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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 16, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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cheap, which is why apple is also bringing out an iphone 8 and 8 plus, a more incremental upgrade on last year's models. and for the first time for an apple smartphone, it can be charged wirelessly — something samsung, it has to be said, has offered since 2015. the iphone 8 plus‘s camera offers a way to artificially change the lighting on a picture, which it does by using the two lenses on the back to digitally simulate different lighting conditions. and the apple watch has been given a significant upgrade. it now has its own cellular connection built—in, which means you don't need to take your phone with you in order for the watch to work. it is sales of the iphone which have made apple the huge, huge company it is today, and the new h0 is a permanent reminder of the company's enormous power. will the iphone x continue the success into another decade? apple seems confident, but then again, they might be talking poo emoji. if you ever wondered what humanity would do if given access to the most
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advance facial tracking technology available, you now have your answer. and that is it for the short cut of click this week, the full—length is up on iplayer for you to watch now. and we live on twitter and facebook as well. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the uk terror threat is raised to critical — it's highest level — as the man—hunt for the person behind the parsons green tube bombing continues. as the public would expect, we are increasing our police resources on the streets of london and across the country.
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police say a thousand armed officers will be deployed across the country and will be supported by the army. 29 people were injured in yesterday's attack which has been claimed by so—called islamic state. this is the scene at parsons green, where the tube station has reopened — we're live there throughout the morning. also: borisjohnson repeats the controversial claim that leaving the eu would save britain £350 million a week as he sets out his vision for the country post brexit. north korea leader kim jong—un vows to complete the country's nuclear programme, as the united states once again warns pyongyang of military action.
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in sport, it's go defoe. bournemouth have their first points of the season thanks to jermain defoe's first goal of the season. and stav has got the weather. i think sunday will be the better day, we have showers and it will be on the chilly side. good morning. first, our main story. armed police and military personnel are being deployed at key locations across the uk after the terror threat level was increased to "critical" — the highest possible level. the hunt for the person behind the parsons green attack is continuing. 29 people were injured, with many suffering from burns orfrom being caught in the crush as people fled the station. the raising of the threat level means that the government believes a further terror attack may be imminent. the device went off as a district line tube train pulled
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into the overground station at parsons green in south—west london at 8:20 yesterday morning. the bbc understands that the bomb, described as a homemade device, had been fitted with a timer but failed to fully detonate. let's get the latest report on the situation now from andy moore. curiosity overcame fear as passengers filmed the device still burning on the floor of the tube. that bag is on fire. security sources have told the bbc the device used home—made peroxide—type explosive very similar to the manchester arena bomb. police said they had a very detailed briefing on the device but refused to make that information public. they said there were many covert components to their investigation. what is clear is that there is a major man—hunt under way involving hundreds of police officers. the man leading the investigation repeatedly spoke at will about suspects and those responsible. i have asked the government
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ministers earlier on for permission to use members of the military to free up extra police resources. what that gives me and my team is an extra thousand armed police officers largely from nuclear constabulary and extra defence police who are freed up by being backfilled by soldiers. so—called islamic state has claimed responsibility for the attack, saying it was carried out by a detachment of its soldiers. no—one is allowed through here. officially, the terror threat level remained the same but last night, the prime minister confirmed it had been raised to critical, the highest possible level. the joint terrorism analysis centre, that's the independent organisation which is responsible for setting the threat level on the basis of available intelligence, has now decided to raise the national threat level from severe to critical. this means that their assessment is that the attack may be imminent.
