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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 17, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and roger johnson. police investigating the london tube bombing are continuing to question an 18—year—old man who was arrested in dover yesterday. officers say they are following numerous lines of inquiry, and haven't ruled out further arrests. the arrested man lived in a house behind me here at sunbury—on—thames, in surrey. it was raided by police yesterday. their investigation continues. good morning, it is sunday 17 september. also ahead: the m5 remains closed, after a crash yesterday left four people dead and a mother and two children seriously injured. bangladesh is to build a huge camp for hundreds of thousands of rohingya refugees fleeing myanmar. good morning, and in sport: a thriller in las vegas,
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as the big fight ends in a controversial draw. canelo alvarez and gennady golovkin couldn't be separated on the judges‘ scorecards after 12 rounds. and stav has the weather. good morning to you. it is a chilly start this morning, but today is looking better than yesterday. fewer showers, more sunshine, and feeling a touch warmer, too. i'll have all the details for you in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: police investigating the london tube bombing are continuing to question an 18—year—old man who was arrested in dover yesterday on suspicion of planting the homemade bomb at parsons green station on friday. officers say they are still following numerous lines of inquiry, and haven't ruled out further arrests. andy moore reports. on a saturday afternoon in a london suburb, people looked out of their windows to find heavily armed counter—terror officers in their alleyways and streets. many residents were evacuated as the police operation continued.
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the centre of their attention was the home of an elderly couple who had fostered hundreds of youngsters over the years. in 2010, penny and ronjones were both awarded the mbe by the queen for their services to children. in an online interview, mrsjones said they had recently started fostering refugee children, including some from syria and iraq. the search in sunbury followed the arrest of an 18—year—old man at the port of dover. police said it was a significant breakthrough. at this stage, we're keeping an open mind around whether more than one person is responsible for the attack, and we are still pursuing numerous lines of enquiry, and at great pace. the device that failed to go off on the tube was made with home—made explosives and, it is believed, was packed with metalfragments. it was similar to the bomb used in the manchester arena attack. we will have to make sure that we take all steps we can
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to ensure that the sort of materials that this man was able to collect become more and more difficult to combine together. we will always learn from these sort of incidents. while the investigation continues, the uk terror threat remains for the time being at critical, its highest level. andy moore, bbc news. andy moore is near to the house in sunbury—on—thames. andy, what's the latest? well, as you can see, the cordons remain in place here, though local residents were allowed back their homes last night. the house that was raided is some distance down the street. you probably cannot see it in the darkness but overnight police have erected a barrier across the street to block the view and just beyond that i can just about see the dome of a police forensics tent. but the investigation is due to carry on here today. so the police believe
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this is the home of the man who planted the bomb. the question is, is that the man who also made the bomb, and did he make it here at this very small terrorist house which he shared with his foster pa rents, which he shared with his foster parents, and we believe one other refugee? another crucial question, of course, is did he act alone? —— terrace house. one further question, of course, is whether he was in the sights of scotland yard. remember that tweet from president trump on friday that the man arrested was in the sights of scotland yard. police say it here the man had been in trouble with police. scotland yard would not comment on those reports. the m5 in gloucestershire remains closed in both directions following an accident yesterday in which four people were killed. a lorry crashed through the central reservation and collided into traffic coming the other way. a woman and two children remain critically ill in hospital. it just looked like, when
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itjust looked like, when we got out of ourcars, it itjust looked like, when we got out of our cars, it was clear, standing still, it just looked of our cars, it was clear, standing still, itjust looked like pandemonium. but loads of people helping out. loads of blues and twos came down. they were amazing. the bbc understands that the prime minister doesn't plan to sack boris johnson for writing a newspaper article on brexit. the foreign secretary set out his vision for a bold and thriving britain outside the eu, just six days before theresa may is due to deliver a major speech outlining her own proposals. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. chris, the opposition claim this shows the splits at the top of government. at the moment it looks like boris is safe. it is extraordinary, this, really. such an amount of conversations, it has provoked such
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conversations, it has provoked such conversation at westminster, it has even left my voice a little croaky. in conventional political times, there is no way a foreign secretary could make this kind of intervention, 4000 word essay in a newspaper which downing street only found out about very late the day, without risking being fired. but of course, these are not normal times. the prime minister is weakened after the general election. boris johnson sees himself as a bit of a standardbearer, if you like tom for brexit, given that he was a vociferous campaigner for it during the referendum. but there are some tory mps who simply see this as a leadership bid. taking a look at my notebook yesterday, when i was making some calls, thieving, desperate, profoundly disloyal. it isa desperate, profoundly disloyal. it is a leadership bid, it is all about boris, said some tory mps. others, who campaigned for brexit, make the argument that they need somebody at the top of the party who can make a positive case for britain's future.
