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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 17, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and rogerjohnson. police investigating the london tube bombing are continuing to question an 18 year old man who was arrested in dover yesterday. officers say they are following numerous lines of inquiry — and haven't ruled out further arrests. the man was arrested list behind me ina the man was arrested list behind me in a house in surrey. it was raided by police yesterday. their investigations continue. good morning, it's sunday 17th september. also ahead: the m5 remains closed after a crash yesterday left four people dead and a mother and two children seriously injured. bangladesh is to build a huge camp for hundreds of thousands of rohinga refugees fleeing myanmar. good morning, and in sport: a thriller in las vegas as the big fight ends in a controversial draw.
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canelo alvarez and gennady golovkin couldn't be separated on the judge's score cards after 12 rounds. and stav has the weather. good morning. it is a chilly start this morning, but today is looking better than yesterday. fewer showers, more sunshine, and feeling a touch warmer, too. i'll have all the details for you in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. police investigating the london tube bombing are continuing to question an 18 year old man who was arrested in dover yesterday on suspicion of planting the bomb at parsons green station on friday. officers say they are still following numerous lines of inquiry — and haven't ruled out further arrests. andy moore reports. on a saturday afternoon in a london suburb, people looked out of their windows to find heavily armed counter—terror officers in their alleyways and streets. many residents were evacuated as the police operation continued. the centre of their attention
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was the home of an elderly couple who had fostered hundreds of youngsters over the years. in 2010, penny and ronjones were both awarded the mbe by the queen for their services to children. in an online interview, mrsjones said they had recently started fostering refugee children, including some from syria and iraq. the search in sunbury followed the arrest of an 18—year—old man at the port of dover. police said it was a significant breakthrough. at this stage, we're keeping an open mind around whether more than one person is responsible for the attack, and we are still pursuing numerous lines of inquiry, and at great pace. the device that failed to go off on the tube was made with home—made explosives and, it is believed, was packed with metalfragments. it was similar to the bomb used in the manchester arena attack. we will have to make sure that we take all steps we can to ensure that the sort of materials that this man was able to collect become more and more difficult
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to combine together. we will always learn from these sort of incidents. while the investigation continues, the uk terror threat remains for the time being at critical, its highest level. andy moore, bbc news. amber rose is on the andrew marr programme on bbc one after 9am. andy moore is near to the house in sunbury—on—thames. andy, what's the latest? the homes that were evacuated yesterday, the people have been allowed to go back in. but please gordon remains in place. if we look down the streets, you can see that overnights, a very sophisticated barrier has been erected across the street. if we look at the view from a different camera, you can see perhaps that there is a barrier on this side of the house and another
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on the other side. right outside the houseis on the other side. right outside the house is a police forensics tent, with a yellow roof. that's right outside the very distinctively coloured my lack house. that is where the foster couple lives. with this young man, and we believe with another foster child. another young man, another refugee. the police believe the man who planted the bomb on the tube lived here. the question then arises, was he the man who made then arises, was he the man who made the bomb and was the bomb made here at this very tiny terraced house was shared with at least three other people? thank you for bringing us up to date. the m5 in gloucestershire remains closed northbound between junctions 1a and 16 following an accident in which four people were killed. a lorry crashed through the central reservation and collided with traffic coming the other way. a woman and two children remain critically ill in hospital. the bbc understands that the prime minister doesn't plan
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to sack boris johnson for writing a newspaper article on brexit. the foreign secretary set out his vision for a "bold and thriving" britain outside the eu — just six days before theresa may is due to deliver a major speech outlining her own proposals. our political correspondent, chris mason, is in westminster. chris, the opposition claim this shows the splits at the top of government. the timing of this whole vision by boris just a few days before theresa may will be talking very much about brexit. yes, the timing here is absolutely crucial. there is this big speech the prime minister is giving in florence on friday, setting out her outlook on brexit, and we don't get that many big speeches from the prime minister on this subject. she constantly refers back to one she gave injanuary. this is a big set piece moment we have known about for a while. six
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days before, up pops borisjohnson with a massive article, 4,000 words long. downing street were aware of it but i'm told they only found out very late in the day. it has left some conservative mps absolutely seething. a couple of notes and phone calls yesterday, desperate, profoundly dismal, it is a leadership bid, all about boris, say some of his critics, privately. other big supporters of his, you eradicate it brexit say, someone who is making a positive different brexit. boris himself has gone rather camera shy. he has tweeted that he is looking forward to the prime minister's speech, and says, all behind trees. thank you, we will see you at that later. business leaders in britain and other european countries have called for the brexit talks to be speeded up. the lobby group, business europe, said the slow pace of the negotiations could jeopardise an orderly and constructive exit. meanwhile, more than 100 companies, with more than one million workers in the uk and eu,