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the public have been warned they may see more police officers on duty this weekend both armed and unarmed, especially at crowded places and transport hubs. andy moore, bbc news. andy is live for us at parsons green. andy, the tube station reopened in the early hours of this morning. what's the scene there now? it out and about 1:30 a.m.. the court has been lifted, the police investigation is over. you can see the police officers and vehicles behind me. they are part of the operation to reassure people who are travelling on the tube today, people who have been very concerned obviously knowing that another attack may well be imminent. but people are being told to be vigilant. and to report to police anything suspicious and of course, anything suspicious and of course, any suspicious object. you can see the officers on the entrance to the tube there and i've had a look inside, you can see the very small
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ticket hall in there, very narrow and divided and you can see why suddenly people were injured in the crush. hundreds of people from one train all trying to get out. a total of 29 people were taken to hospital. some of them with injuries caused by the crush, some of them burn injuries. we now know that eight of them at least have gone home. we've had a message from the mayor of london overnight to set london stands together as always. he said the capital would not be intimidated. 0ur reporter dan freedman is at new scotland yard for us this morning. what's the latest on the investigation? the assistant commissioner who is the national leader the counterterrorism spoke year and said they are making excellent progress but as we know, so far there have been no arrests and that is why we understand the terror threat level increased last night. that happened
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as well after the manchester bomb is in may when mack wrote one blew himself up at the manchester arena. 0nce police were clear there were no other attacks imminent from a network surrounding him, that terror threat level came down once again. of course this is different, a device left on a train and the bomber has subsequently fled. so the search now for that bomb, the concern of course that bomber might have access to other devices. 0r another network that has access to other devices. in terms of the police operation across the weekend which looks different, we know that 1000 military personnel are being drafted into backfilled police survey drafted into backfilled police survey can drafted into backfilled police survey can be out on the streets and the reassuring presence both unarmed, armed and covert places,
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particularly in the capital which is 110w particularly in the capital which is now suffered for terror attacks this year. we'll be talking to the ministry of defence's former head of counter terrorism in just a few minutes‘ time. borisjohnson has set out his vision for what he called the uk's glorious future outside the european union. writing in today's daily telegraph, mrjohnson, who campaigned for brexit, also repeated the controversial claim that leaving the eu would save around 350 million pounds a week, which could be spent on the nhs. it comes just six days before the prime minister gives a major brexit speech in the italian city of florence. the pound has reached its highest level against the dollar since we voted to leave the eu. sterling climbed after a senior bank of england official indicated that there could soon be a rise in interest rates. the pound also went up against the euro. a day after its latest ballistic missile launch, north korea has said its final goal is to match the military power
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of the the united states. last night, the un security council described the missile test over japan as highly provocative — but no further sanctions were imposed. bill hayton reports. north korea is celebrating another successful test for its hwasong—12 ballistic missile and kim jong—un was there to congratulate the scientists. he told his aim is to establish a balance of force in the united states so it cannot threaten his country with military action. but on a visit to an airbase near washington, president trump said the us would never be intimidated. after seeing your capabilities and commitment here today, i am more confident than ever that our options in addressing this threat are both effective and overwhelming. in new york, the un security council discussed the situation
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for the second time this week. this time, there was no new resolution, only a press statement strongly condemning the missile launch in urging compliance with existing sanctions. and russia says the us has to get serious about talks with north korea. but as russia and china urge patience, the us says it is running out of time. it wants an end to north korea's missile and nuclear programmes but with those programmes making rapid progress, the choices facing world leaders are becoming more difficult. a campaign group is calling for a 50% reduction in air passenger duty to boost the uk economy, after britain leaves the european union. air tax paid by people leaving the uk ranges from £13 to £450. here's our business correspondent joe lynam.
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gamekeepers in argyll and bute have expressed concern after more than 11,000 farmed salmon escaped into local rivers. they say there's real concern over how crossbreeding would affect the wild fish. anyone fishing in the area has been told to kill the farmed salmon if they are caught, rather than return them to the river. the american actor harry dean stanton, known for his roles in the godfather ii, alien and twin peaks, has died at the age of 91. he appeared in over 100 films and tv shows over 6 decades, and was well known in hollywood circles for his showbiz lifestyle. his most recent film, lucky, is due to be released later month. the world's top ballet dancers will perform in hull tonight for a special gala performance, which is also something of a homecoming. the world's top ballet dancers will perform in hull tonight
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for a special gala performance, which is also something of a homecoming. i think it's a very special day for hull and the dance world. it's nice to be back here. how long since you last danced in hull? it must have been when i was a little kid before i went to the royal ballet school, i think. this is a story of ballet and an extraordinary homecoming. 0ur young ballerinas here are following in some expert footsteps. joseph caley is now a principal dancer with the english national ballet. and it's notjust him — demelza parrish, elisabeth harrod, the artistic director, even the the choreographer, they all started out here. right leg, left leg... so many successful ballet stars started here in this little sidestreet in hull with vanessa hooper. xander parish was just 10 when he first arrived and is now the first
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ever british principapl of russia's mariinsky. i can't believe it. i get to see all my beautiful babies all grown up, dancing together. you look really well. i'm looking forward to this. we're looking forward to it. and finally backstage, the reunion. lizzie, demelza, xander. the head of the royal ballet wanted to return to his hometown and give it a grand gala, a celebration of ballet that all began here. lots of people were injured in yesterday's parsons green terrorist attack, but the situation would have been far worse if the train bomb had fully detonated. it was an improvised explosive device, or ied, capable of causing terrible injuries. but, crucially, it didn't work as planned.
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0ur security correspondent gordon corera takes a look at what we know about the bomb. the device at the heart of the investigation. the ongoing hunt for the person who planted it has now led to the uk's threat level moving up to critical, its highest level. the makeshift bomb will have yielded some clues in that hunt, like these wires coming from the bucket, used to try and trigger an explosion. they look similar to these christmas tree lights that a birmingham man planned to use in a home—made device, before he was arrested. such improvised devices do not always go off properly. that was the case on 21 july 2005, and experts believe today's bomb also didn't explode as intended. m15 are helping the investigation.