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i suspect downing street, overall, was a little bit irritated. chris, get yourself some honey and lemon, love. interesting that he blamed it on the volume of work, nothing else. he is too professional to have a late night, i am sure! business leaders in britain and other european countries have called for the brexit talks to be speeded up. the lobby group business europe said the slow pace of the negotiations could jeopardise an orderly and constructive exit. meanwhile, more than 100 companies, with more than one million workers in the uk and eu, have signed a letter to brexit negotiators stressing the importance of making progress on a transition deal. there has been a sharp increase in the number of firefighters unable to work because of mental illness in england and wales. figures obtained by bbc radio 5 live show a rise of nearly a third over the last six years. in london, fire staff taking leave because of mental health problems has doubled since 2011.
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the home office said it was the responsibility of fire departments to put wellbeing services in place. the government in bangladesh is planning to build a giant camp to accommodate the 400,000 rohingya muslims who have fled neighbouring myanmar. our south east asia correspondent jonathan head joins us live from bangkok. a benefit concert will be held later this evening to raise money for the victims of the grenfell tower disaster. 158 families affected by the blaze have been invited to the event at cadogan hall, home of the royal philharmonic orchestra. money raised from the concert will go to two charities that have been supporting the residents. american television's most prestigious awards will be handed out at a ceremony tonight. ewan mcgregor, benedict cumberbatch and claire foy are among the british nominees for the emmys. peter bowes reports from los angeles. schmoozing before the big night, the
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traditional bafta party celebrates the nominations of british talent for america's top tv awards. with game of throne is not in the running this year, the race for best drama is wide open. the crown, about the early life of the queen, is among the favourites. claire foy is tipped for best actress. the american public have always had a fascination about our monarchy. i think is a british person you kind of grow up thinking they have always been around, and that's it. but i think the american people kind of have a distance from it, and are able to view them in a different way. and i think that is probably why they have taken the show so into their hearts. what are your drives? to meet my maker. westworld, based on the
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michael crichton thriller of the same name, has more nominations than any other drama. it makes me so proud. i knew that from reading three pages on the first script that it was going to be very special, and 110w it was going to be very special, and now that it is getting them attention and the notoriety, and people are actually connecting to the story, it is what you hope for. and so all of this is a celebration. tandy needn't and sir anthony hopkins are nominated for their performances in westworld. —— newton. television has never been so popular, from prime—time dramas like westworld the satirical comedies and bench watching on the streaming services. no wonder the stars are celebrating. the british stars in the running include benedict cumberbatch, for sherlock, and james called in for his late—night chat show. he is up against america's best—known comedians, with political satire attracting huge audiences. i wish them all the best.
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the front pages has the raid in sunbury on thames. that follows the bombing on the london tube on friday. the observer has that story, and the picture of police and army personnel side by side on duty. that is in the majority of the papers, the sunday express also picking up on that, saying that terror police searched the house of the couple, who care for refugees, as the teenage boy is held by police. the sunday times have that story, but also this interesting story on the right—hand side. the chancellor set to slash tuition fees by £5,000. i thought when i saw that, £5,000 knocked off each year is a big drop, but it is over the course of a whole course. it could work out at £1500 a year that the government will cut from the maximum that universities and institutes of higher education
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can charge. it is one to watch, it could be something in the budget. we we re could be something in the budget. we were just talking to our political correspondent chris mason about the sunday telegraph story, boris johnson's vision for brexit. he wrote that 4000 word article yesterday in the telegraph, and it is just following up on that in the sunday telegraph this morning. the same story on the front page of the mail on sunday, as well. they sort of beef it up a little bit. they say tories at war over boris's move to oust the pm. the sunday mirror has the police raid on the family's house on the front page. can ijust ta ke house on the front page. can ijust take you inside? this is one of those stories where i think if it just happened to you... ijust got thatjoke, just happened to you... ijust got that joke, watch it, just happened to you... ijust got thatjoke, watch it, you cheeky thing. a forgetful gardener, they say, had a lottery ticket worth £1 million in his wallet for a month.