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have signed a letter to brexit negotiators, stressing the importance of making progress on a transition deal. there's been a sharp increase in the number of firefighters unable to work because of mental illness in england and wales. figures obtained by ‘bbc radio 5 live investigates‘ show a rise of nearly a third over the last six years. in london, fire staff taking leave because of mental health problems has doubled since 2011. the home office said it was the responsibility of fire departments to put wellbeing services in place. the government in bangladesh is planning to build a giant camp to accommodate the 400,000 rohingya muslims who have fled a military crackdown in neighbouring myanmar. the authorities also say they'll impose restrictions on their movement to stop the refugees settling in other parts of the country. a benefit concert will be held later this evening to raise
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money for the victims of the grenfell tower disaster. 158 families affected by the blaze have been invited to the event at cadogan hall, home of the royal philharmonic orchestra. money raised from the concert will go to two charities that have been supporting the residents. american television's most prestigious awards will be handed out at a ceremony tonight. ewan mcgregor, benedict cumberbatch and claire foy are among the british nominees for the emmys. peter bowes reports from los angeles. schmoozing before the big night, the traditional bafta party celebrates the nominations of british talent for america's top tv awards. with game of thrones not in the running this year, the race for best drama is wide open. the crown, the netflix series about the early life of the queen, is among the favourites. claire foy is tipped for best actress. the american public have always had
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a fascination about our monarchy. i think, as a british person, you kind of grow up just going, oh, they'vejust always been around, and that's it. but i think the american people kind of have a distance from it, and are able to view them in a different way, and i think that's probably why they've taken the show so into their hearts. what are your drives? to meet my maker. laughs. westworld, the futuristic thriller based on the michael crichton novel of the same name, has 22 nominations — more than any other drama. it makes me so proud. i knew that, from reading three pages on the first script, that it was going to be very special. and now that it's getting the attention and the notoriety, and people are actually connecting to the story, it's — it's what you hope for, and so all of this is a celebration. thandie newton and sir anthony hopkins are nominated for their performances in westworld. television has never been more popular, from prime—time dramas
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like westworld to satirical comedies and binge—watching on the streaming services. no wonder the stars are celebrating. other british stars in the running include benedict cumberbatch, for sherlock, and james corden for his late—night chat show. he is up against america's best—known comedians, with political satire attracting huge audiences. a very glamorous nights. some good entries in that. just coming up to 8:11am. armed police are patrolling the london underground network and stations across the country. many of them are members of the british transport police. their officers were some of the first on the scene at friday's parsons green attack. paul crowther is the chief constable of the british transport police and joins us now from our london newsroom. thank you very much for taking the
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time to talk to us. we are very grateful to you. i know you were not directly involved now in the investigation, it is the net who we re investigation, it is the net who were leading it, so you can't talk about where that's going, but perhaps you can talk about the original response on friday. whether you thought a good job was done. thank you. as you says, it has been a busy time for us. over the last few weeks, my officers were amongst the first to arrive at the magister arena, which is part of the railway station and, of course, london bridge. we have a long experience in dealing with major incidents, whether it is train crashes or incidents like these. we are quite well versed in how to bring order to what can be quite ok yes —— let chaotic situation. i was in my car on the day, i listened to the incident on folding. i heard officers putting in controls and grip and commands. so that we could
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support the people who were injured, make sure the right emergency services were being called to the scene to help them, to make sure we understood the nature of the device, and ascertain if there were any other threats there is we could do with it effectively. i was particularly impressed with the control and grip that was put in early on. when we have seen pictures of the device in the 48 hours since the explosion, some people will look at it and wonder how on earth someone was at it and wonder how on earth someone was able to walk into a tube station carrying something like that. it was a very rudimentary disguise. our question is going to be asked about that? if you think about the context, early in the morning, rush—hour, a very busy train, lots and lots of people going about their business, then i think the people are coming onto the system with all sorts of bags and things they are carrying. what we do
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wa nt things they are carrying. what we do want people to do is to notice the unusual. it is the public and the people who work on the system that no what is unusual because they make their journeys, often no what is unusual because they make theirjourneys, often the same journeys every day. that is where we really need the public and people using the system to tell us when they see things that are suspicious or unusual, and let us know so we can assess that. and respond to them accordingly. that route involves, in some ways, people being quite un—british, they have to cast off any inhibitions and not be afraid to do that. actually, i think the opposite. the great british public have a long tradition of identifying things that are not right. we saw at the incident you recall back in north greenwich, with a device that have been left on a train, it was the public you identify that is notified the train driver, and then some very well practised and rehearsed procedures were put in