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they will want to know if the individual was part of a group or acted alone and, as has often been the case recently, if they were previously known to authorities. for more on this, we can talk to major—general chip chapman, who is the former head of counter—terrorism at the ministry of defence. thank you very much for your time this morning. appreciate it. many people are saying that mercifully this device appears not to have detonated properly, because things could have been much worse. we know that 29 people were injured, many from burn injuries sustained as part of the blast. from your expertise and knowledge of the device, tell us what you make of that device, and what you make of that device, and what you make of that device, and what you saw. well, the signature device for an is explosion is quite volatile, it can have a lot of friction, and indeed, the pre— explosion at barcelona was caused because of its volatility. so either the chemical mix, if it was tatp,
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was wrong, 01’ the chemical mix, if it was tatp, was wrong, or there was not enough power to make the detonated at work properly. if this had been tatp, it would have had both a shockwave effect, which would have killed lots of people, and the blast effect would have killed lots of people. it absolutely didn't function, because at least the windows would have been blown out and one ounce of tatp would blow card doors off, for example. —— car doors. would blow card doors off, for example. -- car doors. obviously those who do not know about explosives can see what there is. there is a bag containing what appears to be a bucket. with your knowledge, what do you see as you look at that? well, you need some sort of a container for the explosive. i wouldn't make too much of the bucket, but you need some kind of container. you would normally also get some shrapnel. they might put some nails or bolts around this. we were lucky that this
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didn't function. it doesn't mean they will not look at their devices. if there are further devices, they will be looking at the constitution of the devices to see if they can make them work. i'm sure there is a future network, which is why we have gone to critical and will stay at critical until it is resolved. if you look at the two london attacks and the manchester attacks, there we re and the manchester attacks, there were 12, 23 and 31 further arrests after those attacks. you will also see more than one here. it is significant that he is out there somewhere. he has not gone into a sewer and he is not with the teenage mutant ninja turtles, he is being supported by some kind of network and someone is giving him cover at the moment. the investigation is ongoing, but we understand there was a time device attached to this bomb. what is the significance of that? well, i wouldn't put too much significance to that. the timer is a rundown device, so it goes off at
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your own place and time of choosing. there is speculation it might have been times wrongly or there might have been some delay on the tube, because it might have had more impact it it had gone off at westminster as opposed to pass on screen. but i wouldn't make too much of that. it was a classic crowded place from is methodology, which was the intent —— parsons green. place from is methodology, which was the intent -- parsons green. you will be aware of the ongoing issue around whether it is too easy to find information about how to make these can provide devices. it is a real problem, isn't it? it is partly a problem, but if you access those sorts of sites you will put yourself on many, many databases, and the metadata, the data about data, gives you lots of clues to try and resolve these networks. if you take finsbury park, you have to get on and off the tube, so the oyster cards, or
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whatever method you use, gives data. the transport for london site will give you how many people get on and off finsbury park at peak times. if you take those people, which you can buy metadata, you will be left by those who travel infrequently, or outliers on that road. we the terror threat has reached its highest point, which is critical. what help is that to the investigation, and also just is that to the investigation, and alsojust in terms is that to the investigation, and also just in terms of public safety? well, the first thing, of course, is there is that unresolved network. three things will happen, i think. firstly there will be a doubling down on the shift patterns so you'll have more manpower released. secondly there will be mutual aid across police forces. they can reinforce across boundaries to the iconic sites if they need to. the third thing is, of course, the military are going in to take over, and my understanding is that from the civil nuclear constabulary,
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there is a completely armed force. that will be armed policemen who will be released to nuclear sites, for example. thank you forjoining us. for example. thank you forjoining us. we will of course bring you all the latest developments. here is stav with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you both. it is a mixture this weekend, showery and quite wet for western areas. some sunshine between any of the showers. a chilly night tonight and tomorrow will be a better date for most of us. will be a better date for most of us. low pressure responsible for generating the showers. northerly winds not quite as strong as we have seen. winds not quite as strong as we have seen. this area of high—pressure wanting to push into mid—atlantic, and it will wind out through sunday and it will wind out through sunday and into the start of next week. we have showers around the channel islands, western and eastern coastal areas of the country, whereas in central areas, starting off chilly.
