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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 18, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. a third property is searched by police investigating the london tube train attack. the shop in west london is where a 21—year—old man was arrested outside on saturday night. good morning, it is monday 18 september. also this morning: iam afraid i am afraid you are under a citizen's arrest. i'm not letting you go anywhere, 0k? the rise of the paedophile hunters. why the police are increasingly using the evidence collected by them in court cases. it is the start of the growing season, and i am surrounded by apples.
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in sport: there was no happy return for wayne rooney at old trafford. everton were thrashed 4—0 by manchester united, which puts them in the bottom three. the handmaid's tale! and the handmaid's tale was the big winner in the emmys, scooping three of the major prizes. and carol has the weather. morning, a chilly start for some of us. morning, a chilly start for some of us. some low cloud, some patchy fog. that will give way to sunshine and showers, the worst of which will be in the west. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it is a takeaway restaurant in hounslow, where a second suspect was arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody. andy moore reports. late on saturday night, a second man is arrested in the centre of hounslow in connection with the tube bombing. this is no ordinary detention. at least three forensic
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officers check the man over for any evidence, before he is taken away. he is 21 years old and believed to be a syrian refugee, who used to live in sunbury, alongside the first man detained at dover. the suspect was arrested just before midnight on saturday, outside these shutters. for several hours yesterday, police were carrying out an investigation and a search of this chicken shop next door. a number of detectives left late last night, carrying several items in bags for further examination, including what seemed to be a television or computer monitor. the connection between this middle eastern chicken shop and the arrested man is unclear. but he is believed to have lived at this location, in nearby stanwell, very close to the perimeter of heathrow airport. neighbours described him as a quiet man who never caused any trouble. the focus of the most intensive police search is sunbury, where an 18—year—old refugee,
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thought to be from iraq, shared a home with his elderly foster parents. these cctv images obtained by itv news show a young man leaving the back of that house very early on friday morning, with a distinctive lidl carrier bag. 90 minutes later, a bucket bomb inside a very similar bag went up in flames on the floor of a tube train at parsons green. the police investigation is by no means over, but the reduction in the terror threat level means the authorities believe there is no longer an imminent risk of another attack. and andy moore is at sunbury—on—thames. andy, the house there is still the main focus for the police search operation. that's right. there has been a very intensive search here, and this is the third day now. and the number of resources that have been devoted to
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this surge of this house leads you to the conclusion that police must suspect this is the location where the bomb was made. there searches inside the house, and we have seen forensics officers looking in the garden and inside a garden shed at the end of that garden. just to tell you a little bit about the 18—year—old iraqi refugee who lived here, we understand he is an orphan, that he came to the uk about three yea rs that he came to the uk about three years ago, and neighbours here say that there were disputes with his foster parents, and he was in trouble with the police quite a lot. the 21—year—old man was arrested, we believe he lived here also, at sunbury—on—thames, at some stage. and just an update on the casualties. 30 people were taken to various hospitals after the attack on friday, but thankfully only one person still remains in hospital. plenty more on that story for you throughout the programme. there has been a big increase in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters.
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in 2014, ii% of cases featured material gathered by the groups. by last year, that figure had risen to 44%. jon cuthill has this report. the police say paedophile hunters are vigilantes, they pose as children online, film their meetings with people who groom them, and post their videos on social media. you've arranged to meet a 14—year—old for sex here today? the police are on their way. i'm a paedophile hunter, mate. that's what i do. you are under citizen's arrest. in 2014, ii% of cases for meeting a child following sexual grooming contained paedophile hunter evidence. two years later, that has grown to 44%. look, i think that's an embarrassing figure for british policing.
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look at the success that's being achieved. recognise, of course, the danger of vigilantes, but then do something about it, and within the criminaljustice system. will there ever be a situation where they could work together with police? i think it is something that we will potentially have to look at, but it comes with complexity, not least of all the psychological screening that the professionals go through, to make sure that these people are still not being adversely affected by this. well, i will have to look at it. the risks are really significant, and cannot be understated. i will not condone these groups, and i would encourage them to stop. but i recognise that i'm not winning that conversation, and i'm not winning that moral argument. the man caught by this southampton—based hunter pleaded guilty, and is injail awaiting sentencing. you can watch more on this on inside out at 7:30pm tonight on bbc one, in the south
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of england, and it will be on the iplayer afterwards. the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson, in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminster. leila, there is no sign of this row going away. this number is still being argued about, isn't it? it is, and we are ina bit about, isn't it? it is, and we are in a bit of an extraordinary row here. we have the uk's most senior statistics official, sir david nor grove, and the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, grove, and the foreign secretary, boris johnson, embroiled grove, and the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, embroiled in a very public argument about this figure —— david norgrove. he revisited that claim in an article he wrote in a newspaper on saturday saying that we would get £350 million back from brussels, and it would be a fine thing, he said, if that was spent on the nhs. now, sir david norgrove wrote in a public letter to him that
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this was a clear misuse of official statistics, and he was disappointed he had chosen to revisit it. or as johnson defiantly sticking to his position, saying that he was disappointed that sir david norgrove had chosen to go public with this, and said he had been wilfully misrepresented, and demanding sir david norgrove withdraw the claim that he was wrong. but i think this shows that passions are still running very, very high. boris johnson's intervention in his article on saturday was seen by some asa article on saturday was seen by some as a pitch for leadership. it certainly suggests he was frustrated about the progress of brexit talks. he was setting out his vision for brexit just days he was setting out his vision for brexitjust days ahead of when theresa may is due to make a big speech on brexit on friday in florence. we heard amber rudd, the home secretary, telling boris johnson to pipe down, saying theresa may is the one in charge and will be driving the car, and telling boris
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johnson he is being a bit of a backseat driver. borisjohnson and his team insist he is fully behind theresa may, but certainly this £350 million figure that he has chosen to resurrect has rather diverted attention on to that, and suggest that his intervention on saturday has somewhat backfired. and because of all that, the argy—bargy continues. thank you very much, we will see you later. a third day of protests has turned violent in the american city of st louis, following the acquittal of a white former police officer who killed a black man in 2011. police broke up the demonstration when some protesters began throwing objects at officers and breaking shop windows. several people have been arrested. children with malignant brain cancer could receive more targeted treatment, with fewer side effects. it comes after scientists identified seven different forms of the most common type of the disease. the researchers at newcastle and northumbria universities hope that in the long—term their work will lead to new drugs and treatments being developed. the handmaid's tale has scooped three of the major prizes at this
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year's emmy awards. as our correspondent reports, brits are celebrating this morning. everything is better on tv. a song and dance routine to celebrate television, from streaming services to mainstream tv. but this was a show rich in political satire. there we re show rich in political satire. there were constant digs at donald trump. post stephen colbert even ridiculed the former reality tv star, for not winning an emmy himself. but that changed, sort of, when alec baldwin took the award for best supporter in a comedy. i suppose i should say, at long last, mr president, here is your enemy. british winners included
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the comedian john oliver, your enemy. british winners included the comedianjohn 0liver, charlie brock, for the drama black mirror, and for the drama the night off. nicole kidman took best actress, and her co—star, reese witherspoon, accepted the award for best limited series. and can ijust say, bring women to the front of their own stories. the handmaid's tale! and i's top award for the streaming service hulu. viewers are turning to the small screen. from the tv set to the small screen. from the tv set to the tablet, television on all its platforms is enjoying a golden age. and some big dresses as well.|j thought they had gone all sort of... no, that was covered. like those things you put over your loo rolls. my things you put over your loo rolls. my mother did use to use those. when we we re
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my mother did use to use those. when we were at home we would take it off and throw it away. not throw it away, mum. very lovely, and they used to keep it warm, as well, which is always important. shall we go with sport. good morning to you, jessica. we will be talking football first of all, because wayne rooney... it is always hard going back to your old club, possibly with a point to prove. he went back to manchester united, and he has been such an influential player for the clu bs such an influential player for the clubs he has played out. for england, of course, but not even he could stop everton being thrashed yesterday. there was no fairytale return to old trafford for wayne rooney, as his new side, everton, were thrashed 4—0. rooney is manchester united's all—time top—scorer, and received a warm reception from the home fans, but couldn't prevent his side slipping to a big defeat. meanwhile, david luiz was sent off for chelsea in a goalless draw against arsenal. it was the gunners' first point at chelsea in six years. could this be the defining moment of the formula 1 season? sebastian vettel crashing out on the opening lap of the singapore grand prix handed
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lewis hamilton victory, extending the briton‘s championship lead to 28 points, with six races to go. and there were remarkable scenes in cardiff, where mensur suljovic, a huge outsider, won the pdc champions league of darts. brilliant. did you see the reaction from him that? he was so overcome with emotion. i saw him beat gary anderson, and he absolutely annihilated him. he was on form all weekend. thank you very much, jess. we will see you later on. carol, you are back from your holidays, looking refreshed. i must say, the wake-up call this morning was a shock. it is nice to be back. more showers today in central and
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eastern areas. the middle of the week. rain. the end of the week, warming up. some parts of the uk, 21. low pressure to the east today. high pressure from the west. this will kill off the show as we have in the west. a chilly start. single figures. a touch of frost in scotland. low cloud and murky conditions and showers coming in, especially in central and eastern areas 1st thing. 8am this morning, bright weather. wales, if you showers. low cloud in the midlands and the east and east anglia and the south—east producing showers and patchy fog. northwards into scotland and northern ireland, not a bad start to the dais to be in the west, a bit nippy. a few showers. —— to the day. through the day, we will find this cloud break up. the sun
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will come out. showers. at the same time, the rain in shetland goes further south, bringing cloud with it as it does so in eastern scotland, eventually getting in across north—east england. showers in wales and the south—west. fairly hit and miss. the highest temperature will be 19. through this evening and overnight, there goes the band of cloud and patchy rain going south. fog around as well. clear skies in the north. 0nce again, a touch of frost. these are the temperatures you can get in townsend cities. the countryside, much lower. 0ne townsend cities. the countryside, much lower. one and four. tuesday, this ridge of high pressure builds nicely. later, something coming in from the atlantic bringing a change. a chilly start again on tuesday.
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sunshine. cloud continuing to break up. one ortwo sunshine. cloud continuing to break up. one or two showers here and there, the exception, not the rule. cloud in northern ireland ahead of this band of rain. temperatures, 17-18, this band of rain. temperatures, 17—18, possibly 19. do this band of rain. temperatures, 17—18, possibly19. do you remember the weather front bringing rain to northern ireland on tuesday? that will move across western areas on wednesday. the east on thursday it will take rain with it. thursday, somewhere could hit 20— 21. that is more like it! thank you very much. we will see you soon. the first day back after the holidays. this morning's airlines. —— headlines. police investigating friday's attack on the london underground have searched three properties, as two men are questioned in connection with the explosion.
