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tv   Asia Business Report  BBC News  September 18, 2017 1:30am-1:46am BST

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the united nations warns of a "horrible tragedy" for rohingya muslims, and says myanmar has one last chance to halt the military offensive against them. aid agencies say they've identified more than one thousand children without parents or relatives among the refugees who've arrived from myanmar. some are as young as three years old. the united states has signalled a possible change in policy on climate change, secretary of state rex tillerson said it's "open" to staying in the paris agreement. and this story is trending on bbc.com. a man has died in hong kong while walking through a haunted house attraction. park officials say he had wandered into a restricted area of the buried alive ride at ocean park. local media reports say he was struck by a coffin. you are up—to—date. and the top story here in the uk: the uk terror threat level is reduced from critical to severe as a second man is arrested after a bomb attack
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on a london tube train. now on bbc news, all the latest business news live from singapore. the yen and other major currencies are getting ready to react as central banks in japan are getting ready to react as central banks injapan meet this week. and the robot revolution comes to preschools in singapore, with high—tech tools soon to become part of every child's education. good morning, asia. hello, world. welcome to another edition of asia business report. it's a monday. i'm sharanjit leyl report. it's a monday. i'm sharanjit leyl. thank you forjoining me. investors are focused on the world's top central banks this week. taking a look on tuesday, the us federal reserve begins a two—day meeting where they will crunch the numbers to decide whether to raise interest
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rates. at the last meeting, they left borrowing cost all two unchanged, but the latest numbers in the us have been picking up. —— costs. the bank ofjapan meet on thursday. on that day, draghi was speaking at a conference on financial stability. they will be looking at clues on the plan to pull back on the programme of quantitative easing and how it is going. experts told us what to expect. it is almost exactly ten yea rs expect. it is almost exactly ten years since a massive reduction in interest rates, pa rt years since a massive reduction in interest rates, part of the crisis. the big question is they going to continue to let interest rates rise in order to deflate the massive amount of quantitative easing in the market? the broad assumption is somewhere between a quarter and a half a percent will be the increase. it is not clear if the us economy is
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robust enough to withstand substantial increases in interest rates. unemployment is at a low level but inflation is not at the right level. what looks like a donald trump phenomenon shows he might be doing it. global investors are also keeping an eye on geopolitical tensions following a repeated missile tests from north korea. it has rattled some global investors, but not all. a fund manager, also known as dr doom, talked to us, and told us he has not pulled any investment out of asia just yet. i would look at essentially a dying opportunity in asia emerging if there was a conflict because markets would obviously adjust on the downside and create value the way we had really good value after the asian crisis of 98. in 2003, and again in 2009 as
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well. markets in asia are relatively inexpensive compared to the us because the us is very expensive, and so asian markets are, in my opinion, reasonably attractive. but they are not absolutely cheap the way they were in 2009 and in 1998. are you looking forward to military intervention? to look forward to war is not a nice thing to do. i mean, the hardship of military intervention is enormous, especially on the poor people and the affected people. so i am not looking forward to that. but if it happened, you know, i am an investor at the same time, soi know, i am an investor at the same time, so i would have to take advantage of it. do you think it is likely? do you think we are headed for armed conflict? i don't think it is likely. the parties will be
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forced by north korea to the negotiation table. north korea is supported by china. they will get concessions from the us and south korea in terms of having the us removed the third missile system from south korea, which, in the eyes of the chinese and the eyes of the north koreans, is clearly an aggression against north korea and china. —— remove. so, the provocation is not from mr kim in the north, it came from the stationing of the thaad systems. one of china's biggest conglomerates has revived a deal previously blocked by the indian government. the group tried to buy 86% of the indian drugmaker, gladfarmer for $1.8
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million last year, the largest ever for a chinese company. following that, they have revised down the size of the deal to get regular tory approval, but not by much. 74% for $1.1 million. shinzo abe could he call a snap election as early as next month? according to reports, he is looking to take advantage of his improved approval ratings and a weakened opposition. party officials are expected to meet today to discuss the move. his popularity took a discuss the move. his popularity tooka dip discuss the move. his popularity took a dip because of a cronyism scandal, but following a cabinet reshuffle and worries of north korea, it has gone back up. the first on line only insurer of china could have a watcher one of $10 billion. casualty insurance has famous names behind it. it was co—founded in 2013 by chinese
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billionaire jack ma. softbank is also a cornerstone investor and owns also a cornerstone investor and owns a5% also a cornerstone investor and owns a 5% stake in it. shared office space company wework is doing something good, receiving a $4.4 billion investment from soft. they are estimated to be worth nearly $20 billion, making it the sixth most valuable technology firm in the world. —— softbank. earlieri valuable technology firm in the world. —— softbank. earlier i ask the managing director what justified the managing director what justified the skyhigh valuation. we don't see ourselves as a c0— the skyhigh valuation. we don't see ourselves as a co— working company, we are a global platform for creators. there are some reasons for that. the market will not open yet, it will open in singapore very soon. when you walk into a building, whether it is in beijing, new york, london, anywhere in the world, there is energy. you can see people
