championship leader lewis hamilton will need to warm things up a bit — he was more than half a second slower than daniel ricciardo, who led yesterday's practice sessions. britain's olympic skeleton champion, lizzy yarnold, says, she now knows, why she has been suffering from dizziness problems, over the last few years. she has a kind of travel sickness. the 28—year—old won gold
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at sochi three years ago, and she's preparing for next year's winter olympics in pyeong—chang: when i'm going down the track, sometimes i can become disorientated but i've seen the best specialists and my team knows what's going on and my team knows what's going on and to know how to recover and compete still. i absolutely have the will to compete in every race regardless of those issues. it was an iconic sporting moment, when britain'sjohnny brownlea, was helped over the line by brother alistair, at the end of the mexican triathlon. that was a year ago, and this year's world series, comes to an end today, in rotterdam, with britain'sjonny hoping for a victory, without the need for any help. i think the rest of my career, a lwa ys i think the rest of my career, always could have in my mind, i don't do a special was the right word, it was unusual. but the need
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to win here would be very, very special. i've never won a grand final before. i've come second a few times and if i could win that, it would go a long way to getting over last year. thousands of boxing fans are in las vegas this weekend, for the middleweight title clash, between two, of the best fighters on the planet, gennady golov—kin and canelo al—varez, which is being dubbed ‘the real deal‘. on the undercard is british two—time olympic gold medallist, nicola adams who says it's a dream, to make her vegas debut. i'm taking it just i'm taking itjust as i take every other fight i'm taking itjust as i take every otherfight i i'm taking itjust as i take every other fight i have i'm taking itjust as i take every otherfight i have been in. stay calm, collected and don't let the nerves overwhelm you. ijust like to have fun when i am in their supply will be taking my time, having fun and just enjoying the moment. it isa it is a first professional fight away from home and we'll hear from
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the boxing commentator. she is a smiley as pre— fight boxer. the boxing commentator. she is a smiley as pre- fight boxer. she would in the ring. you wouldn't want to hurt her puncher, your personality would be overwhelmed. and extremely effective in the ring. absolutely ruthless, skill and power. she doesn't have to do all that stuff the guys do before the fight. she doesn't have to do all the trash talk. she smiles and goes in and nails. she is the ultimate athlete. three years ago prince harry founded the invectives games. next week, the uk's biggest team will take part. steve brown has been to meet one athlete who will not let the injuries to find his life.
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that is the vehicle were i was on patrol and obviously, i was 20 or 30 feet away, face down. but life goes on. stuart robinson graduated from the raf one day after his 18th birthday. he proudly served his country in northern ireland, iraq and afghanistan however stuart's life was changed forever when his vehicle drove over an improvised explosive device, or ied, while on a routine patrol in helmand province in 2013. my only overriding memory of that whole time was the fact that because i could open my eyes and because i could open my eyes and because i could open my eyes and because i was still seeing, i was alive. and that manager wiping yourself locked eyes, it must have been quite a moment for her as much as you? even though she saw me for
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the first time in hospital despite the first time in hospital despite the number of limbs that i was missing at the time, she knew it was me. i managed to get out of hospital, i am walking about, and now trying to get involved in sport and using the invectives games as a massive tool to get better. it's a process i know well. after i was injured 13 years ago, i was introduced to wheelchair rugby and captained the pa ralympic introduced to wheelchair rugby and captained the paralympic team in 2012. it's crazy to think that you watched me play in 2012 as captain and now you are the invicta scams captain, going on to your second captaincy as well. what happened, yes, but it was great to watch you quys yes, but it was great to watch you guys play yes, but it was great to watch you guys play and obviously maybe subconsciously, i might have kickstarted that fired to play the
