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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 18, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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mid-teens lat-5: ' a 19 to 21 celsius. mid—teens further west, but across the western parts of the uk, there will be sunshine too. bye for now. today at 5pm, the budget airline ryanair says it's "messed up" the rotas of it's pilots, leading to the cancellation of thousands of flights, well into october. after mounting pressure, details of all the affected flights will now be published, and the compensation bill could be as much as 20 million euros. when we make a mess at ryanair we come out with our hands up, we try to explain where we have made a mess, we will pay compensation to those passengers entitled to compensation, which are those flights that have been cancelled. after concerted efforts to improve the airline's image, where does this latest controversy leave the company? the other main stories on bbc news at 5. police are continuing to question two men, in connection with last week's bomb attack on a london tube train. both are thought to be refugees from iraq and syria. theresa may insists the government is being ‘driven
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from the front,‘ attempting to reassert her authority. a cyclist who knocked down and killed a pedestrian in east london, has been sentenced to 18 months in youth custody. the former england football captain wayne rooney, has been banned from driving for two years, after admitting drinking and driving. and yet another hurricane bears down on the caribbean. maria is heading towards the leeward islands, and has strengthened to a "major" category three storm. it's 5pm. good afternoon, our top story is that the low cost airline ryanair, says it's preparing to receive compensation claims worth
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a total of £18 million, following its decision to cancel up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. the chief executive michael o'leary denies the company is short of pilots, but he did admit to in his words "messing up" the planning of their holidays. keith doyle reports. it is your‘s biggest airline, and also the most punctual. but the decision to cancel so many flights had it in turmoil. at a news conference this afternoon, the chief executive, michael o'leary, explained why it is cancelling so many flights. what we have messed up is the allocation of holidays and trying to over allocate holidays while we're still trying to run most of the summer schedule, and taking flight of the summer schedule, and taking flight delays because of, principally, air traffic control and weather disruptions. the eu, consumer groups, and millions of passengers, had demanded to know
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exactly what flights will be cancelled, and what alternatives and compensation will be offered. all customers on these flights through to the end of october will receiving e—mail this evening, about the flights they can be moved onto, if they are not satisfied with the alternative flights offered, they will get a full refund and compensation. we will not be trying to claim exceptional circumstances. this is our mess up, when we make a mess at ryanair, we come out with our hands up and explain where we have made the mess. we will pay compensation to those passengers entitled to it, which are those flights that are cancelled over the next two weeks. in terms of a rotor mess up, this is a big one. ryanair plans to cancel a0 to 50 flights a day until october. this is estimated it could influence a00,000 passengers according to experts. how on earth does europe australia biggest airline managed to get itself in such a muddle please, give
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us some itself in such a muddle please, give us some certainty about those flights that will be cancelled. i am one of several million people booked to travel next month, i have no idea if my plane will get off ground. the text me the evening before the morning i was supposed to fly. pretty disappointed, lost a holiday out of it and money as well. ryanair left me stranded in europe. no options to get... in my own hands. i spent £500 to get back to london on another carrier. the airline could have to pay 20 million euros in compensation. but because the cancellations are from major hubs, it expects mini hasn't it will be accommodated on other flights. it expects mini hasn't it will be accommodated on otherflights. also, passengers given less than two weeks notice are entitled to compensation. while the ryanair chief executive admitted this fiasco has damaged the airline ‘s reputation, he said not
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taking this action would be worse for passengers and the airline in the long run. the prime minister has insisted her government is "driven from the front" , following an intervention on brexit by the foreign secretary, borisjohnson. he was rebuked by cabinet colleagues for "back—seat driving" , after setting out his own vision for life outside the eu in a newspaper article. meanwhile the most senior official in the government's brexit department has left his job, after reports of tensions between him and the brexit secretary david davis. oliver robbins is moving to downing street to work more directly for theresa may. a spokesman for number ten said the appointment would "strengthen coordination" of brexit across the government, as the next round of negotiations with brussels approaches. the most eye—catching claim from the referendum campaign — since widely discredited, but this weekend boris johnson revived it, saying that brexit would mean roughly retrieving about that much of an eu, and arguing it would be a fine thing
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that was spent on the nhs. it led to the uk's most senior statistics official, sir david norgrove, saying he was surprised and disappointed the foreign secretary had chosen to revisit the number, warning it was a clear misuse of figures. boris johnson hit back, saying his article had been wilfully distorted and misrepresented. as statisticians the test that we must set ourselves, are we clarifying the big debates of the day? it is not ourjob as the statistical community to tell you what the answer is. but the british public have a right to know what the real numbers are and put them into context. that is what the statistics authority was try to do on this occasion. so what does the argument over the figure centre around? borisjohnson and other leave campaigners claimed that in august 201a the uk gave £350 million a week to the eu. the uk's gross contribution was actually £361 million, but crucially the rebate is removed before any money sent to brussels. so, the amount sent to the eu
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in 201a was £276 million a week, after the rebate. brexiteers insist there will be huge sums to reclaim after we leave. everyone knows it is an awful lot of money. so wouldn't it be more productive to discuss how we will spend that money when we come out, and also to discuss the point that many of us don't think there is any moral or political or legal reason to go on paying them, once we have left. indeed, i think it would be illegal to go on paying them once we have left. this tussle over numbers is a side story to the debate still going on in the cabinet about what brexit looks like, just days before theresa may is due to make a major speech to try and break the deadlock in the negotiations. downing street said it was important that all cabinet ministers were united around the government's decision. but borisjohnson's intervention, setting out his own ideas.