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as police increasingly use evidence obtained by so—called paedophile hunters, the chief constable in charge of child abuse investigations says he'll consider working with vigilantes in the future. the papers. i will start with the daily telegraph. i should have unfolded first. this has been the story for most of the weekend. boris johnson. and london is the source of all creativity. london fashion week, when is it? it is this week. it is this week, everyone! it is funny how it came to you like that. the financial times also talks about the £350 million figure. that row will carry on about whether money be
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saved, the statistics authority is tackling that nhs claim used by borisjohnson. tackling that nhs claim used by boris johnson. the picture we showed you in the piece about the bomb attack in london last week. strolling in suburbia. and this is the sun, on his way to bomb the tube. a little bag in his hand. a story about prisoners and compensation, which could be frozen. dawn french talking about what makes a happy as she turns 60. there is an exclusive about slaughtering badgers. a cull and a row about it. this board. lots about romelu lukaku
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playing for manchester united, scoring against his old club, everton. interestingly, antonio conte is saying chelsea needs more luck with referees, that is after more players being sent off. that is the third time in five matches. is it like? should you notjust stick to the rules? just a little push. could not help it. another one. the daily telegraph. we spoke a lot yesterday on breakfast about the big match on sunday morning. it ended in a draw. 0ne match on sunday morning. it ended in a draw. one of the judges was called in to question because she, well, she scored it very differently to the other twojudges. we now
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understand she has been stood down temporarily. her name is adelaide. we wonder whether she will be permanently standing down. miles away from where most people had scored it. many pundits were baffled by it. have a look at this. here is a parent of pants. nathan french. 19 yea rs a parent of pants. nathan french. 19 years old. he climbed a mountain on the weekend. the only war pants. he struggled with hypothermia but he is doing it for a reason. he wanted to say thanks to the paramedics as well as he says it was silly but he hopes they understood why he did it. i think those pants are a good way to
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go. too much insight. more stories for you now. death threats, verbal abuse, and on—line intimidation. that's what people hoping to win a seat in the house of commons dealt with during the general election this year. a survey of mps by bbc radio five live suggests 87% of them suffered some form of abuse with many saying this year's campaign was the worst ever. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, has been studying the findings. a defaced poster with a reference to hitler, foul language, graffiti, that we have blurred out. alex has been a conservative mp in west yorkshire since 2010.|j been a conservative mp in west yorkshire since 2010. i think it is noticeable in this election, the angen noticeable in this election, the anger, the nasty mess, the way it
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was organised in a way it was in before. having fascist nazi scum written on a poster is so far from the reality of what politics is about today. but i worry that it is sending messages to young people of forgetting what nazi ideology was about. this is the first conservative to win in nottinghamshire in his seat. he is giving up twitter because of abuse and is stepping up security in his home. give us a sense of what you have had to put up with in this campaign beyond political discussion. i got a lot of phone calls with no one on the end of it when i answered. there were people knocking on my door. it is scary in a way, not just for knocking on my door. it is scary in a way, notjust for me, but my young children. a hand delivered letter
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made and aggressive point to me and it was delivered to my house. it makes me realise someone was walking down my driveway with my children at home. it is scary. i have been a reporterfor home. it is scary. i have been a reporter for over a decade, and home. it is scary. i have been a reporterfor over a decade, and i have not found a politician who does not like a good argument. this goes beyond that. a man coming into my office threatening to bomb it. bottles smashed on me, says another. my bottles smashed on me, says another. my windows have been broken three times. i have been threatened with being bert to death. —— burnt.|j received some abuse from a website on facebook. i logged on. it was strange, a compulsion to see what people are saying about you. people say do not look, do not look. but i
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find that difficult. someone had made a picture of me as a used sanitary towel. i remember thinking absolutely i am revolted. a few friends saw it and i felt angry. vandalism, abuse, threats, these are the things people fear will put off people going into politics. and our political correspondent, chris mason, joins us now. chris, what is being done to protect mps from abuse? good morning. what is going to be done about this? good morning. we have spoken to the authorities to get their response to this survey. they recognise the increasing levels of abuse are unacceptable, they acknowledge it is a growing problem which should not seem to be part of thejob for mps which should not seem to be part of the job for mps and staff. there has been real awareness after what happened with jo been real awareness after what happened withjo cox that this is
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more thanjust happened withjo cox that this is more than just abuse that can be easily dismissed. mps can very easily dismissed. mps can very easily cast that line back to very recent times when one of them was killed while doing the job. so there is extra advice available for mps in terms of security and how they manage themselves on line. in addition to that, there are people appointed and security advisers appointed and security advisers appointed that can pass on advice about security. 0n appointed that can pass on advice about security. on top of that, there is the distinction between mps and how they operate at westminster and how they operate at westminster and then security when they are back in their constituencies. regional police forces have a role to play here. but in addition to that there has been a contract employed to help mps who want to install additional security measures at home. speaking toa
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security measures at home. speaking to a few, plenty are doing just that. for obvious reasons, a few will not talk about what they are doing. the very fact they feel they have to gives you a sense of how seriously they take this problem. thank you very much for that. we will speak about that later. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. colletta is in armagh to find out why bramley apples are vital to northern ireland's economy. good morning, everyone. this is known as northern ireland's or county. 0ver known as northern ireland's or county. over the next six weeks it isa county. over the next six weeks it is a crucial time as they pick, harvest, juice the goods we eat. if you have ever had anyjews, it is likely it came from armagh. we will look around this area over the next
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hour or so look around this area over the next hourorso and look around this area over the next hour or so and see how they make it. around 800 tons of apples will be picked in the next six weeks. it is a busy time of year. now it is time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia liza armah. 71% of teachers in london and the south—east say they've had physiological or mental health issues at work. in an exclusive poll for bbc 0ne's inside out programme it found almost all of those asked cited excessive workloads as a key factor resulting in a range of problems like depression, anxiety or panic attacks. the survey also showed that only 15% of teachers, who had suffered these problems, had raised it with their employer. here is a school, and we have seen more teachers feeling more pressured. we have had to go in and
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support those teachers. that is not just this school, that story is replicated across the picture. it's now thought a gas leak was responsible for several people near lewisham being taken to hospital yesterday morning. six homes were evacuated in lee while the fire brigade investigated what was initially described as a chemical leak. millions of council tenants could be in line for huge refunds from their landlords over water bills. at least one local authority was paid commission by a water company to act as its agent, but failed to pass this money on to tenants, which is illegal. it's seen as effectively "reselling" water. and that's been deemed unlawful in a landmark case. now tenants in other areas want to know if their town halls or housing associations have done the same. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the london 0verg round is partly suspended. there's no service from gospel 0ak to barking. and trains on the circle and district line aren't stopping at temple station east—bound because of water leak. 0n the trains,
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some cancellations on the west london line between claphamjunction and watford junction. that's because of a shortage of staff 0n the roads in arnos grove, the aa06 westbound is down to one lane at bounds green road for repairs to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather 110w let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a bit of cloud around first thing this morning. this week will be rather pleasant. today, sunny spells eventually. 0ne will be rather pleasant. today, sunny spells eventually. one or two showers as well. first thing, cloud this morning. mist and murk as well. some fog patches as well. showers developing through the day. a few heavy ones potentially. bright spells. light winds. temperatures getting to 18. feeling a bit warmer than the weekend. a few showers around into the evening and overnight. a lot of cloud. showers dying away. protecting us a little. temperature is still up. 10— 11.
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tuesdayis temperature is still up. 10— 11. tuesday is looking like a very pleasa nt tuesday is looking like a very pleasant day. plenty of sunshine. staying dry. patchy cloud. the wind is light. in the sunshine, rather pleasant. 18. that does mean however another chilly night on tuesday into wednesday. single figures. wednesday, a similar day. the temperature is sneaking up. sunny spells. temperatures could be possibly 20 degrees as we go through the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the breakfast sofa. hello, you are watching breakfast with steph mcgovern and dan walker. we will bring you the latest news and sport injust a moment. and coming up later: his challenge was to cycle around the world in 80 days. we will catch up with ultra—endurance cyclist mark beaumont, as he prepares to cross the finishing line
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a day early. she taught a generation of children how to train dragons. writer cressida cowell will be here to tell us about a new adventure in a magical world full of wizards and warriors. time now for a summary of this morning's main news: and mark almond will be here. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it is a takeaway restaurant in hounslow, where a second suspect was arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody in relation to the incident, which injured 30 people. andy moore reports. late on saturday night,
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a second man is arrested in the centre of hounslow in connection with the tube bombing. this is no ordinary detention. at least three forensic officers check the man over for any evidence, before he is taken away. he is 21 years old and believed to be a syrian refugee, who used to live in sunbury, alongside the first man detained at dover. the suspect was arrested just before midnight on saturday, outside these shutters. for several hours yesterday, police were carrying out an investigation and a search of this chicken shop next door. a number of detectives left late last night, carrying several items in bags for further examination, including what seemed to be a television or computer monitor. the connection between this middle eastern chicken shop and the arrested man is unclear. but he is believed to have lived at this location, in nearby stanwell, very close to the perimeter of heathrow airport. neighbours described him as a quiet man who never caused any trouble. the focus of the most intensive
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police search is sunbury, where an 18—year—old refugee, thought to be from iraq, shared a home with his elderly foster pa rents. these cctv images obtained by itv news show a young man leaving the back of that house very early on friday morning, with a distinctive lidl carrier bag. 90 minutes later, a bucket bomb inside a very similar bag went up in flames on the floor of a tube train at parsons green. the police investigation is by no means over, but the reduction in the terror threat level means the authorities believe there is no longer an imminent risk of another attack. there has been a sharp rise in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters. the chief constable in charge of child abuse investigations across the uk has told the bbc that he will consider working with paedophile hunter groups in the future. the uk's statistics watchdog has
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stood by its criticism of borisjohnson, in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. the intervention by sir david norgrove followed the foreign secretary reasserting that the uk stood to regain £350 million a week after leaving the eu. mrjohnson has accused sir david of the wilful distortion of his article, and asked him to withdraw it. a third day of protests has turned violent in the american city of st louis, following the acquittal of a white former police officer who killed a black man, anthony lamar smith, in 2011. police broke up the demonstration when some protesters began throwing objects at officers and breaking shop windows. several people have been arrested. some of the caribbean islands recently devastated by hurricane irma are preparing themselves for a possible second major storm. tropical storm maria has been upgraded to a category 0ne hurricane force. it is currently following roughly
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the same path as irma, and is expected to strengthen over the next 48 hours. children with malignant brain cancer could receive more targeted treatment, with fewer side effects. it comes after scientists identified seven different forms of the most common type of the disease. the researchers at newcastle and northumbria universities hope that in the long—term their work will lead to new drugs and treatments being developed. the handmaid's tale has scooped three of the major prizes at this year's emmy awards. the drama won best drama series, best director and best actress for elisabeth moss. riz ahmed was among the british winners, taking home best lead actor in the crime drama the night of. 0ther british winners include charlie brooker, who took the best writing award for black mirror. and nicole kidman also did well for
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big little lies. pick a celeb, any celeb. i spotted ewan mcgregor. big little lies. pick a celeb, any celeb. ispotted ewan mcgregor. it isa celeb. ispotted ewan mcgregor. it is a good, fun game. spot the celeb. it is quite easy at awards, isn't it? ok! i can see wayne rooney. speaking of celebs. it? ok! i can see wayne rooney. speaking of celebslj it? ok! i can see wayne rooney. speaking of celebs. i have to say, i felt a little bit sorry for wayne rooney. not only did he have to go back to his old club, manchester united, he had to play them when they are on a roll. they are scoring goals forfun. they are on a roll. they are scoring goals for fun. meanwhile, they are on a roll. they are scoring goals forfun. meanwhile, everton are on a run of losses. they have not scored for 325 minutes. that is a long time. they are not doing well at all, not the return that wayne rooney would have wanted. manchester united's record goal—scorer wayne rooney couldn't stop his new side, everton, slumping to a 4—0 defeat at old trafford yesterday. rooney received a warm welcome from the home fans,
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but his side were soon behind thanks to this brilliant goal from antonio valencia. united scored three more in the second half, including this from former everton striker romelu lu ka ku. that win puts united joint top of the table with their neighbours, manchester city. the first half, we should have killed the game. everton is a very good team, with lots of very good players. but they are in a difficult moment. and when teams are in a difficult moment, it is important that you don't give them confidence, so important to start strong, and to try to kill their mentality as soon as possible. london rivals chelsea and arsenal played out a 0—0 draw at stamford bridge. the visitors thought they had taken the lead, only to see the goal disallowed for offside. chelsea defender david luiz was then sent off for a high tackle in the closing stages of the match.