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low single figure values in places, but also some sunshine. some sunshine as well across northern england, and towards scotland. in northern ireland, the conditions will drift towards northern and western scotland through the morning as the weather front moves south, introducing longer spells of rain. initially the northern scotland, then western parts of scotland, northern ireland, running in towards wales, turning pretty wet for the second half of the day, u nfortu nately. second half of the day, unfortunately. further east, central and eastern areas, a mixture of sunshine and showers and some lucky areas will escape the showers and stay largely dry. not particular wan anywhere, 12 to 16 degrees because of the wind is coming down from the north. it will be quite showery. the showers dying await weekly across northern, central and eastern areas. the rain hanging on for a while across the south—eastern corner, so the rainfall amounts could be mounting up down here. elsewhere it will turn chilly and tonight will be a cool one for the time of year. central and northern areas of the countryside we could even see a
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touch of frost. also some mist and fog developing. low pressure in the south of the uk on sunday, high pressure dominating the picture, and this is why things are more settled on sunday. some showers in southern and south—western areas. elsewhere, we start chilly, with mist and fog clearing away quite quickly. light winds through the day, plenty of sunny spells, the odd isolated shower but it should be dry. with more sunshine it will feel that little bit warmer. into the start of next week on a dominates, so we should continue to see the settled weather —— into the start of next week, high pressure dominates. it was one of the most dramatic periods in port talbot‘s history — the battle to keep its steelworks open. breakfast has been to find out how the real life—drama has been turned
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into a play, starring a former steelworker in his first professional acting role. listen to this. in a warehouse in port talbot, with the smell of damp and steel in the air, you would be forgiven for thinking this is actually a working plant. but this industrial environment is the setting for the national theatre of wales and community wales interpretation of the tata steel crisis. we are the stewards of this community. our children, our grandchildren, only get what we leave them. script has been crafted through the testimony given by those living in this community, and most importantly, from the employees of britain's only steelmaking plant. forget me first, last and always. go for your pension pot if you want, but the steel industry will die. what do you want your legacy to be? for lead actor sam coombs, it is
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personal. he has grown up a stone's throw from these works, worked at the plant for a decade, and he has been given a sabbatical to re—enact two of the most challenging years of his life. it is a severe privilege to be able to tell the story of the boys and myself. the last two years we have been sort of told what our story is, basically. and this is what is happening to you. i feel now it is my chance to say no, this is what is happening to us. all the timei what is happening to us. all the time i was working there, i was afraid of losing myjob. sure enough, i lost myjob. story is based around how the community and workers fought for the future of these works. we were drawn to port talbot not just because these works. we were drawn to port talbot notjust because of the save our steel talbot notjust because of the save oursteel campaign, talbot notjust because of the save our steel campaign, because of the solidarity they sure do the workers there. so, when the show comes to an end in two weeks' time, will he be
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straight back into his overalls? at the moment the plan is to go into work on the fourth of october. like isaid,i work on the fourth of october. like i said, i don't know if something comes of it. unless you hear from hollywood already. exactly, exactly. after being shrouded in uncertainty was a long, stability has now returned to port talbot for now at least. at the emotions of these last few years are clear to see. they have sealed my fate. they will work me to the grave. fascinating, that. we will have the headlines at the latest on the investigation into the tube bombing coming up in a few minutes' time. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before eight, stav will have the weekend's weather forecast for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. armed police and military personnel are being deployed at key locations across the uk after the terror threat level was increased
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to critical — the highest possible level. the hunt for the person behind yesterday's parsons green tube attack is continuing. 29 people were injured. a day after its latest test—firing of a ballistic missile, north korea's leader kimjong—un has said his goal is to match the military power of the united states. the united nations security council described the missile test over japan as highly provocative. washington has again warned pyongyang of military action if current sanctions don't work. but russia and china say diplomacy is the only solution. campaigners are calling for a 50% reduction in air passenger duty to boost the uk economy, after britain's withdrawal from the european union. the fair tax on flyers group says air tax amounts to an extra £400 million a year for uk passengers. borisjohnson has set out his vision
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for what he called the uk's "glorious" future outside the european union. writing in today's daily telegraph, mrjohnson, who campaigned for brexit, also repeated the controversial claim that leaving the eu would save around £350 million a week, which could be spent on the nhs. 0ur political correspondent‘s is here. it seems like a timely thing. theresa may is going to give a big intervention on brexit in florence here we have less than a week before borisjohnson, a here we have less than a week before boris johnson, a long—time here we have less than a week before borisjohnson, a long—time harbour of ambitions, puts forward his own 4000- of ambitions, puts forward his own 4000— were divisions brexit. i think many people will read this, that he
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has leadership ambitions still and is trying to intervene in this brexit debate to try and shape theresa may is going to say. as you say, he mentions that controversial ago, £350 million, but he says we can get back from the eu. although he doesn't say it will definitely go to the nhs. he said it would be good it did that his use of that term will surprise many. labour have criticised him. but the main thrust is really to take us back to the referendum campaign. he restates very forcefully the case for brexit. rebukes people who are doubting that brexit will actually go ahead. and setting up this vision of what brexit means. paint access to markets, battle people were speculating. though there is plenty in this article for all of us to pore over, it also illustrates 18
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months to go before negotiations are due 15 months after the referendum, still plenty of jostling due 15 months after the referendum, still plenty ofjostling to what actually brexit will mean in reality. it is a lengthy piece by borisjohnson, 4000 reality. it is a lengthy piece by boris johnson, 4000 words. reality. it is a lengthy piece by borisjohnson, 4000 words. a full review of the paper coming. the pound has reached its highest level since the bird to leave the eu. sterling climbed up to a senior bank of england official indicated there could soon be a rise in interest rates. a woman injamaica who's believed to have been the oldest person in the world has died at the age of 117. violet brown was born on march 10, 1900, and said the secret to her long life was to eat everything except pork and chicken — and not to drink rum.