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let's speak to norman smith who's in westminster. we will talk about oliver robins in a second, but, those comments from theresa may in canada, that her government is driven from the front, thereby extension from the back seat, does this perhaps slap down the foreign secretary in a way that will then decide on?|j the foreign secretary in a way that will then decide on? i think that is a moot point. borisjohnson is so far the independent minded and does what he wants. whether this will put an end to what many people regard as his freelancing on brexit remains to be seen. what is clear, is theresa may's desire to put him back in his box when it comes to brexit, following a series of printed pointed and sharp remarks on her
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flight pointed and sharp remarks on her flight to canada. saying notjust that she drives from the front, but also, reminding the cabinet that she is the one who has set out brexit strategy as she articulated in her lancaster house speech, noting rather warily that boris will be boris, and also observing quite sharply that when it comes to this £350 million, these contested money, what sort of sums are given to what areas in the public sector after brexit is a matter for the whole cabinet, not a matterfor individual ministers. when you put all that together, that seems to me a fairly determined slap down from boris johnson. whether it will make any difference, we'll have to see. let's move on to oliver robins, the most senior official in the government's brexit department, he is leaving his job, what can be read into it? you
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can read it a number of ways. the downing street version is the his job was frankly too big. he was running the brexit department as the same time running the brexit negotiations and this was too big a task that anyone. he will now be working to theresa may by theresa may to strengthen her hold brexit negotiations. that said, there are plenty of people in whitehall who have been flagging up these strained personal relations between the brexit secretary david davis and oliver robins. the suggestion being that the two men frankly, did not get on and it wasn't working. that was the reason he has been moved into the cabinet office. any way you cut and slice it, it seems to me, it can only compound the demands for clarity by eu negotiators from
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britain over its approach to brexit. notjust britain over its approach to brexit. not just because of britain over its approach to brexit. notjust because of the movement, the removal of oliver robins, but also the ructions over russjohnson and his stance on brexit. and q. at 5:30pm we will bring you a news conference between theresa may and the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau. she is discussing a future trade deal with the uk. we will bring that to you when it happens. police are continuing to question two men who were arrested after a device partially exploded on the tube in south west london on friday leaving 30 people injured. police have been searching a fried chicken shop in hounslow in west london, where a 21—year—old man was detained on saturday night on suspicion of terror offences. he's a syrian refugee who appears to have been living in the uk for four years. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. this is a 2a/7 investigation. late last night, detectives were still removing potential
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evidence from a fast food shop in hounslow, west london. it was raided on saturday. they arrested one man here, surrounding him with offices in overalls, a precaution to ensure any potential forensic evidence on his clothes is not contaminated. he is 21—year—old yahyah farroukh, believed to be from syria. the bbc has been told he worked in the shop searched by detectives. ya hyah farroukh lives in this modern development, close to the southern boundary of heathrow airport. it's also been taped off, and is being subjected to a close search. he is linked to this house in sunbury—on—thames, about five miles away and still surrounded by metal barriers and tents have been put up to protect evidence. this picture of yahyah farroukh was taken in the street outside of the house, and posted online nearly five months ago. ron and pennyjones, who live here, have fostered
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teenage asylum seekers. he may have been one of them. neighbours say another young man who arrived a few weeks ago appeared desperate to run away and came to the attention of the police. i saw one arguing with him. i went out and asked what was wrong. it was a new kid, 15, didn't want to come into the house, he came from kent and he said he wanted to go to london. police cars were parked outside the house when i drove past, but it's been ramped up over the last 2—3 months, with police coming out to the house. the police get called, there will be a police presence at the house. whether it means that the lad has actually caused trouble per se, who is to know? it is speculation. police say an 18—year—old linked to the address was arrested in dover and is being questioned. cctv evidence is at the corner of the investigation. this image obtained by itv news was captured close to the house in sunbury—on—thames.
