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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 18, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at 2pm. the government's top brexit official leaves his post to work in downing street — amid reports of tensions with brexit secretary david davis. police are still questioning two men arrested after the parsons green bombing — including a 21—year—old syrian refugee. former england captain wayne rooney is banned from driving for two years after pleading guilty to drink—driving. a cyclist who killed a woman while riding an illegal track bike pressure on ryanair to publish a full list of the flights it plans to cancel, amid growing anger among customers. also in the next hour — as the clean up continues after irma, there's new cause for concern in the caribbean. we'll have the latest from matt taylor on hurricane maria — as it gains strength heading towards the leeward islands. every day the alarm is going off at
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half past 3am... and around the world in under 80 days, british endurance cyclist mark beaumont is heading for paris and a world record. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the most senior official in the government's brexit department has left his job, after reports of tensions between him and the brexit secretary david davis. oliver robbins is moving to downing street to work more directly for theresa may. a spokesman for number ten said the appointment would "strengthen coordination" of brexit across the government, as the next round of negotiations with brussels approaches. it comes as downing street insists the cabinet is united behind the government's plans for leaving the eu, despite the foreign secretary's decision to publish an article, setting out his own vision for brexit. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. the most eye—catching claim from the
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referendum campaign. since widely discredited, but this weekend boris johnson revived it. saying that brexit would mean roughly retrieving about that much of an eu and it would be a fine thing that was spent on the nhs. it led to the uk's most senior statistics official saying he was surprised and disappointed the foreign secretary had chosen to revisit the number. warning it was a clear misuse of figures. boris johnson hit back saying his article had been wilfully distorted and misrepresented. statisticians set ourselves, are we clarifying the big debates of the day, it is not our job as the statistical community to tell you what the answer is. but the british public have a right to know what the real numbers are and put them into context. that is what the
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statistics authority was try to do on this occasion. so, what does the argument over the figure centre around? argument over the figure centre around 7 boris argument over the figure centre around? boris johnson and argument over the figure centre around? borisjohnson and other leave campaigners said that in august 2014 the uk gave £350 million a week to the eu. the gross contribution was actually £161 million. but crucially, the rebate is removed before any money sent to brussels. so the amount sent to the eu in 2014 was £276 million a week, after the rebate. brexiteers insist there will be huge sums to reclaim after we leave. everyone knows it is an awful lot of money. wouldn't it be more productive to discuss how we will spend that money when we come out, and also to discuss the point that many of us don't think there is any moral or political or legal reason to go on paying them, once we have left. indeed i think it would be illegal to go on paying them once we have left. this tussle over numbers is a side story to the
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debate still going on in the cabinet about what brexit looks like, just days before theresa may is due to make a major speech to try and break the deadlock in the negotiations. downing street said it was important that all cabinet ministers were united around the government's decision. but boris johnson's intervention, setting out his own ideas. let's cross to westminster and our assistant political editor, norman smith. i know you have no time to listen to the radio, so i will tell you that lord coe ‘s ns __ ‘s —— col one. 's -- col one. i thought he sounded rather suspicious about what on earth was going on about the decision to move all of it from his
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post, saying why now? we are on the eve of that speech by theresa may to break that deadlock in negotiations. just days before that, it seems that for whatever reason, the government have decided to shunt him into this new post, he will have a cross departmental role. two ways you can read this, one, it is theresa may trying to assert a tighter grip on the negotiations. it is widely rumoured that david davis and mr robbins didn't get an, that they had a strained personal relationship, it wasn't working, and it was decided to move him to one side. after of course, the intervention by boris johnson on the weekend where he set out his take on how we should approach brexit. seemingly at odds with the likes of the chancellor philip hammond who has argued for eight status quo transition. the
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chancellor's parliamentary aide joins me now. what does the chancellor mean when he talks about eight status quo transition?” chancellor mean when he talks about eight status quo transition? i think the idea is obviously having a minimal effect on businesses. so, we all accept that we're going to leave the eu, we all accept that is going to be end state will stop but the question is how do we get there? i think the view expressed, or that has been expressed, is that there may well be, no one is saying that there will be, it is actually up to there will be, it is actually up to the eu states themselves. they have a say on this. but there may well be a say on this. but there may well be a transition agreement that gets is from where we are now, to an end state where we have left the customs union and the single market. you would understand patently well why many brexiteers are alarmed by that. because they will think, hang on, we are meant to be leaving not carrying on business as usual. and certainly
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not possibly paying still, quite considerable amounts of money to the eu for access to the single market. i was eu for access to the single market. iwas and eu for access to the single market. i was and still i'm a brexiteer, i still believe the great possibilities for this country once we have left the eu. i think many brexiteers understand that there may well be, i'm not saying there will be, but there may well be, even boris is saying that there could be a six—month period, after which we leave the eu, so the question is, how long is the transition agreement going to last? that is the issue of the debate. we can't prejudge the outcome of these negotiations when maddest at the beginning. as a brexiteer, would you be comfortable if, at the end of the day we settled for a doorway style arrangement —— norway style agreement. where we left the single market without any say of the rules? i don't think that