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this was a massive game, and usually when you play against another team that are really strong, it is not simple to play, to try to win. but i think both teams tried to do this, and yes, i think it was a good effort. lewis hamilton says winning the singapore grand prix could prove pivotal in the race for the formula 1 world championship. it was a race ferrari were expected to dominate, but title rival sebastian vettel crashed out, with teammate kimi raikkonen and red bull's max verstappen. that saw hamilton move up from fifth place to coast to victory. he has extended his championship lead to 28 points, with six races remaining. yesterday, we struggled, and we had no idea what was going to happen today. at the thing is we just try today. at the thing is we just try to stay focused and try to get ahead. 0bviously to stay focused and try to get ahead. obviously it was very fortu nate ahead. obviously it was very fortunate with the ferraris in the
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beginning, so yes, i couldn't be happier. i am beginning, so yes, i couldn't be happier. iam really beginning, so yes, i couldn't be happier. i am really grateful. in rugby union's premiership, wasps lost their first home game in 20 matches, as harlequins beat them at the ricoh arena. wasps had won their first two games of the season, and were looking to return to the top of the table. but charlie walker's second—half try, and 1a points from the boot of marcus smith, saw quins take victory. and a great underdog story to end with, as mensur suljovic, the outsider heading into the pdc champions league of darts, has won the tournament in cardiff. he was a 40:1 shot before a dart was thrown, but completed the fairytale by beating two—time world champion gary anderson 11—9 in the final. it was the first major trophy of his career, and he is £100,000 better off, too. just look at the emotion in his face. he said afterwards it was perfect. he never thought that he
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could win. and just look at him, overcome. you would be, when you win that kind of money, as well. not bad foran that kind of money, as well. not bad for an evening's work. a very impressive performance. theresa may is flying to canada today to discuss a post—brexit trade deal, amid the fallout over the government's approach to eu withdrawal. the prime minister was facing calls to sack foreign secretary borisjohnson after he set out his personal vision of britain after brexit. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo joins us now from westminster. the fallout over that article by borisjohnson show no sign of going away, does it? no, ithink no, i think we have got two dig major takeaway is from this 4000 word article that borisjohnson published on saturday. the first is a very public row between the foreign secretary, boris johnson, and the uk's most senior statistics official, sir david norgrove, over
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boris johnson's official, sir david norgrove, over borisjohnson‘s repeating of the campaign claim that britain will get £350 million back per week from the eu after brexit, which could be spent on all sorts of things. sir david norgrove saying this is a clear misuse of official statistics, but borisjohnson defiantly clear misuse of official statistics, but boris johnson defiantly sticking to his guns in this very published slapping match, saying he is being wilfully misrepresented. this could be considered a bit of semantics, he is talking about taking back control over that money. that doesn't mean we will get all of it back, but we can decide whether we send some back to the eu after brexit or not. so there is this sort of self—contained i’ow there is this sort of self—contained row going on about this £350 million figure, but more broadly, the whole idea of boris johnson's figure, but more broadly, the whole idea of borisjohnson‘s intervention at this point, just five days before theresa may is due to make a big wrecks of speech in florence on friday, has made all sorts of questions about why borisjohnson has chosen to do this —— big brexit
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speech. he has spoken about being frustrated about the progress of those talks, and he setting out his stall in advance of theresa may's speech, but being very publicly rebuked by his cabinet colleagues yesterday, and the rudd, the home affa i rs yesterday, and the rudd, the home affairs secretary, telling him to pipe down, accusing him of backseat driving —— amber rudd. the first secretary of state questioning his timing. soi secretary of state questioning his timing. so i think what this all goes to show is there is still so much wrangling at the very highest levels of government. there is still no agreement, at this point into the negotiations, of what exactly brexit should look like. and talking of politics, we will be speaking to liberal democrat leader vince cable later this morning. he has his keynote speech later today. the main stories for you this morning: police
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investigating friday's attack on the london underground have searched three properties, as two men are questioned in connection with the explosion. as police increasingly use evidence obtained by so—called paedophile hunters, the chief co nsta ble paedophile hunters, the chief constable in charge of child abuse investigations says he will consider working with vigilantes in the future. carol is very enthusiastic about the temperature increases, so let's find out whether she still has that enthusiasm. good morning to you. i certainly do have. before i talk about the british whether i will talk about hurricane maria. you can see on the satellite image where she is. she is a category 1, we expect her to drink into a category 3in expect her to drink into a category 3 in the next 24 hours, and if you in mind hurricane irma it was a category 5, that is the stronger the level of hurricane you can get. local time, expected to make la ndfall
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local time, expected to make landfall in martinique and dominica this evening, and we are looking at a powerful hurricane following a similar track to irma as it moves across the caribbean in the next 24 hours or so. at the moment the windspeeds gusting above 85 miles an hour. the sustained speed is above 80 miles an hour. it is expected to bring storm surges, damaging winds and flooding and it is likely to affect some of the areas that were affected by hurricane irma. closer to home we are looking at a cool and showery start to the week. rain coming our way to from the west mid week, and then it looks like it will warm up, week, and then it looks like it will warm up, as week, and then it looks like it will warm up, as steph was alluding to. 20 to 21 a possibility. high pressure to the west, low pressure to the east, the high—pressure killing off some of the showers but in the clearer skies to the west it isa in the clearer skies to the west it is a nippy start. there will be some sunshine from the word go, but we also have quite a lot of murky
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conditions in the east midlands, east and leah, and down into the south—east, with low cloud and patchy fog. 0ne south—east, with low cloud and patchy fog. one or two showers across wales this morning. some showers across east anglia. we will see further showers sprout up across parts of the midlands. for northern england, are brighter start with some cloud around, and a brighter start in northern ireland, with showers not too far away. scotland seeing a few showers, but chilly enough for a touch of frost first thing. we have some rain across shetland. as we go through the course of the day, the rain in shetland and its associated cloud will think a little bit further south. meanwhile, the cloud across parts of the midlands and east anglia, down towards kent, will break up. we will see some sunshine, but the showers will be more prolific across central and eastern england. fewer further west, and prolific across central and eastern england. fewerfurther west, and in wales there will be some, but you can see how the cloud trickles across eastern scotland, eventually getting in the north—east england with some patchy rain. chilly particularly if you are exposed to the breeze down these north sea
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coast. this evening and overnight, oui’ coast. this evening and overnight, our band of cloud and patchy rain moved steadily southwards. behind it, under clearer skies it is going to be another chilly night. in towns and cities our temperature range will roughly be about nine to 11 and 12. in the countryside it will be lower than that, so once again we can expect a touch of grass frost in rural parts in the north of the uk. as we head into tuesday, we have this bridge of high—pressure, leaving things fine and settle for moats to. later in the day, this weather front comes into northern ireland bringing wet and windy conditions —— for most. chilly start, the sunshine breaking up the cloud we do have, you could catch one 01’ cloud we do have, you could catch one or two showers but they will be the exception rather than the rule. for most of us it will be a dry and pleasa nt for most of us it will be a dry and pleasant day. later the cloud comes in northern ireland ahead of this weather front coming our way. in northern ireland ahead of this weatherfront coming our way. so during the course of wednesday, that weather front will produce rain during the course of wednesday, that weatherfront will produce rain in the west. it crosses over to the east as a weaker feature, bringing
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rain on thursday, but by thursday some of us will be looking at temperatures, as i mentioned, of 20 or21. temperatures, as i mentioned, of 20 or 21. you don't expect to hear those kinds of figures at this time of year, do you, carol? she is about to say, yes you do, and you have it wrong again! you have to learn the rules. never try and question, and never try and do a weather report. although she does tell you off in the nicest possible way. over the next few weeks, tens of thousands of apples will be harvested all over the uk to make sauces, juice and of course cider. we've sent colletta to northern ireland's or county, armagh, which is the home of the bramley apple to see the whole process getting under way. good morning. good morning. good morning, everyone. welcome to armagh. a good sunrise. this is the
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heart of the apple growing industry in northern ireland. it produces a lot off of the uk and ireland as a whole. i am joined lot off of the uk and ireland as a whole. iam joined by lot off of the uk and ireland as a whole. i am joined by the owner of this beautiful area. good morning. a busy time for you. six weeks to pick all of them. what happens next? they have to be picked and then matured before we pressed them and turn them into cider and juice. it is important to the cider and juice industries. it is important to both. when it comes to the significance of armagh, you supplied to big companies and make your own as well. —— supply. how do you balance those at the company? we use our own
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apples as far as we can. if it is a larger crop this year, we give some extra to the big companies. thank you. they must really want some good apples. what is special about armagh? why do they come here? we have pgi status, with morejuice than anywhere else. what does that mean? they are unique. what difference does it make to your company having that damp? difference does it make to your company having that damp7m difference does it make to your company having that damp? it is ideal. —— stamp. nowhere else can make armagh cider except armagh. ideal. —— stamp. nowhere else can make armagh cider except armaghlj will talk about the wider industry more generally. food and drink is
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very important to northern ireland's economy in particular. having that status is important. you look after the sector. how important is cider within that? in the drinks sector, it is 70%. it is quite important. what is very important to remember is the market is changing, moving more towards craft products. businesses that were small a few yea rs businesses that were small a few years ago i now businesses that were small a few years ago i now some businesses that were small a few years ago i now some of the biggest. we can grow and expand. it could be larger today. a niche product, one where you know where it has come from, that is what people like. that is what northern ireland is trying to market itself with. yes. we punch above our weight in terms of the wards we have. —— awards. there has been a big push to build a
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reputation of artisan food. that underpins everything in northern ireland. i will show you some of the final product. as i said, there will be many pickers here in the next few weeks looking at the final product. this is what a third of a time of apples looks like. —— tons. they are apples looks like. —— tons. they are a bit sour so i won't take a bite because you won't like how my face looks after it. thank you. we will be back there later. when mark beaumont set out to cycle around the world in 80 days, he was already taking on a record—breaking feat, but he's outdone himself, as he's set to finish a day early. the endurance cyclist‘s route has taken him through europe, russia, mongolia, china,
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australia, new zealand, and north america, and as we speak he's hurtling towards the finishing line in paris. we can talk to mark now, but as he's on such a tight schedule, he's going to talk to us as he cycles. very impressive. good morning. how are you feeling? good morning. i am feeling good. it is beautiful. i and 200 kilometres west. —— am. feeling good. it is beautiful. i and 200 kilometres west. -- am. you are ahead of schedule. yeah. given the current record is 182 days, ijust wa nted current record is 182 days, ijust wanted to live out that fiction. i wasn't aiming to break it. when you get to the what will you do? my
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four—year—old pretty wants to see me. i can't wait to see my two little girls. there has been an amazing public response to this. it will be a big finish. i should get home at five o'clock. you deserve a lot of celebration. what has the journey be like? we have spoken to you before while you were doing the journey. it was tough. yeah. since the second ofjuly, everything you have been dealing since then, i have been riding a bike. i write from 4am until 9pm. —— ride. i crashed three times. we have had every weather condition you can imagine except for
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snow. it is amazing. i am covering 1000 miles every four days. it is like seeing the world as a slideshow. my favourite was the gobi desert. the later stages, the amount of people who have come out, it is amazing to see how much it has ca ptu red amazing to see how much it has captured the imagination. it has given me momentum as i get to the final 3—4 weeks. given me momentum as i get to the final 3-4 weeks. what has been the toughest thing? i spoke before on the programme. it will be great catching up with you. i broke my front tooth having crashed in moscow and fractured my bone. i thought the
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race was over day nine when there was a crash in australia. it brought the race to a crashing halt. i a lwa ys the race to a crashing halt. i always wanted to make history but first of all you have to be safe. my support have worked on an incredible schedule to keep me on the road. this is mentally the hardest thing i have ever done. you have done a brilliantjob. i have ever done. you have done a brilliant job. i hope have ever done. you have done a brilliantjob. i hope you enjoy yourself. thank you for talking to us. yourself. thank you for talking to us. we really appreciated. congratulations. it is amazing that he is not out of breath. talking and travelling! i was worried about the ca rs travelling! i was worried about the cars in the background. i love how
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he has a hug from his four—year—old booked in. carol was telling us about the weather. this is bournemouth. we will speak to vince cable from the lib dems a little later. that is in the minute's time. ido later. that is in the minute's time. i do think that is the best day, but it could be. i will not say anything about the weather. i have seen it sunnier. time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia liza armah. 71% of teachers in london and the south—east say they've had physiological or mental health issues at work. in an exclusive poll for bbc
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0ne's inside out programme it found almost all of those asked cited excessive workloads as a key factor resulting in a range of problems like depression, anxiety or panic attacks. the survey also showed that only 15% of teachers, who had suffered these problems, had raised it with their employer. here as a school, we have seen more teachers feeling more pressured. we have had to go in and support those teachers. that is notjust this school, that story is replicated across the picture. it's now thought a gas leak was responsible for several people near lewisham being taken to hospital yesterday morning. six homes were evacuated in lee while the fire brigade investigated what was initially described as a chemical leak. two murals from banksy popped up in london. and new trains with wider
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doors and climate controlled air conditioning have arrived. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the london 0verground is partly suspended. there's no service from gospel 0ak to barking. and trains on the circle and district line aren't stopping let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. now, there may be a bit of cloud around first thing this morning. but on the whole, this week is shaping up to be rather pleasant. today, sunny spells eventually. one or two showers as well. first thing this morning, cloud this morning. mist and murk as well. some fog patches as well. showers developing through the day.