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so he didn't realise at all that he had won an awful lot of money, he forgot to check, he had a euro millions ticket, and he had a stack of business cards and receipts in his pocket and he read an article about unclaimed lottery prize, which prompted him to dig it out and check the numbers. he might have been absolutely buzzing when he found out. do most people check their ticket straightaway?” out. do most people check their ticket straightaway? i haven't bought a lottery ticket for years. fingers crossed. are you trying to get out of yourjob? he is not, of course. shall we have a look at the weather forecast? good course. shall we have a look at the weatherforecast? good morning to you both. i hope you are all doing well. the chilly start out there. we have plenty of sunshine around, but still a few showers, and that is how it is going to be today. far fewer showers than yesterday. so part two of the weekend is certainly looking better. low pressure still affecting the far east, and also across the
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south. this is what has brought the showers yesterday. this area of low pressure will never be too far away today and into tomorrow, continuing today and into tomorrow, continuing to generate showers, most of them across the east coast. we will have more of an onshore breeze. it is a chilly start, temperatures in low single figures, a touch of frost, mist and fog, which should clear away and then we are looking at a bright day. the best of the sunshine across scotland, in towards northern ireland, parts of wales and in toward the midlands. most of the showers should be across eastern areas, but they will be fairly isolated, a lot of places across the east should stay dry. it was of the the increased sunshine, are staying dry. we will start to see more showers peppering the east coast of scotland, but in particular across england a bit more of a breeze here. so away from the east coast it is going to be another chilly night to come, certainly inland, down to low single figures once again, with a little bit of mist and fog to start monday morning. a bit of a messy
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picture, as you can see from the pressure chart. low pressure still the eastern side of the country, bringing more showers, but this ridge of high—pressure wants to move in and settle things down on the much of the west it will be fined again on monday after a chilly start. looks like more showers will be affecting central and eastern areas because of that area of low pressure. the odd heavy one in the east midlands toward east anglia, and cloud pushing into the north—east of scotland and north—east of scotland and north—east england as well. temperatures 15 to 18 celsius and the brightest and warmest spots. tuesday potentially looking very good. a ridge of high—pressure nudging in, a lot of sunny spells around, cloud bubbling up a rain will be pushing in on wednesday off the atlantic, so it looks like it will turn wetter, cloudy and breezy. the nights will be warmer as well. what is on your thai? little elephants. a quarter of secondary schools in england aren't providing
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religious education lessons, despite it be a requirement to do so, that's according to research seen by the bbc. the data was gathered by the national association of teachers of religious education who are concerned by the lack of provision. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. whatever the religion, whatever the customs or beliefs, at this school in east london, it will be studied in class. why are religious festivals important? religious education is a core subject here. not being religious myself, it is interesting to learn about other cultures and other people. interesting to learn about other cultures and other peoplem interesting to learn about other cultures and other people. it gives you the skills to debate, argue and really consider what other people view. imdb 30 seconds with the person next to you... ——i am giving.
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all schools are obliged to provide religious education as part of the balance. people all around the country where they will interact, marry, people who may have a religious faith and the ability to understand, tolerate and respect their religious belief is a vital skill they will need for the rest of their life. there needs to be something that happens in schools aren't doing this. fiona moss is from the national association of teachers of religious education. suspecting it many people, it issued a freedom of information request to the department of education. it is data showed 60% of state secondary schools in england made no provision for our e. and academies that operate outside of national control, the figure rose to 34%. —— re. operate outside of national control, the figure rose to 3496. -- re. when it comes down to it, schools are
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breaking the law. they have to teach re to all of their students. if someone re to all of their students. if someone is not religious and their family is not religious, why should they be studying re at school? we are not teaching children to be religious and stop we are teaching children about religious beliefs that are in this country. we don't only teach geography to people who are going to be world explorers. many pupils and parents find the subject not a priority. many insist the legal obligation to teach re can be fulfilled in different ways. one union that represents head teachers said claims of lawbreaking are overblown. trying to find a very traditional delivery model of re. i think many schools, whether they are academies of freeze —— orfree schools, might actually be teaching re three different approaches. they might use conferences, citizenship lessons, a sam blease, certainly as
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head of the church of england school, that's what we did. —— assemblies. the department of education said in a statement that it firmly believes in the importance of religious education in that it remains compulsory for all state schools. it stresses that it is up to individual schools as to how they deliver it. some say too many schools are ignoring re altogether. coming up to 20 past six. now it's time to look at this week's cinema releases on the film review, with mark kermode and ben brown. hello there, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. what do we have this week? we have victoria and abdul in whichjudi dench returns to the role of queen victoria.
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we have the villainess, an insanely kinetic action movie. and mother, darren aronofsky‘s crowd—dividing epic. victoria and abdul, yet another film about victoria, and of coursejudi dench. yes. because she was in mrs brown, about victoria's friendship with john brown, her ghillie. this is about a later life friendship with abdul karim, which i have to say i didn't know about. the story is that he is brought over from india, first to perform an official ceremony. she is lonely at the beginning of the film. we see her being isolated, cut off from her surroundings. and she immediately forms a bond, a friendship, with him. much to the outrage of firstly her son, bertie, played by eddie izzard, and all the attendant officials. here's a clip.
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but the piece de resistance is the peacock throne. an exact copy. now i really do feel like the empress of india. i thought she was supposed to be dying. it really is a remarkable addition to the house, your majesty. we have abdul to thank for the whole idea. to celebrate, a little surprise for your majesty. what is this? a mango, your majesty. one moment, your majesty. it's... off. sir henry, this mango is off.
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it looks like a terrific performance as usual from judi dench. yes, and ali fazal is very good as abdul as well. it's a very likeable film not least because the performances are very likeable. from the outside it looks rather fluffy. it looks like a good—looking film that will appeal to the people that loved mrs brown, also people who went to see the best exotic marigold hotel, which was such a big hit. you scratch the surface however and it is a more serious film underneath about an indian muslim's very close friendship with the monarch who is head of the church of england, and what you find is that they have a huge amount in common. that they have enormous shared interests. and their friendship becomes something which, because everybody else around is so concerned by it, seems to threaten the stability. in fact it is actually giving her a great solace and comfort. i think the real scene stealer for me is adeel akhtar, who plays abdul‘s sidekick, unwitting sidekick. and he was so great in the big sick. and here he plays a character,
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he is an incidental character, who doesn't really want to get involved in all this. at first this character is comic and has an element of pathos and then later on this character becomes the voice of subdued anger underneath the film. it is something which is enjoyable. it is fairly broadly played. it says at the beginning it is inspired by real events, mostly. although weirdly enough some of the things that you think must be dramatic do actually turn out to be true. but it's funny. it's very well played. the cast are enjoying themselves. i don't think it's earth—shattering by any means but it does have a serious story underneath it. 0k. and if you're looking for something rather different, totally different, it is the villainess, i suppose, about a trained assassin. yes, the villainess is an absolutely insane south korean action movie about a femme fatale who is forcefully recruited at a young age to become a trained killer. in the opening scene there is a sequence in which she makes her way through a building full of baddies which makes the corridor sequence from oldboy look like some kind of low—key character study. there is a very similar narrative to nikita, the idea of somebody who was taken at a young age who is trained.