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place. i think, rehearsed procedures were put in place. ithink, actually, the british public are very good at this and we want people to continue. you see anything suspicious, contact the police. you can contact us and our tax system. tell us about anything and let us make the assessment. -- text system. we have significantly increased the number of police officers out on the system. right across the system, particularly in london and on the underground. those are officers with a range of skills and capabilities. people will see an increase in armed officers, particularly around transport hubs and on the underground will stop we wa nt and on the underground will stop we want people to be reassured by that. as we are doing everything we can to make the system is safe. cheese cost ofa make the system is safe. cheese cost of a paul crowther, thank you very much for your time. there are more developments on this. this breaking news. a second man has been arrested
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by detectives investigating the terrorist attack at green station. metropolitan police saying this. an 18—year—old man, we know, was arrested in dover, but this morning we arejust arrested in dover, but this morning we are just hearing this news coming out of that a second man has been arrested by detectives who are investigating this. it is very much as roger was just saying, investigating this. it is very much as roger wasjust saying, a situation which is still developing, lots of officers still out there working really hard. a second man has now been arrested. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. quite chilly the last week so. it's next week, winds from the south—west. always a milder direction. temperatures rising a little bit and might not quite as chilly. it was a chilly night last night and chilly. it was a chilly night last nightand a chilly. it was a chilly night last night and a chilly start today. i'm pretty dense mist and fog across the eastern side of england,
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lincolnshire, east midlands. i will linger eventually listing into low cloud. some clown around but also some sunny cloud. some clown around but also some sunny spells. showers from the word go across north—eastern parts of england. also developing across some eastern and south—eastern parts through the day. a much better looking day across western areas. brighterfor looking day across western areas. brighter for western scotland, northern ireland, wales and the south—west. a little bit warmer as well with 17 to 18 celsius, because the winds are lighter and more sunshine around. the football matches this afternoon looked like they should stay mainly dry. a little bit of sunshine here and there. i couldn't rule out the odd shower. this evening and overnight, temperatures plummeting. clear skies in central and western areas. a few showers still running along eastern coastal counties of england, in particular. not quite as chilly poster the coast. a chilly night further inland. certainly across western areas. this is the pressure chart into monday. ijust wanted to
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show you the setup, because high pressure is trying to nudge in. no pressure is trying to nudge in. no pressure to be eased of the uk, meaning more showers, more cloud and a bit more breeze blowing down the north. quite a cool day here in two east anglia, with a few showers. if you could be on the heavy side in the south—east. when pushing into the south—east. when pushing into the north east of scotland. further west, a better chance of staying dry with the best of the sunshine. temperatures 15 to 18 degrees. into tuesday, it could be still a few showers around. a ridge of high pressure means another early fine day, variable cloud, some sunshine and light winds. temperatures around 15 to 18 celsius. these values gradually creeping up as the week wears on. we started pulling a south—westerly winds. thank you. just a bit more on that story we just mentioned about a second man being arrested in connection with the terror attack at parsons green on friday: a bit more information. a
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second man has been arrested by detectives investigating this attack on friday. it is a 21 euros man arrested in hounslow. he was arrested in hounslow. he was arrested at 11:50pm last night. hounslow another part of london. he has been detained under section 41 of the terrorism attack —— terrorism act. taken to a police station where he remains in custody. an 18—year—old who was also arrested yesterday remains in custody as well. that is to people who have been arrested as part of that investigation into the terrorist attack on friday. 8:18am, we will keep you up—to—date. hundreds of thousands of ryanair passengers are facing travel disruption over the next six weeks following the low—cost airline's announcement that it would be cancelling as many as 50 flights a day. the company says the cancellations make up less than 2% of its daily schedule, and that every passenger will receive a rebooked flight or refund. but for some of those affected, it's provided little comfort.
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i was supposed to fly out on the tuesday, i think it was, at about 6:45pm. i got a message from ryanair are the evening before, probably around six or seven o'clock some, saying the fight had been cancelled. due to the short notice, i couldn't put any other flights. there were no other flights available from them or anyone else at the airport. i couldn't refund most of my holiday, so couldn't refund most of my holiday, so pretty disappointed about it. here we are. we came on thursday with ryanair on their monthly budget flights. due to go back sunday, ready for work on monday. we got an e—mail must night saying our flight had been cancelled. a slight to newcastle is next thursday. we can't get through to anybody at ryanair, can't get through to a manager. the app can't get through to a manager. the app doesn't work. if you do ring
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them on customer services, all you get is that we are having a large volume of calls. you get! we are completely stuck, completing strand, nowhere to go. luckily we have our credit cards. i would hate to be anybody who is elderly or doesn't have access to cash. well done, ryanair. he made a real cracker of this one. interesting sentiment from a lady! we're joined now by phoebe smith, editor of travel magazine wanderlust. i guess that lady's sentiment will be shared by a lot of people. why has this happened ? be shared by a lot of people. why has this happened? that is the 100 million euros question. i plucked that figure drought because that is potentially how much it might cost them. notjust potentially how much it might cost them. not just covering potentially how much it might cost them. notjust covering people's meals and hotels, they're basically saying it is how they —— is because they have changed how holidays work from pilots and cabin crew. suddenly they have crew that need to take holidays. once people take holidays, there's no want to fly the planes.