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a few heavy ones potentially. bright spells, light winds. temperatures getting to 18 celcius. feeling a bit warmer than the weekend. one or two showers around into the evening and overnight. but there is a lot of cloud. showers dying away. protecting us a little. temperatures, still up. 10-11. tuesday is looking like a very pleasant day. plenty of sunshine. staying dry, patchy cloud here and there. the wind is light. in the sunshine, rather pleasant, 18. that does mean however another chilly night on tuesday into wednesday. could go down into single figures in one or two rural locations. wednesday, a similar day. the temperature is sneaking up. sunny spells. temperatures could be possibly 20 degrees as we go through the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. a third property is searched by police investigating the london tube train attack. the shop in west london is where a 21—year—old man was arrested on saturday night in connection with last friday's bombing. good morning, it is monday 18 september.
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also this morning: i'm afraid you are under a citizen's arrest. i'm not letting you go anywhere, 0k? the rise of the paedophile hunters. why the police are increasingly using the evidence collected by them in court cases. iam in i am in armagh, in the heart of northern ireland's apple picking area. and these apples are crucial for the cider industry. in sport: there was no happy return for wayne rooney at old trafford. everton were thrashed 4—0 by manchester united, which puts them in the bottom three. the handmaid's tale! and that was the big winner in the emmys — the handmaid's tale scooping three of the major prizes. and carol has the weather. good morning. for some of us, good morning. forsome of us, it good morning. for some of us, it is
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a chilly start to the day. we also have some low cloud and some patchy fog. that will break up, allowing sunshine and showers, but a few showers will be in the west. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it is a takeaway restaurant in hounslow, where a second suspect was arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody. andy moore reports. late on saturday night, a second man is arrested in the centre of hounslow in connection with the tube bombing. this is no ordinary detention. at least three forensic officers check the man over for any evidence, before he is taken away. he is 21 years old and believed to be a syrian refugee, who used to live in sunbury, alongside the first man detained at dover. the suspect was arrested just before midnight on saturday, outside these shutters. for several hours yesterday, police were carrying out
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an investigation and a search of this chicken shop next door. a number of detectives left late last night, carrying several items in bags for further examination, including what seemed to be a television or computer monitor. the connection between this middle eastern chicken shop and the arrested man is unclear. but he is believed to have lived at this location, in nearby stanwell, very close to the perimeter of heathrow airport. neighbours described him as a quiet man who never caused any trouble. the focus of the most intensive police search is sunbury, where an 18—year—old refugee, thought to be from iraq, shared a home with his elderly foster pa rents. these cctv images obtained by itv news show a young man leaving the back of that house very early on friday morning, with a distinctive lidl carrier bag. 90 minutes later, a bucket bomb inside a very similar bag went up in flames on the floor of a tube train at parsons green. the police investigation
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is by no means over, but the reduction in the terror threat level means that the authorities believe there is no longer an imminent risk of another attack. and andy moore is at sunbury—on—thames. i know we have spoken to you from the last three mornings outside the house, and it is still very much the focus of the investigation. that's right. as you say, this is the third day of very intensive investigation here. the centre of that attention from the police is the lilac coloured house you may be able to see behind me, behind the barrier. and from beyond the barrier you can see it the two forensics tent in the front garden. equally there is a lot of attention in the back garden. there is another tent in the back garden, and a shed at the end of the
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garden. and for the amount of resources going into this search, you have to conclude that police must suspect this is the place where that on was made. to tell you a little bit more about the 18—year—old iraqi refugee who lived here, and was arrested in dover, we understand he is an orphan from iraq who came to the uk about three years ago. neighbours talk about disputes with his foster parents, his elderly foster parents, who had fostered hundreds of people. they also talk about him being in trouble with the police. the other man who was arrested, that 21—year—old, at some stage he also lived at this property. and just to give you an update, also, on the casualties, 30 people were injured on friday. 0nly one person still remains in hospital. thank you very much, i know you will be there for us a couple more days. and later this morning we will be speaking to a terrorism analyst. that is at 8:10am.
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there has been a big increase in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters. in 2014, 11% of cases featured material gathered by the groups. by last year, that figure had risen to 44%. jon cuthill has this report. the police say paedophile hunters are vigilantes. they pose as children online, film their meetings with people who groom them, and post their videos on social media. you've arranged to meet a 14—year—old boy here today, for sex? no. you have — do you want me to get the cellphone out and show you? the police are on their way. i'm a paedophile hunter, mate. that's what i do.
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you are under citizen's arrest. in 2014, 11% of cases for meeting a child following sexual grooming contained paedophile hunter evidence. two years later, that has grown to 44%. look, i think that's an embarrassing figure for british policing. look at the success that's being achieved. recognise, of course, the dangers of vigilante behaviour. but then do something about it. bring it within the criminaljustice system. will there ever be a situation where they could work together with police? i think it's something that we'll potentially have to look at. but it comes with complexity, not least of all the psychological screening that the professionals go through, to make sure that these people are still not being adversely affected by this. whilst i'm going to have to look at it. the risks are really significant, and cannot be understated. i will not condone these groups, and i would encourage them to stop. but i recognise that i'm not winning that conversation, and i'm not winning that moral argument. the man caught by this southampton—based hunter pleaded guilty, and is injail awaiting sentencing. you can watch more on this on inside out at 7:30pm tonight on bbc one, in the south of england, and it will be
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on the iplayer afterwards. the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson, in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. the intervention by sir david norgrove followed the foreign secretary reasserting that the uk stood to regain £350 million a week after leaving the eu. mrjohnson has accused sir david of the wilful distortion of his article, and asked him to withdraw it. a third day of protests has turned violent in the american city of st louis, following the acquittal of a white former police officer who killed a black man, anthony lamar smith, in 2011. police broke up the demonstration when some protesters began throwing objects at officers and breaking shop windows. several people have been arrested. children with malignant brain cancer could receive more targeted treatment, with fewer side effects. it comes after scientists identified seven different forms of the most common type of the disease. the researchers at newcastle and northumbria universities hope
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that in the long—term their work will lead to new drugs and treatments being developed. some of the caribbean islands recently devastated by hurricane irma are preparing themselves for a possible second major storm. tropical storm maria has been upgraded to a category 0ne hurricane force. it is currently following roughly the same path as irma, and is expected to strengthen over the next 48 hours. television's top awards, the emmys, have been handed out in los angeles. veep was named best comedy while the handmaid's tale took the top drama series. and, as peter bowes reports, it was a politically charged ceremony, with a number of references to modern politics. # everything is better on tv. a song and dance routine to celebrate television, from streaming services to mainstream tv.
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but this was a show rich in political satire. there were constant digs at donald trump. the host, stephen colbert, even ridiculed the former reality tv star for not winning an emmy himself. but that changed, sort of, when alec baldwin picked up the award for best supporting actor in a comedy. i suppose i should say, at long last, mr president, here is your emmy. british winners included the comedian john oliver, charlie brooker, for the dark satirical drama black mirror, and riz ahmed for the drama the night of. big little lies was one of the big winners. nicole kidman took best actress, and her co—star reese witherspoon accepted the award for best limited series. and can ijust say — bring women to the front of their own stories. the handmaid's tale! the night's top award for a story
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about a totalitarian society won eight emmys for the streaming service hulu. viewers are turning to the small screen. from the tv set to the tablet, television on all its platforms is enjoying a golden age. no chance of missing the names, they shout them, but they? the handmaid's tale! —— don't they? the leader of the liberal democrats, sir vince cable, insists it is perfectly plausible that he could become the next prime minister, claiming politics is in a remarkable state of flux. he became leader after taking back his seat in may's general election, where the party increased its number of mps from nine to 12. so does he have a plan to win back voters? he joins us now from the party conference in bournemouth. good morning to you, mr cable. thank you forjoining us on bbc breakfast.