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sport and just difficult circumstances led to playing. more than 300 people applied to join the uk squad. that's the biggest number since prince harry founded the games in 2014. 2014 was a really exciting opportunity. we had no idea what it was going to be, what the outcomes would be and how it was going to grow and what have seen over the last three years is such a public appetite for what we are doing in such an interest from the guys and girls and a really positive recovery impact. stuart was part of the team which won bronze last year in orlando. now he has the chance to serve his country again and he wants to do even better. lots to look forward to. you can also catch up with coverage of the games next sunday on bbc one. really exciting. it's just games next sunday on bbc one. really exciting. it'sjust coming up games next sunday on bbc one. really exciting. it's just coming up to 6:44a.m.. the
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exciting. it's just coming up to 6:44 a.m.. the attack in parsons green yesterday was that this terrorist attack in britain this year. the only attack in which nobody died, the previous four attacks including those on westminster bridge and the manchester arena saw a total of 36 killed. police believe they have stopped six other significant plots all of which will soon be coming before the courts. that makes this the most sustained period of terrorist activity in england since the ira bombing campaign of the early 19705. we can talk to margaret gilmore with the royal united service5 in5titute gilmore with the royal united service5 institute at par5on5 green this morning. that is where that attack happened yesterday. good morning. we know there is a man—hunt under way. what will the intelligence services and police be doing right now? the key thing is to a rre5t doing right now? the key thing is to arrest the person who carried out the attack and check to his associates were. but he may be
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working with, whether there was somebody else to make that bomb and whether there are other people who are capable of carrying out a similar attack. and you may be able to work out how to make a bomb that actually does go off. i think they are particularly worried because they don't necessarily believe what isi5 say, but isi5 has put out a statement referring to people in the plural being behind this attack and think that has worried them. initially, the working theory yesterday was that there was just one person and now there is a fear that he might have been working as a tea m that he might have been working as a team and it is a real race against time to get to them before they try to carry out more. which is why we expect the terror threat level has been increased to critical?|j expect the terror threat level has been increased to critical? i think that's the case. they will have definitely got... sorry, i'm getting some feedback. they will definitely have got a picture of the person.
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there's cctv all over the shop... in the underground. they will have a picture and will know who they are looking for. they may know where he is. we don't know that. at the fact that their —— there may be other associates has taken into different level. all different walk5 associates has taken into different level. all different walks of life will be affected today. it means security goe5 will be affected today. it means security goes up to a different level, whether it be at your busine55, level, whether it be at your business, there will be extra checks, vi5itors business, there will be extra checks, visitors will be checked further and the army is infiltrating some places, so they can perhaps free up more police to go in the 5treet free up more police to go in the street and what we will see at stations and other public places acro55 stations and other public places across the country is more police visibly but there will also be more undercover police working as well. thank you. i mentioned at the start
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of this that this is the fifth terrorism incident of 2017 and it ta kes terrorism incident of 2017 and it takes us back to the times of the 5u5tained bombing i5 —— bombing5 we 5aw 5u5tained bombing i5 —— bombing5 we saw from the ira in the 705. 5u5tained bombing i5 —— bombing5 we saw from the ira in the 70s. how what we do in it to be about that? it's a different group of people, but what's 5lightly worrying i5 isi5 i5 but what's 5lightly worrying i5 isi5 is constantly changing its tactics and when i say isi5 this person may not have any contact with isi5. or this group of people. so what we saw yesterday is different to what we've 5een yesterday is different to what we've seen before. we saw a bomb that was planted with a timer on it and not a suicide bomber, going on with a knife, knowing he would eventually end up dead. a different tactic, more like the ira. so i think we don't need to be unnecessarily worried. ye5, don't need to be unnecessarily worried. yes, this year has been a bad year. but of the five attacks