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it seems to be an administrative mess up. firstly they were blaming other things as well, are traffic control, whether restrictions. they're saying their punctuality rate has fallen to 80% rather than 90, which seems a bit ironic that you were then cancelling flights com pletely you were then cancelling flights completely to pick that up. there area completely to pick that up. there are a lot of annoyed passengers, as we just saw. what is the deal when it comes to compensation? ryanair said people will be refunded but is it easy? it should be. they should be refunding people within a week once they have cancelled, or offering another flights. even though they will do that, they are still liable to paper accommodation, meals and drinks where they are waiting to get on the new flight. they are also entitled to apply for compensation under eu law. this can be to 50 euros for a short flight and up to —— and up to 400 euros and even 600 from mongrel. most of ryanair‘s routes will be shot all to
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europe? yes, they would be. the difficulties coming... all these things, you should be able to claim for, but the problems come with people who are out there and have to get back to work. how did they get back? a lot of these cancellations are short notice. then you have other people who are still in the uk, waiting to go away and they can only go about weekends. if they haven't but their hotel and the flights as part of the package, they have no right to get the money back from the hotel because they are not protected in that way, do they need to have good travel insurance. what strikes me about this, as someone who talks about ryan are lots, they said not that long ago, we are going to focus on customer service, we know we have let people down. this isa know we have let people down. this is a bit ofa know we have let people down. this is a bit of a kick in the face to that! it is almost classic ryanair. they do this, it comes in waves. one minute they say they don't care, then suddenly they really care about
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customers. this flies in the face of that. it's quite a good opportunity for rival airlines to swoop in, if you pardon the pun, and offer some really good deals for some of these customers who were thinking of booking ryanair. customers who were thinking of booking rya nair. they customers who were thinking of booking ryanair. they can offer a definite flights. he was going to book with ryanair now knowing they have done this at very short notice? 0k, it is have done this at very short notice? ok, it is until october, but would you trust it? would you rather pay more to know you are going to fly? people like a bargain. ryanair say they apologise because of being convenient cost to customers. they're also saying customers will be contacted directly about the small number, they're calling it, of cancellations and offered alternative flights or a full refunds. he very much coming in. i thought we were on watchdog for a moment there! you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. ian mcmillan is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'llspeakto him in a minute,
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we are surrounded by papers here. i don't know where we are starting! we are talking about the rohingya in bangladesh first. this is a story in the observer. it is a tragic tale, this story of the people caught between me and more and bangladesh. what struck me was that the globe, at the moment, seems to be full of people just moving from place to place. it is as though the world is a carpet that is being shook. these arejust moving. stories a carpet that is being shook. these are just moving. stories get forgotten, stories get that to decide. this one, the rohingya, for a long time, was. we often talk about this in terms of numbers. 100,000 people on the move, 400 people ending up in such and such a place. it's difficult to do so, pinky about them as they did —— as
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individuals. i try to think about them in relation to people i know. without people, one of those numbers, be like my neighbour or my a nswer numbers, be like my neighbour or my answer your grandson? when you see a picture like that, that hammers home what you're saying. that's why the newspapers are great. that single image that is part of the story that you then end up looking out. it's a human being that might be like somebody you know, someone you see on the street or on the bus. that's the only way i think you get your head round it. that extra level of thoughts on our part. notjust to view it as something on the tv, in the papers, in a far—off place, to try to make that connection. we are swamped by it. yet we should take that time to think about it, think hard. this is an interesting one. beavers. the humble beaver is going to save us from floods, apparently,
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in the forest of dean. is part of the world. lovely part of the world. they are introducing a family of beavers to build dams. that shows me intelligent and creative thinking. if we are going to have climate change as terrible things happening, we have to think in new ways. someone has gone, beavers, let's try that! other people have said cynically know, but they're suddenly introducing beavers into the forest of dean to build these dams. it could be a whole new thing, the beaver could make a return and save us beaver could make a return and save us all from flooding. cheap labour as well! the older they are, you have to pay their pensions! that's a good point. the white helmets, this is the motorcycle display team. they're putting on their last show. they're putting on their last show. they have been on the go for 90 yea rs, they have been on the go for 90
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years, which i didn't realise. they have been doing this human period —— human pyramid which shows all over the place. there is a bit in the story which says they are backing up to concentrate on looking at cybercrime. you think, actually, surely they can do both? can't they doa surely they can do both? can't they do a bit of bad at weekends? during the week, think about cybercrime. we we re the week, think about cybercrime. we were talking about this on the programme on friday. there was a story which we don't need to recount because it was rude! you could do both, the white helmets and cybercrime. have you ever try to do a human pyramid? not on my own! we tried to do it, the watchdog team. we got 23. there were quite a few of us. we got 23. there were quite a few of us. we got three layers. i was on the bottom layer. i had a foot in my back. there is a coolness tests. not
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going to trouble me, is it? to determine if people have the mysterious qualities that make them cool mysterious qualities that make them cool. what is it? apparently coolness is something you just can't detect. you either have it or you don't. i haven't got it at all. if i put a don't. i haven't got it at all. if i puta pairof don't. i haven't got it at all. if i put a pair of sunglasses on, i don't look cool. in social science have developed a cool test. the newspaper has on their own version on the side. it's about whether you think jacob rees—mogg or the funds is cool jacob rees—mogg or the funds is cool. orjames may, he is more my kind of guy. we all try to be cool, but it using naked from a test then you have failed, in a way. toolis and billy something that lands a new like a kind of dust. doing a test to see if your cool suggests you are probably not. i'm doing it in a