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the key question? did this man with a lidl bag place a bomb on the london underground, also in a lidl bag? burning and terrifying innocent commuters. tom symons, bbc news. donald trump has used his first appearance at the united nations as us president to criticise the organisation for failing to realise its full potential until it tackles bureaucracy and mismanagement. un secretary—general antonio guterres has warned that cuts would create an unsolvable problem for his organisation but said progress is already being made to tackle these issues. we can cross to our correspondent laura trevelyan at the united nations. how did the president's speech go down? by donald trump australia standard this criticism was quite mild, wasn't it? he actually said
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that he and the administration would be partners with the administration in the important work of reforming this world body. what is un reform in? is one previous secretary general said, as how many people worked here, he said about half of them. that is criticism of the un, thatis them. that is criticism of the un, that is bloated and inefficient, that is bloated and inefficient, that it doesn't protect whistle—blowers, that it is transparent and doesn't it is the biggest contributor to the united nations, 98% of the peacekeeping. the us is threatening to slash those contributions and less meaningful progress is made on reform. this is what donald trump said, praising the work of the secretary general. in re ce nt work of the secretary general. in recent years the united nations has reached its full potential due to bureaucracy and mismanagement. while the budget has increased by iao% and its staff is more than doubled since 2000. we're not the results in line
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with this investment. but i know that under the secretary general, that under the secretary general, thatis that under the secretary general, that is changing, and it is changing fast, and we have seen. that is why we commend the secretary general, and its call for the united nations to focus more on people and less on bureaucracy. we seek a united nations that regains the trust of the people around the world. in order to achieve this the un must hold every level of management accountable, protect whistle—blowers, accountable, protect whistle— blowers, and focus accountable, protect whistle—blowers, and focus on results from the non—process. to honour the people of our nations, we must ensure that no one, and no member state, shoulders a disproportionate share of the burden. as president donald trump there, striking a familiar theme. he has talked about nato and how the us
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shoulders and unfettered portion of that. it is the same case here with the un. so, once again donald trump is calling on partners to step up and do their bit as well. but one un source was telling me before donald trump got here, that they were all preparing for the landfall of hurricane trump, so far it has been a reasonably soft landing, but has been a busy day of diplomacy, this is the bed of the clemency from that world leaders. they are talking about the around deal this afternoon, meeting with israel's leader and the french leader. edging him not to withdraw from that deal. thank you. this is bbc news at 5pm, the headlines: the low cost airline ryanair, says it's preparing to receive compensation claims worth a total of £18 million, following its decision to cancel up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. police are continuing to question
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two men in connection with last week ‘s bomb attack on a london tube train. theresa may on a trade visit to canada, insists her government is being driven from the front, as she attem pts being driven from the front, as she atte m pts to being driven from the front, as she attempts to reassert authority, following borisjohnson's recent comments on brexit. in sport, england's head coach, mark sampson, says he is not allowing off the field issues to affect him his side ahead of the world cup qualifier against russia. jonny bairstow will keep his place at the top of the batting order in the first one—day international against the west indies, as england decide not to go back to jason wright. and back to where it all started, rory mcilroy will star at the british masters, the tournament where he made his professional debut ten years ago. i will have more later on. the prime minister and canadian leaderjustin trudeau are expected to discuss a trade dispute that could threaten jobs at bombardier in belfast. the canadian aerospace firm, is northern ireland's largest manufacturing employer and has faced
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complaints about alleged anti—competitive practices in the sale of their cseries jet from rival american firm boeing. bombardier could face significant financial penalties if the us trade authorities find against it. our correspondent chris page is in belfast. just explain how important bombardier is to the area. the importance of bombardier to belfast is that the canadian firm is a huge pa rt is that the canadian firm is a huge part of northern ireland's economy. it is northern ireland's biggest manufacturing employer, several thousand people across several sites, the biggest of which is in east belfast. the importance of belfast bombardier, is that the wings for one of its key products are made here. several hundred people at bombardier‘s plant are involved in that particular process. that is what this trade dispute is