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that came through we know that another six have been prevented and we will hear about those as they go through the course. so i think our security forces and intelligence agencies are actually being more 5ucce55ful tha n agencies are actually being more successful than ever before. the type of person and type of terrorist they are dealing with is very different. it could be somebody sitting up in their own flat this morning suddenly thinking, go5h, i wa nt to morning suddenly thinking, go5h, i want to do that and i believe in the ideology of. a much more difficult person to find. if you are working ina team person to find. if you are working in a team you are as secret a5 person to find. if you are working in a team you are as secret as your wea kest in a team you are as secret as your weakest link. once you get one you normally get the entire i5 weakest link. once you get one you normally get the entire is all. if you work alone and you are links to a group you are more difficult to track down. thank you very much for your time track down. thank you very much for yourtime and track down. thank you very much for your time and thanks for putting up with the dodgy piece you were given! time now to have a look at the weekend weather. good morning. good
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morning. it is a chilly start. it will be quite a chilly weekend. today we have plenty of showers and longer spell5 of rain. a chilly night to come tonight. tomorrow will be debated day. —— will be a better day. there will be northerly wind5, although not as strong as they have been. the high pressure will settle things down for next week. a scattering of showers across the channel islands, western and eastern codes. central areas starting chilly. fog clears quickly and there should be good spells of sunshine. much of northern ireland, western scotland, quite a few clouds. showers merging together to produce longer spells of rain. that's how we see things for the rest of the day. the feature will continue to move south and bring wet weather the western scotland and northern ireland. then it will push into
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wales and the south—west. elsewhere, showers developing from late morning onwards. they could turn out to be heavy. quite a wet end to the day in this part of the country. not especially warm. 13— 16 at best. thenifs especially warm. 13— 16 at best. then it's a wet end to the day. the rain lingers on. further north the showers die away. the winds are light, clear skies. it showers die away. the winds are light, clearskies. it turns showers die away. the winds are light, clear skies. it turns chilly. these are towns and city values. out in the countryside to single figures widely. a touch of frost as well in central and northern parts. low pressure slipping away to the south. that will take the showers away from southern areas. high—pressure toppling him. that will settle things down. sunday looks like it will be the better day of the weekend. a few showers can't be ruled out, but they will be isolated. most places will stay dry. it should be a bit warmer as well.
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see you later. thanks very much. we'll be back with the headline at 7am, but first it's time for click. siren sounds radio: we have one party down. in the united states, mass shootings are something that occur with depressing regularity. libraries, churches, cinemas, and schools — all locations of acts of mass murder. often perpetrated by one individual, with powerful military style weapons. in the last four years there have been more than 200 mass shootings in schools alone in the united states. the deadliest school shooting ever was in 2012 at sandy hook elementary school, where 20 pupils and six staff were murdered by a lone gunman.
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it made headlines across the globe. and so, to help prepare for the next time, authorities have turned to technology that is normally used in video games, to help train emergency crews and even teachers to be ready to respond. just a warning, you might find some of the images in this film distressing. radio: at least one person has been shot... they're saying there's hundreds of people just running around... unfortunately these active shooting situations, particularly in schools, are not going away any time soon. you'll see in schools, they do more fire alarm drills than they do active shooter drills. that's changing now in some schools.
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the most recent school shooting in the us was just a few days ago, in spokane, in washington state. a high school student died confronting the shooter. the department of homeland security is try to do something about these events. there have been a lot of copycats, that have necessitated first responders getting more prepared to respond to these kind of attacks. so it's created a simulation to help train first responders to what it calls "active shooter" attacks. the simulator is called the enhanced dynamic geo—social environment, or edge for short. using a pc, a team of first responders can work together to resolve an active shooting incident in a hotel. fire teams put out blazes, paramedics treat the injured and cops deal with the bad guy. this facility is part of the army research labs.