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super ironic way. what do your tattoo say? i don't know, they're all in japanese. might have rubbed off! i happens those temporary stickers you get. you very much. nice to see you. just coming up to 830 -- nice to see you. just coming up to 830 —— 8:30am. stay with us. hello this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and rogerjohnson. coming up before nine stav will have the weather. but first a summary of this morning's main news. some breaking news this morning, and a second arrest in connection with the terror attack at parsons green station on friday. andy moore is in sunbury—on—thames
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in surrey where police are searching a home in connection to the attack. andy, what more can you tell us about this second arrest? this within the last half an hour we have had a brief press notice from the met police confirming a second arrest in connection with the bombing on the cuba on friday. —— on the underground on friday. it was a 21—year—old man arrested at 11:50pm in hounslow last night under section 41 of the terrorism act and taken to a south london police station where he is being questioned in custody. it is also where the man who used to
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live here has been questioned. the police operation is carrying on. find me overnight a barrier has been erected in front of the property being searched. there is a yellow forensics tenth in front of a lilac coloured house where the 18—year—old man lived with his foster parents and we believe another refugee. you can see from another camera what is going on at the moment. a lot of barriers and infrastructure put up by police, and it suggests they intend to be at this house for some time. one question they want to a nswer time. one question they want to answer is whether the man who planted the bomb also made the bomb and did he make it at this location ina very and did he make it at this location in a very small house he shared with three other people? i know you will continue to monitor developments. the m5 in gloucestershire remains closed northbound between junctions 14 and 16 following an accident in which four people were killed. a lorry crashed through the central
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reservation and collided with traffic coming the other way. a woman and two children remain critically ill in hospital. borisjohnson has insisted he supports theresa may after setting out his own vision of britain after brexit. in yesterday's daily telegraph, he wrote of a "bold and thriving" britain outside the eu. the article comes a week before the prime minister is due to deliver a major speech outlining her own proposals. opposition parties claim the foreign secretary's actions show splits at the top of government. the government in bangladesh is planning to build a giant camp to accommodate the 400,000 rohingya muslims who have fled a military crackdown in neighbouring myanmar. the authorities also say they'll impose restrictions on their movement to stop the refugees settling in other parts of the country. there's been a sharp increase in the number of firefighters unable to work because of mental illness
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in england and wales. figures obtained by bbc radio 5live investigates show a rise of nearly a third over the last six years. in london, fire staff taking leave because of mental health problems has doubled since 2011. the home office said it was the responsibility of fire departments to put wellbeing services in place. now how about this for a lucky escape? a koala survived a ten—mile car journey in australia clinging to the axle of a vehicle. the female crawled into the wheel arch while it was parked near the city of adelaide. the driver was alerted to the marsupial‘s presence when he stopped and heard her cries. after a few days of resting and feeding in captivity, the animal was released back into the forest. she made a sharp exit. eventually.
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straight upa she made a sharp exit. eventually. straight up a eucalyptus tree. iam glad straight up a eucalyptus tree. i am glad she is safe. let's move on to sport. we have talked a lot about boxing in recent weeks on a sunday morning. this is altogether different in las vegas from the mayweather fight. some boxing experts described it as the fight of the decade but it ended ina draw. the fight of the decade but it ended in a draw. a little bit controversial because a few experts had it as a kennedy —— call often when, the draw means golovkin retains his three major middleweight titles and remains unbeaten in 38 fights. one judge scored it 118—110 for alvarez, another 115—113 for golovkin and the third a draw. there were boos when the decision was announced at the t—mobile arena, and both boxers shook their heads. golovkin landed more punches and had
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the better of the middle rounds. former world champion boxer turned promoter bernard hopkins said a rematch could be on the cards. this makes good debate for a second fight, possibly, right? what about the score? are you telling me that the score? are you telling me that thejudges' score the score? are you telling me that the judges‘ score affected how you feel about who want? i can‘t fix that. that is the job of the commission. ourjob as promoters is to do due process. it was frustrating night for nicola adams. she was due to be on the undercard of the golovkin—alvarez fight. it would have been double olympic champion‘s most high profile bout as a professional, but it was called off after a problem with her opponent‘s pre—fight blood test. adams put this message on social media. i‘m devastated that i‘m not boxing tonight, due to a problem with my opponent, thank you everyone for your support and kind messages. better news for billyjoe saunders,
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who successfully defended his wbo middleweight title against willie monroe jr at the copper box arena in london. he won on points and stretches his unbeaten record to 25 fights. manchester city manager pep guardiola described striker sergio aguero as a "legend". he scored a hat trick as city hit six past watford, taking them top of the premier league. elsewhere newcastle won their third successive league game but there was frustration for spurs at wembley. alex gulrajani rounds up the action. when you are in form, everyone wants a piece of you, and sergio aguero is more accustomed to that than most. the manchester city striker could not be stopped at vicarage road, even raising a smile from mr watford himself. by the end, city were the only team still standing, aguero with three of their six, his manager in awe. this kind of play depends on the quality the players.