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in fact there is a scene in the villainess which very specifically seems to recall the bathroom scene from nikita. the film has an operatic narrative. it is something which is histrionic, it is overcooked. the plot is labyrinthine and occasionally you can't follow the plot. but you can always follow the fight sequences because they are choreographed so well. it is a film with real visual panache. i sat there in a screening room with people who were gasping. apparently when it played the festival circuit it was getting standing ovations and you can see why because it is choreographed with real visceral power. it's called the villainess. and it is quite something. did you gasp? everyone else was gasping. idid. the opening sequence, it is turned up to 11 and then some. bear in mind this is the week in which darren aronofsky‘s mother comes to cinemas. everybody will know that this has caused an awful lot of controversy. darren aronofsky, who made black swan, which i know you are a big fan of.
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yes, fantastic. it was a big hit. i have to say black swan was rather more accessible than this. this basically as an archetypal story. jennifer lawrence is the mother of the character. she is a woman living with her older husband, a poet, played byjavier bardem, in this remote house which she is doing up, which she is trying to turn into a paradise for both of them. he is blocked. he is a writer but he can't write. and then at the door turns up ed harris who then also brings with him his wife, played by michelle pfeiffer, who is garrulous and garish, and immediately starts to invade their privacy. bardem's character is absolutely thrilled. jennifer lawrence's character is not pleased. here is a clip. why don't you want kids? excuse me? you are not going to be so young forever. have kids. then you'll be creating something together. that's what keeps a marriage going.
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this is alljust setting. oh, you do want them. a great director, a great cast, a stellar cast, i have to say. is it a great film? it is an extremely polarising film. what happens is it turns from a paranoid nightmare, something like rosemary's ba by, into something closer to apocalypse now, a home invasion movie. it's very allegorical. on the one hand you can see this invasion as the invasion of mother earth, being despoiled by mankind treating it badly. you can see it as a story about the way in which older men prey on younger women. you can also see it as a biblical story which has a creator, which has an adam and eve, which has a cain and abel, and obviously if you think about the director, he made noah, he took the book of genesis and turned it into a story with a bunch of fighting rock monsters. it is an extreme cinema experience.
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whilst i was watching it i found myself feeling profoundly claustrophobic. so much of the film is right on jennifer lawrence's face. you see everything from her point of view. it is subjective cinema. it becomes more and more insane, crazy, over the top, moves towards a third act... there have been talks about walk—outs. you can either be disgusted and walk out, or laugh at the film, or laugh with the film. it is a garish black comedy and everything is massively over cranked. whilst i was watching it i found it very oppressive. but with distance i started to see more and more things in it. i'm very impressed by it. it really does grab you. it never lets you go. i cannot say it is a pleasant viewing experience because it doesn't. it's incredibly intense.
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darren panofsky has referred to exterminating angel as an influence but horrorfans will see david lynch and david cronenberg. there is... it is a very full on experience that will leave you massively disorientated and you need to give yourself at least a week afterwards before deciding what to think about it. and i'm not kidding. it is a week it will take to settle down. i thought you were going to say to take a week off work. all right. let's talk about the best out at the moment. i really like it. as you probably know this has become a record—breaking horror success though it's more of a horror adventure than a horror. based on a novel by stephen king. there was a tv miniseries before. this works because of the affection for the losers, the central misfit kids, they take us on this journey. it is a film that references the goonies. references to poltergeist. people who are fans of stranger things will find an awful lot in it. when it needs to be scary it has some scares. it is much more a coming—of—age adventure. which is true of much of stephen king's writing. and it has a terrific incarnation of pennywise the clown which i think gives tim currry‘s version of pennywise, which i
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thought was definitive, a run for its money. it is very good. it is very enjoyable. it is a real roller—coaster ride. and best dvd? a very impressive british film called chicken. it is directed byjoe stephenson. it is a story about a young man who is trying to find his place in a world which is often very hostile. there are certain elements of ken loach‘s kes there. it was one of those films i knew nothing about before i saw it and it really drew me in. as i said — a small film but with a big heart and lots of ambition. it is very touching and affecting and i really liked it. it's called chicken and it's well worth checking out. all right. thank you. just a quick reminder before we go that you will find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that is it. thank you for watching.