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all about. last year, that is what this trade dispute is allabout. last year, bombardier received a huge order from the us airline delta, who won 125 of these jets, but their rival, the us —based firm says bombardier has had an unfair advantage because of the financial assistance it is received from the canadian and british governments. they say they can sell the bombardierjets governments. they say they can sell the bombardier jets for governments. they say they can sell the bombardierjets for below cost price. they have taken the case to the us trade authorities. it is with the us trade authorities. it is with the us trade authorities. it is with the us department of commerce at the moment. officials are looking at it and they are expected to make a ruling later this month. if the verdict goes against bombardier and in boeing favour it could be hit with punitive task. this is bound to come up in the discussions, what other workers there hoping she can do rose the government has said that they have engaged with this and they
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have engaged with boeing themselves across the atlantic. they have been in chicago to have talks with boeing's chief executive, they had them on the phone last week. there isa them on the phone last week. there is a recognition among staff at bombardier here, that the government are bombardier here, that the government a re really involved bombardier here, that the government are really involved in track to get are really involved in track to get a positive outcome for the workers here in belfast. the government says their preference would be that boeing drop their case, but then they negotiate a settlement with bombardier. in another apparent example of how this is being taken here in northern ireland, the leader of the two main political parties, sinn fein and the dup, have set aside their differences and put a joint letter to the us vice president expressing their concern about the outcome. the blessing of theresa may can find some way forward with justin theresa may can find some way forward withjustin trudeau in their talks today. political unity showing just how far and that is it
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important to belfast. angie. wayne rooney has apologised this is unforgivable lack of judgment wayne rooney has apologised this is unforgivable lack ofjudgment in being guilty for drink—driving. he is been sentenced to a hundred hours of community service. he was arrested by police earlier this month. the liberal democrat leader, vince cable, has insisted that his party will be putting forward radical policies that will be popular, despitejust having radical policies that will be popular, despite just having a radical policies that will be popular, despitejust having a dozen mps popular, despitejust having a dozen m ps after popular, despitejust having a dozen mps after the general election. the leader has said they can become a moderate common—sense alternative to the other parties. he has been speaking at the party's conference in bournemouth. how can you win people over to the liberal democrats? i think british politics is very volatile. you had an open civil war in the conservative party, you have a suppressed civil war in
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the labour party that could happen at any time. what we offer is a package that is moderate, sensible, middle—of—the—road, and i think people will be craving for government by people who have a combination of experience and idealism that we do. doesn't middle—of—the—road sound a bit dull? it is not going to inspire people to vote for you. in itself, it probably doesn't. but i would not discount the value of common sense. i want the value of common sense. i want the party to be a source of radical new ideas, they are ideas i'm tossing around with my colleagues, how do we achieve a transfer of wealth? we are very wealthy people with wealth accumulated in recent years, so we with wealth accumulated in recent years, so we can transfer some of that to the younger generation, so we can help with their post—school education. do something that will break the mould in relation to housing, a whole generation of people are now being shutout of the occupation, because of a lack of imagination with housing policy. occupation, because of a lack of imagination with housing policym
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the last election, a8% of the voted remain, did not show any swing behind you. why not?” remain, did not show any swing behind you. why not? i think it was people at that stage wanted to give government the benefit of the doubt. i think circumstances have changed, we haven't yet got to the end of the negotiations. they may turn out reasonably well, i am doubtful, but it could happen. much more likely i think, is that we get to a very, very messy divorce, with the real risk of crashing out of the eu in very, very disastrous circumstance we have people like borisjohnson arguing for these extreme solutions. i think arguing for these extreme solutions. ithink under arguing for these extreme solutions. i think under those circumstances, the british public would welcome an opportunity to decide that they want to press on all of this, they want an exit from brexit? therefore your success is relying on things going badly in the brexit talks, isn't it? i would hope the best, badly in the brexit talks, isn't it? iwould hope the best, i badly in the brexit talks, isn't it? i would hope the best, i want things to turn out the best for the country. if the government is
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successful in negotiating all the benefits of the single market and customs union, remaining our strong social and environmental legislation, if they can keep all the research, ithink legislation, if they can keep all the research, i think people would be reassured by that. but all the signs are that won't happen. that we will be faced with a much more brutal choice. two years ago you we re brutal choice. two years ago you were writing novels and enjoying not being an mp may be, are you enjoying this now cudd ali relishing the task? i am now. six months ago i did not expect to be in thisjob, i had a good lifestyle, writing books, dancing, teaching economics, i am now leader of a major political party and i'm relishing the challenge. vince cable there. two murals by street artist banksy have appeared in central london. the works, near the barbican centre, mark the opening of an exhibition by by american artistjean—michel basquiat. our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, has gone to take a look at the artworks and joins me now.