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they are primarily concerned with building research and training tools for the military. it is the birthplace of the edge system which we can see through here. designed in conjunction with simulation specialists cole engineering, the research lab has used the unreal engine, the guts of a host of popular video games, to create its environments. one of the reasons we connected with the department of homeland security is that we have a lot of experience in the simulation world. one thing that we have been moving towards is the use of game technology, to provide those capabilities that traditional simulations did in the past. time to try edge for myself. i can play as a firefighter or medic, but i will choose to play as a cop. to make the training is useful as possible,
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the active shooter is played by a human being. this introduces an unpredictable element that an ai would find difficult to replicate. this feels like an ordinary videogame graphically, and the way it plays. actual first responders would play this game, applying their real tactics and procedures to the situation. will this can sometimes highlight problems that might occur in the real world. while the hotel might feel like playing in a normal video game, the team here has been working on a new environment, one with far more chilling connotations. when there is a school shooting, it is completely different than when there is other types of soft targets hit. and it's very different than a traditional, if you have an active shooter event at a mall or a theatre or somewhere like that. a new playable character has been introduced into the school environment. as well as cops, the player can take the role of a teacher. so an active shooter event in a school, has it been discovered then, that by the time law enforcement arrive, the event is over,
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that the shooter has killed people in the school? that's correct. basically the teacher is almost the first line of defence for the students, to stay safe. so i have spawned in and i am a teacher in a classroom. my class has survived, but the experience is an unpleasant one. this has definitely stopped feeling like i am playing a game. while orlando is home to the arl, it also knows the carnage that can be wrought by a lone gunman. this is pulse, it was a gay nightclub. last year it was the site of america's deadliest shooting. omar mateen, a lone gunman, armed with a pistol and an assault—style rifle killed 49 people here. in the wake of the pulse shooting, florida state senator linda stewart tried to introduce a bill limiting the sale of new assault—style weapons and large capacity magazines. the bill did not pass. homeland security has commissioned this simulation
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software, which is to train first responders and law enforcement, in how to deal with active shooter situations. what you think about that bit of software? i think it's absolutely necessary. i think that the more hands—on, or the more information that people who are having to respond have, the better they will be able to respond in real—time. in the meantime, homeland security is hoping to create more environments for edge, eventually building a generic anytown usa for virtual training. i don't think we can necessarily stop these events, but hopefully we can reduce the number or the severity of these attacks. it's unbelievable that it was only just over ten years ago that stevejobs said this. an ipod, a phone...
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..and we are calling it iphone. the iphone did something no smartphone had done before. it really brought the internet into our pockets with its high quality, big touchscreen, a good browser and that great idea of pinch and zoom. it kickstarted a new generation of smartphones. it defines the look that every other maker's smartphone still adheres to, and in the process it made apple the most valuable company in the world. so when a new iphone arrives, the world pays attention. we did too. dave lee was there. say hello to apple park, or the spaceship, as everyone calls it. eventually, 12,000 people will work on this 175 acre site. it was designed by british architect norman foster and cost a reported $5 billion, which makes it the most expensive building in america.
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their headquarters is in many respects the last great project from steve jobs. this was his final appearance in public before he died. one last launch not for a device, but for a building. so it's curved all the way around. as you know, if you build things, this is not the cheapest way. there is not a straight piece of glass in this building. six years later i am among those piling into the steve jobs theatre, a purpose—built venue for the kind of product launches that jobs made his trademark. you wonder what he would have made of the latest iphone. new facial recognition software means you can unlock the device just by looking at it, a system that replaces the fingerprint sensor in previous iphones. after a bit of a mishap, apple's craig federighi got it working. let's try that again. and this might be the most
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ridiculous orfine use of sophisticated technology ever. it's a happy puppy. check out the physics of the ears. animated emojis track my facial expressions to power the emoji with different expressions. this makes me laugh. i can be this pig and if i smile it smiles, and it might raise my eyebrows and puff my cheeks, it does that. at $999 or £999, the iphone x does not come cheap, which is why apple is also bringing out an iphone 8 and 8 plus, a more incremental upgrade on last year's models. and for the first time for an apple smartphone, it can be charged wirelessly — something samsung, it has to be said, has offered since 2015. the iphone 8 plus's camera offers a way to artificially change the lighting on a picture, which it does by using the two
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lenses on the back to digitally simulate different lighting conditions. and the apple watch has been given a significant upgrade. it now has its own cellular connection built—in, which means you don't need to take your phone with you in order for the watch to work. it is sales of the iphone which have made apple the huge, huge company it is today, and the new hq is a permanent reminder of the company's enormous power. will the iphone x continue the success into another decade? apple seems confident, but then again, they might be talking poo emoji.
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