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let's talk about that plan. in the last election the vote share for your party was the lowest since 1959. how do you get the voters back? —— cable. 1959. how do you get the voters back? -- cable. that was a bad outcome, i fully understand that. at the key point is that british politics is in an extraordinary state of flux. you have the governing party, the conservatives, more or less an open civil war. you have the labour party in suppressed civil war. you have extreme polarisation, the heart right on one side, the hyatt left on the other. there is an appetite in the country for moderate, commonsense, middle—of—the—road politics. the kind of thing the liberal democrats represent. we have a record of competence in government, and we also have strong, radical convictions as well. and i think the public will warm to us, we could break through. we have seen this and other western democracies. you say it is perfectly plausible that you could be the next trimester. with respect, you have 12 mps and 7.4% of the vote. surely you would admit
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there is an element of wishful thinking on that. it is not wishful thinking. i would say it is possible rather than probable, but i think it isa rather than probable, but i think it is a realistic ambition for me to m4. and we other third in the uk. if the conservative party continue to disintegrate with this infighting that we are seeing at the moment over europe, and if the labour pa rty‘s over europe, and if the labour party's civil war over europe, and if the labour pa rty‘s civil war reignites, over europe, and if the labour party's civil war reignites, all kinds of changes are possible —— for me to aim for. we are here as a party to take up the reins for the millions of people in this country who want competence, middle—of—the—road, sensible government. can i ask you about brexit? you mentioned the conservative party view on brexit. a key policy platform for the liberal democrats is a second referendum. last year you called the idea disruptive and politically counter—productive. can i ask you has your view changed on that? my
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view has not changed at all. we should not be rerunning the last referendum. the government is now involved in negotiations. we are not talking about that. we are basically arguing that there should be a first referendum on the facts, once we know the results of the negotiation, very different from what the public believed was going to happen when they voted very narrowly for brexit. and the public should ultimately resolve this, and they should have the choice whether they want to press ahead with the results of what the government has achieved, good or bad, or whether they want an exit from brexit. it is the only way of resolving this issue and giving the country are stable, long—term future. how would you deal with someone future. how would you deal with someone like boris johnson, future. how would you deal with someone like borisjohnson, if that was in your party, revealing plans for what they felt would be the way forward before you were to do it as party leader? and also this claim about the £350 million for the nhs, which has resurfaced in the last few days. well, if i was in charge of
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the government i would fire the guy insta ntly. the government i would fire the guy instantly. it is a reflection of the extreme weakness of the prime minister's was assured that she doesn't seem prepared to do it. it is like a school where discipline has broken down completely, the head teacher is barricaded in her office, unwilling to impose discipline. you can't do what the government is doing at the moment, negotiating these very sensitive issues over large sums of money, with government ministers publicly arguing amongst themselves about what we ought to be doing. and the problem with boris johnson's statement is not arguing with other politicians, only, but he is being directly contradicted by a senior, respected civil servant, who has nothing to do with politics. his authority and credibility has been com pletely authority and credibility has been completely shot to pieces. say you became prime minister, would you invite donald trump year? jo
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swinson called him a racist and misogynist bully. that is correct. i would not invite him. i have said that before. we need to make a distinction between engaging in business negotiations with other countries and the us is the major power in the world, and we need proper discussions with nato and he. but there is a difference between honouring somebody with a state visit involving the queen and the panoply of a state visit. it is com pletely panoply of a state visit. it is completely inappropriate. frankly the prime minister is embarrassed about having made this offer but has found it difficult to retract it. about having made this offer but has found it difficult to retract itm you draw the line there, what about other leaders? we have. i was acting
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leader of my party when the king of saudi arabia was here and i question that. why do we invite people here for ceremonial events that embarrassed the queen that a com pletely embarrassed the queen that a completely inappropriate? is donald trump comes there will be a major expression that we are honouring someone expression that we are honouring someone who is a racist and misogynist. the weather. a beautiful picture. good morning. we start this week with an old connell note. ——
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autumnal. mid—wicket, rainfrom with an old connell note. —— autumnal. mid—wicket, rain from the west. warming up by thursday. some parts of the uk, highs of 31. low pressure bringing in showers. high pressure bringing in showers. high pressure killing off the showers. the west, and a clear skies, a cool start to the day. the temperatures will go up quickly. we also have ploughed in the midlands and east anglia. wales, one or two showers. dry in the south—west. sunshine. cloud producing the odd shower. patchy mist and fog which will break up patchy mist and fog which will break up later. the north midlands into northern england and northern ireland, mostly dry. 0ne northern england and northern ireland, mostly dry. one or two showers. nothing substantial. some showers. nothing substantial. some showers in scotland. mostly dry. grass frost. in shetland rain. through the day, that rain in
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shetland and cloud will sink further south. the cloud in the south will break up, allowing sunshine bruce. there will still be showers in central and eastern england. —— through. you can see the cloud spreading far eastern scotland and getting into west england. temperatures today, nothing to write home about. 11 — 18. cooler in the breeze along the north sea. 0vernight, cloud and patchy rain continuing south, getting down to the south coast by around dawn. clear skies. cooloongup once again in the glens. —— cooling down. the countryside, low temperatures. tomorrow morning it will be very cold. high pressure in this area. late in the day, a weather front in
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the atlantic introducing rain and cloud. the wind will strengthen. before that, a bright start. sunshine, especially in rural areas. a few showers. most of us will mist them tomorrow. later in the day, as them tomorrow. later in the day, as the fronts approach, the wind will pick up. on wednesday, the west will have that combination of cloud and rain and wind. it will be moving steadily eased, getting into eastern areas on thursday. as the weakening feature comes in behind that, by thursday, some parts could hit 20 — 21. not too shabby, as you might say it. absolutely correct. definitely friends. and now for the front pages. a similar theme on the times.
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brexit and boris johnson. pages. a similar theme on the times. brexit and borisjohnson. we will talk to vince cable on that. many have this picture which looks blurry. cctv footage showing a man ina hat blurry. cctv footage showing a man in a hat carrying a little bag leaving a house on the thames at ten to seven in the morning on friday. the anticipation is this was the bag that appeared and exploded on the train on friday later that morning. police outside the house today are getting to the bottom of that bomb attack. the majority of the papers have that picture on the front, including the daily mail, again looking at whether that was the suspect on his way to carry out the attacks, saying it wasjust suspect on his way to carry out the attacks, saying it was just 90 minutes before the blast on the district line train. daily telegraph front page. this picture is small on the right—hand side of the screen. london fashion week. the love affair
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of armani with london. borisjohnson and theresa may in a brexit bill showdown. the daily express talking about pay—outs for prisoners. they could be frozen to put victims of crime first. a picture of dawn french talking about what makes her happy as she turns 60. she looks fabulous. very impressive. another story. these are the twins you can tell apart. a fantastic story. a girl who had a heart defect which made herfour inches girl who had a heart defect which made her four inches shorter than her sister. they are talking about the special bonds they have. they look identical in terms of their faces. a cute picture. stricter condensing is soon to come back. —— strictly come dancing. this is what
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it might be like. i am sure he will be brilliant from that pose. it looks like he will be good. be brilliant from that pose. it looks like he will be goodlj be brilliant from that pose. it looks like he will be good. i saw him coming down the red carpet. he can shift. this is bbc news. it is a week and a half since hurricane irma brought destruction to the caribbean. the people who live there have a huge task to rebuild. jeremy cooke reports from tortola. a landscape utterly changed by the
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fury of nature. two weeks ago this was a lush and green island. now it has been stripped back to brown. hardly a leaf on a tree for miles. and now misery on misery. tropical rain. if this is the island of the super rich, there is poverty as well. this woman and her nine children lived through irma and now her house is underwater. children lived through irma and now her house is underwaterlj children lived through irma and now her house is underwater. i lost everything, except my children's lives. desperate, frustrating times. families, british citizens, needing help. but international rules say overall these islands are too wealthy to qualify for the uk aid budget. this is a rich country, but i don't understand how me and others who have lost their roofs and everything still live in a poor
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situation. after the looting of the early days, it feels safe here now. british police helping the border. more than 200 british military on the ground as well. the royal marines are helping locals deliver whatever aid they can find. what struck it about being here? the sheer devastation of it all. absolutely. i have never seen anything like it. for now, all of this is still about survival. but once the people here have enough food and enough water, attention must shift to rebuilding all of this devastation, the getting these islands back to work. crucial will be tourism, but where do you start when confronted with this? the loss of income will cost the economy millions, but there is a determination to rebuild. in church
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today, the focus, not on what has been lost, but what has been saved. jeremy cooke, bbc news, on the british virgin islands. great community spirit. still to come, we will find out why apples are vital to northern ireland's economy. good morning. welcome to county armagh. we are in the middle of the apple picking season. it is about these beauties. they are not only nice to eat, but crucial for the they are not only nice to eat, but crucialfor the cider they are not only nice to eat, but crucial for the cider industry. i will talk to the owners. the harvest is looking good at the moment. we have had a good spring this year. that has helped thankfully when it comes to all of the apples. but now it is time for the news, the travel,
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and the weather, wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia liza armah. 71% of teachers in london and the south—east say they've had physiological or mental health issues at work. in an exclusive poll for bbc 0ne's inside out programme it found almost all of those asked cited excessive workloads as a key factor resulting in a range of problems like depression, anxiety or panic attacks. the survey also showed that only 15% of teachers, who had suffered these problems, had raised it with their employer. here as a school, we have seen more teachers feeling more pressured. we have had to go in and support those teachers. that is notjust this school, that story is replicated across the picture. you can see more on that on bbc one. two murals by street artist banksy have sprung up in central london. they appeared in a tunnel close
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to the barbican centre. he's confirmed they're his on his instagram, and says they're to mark an exhibition of work by the late american graffiti artist, jean—michel basquiat. good news for some rail passengers this morning. govia thameslink has replaced all its stock with new state—of—the—art trains. the fleet has wider doors and aisles, more luggage space and climate—controlled air conditioning. the company says the new stock will create 9,000 extra seats for weekday commuters. 0n the tube, the london 0verground is partly suspended. there's no service from gospel 0ak to barking. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. now, there may be a bit of cloud around first thing this morning. but on the whole, this week
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is shaping up to be rather pleasant. today, sunny spells eventually. one or two showers as well. first thing this morning, cloud. mist and murk as well. some fog patches as well. showers developing through the course of the day. a few heavy ones potentially. bright spells, light winds. temperatures getting to 18 celcius. feeling a bit warmer than the weekend. one or two showers around into the evening and overnight. but there is a lot of cloud. showers dying away. protecting us a little. temperatures, still up. 10-11. tuesday is looking like a very pleasant day. plenty of sunshine. staying dry, patchy cloud here and there. the wind is light. in the sunshine, rather pleasant, 18. that does mean however another chilly night on tuesday into wednesday. could go down into single figures in one or two rural locations. wednesday, a similar day. the temperature is sneaking up. sunny spells. temperatures could be possibly 18, 19, possible 20 degrees, as we go through the week. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the breakfast sofa. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it is a takeaway restaurant in hounslow, where a second suspect was arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody in relation to the incident, which injured 30 people. there has been a sharp rise in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters. the chief constable in charge of child abuse investigations across the uk has told the bbc
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that he will consider working with paedophile hunter groups in the future. the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson, in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. the intervention by sir david norgrove followed the foreign secretary reasserting that the uk stood to regain £350 million a week after leaving the eu. mrjohnson has accused sir david of the wilful distortion of his article, and asked him to withdraw it. a third day of protests has turned violent in the american city of st louis, following the acquittal of a white former police officer who killed a black man, anthony lamar smith, in 2011. police broke up the demonstration when some protesters began throwing objects at officers and breaking shop windows. several people have been arrested. some of the caribbean islands recently devastated by hurricane irma are preparing themselves
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for a possible second major storm. tropical storm maria has been upgraded to a category 0ne hurricane force. it is currently following roughly the same path as irma, and is expected to strengthen over the next 48 hours. children with malignant brain cancer could receive more targeted treatment, with fewer side effects. it comes after scientists identified seven different forms of the most common type of the disease. the researchers at newcastle and northumbria universities hope that in the long—term their work will lead to new drugs and treatments being developed. the handmaid's tale has scooped three of the major prizes at this year's emmy awards. the drama won best drama series, best director and best actress for elisabeth moss. riz ahmed was among the british winners, taking home best lead actor in the crime drama the night of. 0ther british winners include charlie brooker, who took the best writing award for black mirror. have you seen the handmaid's tale?|j
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haven't, i have read the book. have you seen the handmaid's tale?|j haven't, i have read the bookm have you seen the handmaid's tale?|j haven't, i have read the book. it is very dark, which is why people like strictly come dancing so much. because there is no darkness to it. —— strictly come dancing. because there is no darkness to it. -- strictly come dancing. and wayne rooney in the background, not the perfect return to old trafford for mr rooney. you have to feel a bit sorry for him, how difficult mustard need to go back to your old club, manchester united at old trafford, and everton are doing so badly, you have to feel for them a little bit —— howard difficult must it be. manchester united's record goal—scorer wayne rooney couldn't
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stop his new side, everton, slumping to a 4—0 defeat at old trafford yesterday. rooney received a warm welcome from the home fans, but his side were soon behind thanks to this brilliant goal from antonio valencia. united scored three more in the second half, including this from former everton striker romelu lu ka ku. that win puts united joint top of the table with their neighbours, manchester city. every manager in life has doubts. there is no one who has no doubts in life, in football, as a manager. that is normal, and of course i ask myself the question, why, why? sorry, if there is anyone in this room and outside who sees something realistic, what is possible for this everton, please come. the first half, we should have killed the game. everton is a very good team, with lots of very good players. but they are in a difficult moment.