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is something we should aspire tofi should be a tailor—made deal for britain. we have a unique set of circumstances that are different from norway. i have an excitation that we will leave the eu which includes the single market and customs union. what will theresa may do this friday in florence to reach out to other eu countries in an effort to break the seeming brexit deadlock. i think this deadlock issue has been over exaggerated. if you look at what is taking place, there are hundreds of civil servants on both sides that our putting together radio. it looks a likely we will get a deal. i think the prime minister will stay what she's been stating for the last year, i think she has been very consistent on this. i look forward to hearing what she has to say next week. it will be a crunch moment i think in the whole brexit process. thank you for
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joining us. maybe not so much in specifics, but certainly in time, whether theresa may manages to break the deadlock which at the moment seems to be snarling up negotiations. thank you. police are continuing to question two men who were arrested after a device partially exploded on the tube in south west london on friday leaving 30 people injured. police have been searching a fried chicken shop in hounslow in west london, where a 21—year—old man was detained on saturday night on suspicion of terror offences. he's a syrian refugee who appears to have been living in the uk for four years. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. this is a 24/7 investigation. late last night, detectives were still removing potential evidence from a fast food shop in hounslow, west london. it was raided on saturday. they arrested one man here, surrounding him with offices in overalls, a precaution to ensure any potential forensic evidence on his clothes is not contaminated. he is 21—year—old yahyah farroukh,
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believed to be from syria. the bbc has been told he worked in the shop searched by detectives. ya hyah farroukh lives in this modern development, close to the southern boundary of heathrow airport. it's also been taped off, and is being subjected to a close search. he is linked to this house in sunbury—on—thames, about five miles away and still surrounded by metal barriers and tents have been put up to protect evidence. this picture of yahyah farroukh was ta ken in the street outside of the house, and posted online nearly five months ago. ron and pennyjones, who live here, have fostered teenage asylum seekers. he may have been one of them. neighbours say another young man who arrived a few weeks ago appeared desperate to run away and came to the attention of the police. i saw one arguing with him. i went out and asked what was wrong.
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it was a new kit, 15, didn't want to come into the house, he came from kent and he said he wanted to go to london. police cars were parked outside the house when i drove past, but it's been ramped up over the last 2—3 months, with police coming out to the house. the police get called, there will be a police presence at the house. whether it means that the lad has actually caused trouble per se, who is to know? it is speculation. police say an 18—year—old linked to the address was arrested in dover and is being questioned. cctv evidence is at the corner of the investigation. this image obtained by itv news was captured close to the house sunbury—on—thames. the key question? did this man with a lidl bag place a bomb on the london underground, also in a lidl bag? burning and terrifying innocent commuters. tom symons, bbc news. matthew thompson is in sunbury—on—thames where police are carrying out an intense search on a property. the police investigation is very
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much still ongoing. absolutely. you can see behind me that there is a much an active investigation. i thank also, we have another camera angle. you can see two forensic tents in the front garden of this house. there is another one around the back that you can't quite see. very much an active forensic operation, it is scaled down from the weekend when they evacuated many of the houses. those houses are now safe. residents are back in their houses. 0bviously, safe. residents are back in their houses. obviously, this is an ongoing investigation, we heard in that report, that the 21—year—old syrian man ya hyah that report, that the 21—year—old syrian man yahyah farroukh was arrested in hounslow on saturday night in eight chicken shop in which he worked. we spoke to the owner of that chicken shop, this is what he had say. we give no details out
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about the investigation, they searched lockers, and that was it. we we re searched lockers, and that was it. we were closed her for hours, and then they went. what was he like? we didn't know him very well, he was quite quiet. how long was he here for? i don't know those details. yes, he is familiar. we do recognise him. he is a member of staff, so yes he was working here. what was he doing? making chicken. where was he from? i believe originally he was from syria, sorry, he was probably a refugee. i don't know those details. that man, yahyah farroukh, we also know attended west
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thames college and had been in the ukforaround four thames college and had been in the uk for around four years. the other man arrested on saturday morning, we believe was an 18—year—old iraqi refugee who lived at this house with foster parents. refugee who lived at this house with foster pa rents. it refugee who lived at this house with foster parents. it is unclear at this stage how much longer the police will be here at this house. but they have searched at least three other properties comes, none have been at the scale of this. so this is being treated as the centre of operations and where that bomb was made. thank you. the former england captain, wayne rooney, has been banned from driving for two years, and sentenced to a hundred hours of community service after admitting a charge of drink—driving. the everton striker was arrested earlier this month after being pulled—over by police in cheshire at the beginnning of the month. 0lly foster is outside stockport magistrates‘ court. this is where wayne rooney and his entourage appeared earlier. yes, they certainly did. we also found out today in court, that he was
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three times the legal drink—drive limit when he was arrested and charged by police. it was the 1st of september, very early in the hours ofa september, very early in the hours of a friday morning. just after 2am. he was driving a black box beetle, which belonged to laura simson, he arrived this morning and pleaded guilty to that charge. the district judge banned him for two years for drink—driving. wayne rooney's lawyer had asked for a fine on top of that. but thejudge felt had asked for a fine on top of that. but the judge felt that wouldn't have a punitive effect on a man of renee's well. he decided instead to impose 100 hours of community service, unpaid work, that must be completed inside the next 12 months. he was also ordered to pay £170 of court cost. a written statement was