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here she is receiving an award from the jamaican prime minister. the oldest person in the world is now believed to be nabi tajima from japan, who is also 117. no rum, could use it to that? you lack yes, i'm not a big no rum, could use it to that? you lack yes, i'm nota big run no rum, could use it to that? you lack yes, i'm not a big run drinker. did not like rum punch?” lack yes, i'm not a big run drinker. did not like rum punch? i don't think so. you might be around forever. crystal palace are now the only premier league team without a point after bournemouth won last night. defoe is doing it again. it was a really important win for bournemouth. it looked as though they were heading for a fifth straight defeat in the premier league, when solly march put brighton ahead but they levelled and defoe gave them their first points of the season. they're still at the wrong end of the table, of course, but it's a start. a lot of different emotions, and relief is the biggest one. got to be honest — when you start the season,
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you want to first win, ideally in the first game if not the second game and it's taken us longer than we wanted. we had tough fixtures, we are aware of that so today is really important and the real achievement from the players is to go 1—nil down the start that we had to respond in a manner that we did was very special. roy hodgson takes charge of crystal palace, for the first time later today. what a goal it was that gave them a 2-2 what a goal it was that gave them a 2—2 draw. rangers are now third on the table. that is the night race setting for the singapore grand prix. there's something special about the singapore grand prix — but championship leader lewis hamilton will need to warm things up a bit — he was more than half a second slower than daniel ricciardo, who led yesterday's practice sessions.
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britain's 0lympic skeleton champion, lizzy yarnold, says, she now knows, why she has been suffering from dizziness problems, over the last few years. she has a kind of travel sickness. the 28—year—old won gold at sochi three years ago, and she's preparing for next year's winter olympics in pyeong—chang. when i'm going down the track, sometimes i can become disorientated but i've seen the best specialists and my team knows what's going on and to know how to recover and compete still. i absolutely have the will to compete in every race regardless of those issues. it was an iconic sporting moment, when britain'sjohnny brownlea, was helped over the line by brother alistair, at the end of the mexican triathlon. that was a year ago, and this year's world series, comes to an end today, in rotterdam, with britain'sjonny hoping for a victory, without the need for any help. i think the rest of my career,
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always could have in my mind, i don't know if special was the right word — it was unusual. but the need to win here would be very, very special. i've never won a grand final before. i've come second a few times and if i could win that, it would go a long way to getting over last year. thousands of boxing fans are in las vegas this weekend, for the middleweight title clash, between two, of the best fighters on the planet, gennady golovkin and canelo alvarez, 0n the undercard is british two—time olympic gold medallist, nicola adams who says it's a dream, to make her vegas debut. she says she is treating this fight like any other. i'm taking itjust as i take every otherfight i have been in. stay calm, collected and don't let the nerves overwhelm you. ijust like to have fun when i am in there so i will be taking my time, having fun and just enjoying the moment. i'm hoping to become a world
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champion one day. so how big is this fight in las vegas? let us talk to steve. how are you? i wish i was in las vegas. you have other commitments in london. how big is this for nicola adams? if sensation of, not the best buys in las vegas, it is golovkin and alvarez. and adams won't be a sideshow attraction, she has been a big feature all week in the press room. and those press rooms are the size ofa and those press rooms are the size of a football pitch. it might be positioned as six or 700 members of the media and she did the rounds, smiling, beguiling and more than that, she is a great story. the american press can't believe how
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entertaining she is and how vicious she can be when the bell rings. i was really pleased to hear this. what will she do with her personality? they try to work out, the americans, they can't believe she is that nice. that bit of steeliness, in london, when she was this service. she was supreme in rio. we know what she is capable. she actually likes that fighting part. all the smiling, that is just a bonus. it is charlie in the studio. you are in yourfantastic hawaiian shirt last time we spoke to you. i wonder if you can compare and contrast the hype around the mayweather occasion and is there a trickle—down thing with being in las vegas? is that necessarilyjust
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going to somehow trickle into knowledge about it. will that necessarily boosted? the hidden agenda here is that she has to look good and by looking good, she has to doa good and by looking good, she has to do a job on the hungarian opponent. she has to stop her, let's be quite brutal. that would leave an impression, just on the watching public in america and notjust on las vegas itself which is a very important beast when it comes to boxing but on a man called 0scar the la hoya, the promoter because he is looking for a woman, he is looking for a female boxer who he can feature on his undercard and build from the first bout in the evening after the main event over a couple of years and that's what i can see happening here. las vegas, new york, los angeles, in leeds in london, so it's really important that you not just wins but she looks good doing it. how would the audience compare in terms of her bite compared to the