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hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and roger johnson. coming up before 7:00am, stav will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news: police investigating the london tube bombing are continuing to question an 18—year—old man who was arrested in dover yesterday on suspicion of planting the homemade bomb at parsons green station on friday. officers say they are still pursuing numerous lines of inquiry, and haven't ruled out further arrests. andy moore is near to the house in sunbury—on—thames. good morning to you. the sun is
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starting to come up there now. we can see some of the activity behind you. just bring us up—to—date with exactly what has been going on there. well, police raided his house yesterday and local residents were evacuated. they have been allowed back into their homes but the police cordons remain in place. looking down the street, police have actually erected a barrier across the street overnight, at this end of the street overnight, at this end of the street overnight, at this end of the street and at the other end of the street and at the other end of the street. just behind it, you may be able to see the roof of a yellow police forensics tent, and that is in the front garden of the house where the search is being carried out. this is a house that belongs to an elderly couple, penny and run jones, 71 and 88 —— ronjones, and they have fostered hundreds of children over the years, including most recently refugees. police believe this is where the man who
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planted the bomb lived. the question then arises, do they believe he made then arises, do they believe he made the bomb, and did he make it in this tiny house? all this infrastructure suggests that the police intend to remain here for some time. and you will keep us up—to—date throughout the morning. the m5 in gloucestershire remains closed in both directions following an accident yesterday in which four people were killed. a lorry crashed through the central reservation and collided with traffic coming the other way. a woman and two children remain critically ill in hospital. it just looked like, when we got out of our cars, it was clear it was standing still. it just looked like pandemonium. but loads of people helping out. loads of blues and twos came down. they were amazing, just so many. borisjohnson has insisted he supports theresa may, after setting out his own vision of britain after brexit. in yesterday's daily telegraph, he wrote of a bold and thriving britain outside the eu. the article comes a week before the prime minister is due to deliver a major speech outlining her own proposals.
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opposition parties claim the foreign secretary's actions show splits at the top of government. business leaders in britain and other european countries have called for the brexit talks to be speeded up. the lobby group business europe said the slow pace of the negotiations could jeopardise an orderly and constructive exit. meanwhile more than 100 companies, with more than one million workers in the uk and eu, have signed a letter to brexit negotiators stressing the importance of making progress on a transition deal. there has been a sharp increase in the number of firefighters unable to work because of mental illness in england and wales. figures obtained by bbc radio 5 live investigates show a rise of nearly a third over the last six years. in london, fire staff taking leave because of mental health problems has doubled since 2011. the home office said it was the responsibility of fire
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departments to put wellbeing services in place. the government in bangladesh is planning to build a giant camp to accommodate the 400,000 rohingya muslims who have fled a military crackdown in neighbouring myanmar. the authorities also say they will impose restrictions on their movement to stop the refugees settling in other parts of the country. a benefit concert will be held later this evening to raise money for the victims of the grenfell tower disaster. 158 families affected by the blaze have been invited to the event at cadogan hall, home of the royal philharmonic orchestra. money raised from the concert will go to two charities that have been supporting the residents. now, how about this for a lucky escape. a koala survived a ten—mile car journey in australia, clinging to the axle of a vehicle. the female crawled into the wheel arch while it was parked near the city of adelaide. the driver was alerted to the marsupial‘s presence
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when he stopped and heard her cries. after a few days of resting and feeding in captivity, the animal was released back into the forest. that must have been scary for her. they wear out. she is very cute, isn't she? clinging to a tree, much happier there than clinging to an axle at 50 mph. and i am gutted about nicola adams not being able to fight. it would have been her most high—profile fight, but there was a problem with her opponent. boxing experts labelled this one of the fights of the decade. two of the world's best middleweights going at it, head to head, gennady golovkin
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and canelo alvarez, but it ended in and canelo alvarez, but it ended in a draw. that is rare, that it absolutely can't be separated. and it was controversial, there were blues in the stadium is the result was announced. the draw means golovkin retains his three major middleweight titles, and remains unbeaten in 38 fights. our reporter ade adedoyin watched the contest, and joins us now live from las vegas. reaction to this fight has been one of shock. people can't believe it was a draw. golovkin seemed so far ahead. what have the judges seen that everyone else has missed? well, i think that is something that the nevada athletic commission is athletic director needs to look at, particularly thejudge athletic director needs to look at, particularly the judge that gave it