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released in which he said i want to publicly apologise for my unforgivable lack of judgment publicly apologise for my unforgivable lack ofjudgment in driving while over the legal limit. it was completely wrong. i have already said sorry to my family, manager and chairman and everyone at everton fc. he hasjustjoined bat rejoined his boyhood club. he continued, i want to thank everyone who has supported me throughout my career. i accept the sentence of the court and hope i can make some amends through my community service. he has to serve those 100 hours instead of a find that his lawyer had asked for. but we also found out in court today that he is expecting... he has been fined by his club everton, two weeks wages, somewhere in the region of £300,000. his manager, ronald koeman, a couple of weeks ago said how disappointed he was in wayne rooney's arrest. we
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also learned in court, but here's expected to be fined two weeks wages. it is a two—year driving ban, and 100 hours of community work to be completed in the next 12 months. thank you. the headlines on bbc news: the government top brexit official leases post to work in downing street. police are still questioning two men arrested after the parsons green bombing — including a 21—year—old syrian refugee. former england captain wayne rooney is banned from driving for two years after pleading guilty to drink—driving. and in sport, england head coach mark sampson, is not allowing issues off the pitch to effect their qualifying match against russia. after their victories over south africa and the west indies, good
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all—round says joe africa and the west indies, good all—round sastoe root is ready to play ahead of the ashes. in this squash player is going to retire but not before he attempts a third medal. a former courier who knocked over and killed a mother—of—two while riding an illegal bike without front brakes has been sentenced to 18 months in a young offenders institution. charlie alliston was travelling at 18 miles—per—hour on a fixed—wheel track bike before he crashed into kim briggs as she crossed a road in east london, in february last year. 0ur correspondent richard lister is outside the old bailey. thejudge in this the judge in this case described charlie alliston as an accident waiting to happen. the court heard how the former bicycle courier had
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tweeted about the thrill of riding a bike without front brakes, and had bought a track bike specifically for racing which is illegalfor use on the road. nonetheless, it was the bike he regularly used on the road. he was riding when the victim stepped out in front of him. the court heard that he called out twice for her to get out of the way. she stopped, she was frozen, she didn't know what to do. the court heard that charlie alliston rather then tried to stop the bike, decided to weave past. they collided, she suffered catastrophic head injuries and a week later she died. the police were deciding how to charge charlie alliston in this offence. most of the legislation aimed at protecting pedestrians, is aimed at vehicle drivers, people driving motorised vehicles, and it excludes cycles. that gave the police and legal authorities a problem. they did charge him with manslaughter,
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and that is the first time that has happened with a cyclist in these circumstances. he was acquitted of that, but what he was convicted of, was causing harm by wanton or furious driving. that is a child under victorian legislation aimed at horse and carriage drivers. that was something that the victim's widower spoke about when he came to the steps of the old bailey a little while ago. this case is clearly and evidently demonstrated that there is a gap in the law when it comes to dealing with death or serious injury by dangerous cycling. to have two rely on either manslaughter at one end, ora rely on either manslaughter at one end, or a victorian law that doesn't even mention causing death at the otherend, even mention causing death at the other end, tells us that there is a 95p~ other end, tells us that there is a gap. what happens to my wife is rare, is no gap. what happens to my wife is rare, is no reason gap. what happens to my wife is rare, is no reason for there to be
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no remedy. the 18 month sentence that he was given is slightly shorter than a two—year maximum in the guidelines of that legislation. but the department for transport is looking at the implications for this case. the widower said that he is confident in is the way it is moving and the way it will be change. you're so appealed to the manufacturers of these track bikes to find better ways that the bike the killed his wife is not used on the killed his wife is not used on the road. thank you. a storm that will hit the caribbean tonight is strengthening into a hurricane , that's the warning from american weather forecasters. ‘maria' — as it's known — is the second powerful storm in the region in two weeks. it's expected to hit the island of domenica in the eastern caribbean later today. bbc weather's matt taylor has all the details. here we go again! hurricane season,
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very active in this part of the world. another one to devastate the caribbean islands. i will show you where the storm is at the moment, it is to 100 miles to the east of martinique. it is a category two storm with winds in excess of 110 mph. there is some comfort, in that those wins only extend 15 miles out of the court. but in the coming hours that could make in direct impact on dominica. the storm is set to gain further strength in the coming days. it might not hit the already affected islands directly, but we will see floods in excess of 200 millimetres. added to that, the storm passes over even warmer storm passes over even warmer waters, the storm is expected to strengthen even further, it could actually become a category three or actually become a category three or a category four storm bringing devastation to parts of the virgin islands, and puerto rico on
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wednesday thursday for bleyendaal. they will see another devastating storm to come their way. ryanair is under pressure to publish a full list of the flights it plans to cancel over the next six weeks, amid growing anger among customers. the airline is cancelling dozens of flights every day until the end of october, after it said it "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays. but so far so far ryanair has only published a list of affected flights between now and wednesday. the independent‘s travel editor, simon calderjoins us now from sta nsted airport. i think you have a ryanair ticket, but not a ryanair flight?|j i think you have a ryanair ticket, but not a ryanair flight? i do have a ryanair ticket, more of a lottery ticket than a boarding pass. i have this ticket to the barcelona, which should be setting off soon. there
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will be 15,000 people across the ryanair network today, that will not be travelling anywhere. the bulk of those would have been flying to or from here at london stansted. how do they get away with this? first of all, it is is a extremely unusual set of steak and stanzas. it appears to have been building for the last couple of weeks. —— circumstances. they put out a note last wednesday that there were more problems, and that there were more problems, and that they were trained to work harder. but it is a difficult combination with the fact that airlines want their pilots to work all the way through the summer, and they have changed their annual leave calendar, and as a result of that, you have an almighty squeezing together of the possible times when pilots could take holiday. someone time off, others are taking them because they have reached their flight because they have reached their flight time limitations, which carefully stipulate the maximum number of hours a pilot can work in 28 days, orup