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all the managers have good ideas, but without this quality of our players, it‘s impossible. newcastle also have a touch of quality right now. the newly promoted side find themselves up in fourth, after a 2—1win over stoke, rafa benitez‘s side now unbeaten in their last three. quite the opposite forjurgen klopp, burnley the latest side to rattle liverpool, scott arfield putting them ahead, before anfield got excited. lovely first touch from sela. second one is brilliant. the home side could have taken all three points. not a happy manager. despite the early welcomes at selhurst park, roy hodgson‘s start as crystal palace manager did not go to plan. danger here. it‘s a tap—in, and southampton are in front. davis scores. a 1—0 win for the saints, and a fifth straight defeat for palace.
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the criticisms will mount up. it‘s another game where we haven‘t won. and it‘s going to be a long, a long road, a long haul. and there will be more pain, perhaps, along the way, before we can actually start to see some light at the end of the tunnel. hodgson‘s old stadium is tottenham‘s temporary home, not that they are overly set on leaving just yet. it wasn‘t this goalkeeper‘s day against swansea. his side dominated, but after a goalless draw, they are still waiting for their first league win. elsewhere huddersfield and leicester drew 1—1 while west brom and west ham played out a 0—0 draw. later today manchester united host everton and arsenal travel to london rivals chelsea. in recent years, chelsea had great teams always and it was always difficult to win there but our record against chelsea
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recently has been good. we won last year here, we won in the fa cup final, we won on penalties in the charity shield, so let‘s just continue to just focus on the quality of our game. in the scottish premiership, celtic bounced back from their midweek thrashing by paris st—germain with a 4—0 win over ross county. they‘re now unbeaten domestically in... 55 games. elsewhere second placed aberdeen remain unbeaten in the league. there were three penalties awarded in seven minutes in the game between dundee and stjohnstone, dundee ran out 3—2 winners. hearts beat hamilton 2—1. motherwell drew with hibs. harry redknapp says he could have built a birmingham city team to challenge for promotion back to the premier league had he been given time. he was sacked yesterday. the former tottenham and portsmouth boss kept birmingham up last season, after taking charge with three games remaining.
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but despite signing 14 players over the summer, the blues are currently second bottom of the championship, and were beaten 3—1 at home by preston yesterday. it wasn‘t a good day for england‘s cricketers. their batsmen collapsed as they lost to west indies in the one—off twenty20 international. england won the toss and chose to field first, but the windies got off to a flying start. their star man chris gayle hit a quick—fire 40 as the visitors set england 177 to win. alex hales top scored for england with 43 but they fell short by 21 runs, all out for 155 with three balls remaining. sebastian vettel will start today‘s singapore grand prix expecting to regain the lead of the formula one championship from britain‘s lewis hamilton. the ferrari driver claimed pole at the marina bay street circuit by three tenths of a second, from red bull‘s max verstappen. hamilton was more than half a second off the pace and will start from fifth. very, very happy.