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ones we have seen in terms of her bite compared to the ones we have seen in the past with the blokes? i tell you what happens with was vegas audience when it comes to women. the people out there, the punters, they sit back, they want to be entertained, rose when nicola adams walked out in leeds, she could have been going to the ring to mix a kick and everyone went ballistic. it will be different, and she will have to show them that she can fight and she will do that, don't worry about that. how realistic is it for her to win a world title early next year? this is a stepping stone tonight on her way towards that. i have been fairly upbeat and it is difficult. they do not give world titles away. before five women around to have got the various belts at the mexico have got sensational records. they will have
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30 or 40 fights. more than that, they have all been ten rounds, a dozen or more. our experienced. we can hope she wins a world title but she is at least a good solid year, six or seven fights away, with a series of very tough argentinian and mexican women. thank you so much for that. stay with us if you can. as monty python said, for something com pletely monty python said, for something completely different but with a wrestling fighting theme, i suppose you have never had a go at toe wrestling? i know that marti nike and, the famous finnish ski jumper, he once lost at toe wrestling competition and assaulted the man and got sentenced. he won gold medals, lost the toe wrestling and got sentenced. that is a trivial fa ct got sentenced. that is a trivial fact for you. thanks to that one. we
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will speak about someone from is dope and he is recognised wherever he goes and anna nash was crowned champion once again. do we need to put out a warning? toes, no. i know people might be a bit squeamish about pupils toes. why? they are like many fingers but they are ugly. the warning has been given. all the toes preaching in this report are clean. 0na on a factory floor and stoke, steel capped boots protector sporting dynasty by day but when he clocks off, anna nash can unleash his arsenal, feet of fury that are feared around the world. grandad
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allen recently won the toe wrestling championship for the 14th time. as a result, he has troubled top to toe across the world with a showdown auto down is shown on tv from new zealand to hollywood —— hollywood and europe. it's a daily gruelling training regime which starts at home. the thing about this is it stretches the skin between the toes. itrain all year stretches the skin between the toes. i train all year round. i'm the best in the world. the main support comes from the arms and the core. you keep the arm is powerful and the shoulders powerful. the arm is powerful and the shoulders powerfullj the arm is powerful and the shoulders powerful. i never thought s0 shoulders powerful. i never thought so much power would come from your arms and shoulders through the core, through the legs right down to those big toes. it's because after you've had your feet cleaned and inspected and you are on the toe—dium, your
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upper body is the anchor and you try to force your opponents, which can last an hour. allen said if i can compete —— keep the defensive legs straight, i can put up a bit of resistance. he is looking at my eyes to see my weakness. as soon as i go like that... i watch my feet all the time but i also watched —— watch the eyes and the expression. it's like a game of poker. toe wrestling was invented by three guys in a pub in derbyshire in the 1970s and they wa nted derbyshire in the 1970s and they wanted to find a sport at which the uk would become a world champion at. the trouble is, a year later, a canadian came on and you can see what it's meant to these parts ever since. i think it'sjust a quintessential bonkers english game that only the british could ever invent or play. at first, it's quite embarrassing because what is toe wrestling but it's the championship,
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so wrestling but it's the championship, so i'm proud. but even beckie had work cut out when she went toe to toe with a newjunior champion. it's nice that you won something, itjust makes you feel happy. does it make your toes stronger? yes. like in most sports, athletes foot is not welcome but it does take an awful lot of leg pulling to make a champion on the toe—dium. so, you can look again now. some very beautiful toes. so, you can look again now. some very beautifultoes. so so, you can look again now. some very beautiful toes. so get training for next year, it is injune. he trains all year round. when you think about it, if you have one leg in the airand think about it, if you have one leg in the air and you are wrestling with the other foot, to stay like that for an hour takes some fitness. you never know what mike will get up
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to next. here is stav with a look at this morning's weather. thank you very much, good morning to you. it is a chilly start out there, but the weekend promises to be better for the second half. but the weekend promises to be betterfor the second half. sunday for most looking drier. today plenty of showers, longer spells of rain and a little bit of sunshine as well. it will turn a little bit chilly tonight. some weather watch is‘ pictures coming through. this sunshine in cornwall, i will show you more in subsequent bulletins the showers as well. this area of low pressure is responsible for bringing the showers. this high—pressure wa nts to the showers. this high—pressure wants to wind out, and it will do from sunday onwards. showers across parts of wales in the south—west. a few as well across northern and eastern coastal areas. confined to the coast this morning before they become a bit more wide spread through the course of the day. good sunny spells for many parts of england and in the southern scotland