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number of hours a pilot can work in 28 days, or up to a year. a lot of people suggest, depending who you talk to, the as a pilot you go to ryanair to cram talk to, the as a pilot you go to ryanairto cram in talk to, the as a pilot you go to ryanair to cram in the hours and get in the experience before you go to another airline. is the problem, that they are going to another airline sooner than they wished. because they don't even pay their hotel bills? there are rumours about pilot is going to this airline or another full stop it is difficult to substantiate that. generally, of course, there is a progression away from ryanair to course, there is a progression away from rya nair to other course, there is a progression away from ryanair to other airlines. that is true of many ambitious men and women who want to become pilots. it isa women who want to become pilots. it is a great way to build up hours. there is definitely an appetite among norwegian and jetjet2 pilots. any stories you have seen of up to 700 pilots going from ryanair to
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other airlines, i would treat with care, they are certainly rejected by ryanair. they say yes, we messed up, it isa ryanair. they say yes, we messed up, it is a short—term blip but we're doing what we can to fix it. i graduated several thousand customers between now and october having their flights disrupted. that is only two and a half percent of their total passenger carrying is, but if you are one of those get your entitlements, including compensation depending on when you're off—line. if you are waiting on a later flight, if you are waiting on a later flight, even hotels and meals into luiten get you home. crucially, it will, there is no specific desk willian definition of this, you can book on a rival airline. but that is a bit ofa book on a rival airline. but that is a bit of a law that is fussy and that civil aviation authority says they need to come out and say what they need to come out and say what they believe the rules to be. there
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isa they believe the rules to be. there is a new conference at four o'clock with the ceo, if you were there, what would you asking? how on earth does your‘s biggest airline managed to get itself in a muddle, and please give us some certainty about the flights that will be cancelled. iam one the flights that will be cancelled. i am one of several million people booked to travel next month and i don't know of my plane will get off the ground. thank you. thank you. we have live pictures from the un, they have the need for change in the un. donald trump australia address make it a different time, he's talking about reform of the organisation. let's see if he is saying anything... inaudible
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no. they are expecting tough talking from the podium, it is expected that he wants to streamline the process at the un. it will be lively, and we will be bringing it to you live. the writer charlie brooker led the way last night at the list tv awards ceremony the emmy‘s. as our reporter discovered it was a politically charged evening with several references to president trump. # everything is better on tv... a song and dance routine to celebrate television, from streaming services
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to mainstream tv. but this was a show rich in political satire. there were constant digs at donald trump. the host, stephen colbert, even ridiculed the former reality tv starfor not winning an emmy himself. the president did pick up an award. i suppose i should say at long last, mr president here is your emmy. charlie brooker, for the dark satirical drama black
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mirror, and riz ahmed for the drama the night of. big little lies was one of the big winners. nicole kidman took best actress, and her co—star reese witherspoon accepted the award for best limited series. and can ijust say — bring women to the front of their own stories. two awards for donald love. two awards for donald lovelj two awards for donald love. i would like to thank donald trump. the handmaid's tale! the night's top award for a story about a totalitarian society won eight emmys for the streaming service hulu. viewers are turning to the small screen. from the tv set to the tablet, television on all its platforms is enjoying a golden age. just to bring you some news coming
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in from banbury magistrates court, where southern health has pleaded guilty to breaching the help and save yet work act. this follows the death of a man in its care. he suffered epilepsy and drowned in a bath at an nhs units, and a tribunal found that doctors had not carried out risk assessments for the teenager. the case was taken to the court, where southern health have just admitted breaching section three of the health and say that the work act, sentenced to follow. that copy coming in right now. we will get a weather update from matt taylor. struggling to shake the rain clouds at the moment, you can see this beckley cloud in the south—east, where we have the heaviest downpours this afternoon. cloudy in northern
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england and scotland, patchy rain and drizzle coming and going. les and drizzle coming and going. les and another in the sunshine, in fact this is where the lighter winds will be. —— pleasant enough in the sunshine. drizzle clearing southward through the night, showers continuing in the morning in the south—west, mostly dry, partly clear skies, rather chilly, temperatures in scotland close to a frost to start the day. mist and fog clears, the driest and brightest day of the week across the uk on tuesday. in the sunshine it will probably feel warmer than of late, highs of around 15-80d. warmer than of late, highs of around 15—80d. your next update is in half an hour, see you then. hello, this is bbc news with simon mccoy. the top official at the department for exiting the european union, 0liver robbins, has left his post amid claims of tension between
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him and the brexit secretary. mr robbins will be moving to work directly for the prime minister in the cabinet office. police are still questioning two men arrested after the bomb attack on a tube train in parsons green, including a 21—year—old syrian refugee. wayne rooney has pleaded guilty to a charge of drink—driving at a court in stockport. the footballer has been sentenced to 100 hours of unpaid work and received a two—year ban on driving. a cyclist who killed a woman while riding an illegal track bike is sentenced to 18 months in a young offenders institution. ryanair is facing pressure to publish a full list of flights it will cancel, having said on saturday they will cancel 40—50 flights each day for the next six weeks. they are having a press conference at four o'clock. sport now, and we can go to tim hague at the bbc sport centre.