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the car, as i said, is amazing. it‘s an amazing track. if you feel that the car is coming alive, then you can do what you want to. so i know we had it in us. it was a bit of a struggle to get here, but now i‘m just happy. rugby union‘s premiership match between newcastle and saracens was played in an unusual setting last night — in philadelphia in the united states. but i‘m not convinced americans have taken to the sport. lots of empty seats. it‘s only the second premiership game to be played in america. saracens won 29—7. in the day‘s other game, leicester beat gloucester. in rugby league, disappointment for london broncos. they won‘t be playing in super league next year after losing 38—16 to widnes vikings in the super 85 qualifiers. widnes ran in a total of seven tries including this one from danny craven that keeps them in the hunt for promotion. jonny brownlee finished fifth in the final world series triathlon
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race of the season in rotterdam. the two time olympic medallist has won just once this year, and his season ended with a race where he had to swim without his goggles. brownlee finished sixth in the overall standings. spaniard mario mola successfully defended his men‘s title, while bermuda‘s flora duffy took her second title in the women‘s competition. he said his goggles were getting steamed up so he had to take him off. tonight, survivors of the grenfell tower tragedy will attend a benefit concert that was launched after their homes were destroyed in the horrific blaze earlier this year. some of the world‘s leading operatic stars and classical musicians have dontated their services for free, which was organised by nazan fikret, whojoins us now from our london newsroom. good morning. tell us about it. what
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are we going to hear because me and --? the first half is songs with a voice and piano and the second half is largely opera and orchestral items. we have presenting all the way through. wonderful people coming together to make a memorable evening. we can see pictures of you performing at the moment. how did you end up organising this? performing at the moment. how did you end up organising this7m performing at the moment. how did you end up organising this? it was something that resonated with me and i woke something that resonated with me and iwoke up something that resonated with me and i woke up on my 30th birthday, the 14th ofjune, put something on facebook was a call—out to my collea g u es facebook was a call—out to my colleagues asking who would like to join me, and it snowballed. once a few famous fake this —— famous faces turned up it gathered momentum. you
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haven‘t organised anything like this before have you? no, and i won't be hurrying to again! we had ourfirst rehearsal last night with the chorus and we will gather in a few hours starting to put the programme together for this evening. lots of people were quick to sign up. where is the money going? we are splitting our funds between brief is the money going? we are splitting ourfunds between brief encounter, hoping to raise £100,000 are sought for counselling, grief counselling, and the other half will be for the rugby portobello trust who will split the money between the survivors exactly, straight into their accounts. those are our two charities. i understand you just called cold cadogan hall and asked
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them. i was a bit cheeky. i expected them. i was a bit cheeky. i expected them to say no but they said yes. they said the next date they had was the 17th of september and they asked the 17th of september and they asked the board and they have put it all on forfree including the board and they have put it all on for free including all the tickets and staff. they are wonderful. i really surprised by everyone‘s reaction? wonderful. i really surprised by everyone's reaction? i am surprised in the sense that there are some many sad things going on in the world and it is lovely when something positive happens to remedy that but i am not really surprised because i‘m surrounded by wonderful collea g u es because i‘m surrounded by wonderful colleagues and i just because i‘m surrounded by wonderful colleagues and ijust keep in mind how wonderful and generous they are. and some of the residents are invited to? i think the current cou nters invited to? i think the current counters 86 coming for free. have
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you got the bug for organising things like this? i think my fiance would want me to say no because it is taking over our lives but i have seen is taking over our lives but i have seen things from the other side of the coin and i am inspired to bring people together for good. the coin and i am inspired to bring people together for goodlj the coin and i am inspired to bring people together for good. i really hope it goes well. good luck with it all. thank you. some breaking news this morning, and a second arrest in connection with friday‘s terror attack at parsons green station on friday. their arrest was made at ten to midnight last night, a 21—year—old in hounslow. yesterday an 18—year—old was arrested in dover in kent. both suspects are being held
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in london and this investigation is ongoing. we understand there is a house being searched in sunbury—on—thames. we will keep you up—to—date with information. andrew marr will be interviewing the home secretary amber rudd, which is where iamoff secretary amber rudd, which is where i am off to. go and do the news. we are going to talk about giant vegetables in a minute. you‘re going to be missing a massive marrow. let‘s take a look at the weather with stav. is it good weather for marrows? it isa it is a bit on the cool side. a chilly start across the country but lovely spells of sunshine. parts of the east midlands and lincolnshire
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have seen dense fog which will lift. sunny spells will develop after. sunny spells will develop after. sunny spells will develop after. sunny spells in eastern scotland —— showers in eastern scotland and down the east coast of england. lighter winds, more sunshine around and it should a little warmer. a little bit pessimistic, showing a lot of cloud. there could be brightness to the afternoon for the premier league matches but i cannot rule out the odd shower. showers linger in eastern areas this evening and part of the night particularly close to the east course. townsend city temperatures just into double figures but significantly lower in the countryside, really chilly in some northern and western areas. we could see mist and fog developing. low pressure to the east of the uk
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will generate more showers on monday but it is a weak area. more breeze on the east coast because of low pressure ringing in some showers and some showers could develop further inland. maybe the odd thundery one across the south—east. the high—pressure builds in a bit more on tuesday but it doesn‘t mean it will be completely dry, could still see isolated showers. but more dry weather and cloud. from wednesday it is more unsettled with low pressure bringing spells of rain, sunshine and showers. temperatures are just creeping up a a quarter of secondary schools in england do not provide religious