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and when teams are in a difficult moment, it is important that you don't give them confidence, so important to start strong, and to try to kill their mentality as soon as possible. london rivals chelsea and arsenal played out a 0—0 draw at stamford bridge. the visitors thought they had taken the lead, only to see the goal disallowed for offside. chelsea defender david luiz was then sent off for a high tackle in the closing stages of the match. we had a bad record recently here, you know, and they have a strong re cord you know, and they have a strong record at home. i told them to focus on our quality of performance and solidarity, and we played every time we had the ball. i believe it is a good performance to strip down for future games. lewis hamilton says winning the singapore grand prix could prove pivotal in the race for the formula 1 world championship. it was a race ferrari were expected to dominate,
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but title rival sebastian vettel crashed out, with teammate kimi raikkonen and red bull's max verstappen. that saw hamilton move up from fifth place to coast to victory. he has extended his championship lead to 28 points, with six races remaining. yesterday, we struggled, and we had no idea what was going to happen today. but the thing is, we just try to stay focused, and try to get ahead. obviously it was very fortunate with the ferraris in the beginning. so yeah, i couldn't be happier. i'm really grateful. in rugby union's premiership, wasps lost their first home game in 20 matches, as harlequins beat them at the ricoh arena. wasps had won their first two games of the season, and were looking to return to the top of the table. but charlie walker's second—half try, and 14 points from the boot of marcus smith, saw quins take victory. and a great underdog story — the is the darts. a huge outsider has won the champions league of darts. mensur suljovic was a 40:1 shot
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before a dart was thrown, but completed the fairytale by beating two—time world champion gary anderson 11—9 in the final. it was the first major trophy of his career, and he is £100,000 better off, too. in the interests of balance, one happy story, followed by a rather unsporting one. look at this from a football match in germany over the weekend. sv meppen were leading carl zeissjena 2—0. one of thejena players, in blue, goes down after a bad tackle. one of the meppen players on the opposing team then stops play so he can receive attention. very sporting. but what follows is not. one of thejena players sees it as an opportunity to score. jena take the lead, and the meppen players understandably upset about it all. they are not happy, look at them.
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they are not happy, look at them. the picture is about to come to an end, but that could have ended quite badly. he was running very quickly back to his own half, to avoid the opposition. but the goal stood, did it? it did, but the other team equalised, and they ended 2—2. it? it did, but the other team equalised, and they ended 2-2. they would have wanted a win, after that. children in reception and yearfour in primary schools in england are to be offered the flu vaccine for the first time this autumn, as part of an expansion of the programme to protect the vulnerable, including the elderly. in the uk, 600 people a year die, on average, from complications of the flu virus. more than 12.5 million adults and children in england were vaccinated against the infection last winter. this reduced the risk of flu by 66% in children and 40% of adults aged 18 to 64. however, it didn't work in those aged over 65. dr richard peabody, acting head of respiratory diseases
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at public health england, joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning to you. talk passthrough why children are these so—called super spreaders. what is the deal with the young folk of this fine country? thank you for the opportunity to speak to you this morning. so children are really the important spreaders of influenza in the population. and that is really one of the key reasons they also suffer a lot from flu, they cause a lot of gp consultations and hospitalisation is due to flu. so thatis hospitalisation is due to flu. so that is really the reason why they are rolling out this children's vaccine programme this season, for children from 228 years of age. as
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you have highlighted, this year it will be children in year 4, and children in reception who will be receiving the vaccine, they are a new addition to the vaccine programme. and it will be offered to all children between two and 11. if thatis all children between two and 11. if that is the plan, how far away it are we from that? the programme is being rolled out gradually, season on season, so over being rolled out gradually, season on season, so over the coming years it will be offered season on season to those older children as well. ultimately it is being offered to all children up to 11 years of age. do you think it will have a big impact on those who are getting the virus, 65 years and above? is that what the research is telling us, that it will prevent that from happening? well, we have been monitoring the programme closely over the past few seasons, since it has been introduced. in the early results have been very encouraging. as you highlighted in your introduction, the vaccine is preventing children getting the flu
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by two thirds, but also, importantly, it is also protecting theirfamilies importantly, it is also protecting their families and the communities around them, and reducing the risk of flu in the vulnerable members of the community, and also the elderly. i was noting that both australia and new zealand have had particularly heavy flu seasons. because they are having that, does that mean that we are in line to have a similar sort of heavy season here? we have been watching, as we normally do very closely, what has been going on with influenza elsewhere in the world, including in the antipodes, and as you point out, australia has had a nasty flu season this winterjust gone, and they have seen a very similar type of flu, what is called the h3 virus, to what we had last winter. i think what it highlights is that we just need to be ready as normal each winter, with all our
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various reparations, including, of course, the flu vaccine programme, and that people take up the offer of flu vaccines. whether they are a vulnerable group, middle—aged, or indeed an older adult above 65 years of age. i have another ignorant question for you. just listening to you talking about h3, and we talk about various strands of the flu virus. hal confident are you that the vaccine you are giving out the children actually covers the right strains? this is something which is done very carefully each year. —— how confident are you. each year, together with colleagues around the world, a group convened by the world health organization, we review what are the main circulating viruses and therefore make recommendations as to what should go into the vaccine for the coming winter. so the vaccine which becomes available in the next few weeks is really based on those decisions. based on what we know, we
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are hopeful that the vaccine will provide good detection this winter. so again, take up the offer of a vaccine and get yourself protected this winter. if you have any more information about that or you want to send questions, you can get in touch with us via the normal channels. in wales, the vaccine is given to children in school reception class, years one, two and three. in scotland, it is offered to all children in aged 2—5 years at their gp practice, or to all primary school children at school. and in northern ireland, pre—school children aged two years and over are offered the vaccine at school. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. day one of the return of kirkwood, and a beautiful picture in the background. good morning to you, and it is nice to be back as well. the weather today is taking a bit more ofan weather today is taking a bit more of an all—time northfield. it is going to be cool and showery. we will see some rainbow midweek. then it looks like it will warm up again
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as we head towards the end of the week, with some parts of the uk likely to see 20 or 21 celsius. today what we have is high pressure building in from the west. still low pressure close enough to the east to be throwing some showers our way. here also we have quite a bit of cloud around. some murky conditions, but through the day, that cloud will break up and it is central and eastern parts which are likely to see the lion's share of the showers. we also have thicker cloud and rain coming in across north—east scotland, eventually getting in the north—east england. so in the west we are not immune to the showers, but they are likely to be fewer and further between them they are going to be in the east, and in between them they will be some sunshine. moving over towards the east, the cloud we currently have breaking up. it will brighten up quite nicely, but still some showers. in east anglia, some of the showers could be heavy and thundery. 0ne anglia, some of the showers could be heavy and thundery. one or two showers across northern england, but a lot of dry weather as well.
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northern ireland senior dry day as well, but you can see we have the cloud and patchy rain spreading southwards across north—east scotland, getting in across eventually north—east england. as we go through the evening and overnight, that same band will sink southwards. pushing down into the south—east by around dawn, some coastal showers left in its wake and we will also have some clearer skies. so in the towns and cities we are looking at around nine to 10 celsius as the overnight lows. in the countryside, one to four. cold enoughin the countryside, one to four. cold enough in some glens for a touch of grass frost. tomorrow, high pressure is ensconced right across the uk, so things will be very quiet. later in the day, a weather front coming in from the west will change the weather. to start with, a nippy start. there will be some sunshine. it will be a pleasant start to the day, the cloud we have breaking out. it could produce the odd shower, but they really will be the exception rather than the rule. in the sunshine it will feel quite nice. don't forget the cloud will be building across northern ireland. later we see the rain coming in and the wind will strengthen. so that is
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coming our way during the course of wednesday across parts of scotland, northern ireland, into parts of wales, possibly as far as the south—west. moving further east, it is drier, brighter, there will be some sunshine, and hires at the 19 celsius. it is as we go from wednesday into thursday. we have all this in the west, transfers over towards the east during the course of thursday. so it will brighten up in the west, and it is on thursday that some parts of the uk could well hit 20 or 21. 21 is 70 fahrenheit in old muggy, and that will feel more like it, because it has been quite cool of late. don't panic, steph isn't gone, she's ona don't panic, steph isn't gone, she's on a rickshaw. over the next few weeks, tens of thousands of apples will be harvested all over the uk to make sauces, juice and of course cider. we've sent colletta to northern ireland's or county,
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armagh, which is the home of the bramley apple to see the whole process getting under way. good morning. good morning, everyone. you arejoining me in an absolutely beautiful apple field. as you say, the next few weeks are crucial. it is when they pick these apples and they will mix them together to make juices and apples and they will mix them together to makejuices and ciders which you may have been drinking for the past few years. how long have you worked here and owned the place? you have a basketful already. it is a busy time of year. it is. this is the culmination of a lot of work. this is the final crop of the year. how is it looking? that is the crucial thing. you are finding out if it is a good or bad year. it has beena
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if it is a good or bad year. it has been a good year. we have more than la st been a good year. we have more than last year. all good. that is a relief when it comes to... it is ha rd to relief when it comes to... it is hard tojudge at relief when it comes to... it is hard to judge at the beginning relief when it comes to... it is hard tojudge at the beginning of the year. it is hard to plan as a business when you don't know how much you will get. the crop totally depends on a week in may. we could get a lot orjust a few. it depends on nature. 7- 800 tons of apples, would that be about right? yes. i would that be about right? yes. i would say it somewhere around 700. six weeks does not sound like very long when you have got all of these to pick across the field. you get extra help this time of year. we depend on seasonal labour. we are experimenting with mechanical harvesting. we can afford to do that. but we are not there yet. that
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is why we definitely need help. and where does that labour come from? all over the world, notjust locally. migrant labour. very much so. locally. migrant labour. very much so. we worry about that in terms of brexit. interesting. thank you very much. johnnies us as well. —— john is. the whole industry is increasingly part of a tourist industry. not only this time of year but when all of these trees are in bloom is actually a moment when people love to come and see them and do tours here. that is something you are marketing in particular. do tours here. that is something you are marketing in particulatm do tours here. that is something you are marketing in particular. it is a consideration for people when they go on holiday. they want to experience local produce, meet the people who produce it, and enjoy it. this is spectacular in bloom. many
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people come here to experience had. how important is the whole food and drink sector to the economy? how important is the whole food and drink sector to the economy7m how important is the whole food and drink sector to the economy? it is the biggest industry. it is the biggest place for export growth. tourism is very much integrated with that. people want to experience the product. that allows us to piggyback on the image and the reputation of northern ireland food. thank you. we we re northern ireland food. thank you. we were saying earlier that they are bitter at the moment. but i found a sweet one, so i will tuck into it. it is really good. they do grow these here as well. that is delicious. excellent. a serious thumbs up. we will let you enjoy the rest of it. for many of the two million people aged over 75 and who live alone, some can feel isolated.