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ahead of england's opening world cup qualifier against russia tomorrow night, manager mark sampson says he's not allowing the recent controversy surrounding eni aluko's discrimination case to affect the team's preparations. forward aluko and midfielder drew spence have both submitted evidence against sampson, though he's been cleared of any wrongdoing in two separate investigations. the important thing is to be professional, you know, we understand that there is a huge public interest in the investigations, but from our point of view, the players have got a job to do, we are representing england tomorrow, and these players have worked incredibly hard to have this opportunity to represent england, so we focused on making sure we produced the best performance we possibly can. i have made clear my sta nce possibly can. i have made clear my stance on the allegations, and as we sit down, 24 hours away from an aborted world cup qualifier, i am asking people to respect the fact thatis asking people to respect the fact that is the case, and the players
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and staff get a chance to represent england. —— from an important world cup qualifier. mark simpson gave me the chance to play for england, not only getting the opportunity, it is the technical detail, improving me asa the technical detail, improving me as a footballer and a person, and i have said it before, this is the most together team i have ever been involved in, the most positive environment and, the best team culture i have been involved in, and i have been involved with a lot of clubs, so that along with the footballing side of things has helped me develop as a player. league cup ties dominate the midweek fixtures, 16 across tuesday and wednesday. the tottenham game against barnsley tomorrow at wembley, with the spurs boss well aware that his side is yet to win a domestic fixture at their new temporary home. we can do better. it is true that we are struggling maybe to ta ke is true that we are struggling maybe to take some... because we have dropped many points at wembley in
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the three games that we have played, against chelsea, barnsley and swa nsea. against chelsea, barnsley and swansea. and we won at everton and newcastle. we started really well in the champions league, but i am happy. england and the west indies begin their five match one—day series at old trafford tomorrow, jonny bairstow has been selected to open the batting with alex hales. former england captain andrew flintoff says he believes the current england test squad is probably the best ever, following their series wins over south africa and the windies this summer. the former all—rounder is also full of praise for captainjoe root, ahead of the winter's ashes series. be has got the perfect team to do it with. i think that team that he is looking after is the best england tea m looking after is the best england team we have ever had. people have a go at me when i say that, we just have to find consistency. he is brilliant, the team is great, way more successful than i ever was, and it will be a tough winter for him
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with the ashes. heather watson's disappointing season has continued at the seoul 0pen. the british number two was knocked out in the first round by sara sorribes tormo, who won in three sets. watson, who had moved back into the top 100 this year, has now failed to get past the first round in korea in four attempts. the three—time squash world champion nick matthew has announced that he'll retire at the end of the forthcoming season. the former world number one could play his last event at the british open in the spring. before that, matthew will bid to win a fourth world title in manchester at the end of the year, and another commonwealth games gold next april. retirement is sometimes a dirty word, i think, retirement is sometimes a dirty word, ithink, in retirement is sometimes a dirty word, i think, in sport, retirement is sometimes a dirty word, ithink, in sport, you retirement is sometimes a dirty word, i think, in sport, you get as did all the time, which is why i wa nted did all the time, which is why i wanted to get it out in the open and then be able to concentrate, i guess, on what i do best, and it is nice that it is in my own hands. that's all the sport for now, i'll have more in the next hour. thanks very much.
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0liver robbins, the top official leading britain's brexit negotiating team, has moved to the cabinet office to work more directly for the prime minister. the news comes as downing street insists the cabinet is united behind the government's brexit plan, despite borisjohnson's intervention last week. let's speak to now to andrew gimson, boris johnson's biographer. he's in our westminster studio. what do you think is going on? is this announcement is directly linked to boris johnson's this announcement is directly linked to borisjohnson's article? this announcement is directly linked to boris johnson's article? well, there is enormous pressure behind—the—scenes. a lot of people think boris should not have spoken up, but! think boris should not have spoken up, but i think that what he said will strengthen the prime minister's hand, because he has drawn attention to the fact that a very large number of people voted leave who will be looking closely at whatever deal is struck, so she mustn't make too many concessions in florence or at some later stage in order to get some kind of a deal. but there are those
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who would say that his article has totally weakened her position, that she will have to come up with something on friday, whereas perhaps she didn't want to have to. she needs boris johnson, and she didn't want to have to. she needs borisjohnson, and he ought to be bound more closely into this process. be has been given a great office in which he visits the british virgin islands and nigeria, places which have little bearing on brexit, but he was the decisive figure in the leave campaign. a lot of people will not forgive him for that, they did testing, they think he isa that, they did testing, they think he is a disgrace to politics, but he is needed by theresa may. without him, it she will not be able to sell whatever deal is struck in brussels. without her, he hopes to be the prime minister who replaces her. very few conservatives wants to fight the next election under theresa may, because she wasn't an asset on the campaign trail. stanley baldwin was when he lost his first election as conservative leader.