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to canelo alvarez. mostjournalists, writers, even some mexican fans i spoke to, believe that gennady golovkin won that fight. he was the aggressor throughout. alvarez did have some moments, but he didn't do enough to claim that victory. that is the sort of general feeling here. i think the fact that he was boxing in front of pro— mexican crowd, when he came into the arena, the noise was incredible and yet when he gave his ringside interview afterwards, he was booed and heckled by the crowd. lennox lewis, the former heavyweight champion of the world, perhaps summed it up best when he posted on social media that both men can leave the ring with their head held high, but no way was that even close to being a draw. this fight was billed as the bout that will save boxing, after we saw that circus atmosphere with the mayweather fight. that hasn't happened with this fight, has a?|j think suggestions that it would save boxing were slightly exaggerated by
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the promoter, oscar de la hoya. what it should have been was a great contest it should have been was a great co ntest a nd it should have been was a great contest and a great occasion. it was mexico's independence day weekend. thousands have flown into the city of las vegas to watch the contest, and perhaps the opportunity to crown the next pound for pound fighter in the next pound for pound fighter in the world. —— next test. it was actually a good contest, not quite the barn burner they predicted it would be, but a good fight nonetheless and the fighters did their bit in the ring. it was a shame the sport got a little bit of a black eye, and the officiating left a sour taste in the mouth. u nfortu nately left a sour taste in the mouth. unfortunately what was a good fight was ruined by some bad officiating. it was a frustrating night for nicola adams. she was due to be on the undercard of the golovkin—alvarez fight. it would have been double olympic champion's most high—profile bout as a professional, but it was called off after a problem with her opponent's pre—fight blood test. adams put this message on social media. i'm devastated that i'm not boxing tonight, due to a problem with my opponent. thank you everyone for your support and kind messages. better news for billyjoe saunders,
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who successfully defended his middleweight title against willie munrojunior. middleweight title against willie munro junior. he won middleweight title against willie munrojunior. he won on points and stretched his unbeaten record to 25 fights. manchester city manager pep guardiola described striker sergio aguero as a legend. he scored a hat—trick as city hit six past watford, taking them top of the premier league. elsewhere, newcastle won their third successive league game, but there was frustration for spurs at wembley. alex gulrajani rounds up the action. when you are in form, everyone wants a piece of you, and sergio aguero is more accustomed to that than most. the manchester city striker could not be stopped at vicarage road, even raising a smile from mr watford himself. by the end, city were the only team still standing, aguero
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with three of essex. his manager in all. this kind of plane depends on the quality the players. all the managers have good ideas, but without this quality of our players, it is impossible. newcastle also have a touch of quality right now. the newly promoted side find themselves up in fourth after a 2—1 win over stoke. benitez‘s side now unbeaten in their last three. quite the opposite for klopp, burnley the latest side to rattle liverpool, scott armfield putting them ahead before enfield got excited. —— and field. the home side could have taken all three points, not a happy manager. despite the early welcomes at selhurst park, the start as crystal palace manager did not go to plan. danger here, it is a tap in, and southampton are in front. davies
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scores. 1-0 win for the and a fifth straight defeat for palace. the criticisms will mount up. it is another game where we haven't won, and it is going to be a long, along road, along whole, and there will be more pain, perhaps, along the way before we can actually start to see some light at the end of the tunnel. hodgson's old stadium is tottenham's temporary home, not that they are overly set on leaving just yet. it wasn't this goalkeeper‘s day against swa nsea. wasn't this goalkeeper‘s day against swansea. his side dominated, but after a goalless d raw swansea. his side dominated, but after a goalless draw they are still waiting for their first league win. elsewhere, huddersfield and leicester drew 1—1, while west brom and west ham played out a 0—0 draw. later today, manchester united host everton, and arsenal travel to london rivals chelsea. in the scottish premiership, celtic bounced back from their midweek thrashing by paris st—germain with a 4—0 win over ross county. they are now unbeaten
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domestically in 55 games. elsewhere, second—placed aberdeen remain unbeaten in the league. there were three penalties awarded in seven minutes in the game between dundee and stjohnstone. dundee ran out 3—2 winners. hearts beat hamilton 2—1. motherwell drew with hibs. harry redknapp says he could have built a birmingham city team to challenge for promotion back to the premier league, had he been given time. he was sacked yesterday. the former tottenham and portsmouth boss kept birmingham up last season, after taking charge with three games remaining. but, despite signing 14 players over the summer, the blues are currently second—bottom of the championship, and were beaten 3—1 at home by preston yesterday. not a good day for england's cricketers. their batsmen collapsed as they lost to west indies in the one—off twenty20 international. england won the toss and chose to field first, but west indies got off to a flying start. their star man chris gayle hit a quick—fire 40,
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as the visitors set england 177 to win. alex hales top—scored for england, with 43. but they fell short by 21 runs, all—out for 155, with three balls remaining. sebastian vettel will start today's singapore grand prix expecting to regain the lead of the formula 1 championship from britain's lewis hamilton. the ferrari driver claimed pole at the marina bay street circuit by 0.3 seconds from red bull's max verstappen. hamilton was more than half a second off the pace, and will start from fifth. very, very happy. the car, as i said, is amazing. it is an amazing track. if you feel that the car is coming alive and you can do what you wa nt coming alive and you can do what you want to, so i know we headed in us, it was a bit of a struggle to get here, but now i am just happy. rugby union's premiership match between newcastle and saracens was played in an unusual setting last night — in philadelphia, in the united states. it is only the second such game to be played in the states.