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education lessons despite being a requirement to do so. the data was gathered by the national association of teachers of religious education, who are concerned by the lack of provision. whatever the religion, whatever the customs or beliefs, at this school in east london, it will be studied in class. why are religious festivals important? religious education is a core subject here. not being religious myself, ifind it‘s really interesting to learn about other cultures and other people. it gives you the skill to debate, argue and really consider what other people view about something. i‘m going to give you 30 seconds with the person next to you... all state schools in england, including academies and free schools, are legally obliged to provide religious education as part of a balanced curriculum. these students and young people all around the country
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will go into a world where they will interact, work, marry, people who may have a religious faith and the ability to understand, tolerate and respect their religious belief is a vital skill they will need for the rest of their life. there needs to be something that happens if schools aren't doing this. fiona moss is from the national association of teachers of religious education. suspecting many schools ignore re altogether, it issued a freedom of information request to the department for education. its school census data showed 26% of state secondary schools in england made no provision for re. in academies, which operate outside of local authority control, the figure rose to 34% amongst the 11—13 age group. 44% for older pupils. when it comes down to it, schools are breaking the law. they have to teach re to all of their students. if someone is not religious and their family is not religious, why should they be studying re at school? we're not teaching
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children to be religious. we are teaching children about religious beliefs that are in this country. you don't only teach geography to people because they are going to be world explorers. schools we‘ve spoken to have told us that re teachers can be hard to recruit and that for many pupils and parents, the subject is not considered a priority. and many insist the legal obligation to teach re can be fulfilled in different ways. one union that represents head teachers says claims of lawbreaking are overblown. it might result from the report, trying to find a very traditional delivery model of re. i think many schools, whether they are academies of free schools, or any type of school, might actually be teaching re through different approaches. they might use conferences, citizenship lessons, assemblies. certainly as head of a church of england school, that‘s what we did. we were most definitely not breaking the law. the department for education said in a statement that it firmly
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believes in the importance of religious education and that it remains compulsory for all state—funded schools. it stressed that it is up to individual schools to determine how they deliver it. but some fear too many schools are ignoring re completely. i wish you could smell what i can smell in the studio right now as i am surrounded by huge vegetables. there is a big battle going on at the harrogate flower show. from colossal cabbages to monumental marrow, they‘ve received more than 170 entries for the giant vegetable competition. so what is it about oversized veg that has caught people‘s imagination? nick smith from the harrogate flower show and kevin fortey, who is the uk‘s giant vegetable record holder, join me now. what a title! can you tell us what
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we have here? in front of you. .. what a title! can you tell us what we have here? in front of you... be careful. that is really heavy! carrots, parsnips, a marrow and as we‘d —— a swede. carrots, parsnips, a marrow and as we'd -- a swede. is this quite common? from our point of view, we have done the heaviest onion championship for over 30 years, but in the last few years the rise of giant vegetables has become incredible and we have gone from three or four entries up to this now which is almost 180, and the scale of these things, i mean, the
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examples here are great but there are bigger again. i suddenly feel like one of the borrowers! how do you call them like this? a lot of time and effort. if you like holidays, forget it. the heaviest marrow was 173 pounds. it is really about learning, going to shows like harrogate, there are a number of other shows in the uk. the marrows will take five square metres just for one. so you need plenty of space. how does it even start? the process of getting on that size. seat like that will grow a 170— pound plus marrow. my father
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developed the art of giant vegetable growing. we are here today with massive vegetables. it is an amazing feat just to see that shows like harrogate are taking giant vegetable growing to a new level. there were some novice classes and people were enthusiastic. we know you are a winner. we have some pictures of other winners. tell us a bit about the types of winners that you get. read classes as professional growers. look at that cabbage! with the novice classes this is a chance for you and i to have a go. we have three new glasses —— classes this year. we have had some great entries. in terms ofjudging, is
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literally a case of getting out a tape measure? some are heaviest and some are longest. the runner bean is longest, things like the marrow are heaviest. some people would fill pumpkins with water! we don't do that. there is no lead in that marrow. have you started preparing for next year? we have the uk giant vegetable championships. the them afterwards ? vegetable championships. the them afterwards? that carrot would be good perhaps for dental floss. and like to see you get that through your teeth! that swede, you could started on our slow cooker now and
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it would probably be ready for christmas day. a lot of them will go maybe as props. we had a call from eastenders asking for a giant marrow. so it really does have the wow factor. i bet you do a good roast dinner. a big ross taylor! -- roast dinner. a big ross taylor! -- roast dinner! i don't think these would be kicked by one o‘clock. roast dinner! i don't think these would be kicked by one o'clock. we have over 80 plant nurseries and there is a huge amount going on for everyone involved. thanks for bringing in the year beckett marrows. that‘s all we‘ve got time for today. i‘ll be back here with dan from six
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tomorrow on bbc one. until then, whatever you are doing, have a good day. bye— bye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 9am: police investigating the london tube bombing have arrested a second man — he‘s 21 and was detained in west london last night. here in surrey, the police search home of the first man arrested, an 18—year—old arrested in dover. but is being stepped up. but is being stepped up. no plan to sack borisjohnson after writing a newspaper article on brexit — viewed by many as a challenge to the prime minister. the un secretary—general says myanmar‘s leader, aung san suu kyi, has a "last chance" to end the military offensive that‘s forced 400,000 rohingya muslims to flee to neighbouring bangladesh. also in the next hour, we‘ll take a look at this morning‘s papers. this morning‘s reviewers are caroline crampton
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of the new statesman and the broadcaster, john stapleton. and anger and controversy in las vegas, as the hotly anticipated

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