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she, alas, was not. on the other hand, most eurosceptics can see the sense of letting her see this difficult negotiation through, so the party is fairly united behind her. she didn't have any trouble passing the eu withdrawal bill the other day, a majority of 36, more solid than one might have expected. soi solid than one might have expected. so i think unless people who detest boris overreacts to what he has done, there is no real reason. i have noticed, as his biographer, there are often great glories of publicity and excitement, accusations, and it all dies down after a couple of days. the chap at the statistics agency has kept this going for another day by attacking boris, but no reason why it should run for day after day. the trouble is that this is all about perception, and this adds to the perception, and this adds to the perception that there is a prime minister on sufferance, if you like, that boris johnson minister on sufferance, if you like, that borisjohnson is wheeling and dealing behind the scenes, positioning himself as the obvious
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johnson to take over. is that not right? well, the obvious person very rarely ta kes right? well, the obvious person very rarely takes over, the obvious person is often nobbled, so it would be in these interests not to be seen as the obvious person. but you said these perception is what is important, and there is no point in denying that she is there on sufferance, she has skilful people around her, like damian green, this new official who moved across to downing street — there is no reason why they should not manage it, but it will be difficult. in europe, eve ryo ne it will be difficult. in europe, everyone watching this needs to know that she has got to strike a decent deal or people in london, people in england, people in the united kingdom will save no do it. that is the value of borisjohnson having spoken up. can any deal but beached without boris johnson?
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spoken up. can any deal but beached without borisjohnson? some say theresa may should have the strength to turn around and sack him. theresa may should have the strength to turn around and sack himlj theresa may should have the strength to turn around and sack him. i think that would make them feel better for at least five minutes. they would be really delighted, these many people who would stand is on his political grave, but from her point of view, it would be a terrible weakness. she had this astute idea of putting the three brexiteers in the three brexit ministries, the three very senior posts, and now she has to use them, and she has not been using boris properly. she has, funnily enough, got to bring him closer to her, not chuck him off the sledge and think that the people have to will be satisfied by feeding on the corpse of borisjohnson satisfied by feeding on the corpse of boris johnson — satisfied by feeding on the corpse of borisjohnson — they won't be, they will come for her. if she does that, the whole thing will fall to bits. do you think you would prefer david davis's or liam fox's job? bits. do you think you would prefer david davis's or liam fox'sjob?|j would be surprised if he was thinking in those terms, he wants to make a success of being foreign secretary. at this level, he is a
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newcomer. because he has been well—known, people think he must be experienced, but he has only been a cabinet ministerfor a experienced, but he has only been a cabinet minister for a year, experienced, but he has only been a cabinet ministerfor a year, and i think he will want to do it for several more yea rs think he will want to do it for several more years and show that he is very good at it. as harold macmillan said, you always caught between a cliche and an indiscretion as foreign secretary, no—one plays a blind bit of attention to cliche, but with an indiscretion you can turn the volume up too high. he ought to have several more years in thisjob to show ought to have several more years in this job to show how well he can do it, that he has actually learned he is no stranger to indiscretion, of course — i am just getting the impression that it is a job he does not enjoy. i think he would enjoy being surrounded by very high—grade officials, he is fascinated by foreign policy, but he doesn't want it. i can imagine that he would not wa nt it. i can imagine that he would not want it to be foreign policy minus
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the most important bit of foreign policy, which is brexit. he is saying, look, in effect, iwas policy, which is brexit. he is saying, look, in effect, i was a decisive figure in the leave campaign, and! decisive figure in the leave campaign, and i shouldn't be left out of what is going on now. do you think he is relishing the response to that article, or regretting it?|j think he likes being the centre of attention, and i think he is genuinely quite sensitive to the accusation which he will have met a lot of it in the whole of liberal circle of friends that he has, the whole referendum thing being so divisive, and people, his opponents, they thought he was such a monster, they thought he was such a monster, the way he behaved, he would have been hurt by that, actually, because it will include people in his close family and a circle of family and friends. so he is hurt by that, and he wants to stand up for himself and say, look, iam nota he wants to stand up for himself and say, look, iam not a monster, he wants to stand up for himself and say, look, iam nota monster, iam not trying to be dishonest about it,
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and we can actually make a success of this thing, instead of feeling terribly cautious and nervous, as british negotiators in europe generally have for the last 30 yea rs. generally have for the last 30 years. the european officials, as he said, the british always protest, they always say no, and then in the end they say yes. if they think theresa may in the end is going to say yes to a deal which involves not really getting out of the european union and paying vast sums of money for the privilege of staying half m, for the privilege of staying half in, it would be a good thing if they we re in, it would be a good thing if they were disabused of that illusion. andrew, always good to talk to, thank you. we will talk to norman about this in a moment, but breaking news from the united states — following the decision injune by donald trump that he would announce the us would withdraw from the paris accord on climate change, his secretary of state, rex tillerson, has suggested the present was hoping to keep the country in the agreement. butjust hearing that white house officials are saying we are withdrawing unless we can