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saracens were also involved in the first, in newjersey last year. and it was a second win of the premiership season for them, as they ran out winners by 29—7. in the day's other game, leicester beat gloucester 24—10. in rugby league, disappointment for london broncos. they won't be playing in super league next year, after losing 38—16 to widnes vikings in the super 85 qualifiers. widnes ran in a total of seven tries, including this one from danny craven, that keeps them in the hunt for promotion. jonny brownlee finished fifth in the final world series triathlon race of the season, in rotterdam. the two—time olympic medallist has won just once this year, and his season ended with a race where he had to swim without his goggles. brownlee finished sixth in the overall standings. spaniard mario mola successfully defended his men's title, while bermuda's flora duffy took her second title in the women's competition.
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imean, as i mean, as if open water swimming... without any goggles. isn't hard enough as it is. and of course, our very own louise is competing today, in team gb. she is competing in rotterdam as well. she said to me last week, do you think you will be able to do my shift tomorrow, because i am not sure i will be able to get to the sofa. and you said... isaid yes, to get to the sofa. and you said... i said yes, so i will be presenting with dan tomorrow. fingers crossed for her. and i learnt a new term during the course of that, a barn burner, in las vegas, it wasn't the barn burner everyone expected. is that like a barnstormer? you tell me, that is a new word for me as well. i presume he met a big dustup. tweet us, let's find out what that means. i love learning new words. hundreds of thousands of ryanair passengers are facing travel disruption over the next six weeks following the low—cost airline's
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announcement that it would be cancelling as many as 50 flights a day. the company says the cancellations make up less than 2% of its daily schedule, and that every passenger will receive a rebooked flight or refund. but for some of those affected, it's provided little comfort. i was supposed to fly out on tuesday at about 645 and then i get a message from ryanair at six or seven o'clock saying the flight has been cancelled. i was able to refund both flights but however, due to the short notice, i couldn't book any other flights, there were short notice, i couldn't book any otherflights, there were no short notice, i couldn't book any other flights, there were no other flights available from then or anyone else at that airport and i could refund the rest of my holiday. —— couldn't. pretty disappointed. could refund the rest of my holiday. -- couldn't. pretty disappointed. we came on thursday on ryanair on the lovely budget flights. ready to work
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on monday and forgotten e—mail last night saying that our flight had been cancelled and next flight out is the next thursday. we can't get through to anybody at ryanair, a manager, live chat doesn't work, the app manager, live chat doesn't work, the app mac doesn't work. —— app. we have places to be and everything else. we are completely stuck, completely stranded, we have nowhere to go. lucky we have a credit card. i would hate to be anybody who is elderly or doesn't have access to cash. well done, ryanair, you made an absolute cracker of this one. let's speak to simon calder, the independent‘s travel editor who joins us now. this sounds like a right mess. there are about 15,000 people waking up this morning. initially, we were told that this was in order to
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improve the timekeeping of ryanair, they would keep more planes on the ground so they have more things in place when things go wrong. last night, they came out and said they messed up on pilot planning. they say there was an issue with pilots and because of the change in the way they organise their holidays, they have an awful lot of pilots taking time off. assuming that is the case, they say 14— 15 flights being cancelled every day from now until october however today, it has been over 80 and that is why the impact is so huge. it is an administrative mess but they made a big thing about putting on more routes and expanding their schedule and clearly they haven't got enough people to fly the planes. well, there has been some kind of foul up. there are all kinds of remedies. particularly, now, we
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are into the second half of september. lots of planes and pilots they can charter in and they have chosen not to do that. instead, they have just been giving people, in chosen not to do that. instead, they havejust been giving people, in my experience between them, six hours and about four days notice that theirflight will and about four days notice that their flight will be cancelled. but, i must say, i have spoken to dozens of people and had hundreds of people contacted me on social media and the common story is that ryanair hasn't been entirely claire about what their legal entitlements are. the first one is, if you are very simply in that position, many people rebooked on a subsequent flight, you are entitled to a hotel and meals until they can get you to your destination. ryanair is supposed to organise that. if it doesn't, you need to keep receipts and bear in mind, it doesn't cover alcohol. i have heard some people said, oh, we
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only got one night. that is complete tosh. maddeningly, while european rules say yes you can be re— routed at the earliest opportunity, there is no actual definition to what that is. the civil aviation authority tells me if there is a significant difference in the time that a ryanair is going to get you and a time and other airline will get you, it doesn't define a significant. if they say no flight of three days, you would have a right to buy a flight you would have a right to buy a flight on another airline and then claim it back. there is no absolute guarantee you will get your money back. finally, on top of that, compensation. because one of —— because it is the airline's flight, there is an obligation to pay people to 100 and 50 euros if it is a short flight. 400 to 100 and 50 euros if it is a short flight. 400 euros if it is long. there is a lot of entitlement and you need to make sure that if you
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are being cancelled, you get all that. if you have any problems with dealing with rya nair that. if you have any problems with dealing with ryanair direct, there is an other service? yes, but we are looking down the road little bit. ryanair, if it is the fault of theirs, in my experience, they are paying out quite well. who knows? the time this will take if you are cancelling flights, on an industrial scale, like this, i would cancelling flights, on an industrial scale, like this, iwould imagine you wouldn't get an immediate response certainly the law in most respects makes it clear. you have a piece of paper. you are flying with ryanair tomorrow? khayyam. --i am. is there any danger that your flight might... a lot of people have said this, i have no idea when my flight is leaving —— if it is leaving. i am
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flying tomorrow and i have checked in like you have two otherwise you will have all kinds of other problems. if you are travelling up to wednesday and i think there will be rolling cancellations. the problem is, if you have been out exploring southern portugal for example, you haven't got the message. there will be a lot of people upset turning up to the airports. if you book through an agent, they may not have your e—mail address. the good news is, if you like, they hope not to cancel so many flights as the weeks progress. hopefully they will perhaps a charter some flights in. good advice as ever. enjoy your trip to barcelona. that is a whole other story! hopefully simon will have good weather when he arrived somewhere in spain.