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we talk about this quite often, don't we? thanks to a scheme that originated in denmark, the problem is being eased by getting older people out and about. steph has popped outside to the piazza here in salford quays to find out more. we promised you see would be there. good morning! good morning. hello, everyone. i have gone outside to have a leisurely ride. this is one of the rickshaws which has come up from brighton which is used to give people a trip around the area. i know it has made a big difference to your life. notjust me. i live in a retirement block of flats. there are people who are not able to get out much. it has transformed my life. people who are not able to get out much. it has transformed my lifem isa much. it has transformed my lifem is a great way to do it. let us find out more. this woman lives in sheltered
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accommodation and does not get out as much as she used to. tomorrow i will be 93. i was born in brighton. i have never lived anywhere else. my husband died when i was 65 so i have been by myself or 29 years. i have a chair outside, but inside i use a stick. i have the help of my trolley. i used to walk to the seafront but i cannot do that now. where this is where cycling without age comes in, a rickshaw ride operation that started in denmark. it is now operating in denmark. operation that started in denmark. it is now operating in denmarkm was great when we were kids. we used to ride bikes. many still ride them, but most don't. it is not to say they don't want to. operation great
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escape has been top—secret for weeks with duncan in cahoots. what a lovely surprise. this woman also lives alone two doors down. lovely surprise. this woman also lives alone two doors downlj lovely surprise. this woman also lives alone two doors down. i feel like a star. you are. did you use the cycle when you were younger?” did. you don't go faster than it. you are encouraged to go a walking pace. it gives the opportunity for people to say how are you going? we are going for a ride. it is beautiful. and there are surprising health benefits. it drops you straight into a very natural kind of interaction, a conversation place, and afun interaction, a conversation place, and a fun place for it. we need conversations. we are evolved to be in those situations. 0ur brains want to interact. it is not good to be
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taken away from that. it is wonderful. it puts you back in the land of the living. a big one! she has not been on a bicycle since the 19405. i has not been on a bicycle since the 1940s. i haven't had ice cream like this for ages. we are looking at the ocean and breathing the air. does it taste better? now she is looking forward to many more rides and ice cream. you were just watching yourself on the screen. you can see it has made a big difference. tell us more about what you like about it.” a big difference. tell us more about what you like about it. i love the independence it gives to some people. i live in a retirement locker flats. 0ne people. i live in a retirement locker flats. one of the two bugbears of getting older is loneliness and isolation. if you have a physical disability, what can you do? and then this changes everything. you go along in the
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front and everybody stops, well, most people, to chat with you. it is so most people, to chat with you. it is so lovely to be part of the community again. yes. it is incredible. we are not even moving! tell us about how you got involved. i saw it on line. i saw the founder talking. it started in copenhagen. it seemed like a fantastic idea. talking. it started in copenhagen. it seemed like a fantastic ideam makes such a difference. you must feel good. it is remarkable. everyone smiles, everyone stops and waves. it is unusual, especially if you are cycling on the road. it brings everyone together. what are you taking in as you go around? what do you see and do? it is almost like going back to nature. with my little
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friend who is 93... going back to nature. with my little friend who is 93. .. she does not look it. she looks amazing. incredible. when we went out the first time with duncan, being born and bred in brighton, it was touching. as we went to the marina, she said i haven't been here for yea rs. she said i haven't been here for years. isn't that nice? it really was. it is a scheme that you just have the one rickshaw at the moment. are you hoping to expand it? we are crowdfunding and i need to wear second. we are looking for a sponsorship and any funding to get it going. is it something you do as a volunteer? totally free. we had 123 people sign up to write this bike in brighton alone. —— ride. does it go faster? it is slow for me. you can find out more on inside
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0ut. that is at 730 on bbc one. that is in the south of england. but you can watch it on the iplayer. come on, duncan. now for the can watch it on the iplayer. come on, duncan. now forthe news, travel, and weather. i like this. wonderful! good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia liza armah. 71% of teachers in london and the south—east say they've had physiological or mental health issues at work. in an exclusive poll for bbc 0ne's inside out programme it found almost all of those asked cited excessive workloads as a key factor resulting in a range of problems like depression, anxiety or panic attacks. the survey also showed that only 15% of teachers, who had suffered these problems, had raised it with their employer. here as a school, we have seen more teachers feeling more pressured. we have had to go in and support those teachers. that is notjust this school, that story is replicated across the picture. you can see more on inside out
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london on bbc one. two murals by street artist banksy have sprung up in central london. they appeared in a tunnel close to the barbican centre. he's confirmed they're his on his instagram, and says they're to mark an exhibition of work by the late american graffiti artist, jean—michel basquiat. good news for some rail passengers this morning. govia thameslink has replaced all its stock with new state—of—the—art trains. the fleet has wider doors and aisles, more luggage space and climate—controlled air conditioning. the company says the new stock will create 9,000 extra seats for weekday commuters. 0n the trains, some cancellations on the west london line between clapham junction
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and watford junction. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. now, there may be a bit of cloud around first thing this morning. but on the whole, this week is shaping up to be rather pleasant. today, sunny spells eventually. one or two showers as well. first thing this morning, cloud. mist and murk as well. some fog patches as well. showers developing through the course of the day. a few heavy ones potentially. bright spells, light winds. temperatures getting to 18 celcius. feeling a bit warmer than the weekend. one or two showers around into the evening and overnight. but there is a lot of cloud. showers dying away. protecting us a little. temperatures, still up. 10-11. tuesday is looking like a very pleasant day. plenty of sunshine. staying dry, patchy cloud here and there. the wind is light. in the sunshine, rather pleasant, 18. that does mean however another chilly night
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on tuesday into wednesday. could go down into single figures in one or two rural locations. wednesday, a similar day. the temperature is sneaking up. sunny spells. temperatures could be possibly 18, 19, possibly 20 degrees, as we go through the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the breakfast sofa. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. a third property is searched by police investigating the london tube train attack. the shop in west london is where a 21—year—old man was arrested on saturday night in connection with last friday's bombing. good morning, it hasjust gone
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good morning, it has just gone 8am, it is monday, the 18th of september. also this morning... we are not going to let you go anywhere, right? the rise of the paedophile hunters — why the police are increasingly using the evidence collected by them in court cases. iam in i am in county armagh in northern ireland, and we are getting ready for the apple picking season. sport, there was no happy return for wayne rooney at old trafford. the handmaid's tale! and that was the big winner in the emmys — the handmaid's tale scooping three of the major prizes. someone with a big voice as well! and carol has the weather. showers in the west, patchy rain,
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showers heading in the direction of north east england, i will have more details shortly. good morning. first, our main story. police investigating the london tube bombing have searched a third property in connection with the attack. the bbc understands it's a takeaway restaurant in hounslow, where a second suspect was arrested on saturday night. two men remain in custody. andy moore reports. late on saturday night, a second man is arrested in the centre of hounslow in connection with the tube bombing. this is no ordinary detention. at least three forensic officers check the man over for any evidence, before he is taken away. he is 21 years old, and believed to be a syrian refugee. he used to live in sunbury, alongside the first man detained at dover. the suspect was arrested just before midnight on saturday, outside these shutters. for several hours yesterday, police were carrying out an investigation and a search of this chicken shop next door. a number of detectives
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left late last night, carrying several items in bags for further examination, including what seemed to be a television or computer monitor. the connection between this middle eastern chicken shop and the arrested man is unclear. but he is believed to have lived at this location, in nearby stanwell, very close to the perimeter of heathrow airport. neighbours described him as a quiet man who never caused any trouble. the focus of the most intensive police search is sunbury, where an 18—year—old refugee, thought to be from iraq, shared a home with his elderly foster pa rents. these cctv images obtained by itv news show a young man leaving the back of that house very early on friday morning, with a distinctive lidl carrier bag. 90 minutes later, a bucket bomb inside a very similar bag went up in flames on the floor of a tube train at parsons green.
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the police investigation is by no means over, but the reduction in the terror threat level means that the authorities believe there is no longer an imminent risk of another attack. and andy moore is at sunbury on thames. andy, the third day of the investigation and very much ongoing. that's right, you can see the lilac covered house, that is where the foster parents covered house, that is where the foster pa rents lived covered house, that is where the foster parents lived and the 18—year—old refugee. from another camera you can see two forensic tents in the front garden, there is also a forensics tent in the back arden, a lot of searching going on in that area at the back of the house, a shed at the end of the garden. to tell you a little bit more about the 18—year—old who used
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to live here, arrested in dover, we believe he is an orphan from iraq who came to the uk about three years ago. neighbours here have talked about him being in trouble with the police quite a lot. now, the other man who was arrested, the 21—year—old, he is reported to be a man, named, 21—year—old refugee from syria and we understand he lived at this property for some time before moving out and he lives currently at that address in stand well, that location very close to heathrow airport that was being searched by police. the two other locations that have been investigated by the police, there is no overt near the intensity of the search that is happening here. —— stanwell. badly due to the conclusion police probably think the bomb was made at this house. andy, thank you very much. andy outside the house
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currently being investigated as part of the terror attack that happened on friday. there's been a big increase in the number of prosecutions for the online sexual grooming of children using evidence supplied by so—called paedophile hunters. in 2014, 11 percent of cases featured material gathered by the groups — by last year that figure had risen to 44 per cent. jon cuthill has this report. the police say paedophile hunters are vigilantes. they pose as children online, film their meetings with people who groom them, and post their videos on social media. you've arranged to meet a 14—year—old boy here today, for sex? no. you have — do you want me to get the cellphone out and show you? the police are on their way. i'm a paedophile hunter, mate. that's what i do. you are under citizen's arrest. in 2014, 11% of cases for meeting a child following sexual grooming contained paedophile hunter evidence. two years later, that has grown to 44%. look, i think that's an embarrassing figure for british policing.
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look at the success that's being achieved. recognise, of course, the dangers of vigilante behaviour, but then do something about it. bring it within the criminal justice system. will there ever be a situation where they could work together with police? i think it's something that we'll potentially have to look at. but it comes with complexity, not least of all the psychological screening that the professionals go through, to make sure that these people are still not being adversely affected by this. whilst i'm going to have to look at it, the risks are really significant, and cannot be understated. i will not condone these groups, and i would encourage them to stop. but i recognise that i'm not winning that conversation, and i'm not winning that moral argument. the man caught by this southampton—based hunter pleaded guilty, and is injail awaiting sentencing. you can watch more on this on inside out at 7.30pm tonight on bbc one in the south of england, and it will be on the iplayer afterwards.
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it's just coming up to nine minutes past eight. the uk's statistics watchdog has stood by its criticism of borisjohnson in a growing row over whether the nhs will get a financial windfall from brexit. this is about the £350 million nhs claims. iam this is about the £350 million nhs claims. i am sure you remember it. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminister. leila there's no sign of this row going away ? it's unusual to have the uk's senior statistics official under foreign secretary engaged in a slanging match. restaurants and chose to repeat the £350 million claim in an article he wrote in the telegraph newspaper on saturday, he talks about that money coming back from the eu after brexit and said it
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would be nice if some of that money could go to be spent on the nhs but we have sir david norgrove, the head of the statistics authority saying this is a clear misuse of officials at sticks. a public letter he wrote to the foreign secretary under foreign secretary replied, digging his heels in saying he had been misrepresented and calling sir david norg rove to misrepresented and calling sir david norgrove to withdraw his claim. very extraordinary row here, or as johnson had come to be associated with that claim, we know he feels very strongly about money going to the eu, the brexit bill, the divorce bill we may have to pay upon leaving but by his intervention in general has certainly raised eyebrows as to his motors come was he making a 4000 word pitch on brexit outlining his vision for brexit in a saudi newspaper just days ahead vision for brexit in a saudi newspaperjust days ahead of an theresa may is due to make her own big rigs at speech on brexit. —— in
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a newspaper. there is an attempt to present a united front, we are just days ahead of theresa may's speech on brexit, attempting to break the deadlock on brexit talks and i think this goes to show there are divisions at the highest level of government offer what brexit should look like. thank you very much for the update. speak t u a little bit later. a third day of protests has turned violent in the american city of st louis following the acquittal of a white former police officer who killed a black man, anthony lamar smith in 2011. police broke up the demonstration when some protesters began throwing objects at officers and breaking shop windows. several people have been arrested. some of the caribbean islands recently devastated by hurricane irma are preparing themselves for a possible second major storm. carol was mentioning this a little bit earlier. tropical storm maria has been upgraded to a category one hurricane force.