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re—engage in terms more favourable to the united states. perhaps weakening the statement by rex tillerson, suggesting that the united states would continue, would change their decision to withdraw from the paris accord. many in the united states and further afield remain committed to implementing the agreement, according to one member of white house staff, but anyway, confusion, is the word, that sums that up. we will take you over to new york when donald trump addresses the united nations. let's return to the united nations. let's return to theissues the united nations. let's return to the issues brexit, norman smith joins us now. fascinating chatjust then with andrew grimson, boris johnson's biographer, who suggests that boris and theresa may need to get closer together, rather than the expected showdown that they may have in new york, which is the first time he will meet her after the article, of course. i suspect the difficulty
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in trying to get a meeting of minds in this is that theresa may seems to be engaged in a balancing act between different takes on brexit within government, within those, it seems, aren't philip hammond, possibly david davis, who are arguing fora possibly david davis, who are arguing for a status quo brexit when we leave in march 2019, to smooth the path for business, against the likes of boris johnson, the path for business, against the likes of borisjohnson, who at the weekend seems to be arguing for a much less giving approach to brexit, ig lets not give the eu loads of cash for access to the single market. —— ie let's not give. that is the divide which theresa may, up to now, has been bridging. whether she can continue to do so, we will find out with the florence speech looming, but i am joined by a parliamentary aide for the treasury, is that your take on the fundamental, if you like, difference
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over the government's approach to brexit? there is no fundamental dividing government, the government is working as one team towards a good deal for britain, and that involves leaving cleanly in march 2019, rapidly transitioning to a good free trade deal with europe. the most important thing to bear in mind is that a good free trade deal with europe is in their interests as much as ours, possibly more so, given that we have a big trade deficit with europe, and indeed half of that is bilateral with germany. what i hope will happen is that after the german elections in a short time the german government will say to the european commission, who have been stalling on starting the uk is the largest export market for german cars, and it will not do the germans any favours if their car workers start losing jobs in munich, or if french winemakers start losing theirs. the european commission need
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to focus onjobs, theirs. the european commission need to focus on jobs, rather than the political posturing we have seen so far. and how do you read the decision this lunchtime to move 0liver robbins, a top official in the brexit department, and and eu countries likely to be scratching their head and wondering what is going on? i read nothing into it at all. it sounds like a modern—day version of kremlinology, where you sort of observed movements of officials and try to draw some sort officials and try to draw some sort of grand inference. moving senior civil servants around from time to time isa civil servants around from time to time is a normal thing to do, and civil servants around from time to time is a normalthing to do, and i wouldn't read anything into it all. we have got borisjohnson seemingly freelancing on brexit, now a shake—up at the brexit apartment at precisely the moment they want clarity, and that seems the one thing that we cannot give them. clarity, and that seems the one thing that we cannot give themlj was talking to david davis just a few days ago, and we have been very clear with the european union, with
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the european commission, what our objectives are. we have published a large numberof objectives are. we have published a large number of incredibly detailed papers ina large number of incredibly detailed papers in a whole range of different areas, so papers in a whole range of different areas, so the one thing they cannot claim isa areas, so the one thing they cannot claim is a lack of clarity. david davis and is very large and very able team, i think, are doing a good job in these negotiations. what the european commission need to do is stop stalling on the trade talks, get on with those, because they are in the interests of their own member state and individuals employed in europe as much as in our interests. they should stop playing political games and gets down to the proper talks. thanks very much indeed. simon, the edge to this is that we're just days away from that crucial speech by mrs may in florence, which is being billed as a make or break attempt to break the deadlock over these seemingly stalled brexit negotiations. norman smith in westminster, were you hoping to use the duke on october the 50 mark anything particular happening? london underground have
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announced a strike, you are the first to know! a dispute over working conditions, there has been a ballot, strike action, a 24—hour strike on october the 5th in a dispute over working conditions, that has just come in. dispute over working conditions, that hasjust come in. in a moment, a summary that hasjust come in. in a moment, a summary of the business news, but first the headlines. the government's top brexit official leaves his post to work in downing street amid reports of talk of tensions with david davis. lisa questioning two men arrested after the parsons green bombing, including a 21—year—old syrian refugee. and england captain wayne rooney is banned for two years after pleading guilty to drink—driving. firms who fail to pay the minimum wage predominantly employ women, according to a new report. the low pay commission, which advises the government on minimum wage levels,
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says women are also the least likely to complain about underpayment. ryanair is under pressure to publish a full list of the flights it plans to cancel over the next six weeks, amid growing anger among customers. the airline said this weekend that it would cancel 40—50 flights every day up until 20 september, after it messed up the planning of pilot holidays. but it's only published a limited list of affected flights. theresa may is in ottawa to intervene in a row between the us and canada over aircraft. the canadian firm bombardier, which employs 4000 in northern ireland, has been accused by us rival boeing of unfairly receiving state aid. but since the uk government relies on votes from northern ireland to push through legislation, the prime minister is keen to make sure jobs are safeguarded. lawmakers in the us are stepping up the pressure on facebook as concerns