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a chilly start of the day. some pretty dense fog patches so take care. a day of sunshine and showers but fewer showers than yesterday. it is looking better than yesterday. low pressure always still influencing the weather on the eastern side of the country but generally speaking, this area will be exhorting its force across many places today. —— exerting its force. there should be sunny spells around, too. as that which is begin to rise into the afternoon and showers develop, most of them across eastern areas, a few showers in the morning but they become more widespread. the odd heavy one. better looking gave the western scotland. we have lost the western scotland. we have lost the heavy showers today. a touch warmer. most places dried overnight, certainly western areas. a chilly
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one to come. showers will be affecting eastern coastal parts of scotla nd affecting eastern coastal parts of scotland and towards england. it will be cool. towns and city temperatures 10— 11 degrees. down to mid— low figures in countrysides. low pressure exiting its force that wa nts to low pressure exiting its force that wants to produce showers across this side of the country. this feature will bring more clout and outbreaks of rage to north—eastern scotland later on. —— mcleod. most of the showers will be affecting the east of england's ——a bit more clout. —— cloud. tuesday is looking pretty good. we are in between weather systems. a ridge of high pressure. wind and rain will be arriving across the west of the country later on. that means we will see a more u nsu btle on. that means we will see a more unsubtle wednesday into thursday. a bit more of a breeze, outbreaks of rain. nights will be a little bit
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milder. i heard the word milder. always encouraging. we will be back at seven with the headlines but first, it is time for click. it's unbelievable that it was only just over ten years ago that stevejobs said this. an ipod, a phone... ..and we are calling it iphone. (applause). the iphone did something no smartphone had done before. it really brought the internet into our pockets with its high quality, big touchscreen, a good browser
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and that great idea of pinch and zoom. it kickstarted a new generation of smartphones. it defines the look that every other maker's smartphone still adheres to, and in the process it made apple the most valuable company in the world. so when a new iphone arrives, the world pays attention. we did too. dave lee was there. say hello to apple park, or the spaceship, as everyone calls it. eventually, 12,000 people will work on this 175 acre site. it was designed by british architect norman foster and cost a reported $5 billion, which makes it the most expensive building in america. their headquarters is in many respects the last great project from steve jobs. this was his final appearance in public before he died. one last launch not for a device, but for a building. so it's curved all the way around.
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as you know, if you build things, this is not the cheapest way. there is not a straight piece of glass in this building. six years later i am among those piling into the steve jobs theatre, a purpose—built venue for the kind of product launches that jobs made his trademark. you wonder what he would have made of the latest iphone. new facial recognition software means you can unlock the device just by looking at it, a system that replaces the fingerprint sensor in previous iphones. after a bit of a mishap, apple's craig federighi got it working. let's try that again. and this might be the most ridiculous orfine use of sophisticated technology ever. it's a happy puppy. check out the physics of the ears. animated emojis track my facial expressions to power the emoji with different expressions.
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this makes me laugh. i can be this pig and if i smile it smiles, and it might raise my eyebrows and puff my cheeks, it does that. at $999 or £999, the iphone x does not come cheap, which is why apple is also bringing out an iphone 8 and 8 plus, a more incremental upgrade on last year's models. and for the first time for an apple smartphone, it can be charged wirelessly — something samsung, it has to be said, has offered since 2015. the iphone 8 plus's camera offers a way to artificially change the lighting on a picture, which it does by using the two lenses on the back to digitally simulate different lighting conditions. and the apple watch has been given a significant upgrade. it now has its own cellular connection built—in, which means you don't need to take your phone with
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you in order for the watch to work. it is sales of the iphone which have made apple the huge, huge company it is today, and the new hq is a permanent reminder of the company's enormous power. will the iphone x continue the success into another decade? apple seems confident — but then again, they might be talking poo emoji. if you ever wondered what humanity would do if given access to the most advance facial tracking technology available, you now have your answer. and that is it for the short cut of click this week, the full—length is up on iplayer for you to watch now. and we live on twitter and facebook as well. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and roger
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johnson. police investigating the london tube bombing are continuing to question an 18—year—old man who was arrested in dover yesterday. officers say they are following numerous lines of inquiry, and haven't ruled out further arrests. the arrested man lived behind me at a house at sunbury—on—thames, in surrey. police raided that house yesterday. the investigation continues. the investigation continues. good morning, it is sunday 17 september.

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