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there they are. is this banksy saying i'm as good as basquiat.|j think it is him saying how much of a fan of basquiat he was. look at the style, if there is any doubt whatsoever, he went on to social media to talk about these two new pieces of art that had recently appeared here close to the barbican centre. as basquiat, new york city graffiti artist who sadly died young. an exhibition of his work is opening later this week in the barbican centre, around the corner from where these two pieces. banksy ca ptu red from where these two pieces. banksy captured it on social media, portraits as basquiat being welcomed by the metropolitan police. a major new exhibition being opened at the barbican centre. there is another
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one that resembles a ferris wheel, and he talks again about the basquiat exhibition, and also mentioning that this is an area that the authorities around the barbican centre that they like to keep clear of graffiti. whether they will make an exception in this case, we don't yet know. but the city of london corporation that controls this area, says they will be consulting with everybody from city of london colleagues, to local residents, to see what should be done with these pieces of art that have strung up here, from banksy showing his liking and affection for the work of basquiat. so it is a whole... time for a look at the weather. into the evening, a cool one, but things will change later. this is at
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the moment, still some showers out the moment, still some showers out the west, cloud around england and. actually drizzle working its way south through the night, rain will come and go. clearing skies from the north, the odd mist orfog patch, another chilly night on the way. temperatures in the town is down to single figures, in the countryside it could be low enough for a touch of frost tomorrow. but tomorrow will bea of frost tomorrow. but tomorrow will be a much drier and brighter day, it will be the dry and brightest day of the week. one or two isolated showers around, particularly in east anglia, and the west. best of the sunshine in the morning, once the mist and fog has cleared. a bit more cloud into western areas as the breeze freshens up, but given lighter winds, and sunshine, breeze freshens up, but given lighterwinds, and sunshine, it breeze freshens up, but given lighter winds, and sunshine, it will feel a touch warmer. one might still into wednesday, but wet and windy weather in the west. that is its an hour. this is bbc news at five. the headlines. ryanair has said it is preparing to receive compensation claims worth a total of 20 million euros,
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following its decision to cancel up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. in an two men who have links to a foster home in surrey are still being questioned by police after friday's tube attack. both are thought to be refugees from iraq and syria. theresa may on a trade visit to canada has insisted her government is "driven from the front" following an intervention on brexit by the foreign secretary, borisjohnson. a cyclist who knocked over and killed a aa—year—old woman in east london has been sentenced to 18 months in a young offenders' institution. now we are expecting that news conference from theresa may and the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau in ottawa, that is the scene, the podiums are ready and the journalists are ready as well. no
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doubt theresa may will be taking a few questions from those journalists concerning the latest interventions by borisjohnson concerning the latest interventions by boris johnson over concerning the latest interventions by borisjohnson over brexit. theresa may has already said to journalists that her government is driven from the front not back—seat drivers, which was the allegation made by the home secretary concerning that intervention in a newspaper article by borisjohnson on the brexit talks. as soon as we get that press conference in canada we will bring it to you, but first we will bring it to you, but first we are going to have some sport. england women's manager mark sampson insists he's not allowing the recent controversy surrounding eni aluko's discrimination case to affect the team's preparations for their opening world cup qualifier against russia. forward aluko and midfielder drew spence have both submitted evidence against sampson... who has been cleared of any wrongdoing by two separate investigations. the important thing is to be
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professional. we understand there is a huge public interest in the investigations but from our point of view, the players have a job to do. we are representing england and these players have worked incredibly ha rd to these players have worked incredibly hard to be given the opportunity to represent england. we are focused on that and making sure we can the best performance we can. i have made clear my stance on the allegations and as we sit now, 2a hours away from an important qualifier, we are asking people to respect that is the case and give everyone the chance to represent england. mark has been fantastic for my career, he gave the chance initially to play for england and notjust chance initially to play for england and not just getting chance initially to play for england and notjust getting the opportunity, it is the technical details, improving me as a footballer and as a person, i have said it before and i will say it again, this is the most together team i have ever been involved in, the most positive environment, best teen culture i have been involved
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in. i have been involved in a lot of clubs and that along with the foot ball clubs and that along with the football side of things has helped me develop as a player. efl cup ties dominate the midweek football... with sixteen ties spread across tuesday and wednesday. they include another chance for tottenham to win their first domestic fixture at their new temporary home wembley... when they meet barnsley tomorrow. we can do better. we have struggled, perhaps, because we dropped many points at wembley in the three games that we played against chelsea and swa nsea. that we played against chelsea and swansea. we won against everton and newcastle. we started really well in the champions league and i am happy. england have decided to stick withjonny bairstow as an opener for theirfirst one day international against west indies tomorrow at old trafford. bairstow replaced jason roy at the top of the order for the last one dayer the team played...
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which was in the champions trophy in june. captain eoin morgan sez bairstow "deserves a chance... and has been waiting in the wings for quite a while." ten years after turning professional... rory mcilroy has been added to the field for next week's british masters at close house... the tournament where he made his pro debut. the world no 8 is joined in northumberland by several of his 2016 ryder cup teammates... including masters champion sergio garcia and tournament host lee westwood. mcilroy failed to qualify for the pga tour's season—ending tour championship yesterday... so won't be able to defend the fedexcup title he won last year. three times squash world champion nick matthew has announced his retirement. he could play his last event at the british opium which is next spring, before that he will bid to win another title in manchester —— british open. as well as another commonwealth gold. retirement is