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rise about the role the social—media network played in russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election. samira hussainjoins me now from new york stock exchange. what do we know so far about what happened on facebook during the election? so it was only revealed about a year after the election that there was $100,000 paid to facebook for specific ads. it turns out they we re for specific ads. it turns out they were financed by another group, with ties to a russian group, and the ads we re ties to a russian group, and the ads were really targeting highly divisive social issues, things like 93v divisive social issues, things like gay marriage, lg bt divisive social issues, things like gay marriage, lgbt rights, refugees, issues that are very socially divisive and put people on the left or the right. the ultimate goal, of course, was to try and bolster
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donald trump's position ahead of the us presidential election. but the thing that lawmakers are upset about is why is it only one year after the election that only now they are catching wind of this. what are lawmakers wanting to know now? what are they trying to find out? well, several things, just how widespread this was, is there more evidence of more kind of tampering, what other social media groups could have possibly been impacted, like facebook has been, and the timeline is really a big thing, jamie — facebook has been, and the timeline is really a big thing, jamie - just why it took so long for facebook to come up with this kind of information. so there are certainly a lot of questions being asked by congressional leaders, and don't forget there is a separate russian investigation that is being run by robert mueller. thank you, samira hussein. i think we're going over to donald trump now. you have just given
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donald trump now. you havejust given it donald trump now. you have just given it all away! that is what is happening, over to the un, donald trump has taken his seat, the first time he has addressed the un. this is the scene in the chamber. now, in the past, he not been entirely full of praise for this organisation. he has described the un as a club for people to get together, talk, and have a good time. he is expected to address several issues, which he hopes will end up in the reform of this organisation. as you can see, looking fairly relaxed there with the us ambassador to the un. it is understood that the administration wa nts to understood that the administration wants to streamline bureaucracy at the un and, more importantly, get other countries to cover more of the costs, particularly for peacekeeping, which is something he has talked about before. something that he has said in front of otherworldly does before, catching some of them by surprise in doing so. some of them by surprise in doing
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so. there are 192 sovereign states, members of the un, all with different agendas. some are worried that reform will strip them of their powers at the un. he hasjust that reform will strip them of their powers at the un. he has just check to see if his microphone is on. let's just join to see if his microphone is on. let'sjustjoin and to see if his microphone is on. let's justjoin and see how this progresses. hubbub well, he wanted to speak, he is now being briefed a little further. he is expected to speak for five or ten minutes. there is likely to be a battle with the secretary—general, because it is an organisation heinous back to front, whereas donald trump is still relatively new in his position as president of the united states, still coming to terms
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with the machinations of such a large organisation. he does, though, have backing from 120 countries, and antonio guterres himself as suggested that donald trump is right to raise the issue of reforms. cutting resources, including the peacekeeping budget could prove difficult, because any cuts would make some peacekeeping missions less effective, his critics have been saying. borisjohnson, effective, his critics have been saying. boris johnson, as effective, his critics have been saying. borisjohnson, as you can see, bottom right there. also away from this chamber, but in new york, borisjohnson will be having his own conversations with theresa may, the first time they will have had a chat since his controversial article in the telegraph, which has reignited the telegraph, which has reignited the row over brexit and taken the spotlight away from theresa may
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before she makes her crucial speech in florence on friday. of course, other serious issues on the agenda — north korea, the crisis there, and theissue north korea, the crisis there, and the issue of climate change. different messages coming out of washington as to whether the us will pull out formally from the paris accord. so the niceties are over. it suggested is now time for someone to speak. —— it suggests. so at the risk of periods of silence, let's join the un. good morning, and welcome to everyone. thank you and welcome to everyone. thank you and welcome to everyone. thank you and welcome to an event that shows it truly is a new day at the united nations. i thank you very much for being here. you should know that we have to get a bigger room to accommodate everyone here today, and thatis accommodate everyone here today, and that is a good problem, and that is one of the greatest signs of hope
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for the united nations that we have seen for the united nations that we have seen since i have been here. the declaration of support for united nations reform began as a way to give momentum to secretary—general antonio guterres to bring greater efficiency, accountability and transparency to the un. we thought that having member states put their names on a document would help ensure that these goals don't remain just words but become a part of the culture of the un. the response that we have had has been nothing short of fantastic. 128 nations have signed on to the declaration as of this morning, and we are still counting. that is a super majority. i thank counting. that is a super majority. ithank our counting. that is a super majority. i thank our co—host today, our friends from canada, germany, indonesia, japan, jordan, niger, rwanda, senegal, slovakia, thailand, the united kingdom and uruguay. most
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of all, i thank all of you. the fact that so many are committed to seeing the united nations succeed is gratifying. it is a sign not only that change is desperately needed but that it will be achieved. you are the reason change is coming to the un. it is now my honour to introduce someone who is no stranger to change. donald trump as a businessman's — seeing potential, and he sees great potential, not just in this reform movement but in the united nations itself. he shares your commitment to creating a more effective advocate for peace, security and human rights. we are deeply grateful he has taken the time to be with us today. ladies and gentlemen, president donald j time to be with us today. ladies and gentlemen, president donaldj trump. applause well, thank you very much. thank you.

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