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collaborating and working together, whether it is a large company, a small company. there is design and intention and research going around that, how do you get a workspace that, how do you get a workspace thatis that, how do you get a workspace that is inspiring and functional? there is a lot of research and development going into how to development going into how to develop those spaces to be the other isa develop those spaces to be the other is a global platform. if you are sitting in beijing, singapore, and you can access space in the us, there is no one in the world who can provide both research and development and functionality. you are talking about collaboration and creative workspaces, but i have an office here in the bbc and we collaborate and work in regular office space is. —— spaces. how are you different? rigger back to design. in our buildings we literally do a test to see whether
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open or closed space is better. it can be different for different markets. a lot of design goes into that. when you walk into a space, compared to other places, it is apparent the second you get in. preschooler‘s next best friend could bea preschooler‘s next best friend could be a robot. singapore has been testing the use of robotic toys to help children learned. will they be pa rt help children learned. will they be part of every preschool in singapore? —— learn. we went to check out. technology in the classroom has been a trend for yea rs. classroom has been a trend for years. but in singapore, children are connecting with robot at a very young age. here at this kindergarten, these 4— 5—6 year old 0h kindergarten, these 4— 5—6 year old on learning the building blocks of programming. —— yearolds on learning the building blocks of programming. —— year olds are. she is showing me how it works. she is
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programming this robot with a set of instructions. what do you like about it? it can dance, the robot can laugh and play. the kit they are using is called kibo, just one of the kids they are using. 10% of classes in singapore have in taking pa rt classes in singapore have in taking part in the pilot called playmaker. it is costing 1 million us dollars to the government, but they say the payoff is worth it. i have children lacking communication skills. they are reserved in classroom discussions and sessions. but ever since they took on playmaker, since it has been in the curriculum, there is an improvement in how they interact. but this technology does not just help children interact. but this technology does notjust help children interact, it also helps improve the content first
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century skills they have. almost every object has a component that has been programmed, like watches and tvs. this will help them not only understand how objects work, but to create new ones. they need to become literate, notjust in writing and reading, but in coding. for elise and her classmates, they are more than child's play, they want to survive in the digital world. we end the programme on that note. thank you for watching. you are watching bbc news. these are
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the headlines. the un has warned of a "horrible tragedy" for rohingya muslims, and says myanmar has one last chance to halt the offensive against them. the united states has signalled a possible change in policy on climate change, secretary of state rex tillerson said it's "open" to staying in the paris agreement. borisjohnson has been accused of misusing official figures, for repeating the claim that the uk will free up £350 million a week, on leaving the european union. the head of the uk statistics authority, says he's "disappointed" by the claim, which comes as two cabinet ministers accused the foreign secretary of "backseat driving," after he set out his personal vision of britain after brexit. our political correspondent, alex forsyth, reports. it was the contentious claim emblazoned on the bus. it was the contentious claim emblazoned on the vote leave bus. is it not time we took control? and borisjohnson repeated it this weekend, while setting out his vision for brexit, prompting an extraordinary row. the head of the uk statistics authority said he was surprised
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and disappointed the foreign secretary had returned to the £350 million figure, saying it was a clear misuse of official statistics. the foreign secretary issued a defiant response, saying that his article had been wilfully distorted and misrepresented. and all that followed comments by cabinet colleagues who were not thrilled by his public take on brexit. i don't want him managing the brexit process. what we've got is theresa may managing the process. she is driving the car and i will make sure that as far as i'm concerned and the rest of the cabinet is concerned, we help her do that. so this is backseat driving? backseat driving, absolutely. his article argued for a bold and positive brexit, leading to claims of a cabinet split and attempts to undermine the prime minister. despite the headlines, there is no suggestion that he will lose his job. publicly, the government says it is united about getting the best brexit deal. and the spokesman for borisjohnson says he is fully behind the prime minister,
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who is leading negotiations. but, privately, there is frustration and anger at the nature and timing of this intervention, coming less than one week before the prime minister is due to make a major speechof her own about brexit in florence. on an interview in american television she described her vision for life outside the eu. some people hear brexit and think it is about britain turning inwards. it wasn't. it was actually about us looking out at the rest of the world, but ensuring that we can control our laws, money and borders. it is now for theresa may to assert her authority over brexit and settle internal disputes although it seems that borisjohnson is intent on fighting his own battles. alex forsyth reporting. and the bbc‘s reality check has an explanation of that £350 million claim and all the facts and figures behind it. that's on the bbc website. don't forget, you can get
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in touch with me on twitter. i'm @babitabbc. hello there. i am tulsen tollett and this is sport today, life in the bbc sport centre. coming up on the programme: lewis hamilton increased his lead in the formula 1 world championship with victory in singapore as sebastian vettel crashed out at the start. wayne rooney's old trafford return ends in a 4—0 defeat for everton against his former club manchester united. and marc leishman wins the bmw championship, the penultimate tournament of the fedex cup play—offs. hello there and welcome to the programme. lots to talk about, there, but we start with the news that lewis hamilton has claimed

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