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sometimes a dirty word in sport. i wa nted sometimes a dirty word in sport. i wanted to announce it, get it out in the open and then be able to concentrate on what they do best or what i will do best for the next year at least. it is nice it is in my own hands. that is all the sport for now, much more available on our website, keep up—to—date with everything happening in the world of sport today. much more coming up for you at half past six. thank you. we are going to bring you the news of the cycle is to knock down and killed a woman while riding and the legal bike who has been sentenced to 18 months in a young offenders institution. charlie alistair was riding a bike with no front brake when he hit him breaks. she later died from her injuries, thejudge said that he was an accident waiting to happen. do you feel any remorse? charlie
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alistair and never accept responsibility and had no words today for her family. the court heard he had been doing 18 miles an hour when he approached mrs briggs is stepped into the road just ahead of the cost —— crossing. he shouted at her to get out of the way but she froze and when he did slow down to around a0 mph, he did not try to stop and as he swerved, they collided. his bike was built for the track with a fixed rear hub and no front brake. riding it on the street is illegal. that evening, charlie alliston posted on line... he later deleted those but the judge said today they were evidence of his
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lack of remorse. charlie alliston was sentenced to 18 months in a young offenders institution for causing harm by wanton orfurious driving, although he was acquitted of manslaughter, the judge said driving, although he was acquitted of manslaughter, thejudge said he had a callous disregard for the safety of others and was an accident waiting to happen. his family today adopted a more conciliatory tone. on the half of my son charlie and his family we would like to express our sincere condolences to the briggs family for their loss. we know they bear the heaviest loss of all this case, my son charlie, whilst acquitted of the most serious charge, has been sentenced appropriately. but this case has revealed a gap in safety legislation, the law is clear when it comes to dangerous behaviour by motorists but not cyclists. to have to rely on either manslaughter at one end ora to rely on either manslaughter at one end or a victorian law which does not even mention causing death at the other end, tells us that
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there is a gap. the fact that what happened to him is rare is not a reason for there to be no remedy. the department for transport is now looking at the invocations of this case and kim briggs 's family believes that the laurel must now be changed to make it easier to prosecute dangerous cyclists. -- the law must now be changed. on our soil, the tesco expansion into canadian supermarket —— supermarkets. he speaks french. prime ministerjustin trudeau there in canada, speaking french little bit earlier. we will bring you a translation but he is standing next
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to theresa may. part of the discussion there concerning a possible future trade deal. he is probably going to be switching between english and french over the next few minutes of the press conference. let us step in and hear what he is saying. translation: indeed our transit —— are ambitions are alike in terms of economic growth. we know that our trade partnership will continue for many years to come. but we share much more than simple economic ties. working together on the international stage to address some of our most pressing, difficult challenges. we have instructed our officials to develop a joint initiative to enhance the role of women in un peace support operations. this is part of our broader commitment to the empowerment of women and girls around the world. we have agreed to
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work together to enhance disaster recovery, reconstruction and resilience efforts in the future as we prepare for and respond to natural disasters. and we will continue to partner in defence and security across europe and beyond. friday powers—macro attack on london underlined once again by this close partnership is so vital. allow me to reiterate once again that all canadians wish a speedy recovery to those injured. canada and the united kingdom share a deep and rich history with almost a third of canadians today claiming british ancestry. we share a queen and the westminster parliamentary system and we share fundamental values like democracy and the rule of law. the canada uk friendship has stood the test of time and we will continue to work together in the years ahead to help citizens in both of our countries prosper. with that, i am
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delighted to turn it over to theresa may. thank you, justin, for welcoming me here to ottawa today. canada and the united kingdom have a long shared history. this nation conceived and created 150 years ago has flourished. over that time, british and canadian soldiers, sailors and airmen and women have fought and died alongside each other in the pursuit of freedom. we have developed the institutions of westminster style democracy, personal rights of the common law. and we celebrate together our shared monarchy and close ties of family and friendship. my visit to canada todayis and friendship. my visit to canada today is not only about recognising our past but also looking ahead to our past but also looking ahead to our bright future. we are both countries with ambitions to lead on the world stage and progressive values that underpin those ambitions. we are both committed to
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ensuring our economies work for everyone , ensuring our economies work for everyone, not just ensuring our economies work for everyone, notjust the privileged few. and that includes eliminating the gender pay gap once and for all. we have spoken about the importance of closing that gap and championing name the rights of women in gaza around the world. that means ending the tyranny of domestic violence, sexual violence and economic exclusion. our cooperation on this matter is emblematic of the uk and canada joining forces to share approaches at home and champion our shared values that in the world. we will also be discussing the ways in which our governments will work together to foster innovation, including measures that will allow business to harness the opportunities of wingrove and we have confirmed ourjoint commitment to supporting the global transition ona to supporting the global transition on a reliance on coal as an energy source. once again the uk and canada
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will lead the way and i am pleased to announce that the uk will aim to phase out unabated coal by 2025. the uk and canada have a strong and growing economic relationship and we are natural partners in promoting the benefits of free trade. the eu comprehensive trade agreement, which comes into effect this week has significant potential, to boost trans atlantic prosperity and the uk economy. eliminating 90% of canadian import duties and massively increasing the opportunities for british exporters. i am pleased that we have agreed today that this should be swiftly transition to form a new bilateral arrangement between us a new bilateral arrangement between us after brexit. a staunch champions of the power of free trade to grow our economies, canada and the uk will work together at the world trade organisation to promote and spread the benefits of free trade. the rules —based international