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to begin with. cloudier skies for northern ireland, parts of northern and western scotland, and here it will turn wet through the course of the day. enjoy that sunshine through the day. enjoy that sunshine through the morning period while it lasts, because showers will really get going late morning onwards and some of them could turn out to be quite heavy. this area of rain across northern and western scotland will spill southwards into northern scotla nd spill southwards into northern scotland and then into wales, so many western areas having quite a drab day, quite grey, cool and wet. the best of any sunshine in central and eastern areas. it will be cool across—the—board and eastern areas. it will be cool across—the—boa rd mid— teens and eastern areas. it will be cool across—the—board mid— teens celsius. a wet and to across many western and south—western areas, but elsewhere those showers will die out, and under clear skies, light winds are going to turn it very chilly. some of the largest cities in the countryside march cooler, a little bit of mist and fog as well. —— much cooler. we start the week on a chilly note, plenty of sunshine through the day, though a few
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showers developing. they really will be quite isolated. a dry day for most of us, light winds, and with more sunshine it will feel that bit warmer. 16 to 18 celsius. as we head on towards monday and tuesday, largely fine and dry. a cool night, but dry with some sunshine during the day. so chilly, but calm. now it is time for newswatch, with roger bolton. hello. welcome to newswatch with me, roger bolton. this week, what some have called "storm porn", with bbc reporters putting themselves in the eye of the hurricane. are they taking unnecessary risks and focusing attention on themselves rather than on the tragedies they are sent to cover? the ayes to the right... and did bbc news fail to give monday night's brexit vote in parliament the attention it deserved? but first, the launch of the new iphone. it's become an annual fixture in the diary of anyone obsessed with technology, or who wants
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to keep up with the latest digital fashion. the aim, of course, is to sell phones and make profits. is the bbc helping apple with its marketing? this year's unveiling of new models included the iphone x, and it took the usual form of a massive media jamboree, brought to you with all the razmatazz that silicon valley could muster. although the face recognition technology didn't seem to work too well, and there were plenty of mentions of the £1,000 pricetag. martin pointed to what he felt was overkill on the bbc news website... and iain thought bbc news... meanwhile, it's a case of another week, another storm over weather
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coverage by bbc news. hurricane irma has followed hurricane harvey, and the floods in south—east asia, in prompting considerable reaction from newswatch viewers. here are some examples of how irma has been reported on over the past week, and what some of you thought of that reporting. two million homes and businesses in florida are without power tonight, with central miami deserted. there is barely a soul on the streets anywhere in southern florida, and that is because of the risk of flying debris. you said the streets of miami were deserted because it was too dangerous to be out. so why was he standing outside, and with a blown—down tree behind him? i spent my time during this report wondering about that, and the risk notjust to him, but also the team around him. we get a sense of what it is like
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from the scene behind you, but what are people being advised? well, certainly to stay out of this... that's aleem maqbool, braving the elements in miami on sunday. he was just one of a number of bbc correspondents reporting on hurricane irma. 0thers included jane 0'brien, also in florida, nick bryant the turks and caicos islands, will grant in cuba, and laura bicker in the caribbean. meanwhile, bbc weatherman tomasz schafernaker was also in the region. so was having them on camera on location worth it, and were they at risk? i thought the bbc update of hurricane irma was really informative and very well covered. however, the evacuation of six million people was there for a reason. the national guard and the sheriffs telling people to stay inside and stay safe was there for a reason. so why did we have the bbc sending tomasz schaferna ker and will grant out into the hurricane area,
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to stand in the street and get thoroughly rained on? was this a case of sensationalism over safety? there may, of course, have been safety measures in place which the audience could not see. i once hung onto a correspondent‘s ankles, out of shot, while he stood on the edge of a cliff. and the bbc points out that reporters are often sheltered by a wall or building that can't be seen on screen. they say coverage like this is a good way of safely showing the audience the strength of the wind. but is it? well, for me it isn't. and, if that were the case, then why didn't the newsreader in the studio not tell viewers that before the outside broadcast was given? it would have saved giving countless people like me sort of palpitations, worrying about the risk to the bbc‘s reporter and the team. another viewer who contacted us this week about the storm coverage was peter towers, and he is in our newcastle studio, while with me here in london is sam taylor, executive editor
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of the bbc‘s news channel and news at1:00pm. first of all, is it the danger to reporters and presenters that most concerns you? yes, the actual presenters were at risk. if anybody was watching bbc news 24 in the states, they might have concluded that it was actually safe for them to do exactly what the reporters were doing, because they would not have had a safety team hanging onto their ankles, or any other part of them, to stop them from being affected by the weather. so, sam taylor, how dangerous is it? are there people making sure the presenters and reporters are secure? yes, i mean, we have very clear training plans, do risk assessments on all our reporters, and especially on a story like this. when people ask why reporters go to places at all, that is ourjob, to get close up to things, to tell people what's going on. yes, it is theirjob to find