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it is currently following roughly the same path as irma, and is expected to strengthen over the next 48 hours. we will be keeping an eye on that for you over the next few days on brea kfast. television's top awards, the emmys, have been handed out in los angeles. "veep" was named best comedy while "the handmaid's tale" took the top drama series. and as peter bowes reports it was a politically charged ceremony with a number of references to modern politics. # everything is better on tv... a song and dance routine to celebrate television, from streaming services to mainstream tv. but this was a show rich in political satire. there were constant digs at donald trump. the host, stephen colbert, even ridiculed the former reality tv starfor not winning an emmy himself. but that changed, sort of, when alec baldwin picked up the award for best supporting actor in a comedy. i suppose i should say, at long last, mr president,
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here is your emmy. british winners included the comedian john oliver, charlie brooker, for the dark satirical drama black mirror, and riz ahmed for the drama the night of. big little lies was one of the big winners. nicole kidman took best actress, and her co—star reese witherspoon accepted the award for best limited series. and can ijust say — bring women to the front of their own stories. the handmaid's tale! the night's top award for a story about a totalitarian society won eight emmys for the streaming service hulu. viewers are turning to the small screen. from the tv set to the tablet, television on all its platforms is enjoying a golden age. a golden age of television, but it's
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getting bigger and bigger all the time. it is always a golden age, eve ryo ne time. it is always a golden age, everyone says that, sorry, i am a bit cynical about that. i was making a point! you decimated my point! 13 minutes past eight. i think we should move on! think we should move on! let's return to our main story. it's been four days since the attack at parsons green underground station are being questioned on suspicion of terror offences. while the homemade device did not fully detonate on the train last friday, dozens of people were caught up in the incident that left 30 people with injuries. 16—year—old jack was travelling on the train — he's been talking to the bbc‘s adina campbell. i was just listening to music and i wasjust listening to music and i had noise cancelling headphones on, i heard a scream, i took them off, i looked to my left, there was a ball of fire the width of the carriage living towards is very fast, my instinct was to just run and i ran away from the fire and out the door. my away from the fire and out the door. my priority was just to get out of that train. the flame was very gassy
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as, the carriage, it was sort of us have someone filled the train with as and lit a match. what was the first thing you did when you got off? i got to the platform, i stood still for a second and ijust sort of... blocked and ijust sort of started crying. once out of the station jack recorded started crying. once out of the stationjack recorded this started crying. once out of the station jack recorded this footage on his mobile phone. wasn't sure what to do next. i was a bit confused about what to do, offer to 90, confused about what to do, offer to go, whether i should go to school, dad, i don't think he realised, he said, go to school, i don't think he realised how close i was to it. as will happen to you on friday to change the way you feel about using public transport and going to couege public transport and going to college from now on? when i was on the train today going to go for it i did not want to sit down because if i had sat down video would not be able to run. i am very lucky. the idea that if i stayed for i was i
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would have been much closer, the fa ct would have been much closer, the fact that i escaped that narrowly, i am really grateful. that is jack talking to our reporter. friday's incident at parsons green is the fifth terror attack in the uk in the last six months, raising questions about the problems around radicalisation and extremism. brooke rogers is a risk and terror analyst at king's college london, and shejoins us now from our london newsroom. good morning. thank you forjoining us. when we talk about radicalisation is what do we actually mean, what is it? we are looking at changes in beliefs that will eventually, if they become extreme enough lead to changes in behaviour and what we are really concerned about when we think about radicalisation is when it moves to violent radicalisation, when those beliefs support while and actions and when those beliefs actually lead to violent action. what's the psychology behind it? how does it happen? there are a number
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of models where we try to find similarities and trends among the individuals who do become radicalised. there is a lot of debate around the psychological state around the individuals, but a lot of evidence seems to suggest there are strong identity components to it so they are trying to find a reason for being a cause that they can actually feel important too when they are engaged in it. it can change their level of self esteem, it can change how they feel about themselves when they feel that they fit into something when they can be pa rt fit into something when they can be part of something bigger. there are similarities between the types of people who can be and who are radicalised? we do see trends and it depends on the type of radicalisation. we see trends where it tends fob men. where we are looking at the islamist, so the extreme interpretation of islam, they tend to be younger men. if we
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look at right—wing extremism, they tend to be older gentleman. that's not to rule out the role that women can play in this and that women can be radicalised as well. how much of a problem, do you think it is? people holding extreme views in general, we can count that in terms of several thousand. when we look at individuals who hold the extreme views that drive them towards violence, i think it is on a much smaller scale. they can actually have beliefs that could lead them to support violence, but having those beliefs become strong enough to move them towards violence can be quite a tricky thing to ascertain. the pace is different for everyone. the way in which they are radicalised is different for everyone. so it can be difficult from move from saying you hold beliefs that lead to you support violence, to say you hold beliefs that will actively make you engage in violence and that's where we need to intervene. we heard the metropolitan police and the others talk about the help they receive from the public and how that's
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really important to them in dealing with terrorism. what should people look out for when they suspect perhaps someone is being radicalised? well, when we look at radicalisation we quite often look for leakage behaviours and those are behaviours where individuals either accidentally or intentionally share their extreme views or share their intentions to undertake an attack and we know that individuals especially if we're looking at this extreme version of the islamist threat almost 50% of individuals have demonstrated leakage behaviour. so sharing their thoughts, sharing their behaviours. the rest of is more general which you can't link directly to violent radicalisation such as isolating themselves from friends and family and changing their social circles and possibly changing their dress and behaviours. brooke rodgers, thank you very much. here's carol with a look
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at this morning's weather. bottom we are starting off with a beautiful weather watcher picture. some of us will be seeing a similar kind of skyline. bottom there will be sunshine between the showers and rain midweek, but it looks like it will start to warm up. low pressure is out towards the east of us. throwing in some showers and some low cloud this morning. high pressure in the west is killing off some of the showers and here we've got clear ter skies so it has been a cooler start, but temperatures red sponding nicely now. we've got rain across the far north of scotland slipping southwards heading down through north—east england and we will see more showers develop, but in between them, there will be sunshine. for northern ireland though, we are looking at a dry, mostly dry day. though for wales, south—west england, heading over towards the midlands we are likely to see
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showers. not all of us will. for east anglia solicitor the showers could be heavy and thundery and then you can see a lot of dry weather, some showers across the north of england, you might see one or two in northern ireland, but not many and for scotland too, a lot of dry weather, but we have got this rain across north—east scotland fringing in through aberdeenshire and heading in the direction of northumberland. through the evening and overnight period, the rain will slip southwards and getting into the south east probably by dawn. behind it, there will be coastal showers, but equally, there will be clear skies. so it will be a nippy night. temperatures in towns and cities eight to ten, but in the countryside one to four orfive eight to ten, but in the countryside one to four or five celsius. cold enough especially in the northern half of the country for a touch of grass frost. tomorrow, a ridge of high pressure will be ensconced across us. we have another weather
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front coming in from the west which will introducing wet and windier conditions to northern ireland during the day. but for most, we are looking at a dry day. a chilly start. the cloud breaking. again, one or two showers, but they will be the exception rather than the rule. most of us won't see them. in the sunshine it will feel pleasant enough with highs up to 18 or 19 celsius. we have got the rain on wednesday across scotland, northern ireland, western parts of england and wales. it won't get into the south—west until later. so we hang on to the drier conditions with the cloud building across central and eastern parts of england and even as we head into thursday, that band of rain is not making huge progress eastwards, but it is slowly drifting in that direction. so again the further east that you are, the higher the temperatures are likely to be. we could hit 20 or 21 and behind it, we will see a return to bright spells, sunshine and showers. soa bright spells, sunshine and showers. so a wee bit of a political party if you don't like the rain in the middle of week, dan and steph.
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i was just having a look round. i could see our next guest standing by. whatever. caught out! exactly. 0n by. whatever. caught out! exactly. on to by. whatever. caught out! exactly. 0ntoa by. whatever. caught out! exactly. on to a serious story. death threats, verbal abuse and online intimidation. that's what people who had hoped to win a seat in the house of commons faced during the general election this year. a survey of mps by bbc radio five live suggests 87% of them suffered some form of abuse with many saying this year's campaign was the worst ever. 0ur political correspondent chris mason has been studying the findings. a defaced poster with a reference to hitler, foul language, graffiti, that we have decided to blob out. alex has been a conservative mp in west yorkshire since 2010. what i do think it is noticeable
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in this election was the anger, the nastiness, the way it was organised nastiness in a way it was in before. "fascist nazi scum" written on a poster is so far from the reality of what politics is about today that i worry that it is sending messages to young people of forgetting what nazism and what fascism was about. ben bradley was the first conservative to win in nottinghamshire in his seat. he is giving up twitter because of abuse and is stepping up security in his home. give us a sense of what you have had to put up with in this campaign beyond political discussion. i got a lot of phone calls
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with no body on the end of it when i answered. there were people knocking on my door. it is scary in a way, notjust for me, but my young children. i had a hand delivered letter that made an aggressive point to me and it was hand—delivered to my house. it makes me realise someone was walking down my driveway with my children at home. it is a scary prospect. i have been a reporterfor over a decade, and i have not found a politician who does not like a good argument. this goes beyond that. does a man coming into my office threatening to bomb it count? bottles smashed on me, says another. my windows have been broken three times. i have been threatened with being burnt to death. one day, i had received some abuse from a website on facebook.
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i logged on. it was strange, there is almost a compulsion to see what people are saying about you. people say do not look, do not look. but i find that difficult. someone had made a picture of me as a used sanitary towel. i remember thinking and feeling revolted. a few friends saw it and i felt angry. vandalism, abuse, threats, these are the things people fear will put off people going into politics. chris, it is an interesting survey this conducted by bbc radio 5 live. ijust wonder what this conducted by bbc radio 5 live. i just wonder what happens this conducted by bbc radio 5 live. ijust wonder what happens now? good morning, dan. we have spoken to the commons authorities to get their take, their response to this five live survey. they acknowledge, yes,
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there is increasing abuse. that it isa there is increasing abuse. that it is a grave there is increasing abuse. that it is a grave concern there is increasing abuse. that it is a grave concern to them. that it is a grave concern to them. that it is not acceptable that this should be part of the job for mps and their staff and there is an acute awareness here at westminster, this isn't just words, mps awareness here at westminster, this isn'tjust words, mps will remember very keenly and with real thought the murder ofjo cox and realise that that's the consequence if you like of what can happen in their job. that they are out there. that people often know where they are working and where they are appearing. the commons authorities say that they offer security advice to mp5. there are dedicated advisors allocated to each mp. there is also an acceptance that there is a different situation in constituencies, regional police forces have a role there are, but also a contractor has been appointed by the commons authorities to offer security advice to allow additional measures to be installed at home. now, mps don't tend to talk about the specific of what that amounts
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to, but it gives you some sense of the scale of the problem here. thanks, chris, there is more on radio 5 live throughout the day. it's time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, a cool and charles start to the week. low—pressure in the british isles, some blustery conditions in the east. away from that area of low pressure, decent sunshine getting through, the potential for showers to be heavy, especially across east anglia this afternoon, heavy and thundery, showers in the western parts of wales, devon and, most of us getting
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away with a dry day, temperatures between 11 and 18 degrees. showers continuing as we head into tonight, gradually easing and clearing, or overnight, underneath the clear skies, some mist and fog patches forming and it will be another chilly night, temperatures into low single figures and the countryside, in towns and cities ranging between 8-12dc. not in towns and cities ranging between 8—12dc. not surprisingly tomorrow a bit of a chilly start to choose to, high pressure building from the south, a lot of dry and settled weather to look forward to, much better day tomorrow compared with today, all of us seeing sunshine, just the risk of an odd isolated shower, you would have to be unlucky to catch one, most of us will get away with a fine day. feeling warmer tomorrow compared to today, thanks tomorrow compared to today, thanks to the sunshine, temperatures getting up to 18—19d, much lighter winds compared to today. heading into wednesday, try start, but he quickly starting to see this band of
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rain pushing into the west, the wind picking up, the best of the dry and bright weather across the south—east, temperatures reaching 19 celsius. hello. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. british prime minister heads to ottawa with a dispute over planes hanging in the air. live from london, that's our top story on monday 18th september. mrs may wants to protect uk jobs in a row between canada and the united states over subsidies. also in the programme.... ryanair shares sink by over 3 percent as one of the world's biggest airlines apologies for cancelling thousands of flights. and ahead of a big week for the fed this is how europe has opened,
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