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syste m the rules —based international system established after the second world war is under threat as never before and we must make sure it can adapt and change to cope with new and emerging powers and the economic realities of globalisation in order to deliver growth and opportunities for all. as we work to support the rules —based order, so do we stand firmly together in upholding the international norms that govern our security. i am international norms that govern our security. lam pleased international norms that govern our security. i am pleased to announce that we will deepen our defence and security cooperation in the east of europe, as we stand up to russian aggression there. we have agreed concrete steps to improve our defence cooperation and our interoperability through new joint training in the ukrainian armed forces from the beginning of next year. this will be the first joint training uk has done with any other country in ukraine and it will involve joint reconnaissance training, joint sniper training and joint police training and we will conduct a joint uk canada military
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operation in latvia next month under the umbrella of nato's enhanced forward presence in europe. to ensure that nato can respond to a changing world, the uk and canada will be at the forefront of championing nato reform, including on cyber security. and today we have discussed how we will continue to work closely together on counter—terrorism and counter extremism. sharing intelligence and expertise, to build community cohesion. i want to thank the canadian people for their support and solidarity in the wake of the terrible manchester and london attacks, including the attackerjust la st attacks, including the attackerjust last week. you stood with us as we stood with you in the wake of the tragic quebec attack. we will never be divided, the terrorists will not win, our values will prevail. when we come together and work as one to project our shared values on the world stage we form a powerful
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union. from our cooperation as 6—7 members, in the commonwealth and in dealing with the oft all if, of hurricane erma, providing life—saving aid to those in need, to the inspirational invective games, showcasing the para—sport inspire recovery, support rehabilitation and generate a wider understanding and respect of all those who serve their country, the uk and canada stand side by side. i am looking forward to to meet athletes later. the values and principles which make our country special are needed more than everin country special are needed more than ever in the world today. so britain and canada can confidently face the future together. good afternoon. you both spoke earlier today about a seamless transition from ceta to
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post brexit trade relations of canada, you spoke just now about a swift transition, did you agree to date to start formal talks in that regard and what would that look like? will that essentially be a mirror image of ceta? what does the translation apply can visit underway now? we spoke about the deep ties we have between canada and the uk on the commercial side, the trade relationship is won the matters deeply to both of us and we recognise that with ceta coming into force later this week, we are going to see a decrease of over 90% of all barriers to trade between the uk companies, good for citizens, good for workers. we recognise the rules in place around negotiating with the eu and eu members and we respect the need for the uk to determine its path forward and brexit from the eu,
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but at the same time, we know that there is in place ceta, as the uk has demonstrated, time and time again, it supports this trade measure, we will be able move forward and it will benefit in a smooth transition which keeps the essence of ceta applicable to the uk in ways that will respect the eu's requirements and rules. we want to ensure that when we leave the european union, for businesses and people, that change is as smooth and orderly as possible. and bringing ceta, working on ceta, as becoming the first of the bilateral trade relationship between the uk and canada, that means that seamless transition can take place, people would go the basis on how that trading relationship will be set up and we will have a working group that will look at the details of how that will look at the details of how
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that transition will operate in detail. also for canada and the united kingdom in a specific way. translation: ceta will be provisionally implemented, thereby eliminating over 90% of international trade barriers between canada and the european union and especially between canada and the united kingdom. this will be the basis from which we will work on an agreement between canada and the united kingdom after brexit. we will work on this transition over the next couple of years and we will discuss how we will do this. we need to respect eu rules with regards to negotiations. ceta is coming into force, it is therefore reasonable,
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asa force, it is therefore reasonable, as a first post brexit step to take ceta and its opportunities for the good of our workers, so that we can make sure there is a transition, and undisturbed transition, during brexit. you both talked about progressive values, you're both heading to the un this week, and i wa nt heading to the un this week, and i want to know, hong sang soo key speaking from myanmar tomorrow, what is your message to her? issue worthy of canadian citizenship, what do you need to hear from her tomorrow? canada is preoccupied with the plight of the rohingya muslim and largely in myanmar. we have made our position is clear, i spoke to the leader last week to impress upon her how important it was to de—escalate
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the tensions and to bring more peace and harmony to the region. indeed to all of myanmar and i also just sent all of myanmar and i also just sent a letter to aung san suu kyi laying out the important steps i think she and the burnie ‘s government need to ta ke and the burnie ‘s government need to take in order to protect innocent lives and be consistent with the expectations, not just lives and be consistent with the expectations, notjust canada, but the world has of her and her government. i would echo those comments regarding de—escalating the situation and ensuring vulnerable people in myanmar can live life in security. so many of them are vulnerable to attack and so many are leaving, many are going into bangladesh. i think it is important that the tensions are de—escalating