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out what is going on, but here we know what is going on and we can see that whether there is a presenter in front of it or not. there is the challenge about how to present the strength of a storm, and people talking and reporting up close to it does often visually convey more than a distant shot of palm trees blowing in the wind. one thing i would stress is that it is risk assessed, people are trained. we have training that members of the public don't have. to some extent it's the same as going to a war zone, an accident. you would expect journalists to get close to that. does that reassure you? not at all. reporters in a war zone have body armour and helmets and protective vehicles. being out in winds described as up to 180 mph, with the rain coming down sufficient to flood areas like miami, puts them in the height of danger, it would seem to me, and i think it's highly irresponsible. we had a small number of reporters who did some limited reporting. they weren't doing it at the very
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height of the storm. they were usually doing it before or afterwards. i think it's interesting, in the introduction from some of your contributors, about flagging precautions, or telling people what is going on, in the way we might warn about flash photography or something like that. that is something we could give consideration to. but we weren't trying to present all of the news from location all day long. actually, in our coverage overall, we put more of our emphasis on reporting the devastation afterwards, with a big team out in the caribbean. peter, the argument often made for having people in situ, it gives a greater sense of drama. do you think that is true? i'm not convinced. i think that the pictures of the crashing seas and the street furniture being damaged by the wind would have been quite dramatic enough without putting people into the picture as well. sam, what is the added value? i was going to say, we're not in the business of adding drama, we are in the business
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of giving an accurate portrayal. but presenters, and i include myself, want to make a name for themselves, do dramatic things. you must be aware that we are all a bit of exhibitionists, and therefore you have to control us in some way. absolutely, but if you look at our coverage, we have tried to give a clear sense of a major story. there is no doubt about interest in these stories. high audience and a lot of concern about what is going on. we sent specialist people who know the story well and have the right training, and the coverage they have done in the storm has been limited and well controlled. i do not want to suggest their concern is not thejournalism but there is that bit of, if i can get a shot of myself looking particularly brave, or something people might remember, they might remember me as well as the story. there's always that element, isn't there? that is why we have a clear risk assessment process. you have to hold them back sometimes? well, we have developed our approach. i've covered floods for a couple of decades, and our approach has
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changed quite a lot. the whole business of wearing waders, in the water quite deep, we don't do things that others or we might have done in the past. so our understanding of how to do this correctly and safely has evolved over time. and there will always be a discussion. you have a with the producer, people like me, saying what we should and should not do, feeding into the process. we want to make sure the coverage is engaging and that people get a real sense of the story from reporters on the ground, but we don't want to actually put people in danger, and we certainly don't want to create kind of unnecessary drama around it. peter, what advice do you have the next time there is a hurricane? send fewer reporters, orjust ensure they are on screen for less amount of time? make use of unmanned cameras. peter towers, sam taylor, thank you very much. do let us know your thoughts, on that or on any aspect of bbc
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news. details on how to contact us at the end of the programme. now, the battle over brexit. late on monday night, the government's bid to extract the uk from eu law passed its first parliamentary test. the eu withdrawl bill, which will end the supremacy of eu law in the uk, passed its second reading stage after midnight, when viewer elizabeth davison was fast asleep. the next day she was keen to catch up on the news but she was disappointed. well, we put that point to bbc news, and they told us... victorjones, though,
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is another viewer who thinks the bbc is anti—brexit, and he e—mailed us this week with a touch of sarcasm. thanks for all your comments this week.
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if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs, or even appear on the programme, you can call us, or email. you can find us on twitter, and do have a look at our website. that's all from us. samira will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the uk terror threat is raised to critical — its highest level — as the manhunt for the person behind the parsons green tube bombing continues. well we chased down the suspects, as the public would expect, we are strengthening our police resources on the streets of london and across
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the country. police say a thousand armed officers will be deployed across the country and will be supported by the army. 29 people were injured in yesterday's attack, which has been claimed by so—called islamic state. this is the scene at parsons green, where the tube station has reopened. we're live there throughout the morning.
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