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so the rohingya people can live in peace. it is an important week for brexit starting here and ending in florence but after seeing your foreign secretary accused of back—seat driving by senior colleagues, can you say you're a truly in command of your cabinet and brexit policy and will you tolerate more back—seat driving in future? the uk government is driven from the front and we all have the same destination in our sights and that is getting a good deal for brexit with the european union, that is a good trade deal but also good ongoing relationship with regards to matters like security and i have spoken in the past of the deep and special partnership we want to build with the european union. i believe that this not only in the interest of the united kingdom, it is in the interest of the remaining member states of the european union as well and that is what we are working for. can you expect and tell us that we will see a brexit plan for britain which is clear and on track by the
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end of the week and, prime minister trudeau, how long will it take for britain to strike a trade deal with canada? on the first point that you raise, we set out our plan for brexit back in the speech i gave in january. that was amplified in the article 50 letter that i sent to the european union triggering the process of starting these negotiations and i will be speaking, i have always said, i will be speaking about where we are in the negotiations and look into the future on friday. the negotiations are being conducted in a constructive and positive spirit and we are making progress in the areas we are making progress in the areas we have been addressing so far. of course, if you look to the relationship we have with the european union, it is a different point that we are starting from that the point that canada start from when it started its trade negotiations. indeed, within the
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european union, the uk is the largest trading partner that canada has. the uk was deeply involved throughout those negotiations towards ceta obviously over the past seven towards ceta obviously over the past seve n yea rs towards ceta obviously over the past seven years and it will form the basis for the way we move forward in a post brexit europe. we are very confident that we will be able to continue the strong trade ties a commercial relationship with the uk, between the uk and canada, throughout this period of transition. translation: with regard to trade negotiations that are upcoming, do you want a simple copy and paste of the ceta agreement. mr trudeau, in these discussions, could this not ruffle a few feathers amongst european allies? on the first point, asi
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european allies? on the first point, as i said earlier, we want to ensure that for businesses and individuals, there is a smooth change of when the uk leads the european union as possible. we want to see as little disruption to economies and to the lives of people and that is why we believe it makes sense to take the trade agreements that the uk as part of, that are part of the european union, with canada and say that that is the basis, at that point of which we leave for a bilateral relationship between the uk and canada. over time, it relationship between the uk and canada. overtime, it would be possible, if we chose to change the details of that relationship, to do so, but at the point at which we leave, it is important that ceta is the basis of that transition and if i may, it is not —— it is something we have discussed with the european union and make clear that i think it makes sense that we have the smooth transitions. translation: through ceta we have implemented a framework that
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eliminates most international trade barriers between canada and europe. this of course includes the united kingdom. it is therefore logical and expected that ceta with europe be a basis for a future negotiation and trade agreement with the united kingdom. of course, once brexit becomes official, we will continue to speak with european union and the united kingdom on the next steps to take. details were ceta is not fully a lounge with the priorities of canada and the uk, as a first basis, it will allow us to have a very reassuring transition for investors, for business owners and four canadians and the british people.
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there is no question that ceta, which eliminates well over 90% of barriers of trade between canada and the european union, which includes, of course the uk, will make an excellent basis for ensuring a smooth transition in a post brexit world. after that, there will obviously be opportunities for us to live that particular details that could be improved upon for the specific needs and opportunities in the bilateral relationship between the bilateral relationship between the uk and canada, but as a strong basis for a smooth transition, ceta is perfectly designed and will be able to insure for investors, for
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companies and for workers and consumers, a smooth transition. follow—up on bombard a —— bombard air, prime ministertheresa follow—up on bombard a —— bombard air, prime minister theresa may will you be talking about that with president obviously, if so, what will you say? mr trudeau, president obviously, if so, what will you say? mrtrudeau, how president obviously, if so, what will you say? mr trudeau, how far will you say? mr trudeau, how far will you say? mr trudeau, how far will you go to leveraged this?|j have will you go to leveraged this?” have already raised the issue with president trump and i will raise it with him when i meet him again later this week. i will be impressing on him the significance of bombardier to the united kingdom and particularly jobs to the united kingdom and particularlyjobs in northern ireland. we have discussed today how we can work together to see a resolution of this issue, which in my point of view, i want to see a resolution that protects those jobs in northern ireland. translation: defending good aerospacejobs and translation: defending good aerospace jobs and specifically defending this excellent c series
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aircraft is a priority for us. and thatis aircraft is a priority for us. and that is why i am very happy to be working with prime minister may to explain to the american administration how boeing's actions are harmful to workers here in canada, harmful to get the growth that are countries and also harmful to the future of the aerospace industry and the whole world. we know that the c series represents significant leaps ahead that boeing is currently hindering further haidara reasons, for trade related reasons linked to their profits, thatis reasons linked to their profits, that is not the way the world should operate. we will always defend the interests of our workers and economic growth in our countries. we
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will always defend technological progress towards a greener future in the aerospace industry. and will continue to defend canadianjobs the aerospace industry. and will continue to defend canadian jobs at every single level. in particular, with the us president let me answer that one in english. you are watching a live news conference. the six o'clock news is over on bbc one. but we will stay with this. we will stand up for the excellent air plane from bombardier. the actions that boeing have taken, are very much in their narrow economic interest to harm their
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competitor. quite frank, it is not in keeping with these kind of openness to trade that we know benefits citizens all around the world. we are going to continue to

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