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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 19, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it is tuesday, it is 9am, i'm chloe tilley, welcome to the programme. another power. has battered the caribbean, with winds of up to 160 mph. hurricane maria has grown suddenly in strength and is devastating homes on the island of dominica. it is horrible over there. there's not a leaf, every tree is bent, buildings, houses, built in zoos, everything is devastated. we will have the latest, —— businesses. we'll be asking why so —— businesses. we'll be asking why so many deadly hurricane are hitting the same part of the world. and then souquet pledges to tackle the rohingya refugee crisis, but is it too little, too late? we condemn all human rights violations and awful violence. we are committed to the restoration of peace, stability and rule of law throughout the state. also this morning... a mother who chose not to vaccinate her child against measles talks of the
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devastating consequences.” against measles talks of the devastating consequences. i feel as if i've cheated her, because i should have done more when she was a child. i should should have done more when she was a child. ishould have should have done more when she was a child. i should have known to protect her against measles, and i didn't. hello, and welcome to the programme. we are live until 11am by smaller. do let us know if you think parents should be forced to vaccinate their children to ensure that measles can't cold here in the uk. we're also going to be talking about ryanair this morning. the airline has published a full list of 2000 flights that are going to be cancelled over the next six weeks. do let us know if you've been affected. you can get in touch on all of the stories this morning using the hashtag victoria live. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. 0ur you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story... another powerful hurricane has made landfall in the caribbean,
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having grown in strength on its approach to the island of dominica. reports are emerging of widespread damage, with buildings having been battered by winds of up to 160 mph. hurricane maria is a category five storm, that's the highest level. it is on storm, that's the highest level. it isona storm, that's the highest level. it is on a similar path to hurricane, which devastated other islands earlier this month. sarah cork reports. the french island of martinique is being battered by strong winds and this is just the start. hurricane maria is strengthening rapidly. packing winds of more than 200 kph and bringing torrential rains, residents on the east coast are being told to leave. and coming hot on the heels of hurricane irma, the caribbean is braced for more fury and misery. on st kitts, they're preparing for the worst. we know that the winds are going to be quite strong, and that we're
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expecting the seas to get up to a swell of around 20 feet. they're on high alert, as it were. us forecasters say maria is a potentially catastrophic hurricane. this is the predicted route. the island of dominica, the first place be hit. then maria is expected to move roughly along the same route as hurricane irma. the prime minister of dominica took to facebook as the powerful hurricane made landfall, writing:. then:. later, he wrote:. in the us virgin islands, people are battening down the hatches again. buildings, houses, businesses, everything is devastated. elsewhere, in puerto rico, which escaped the worst two weeks ago, residents are stocking up on essentials as maria is expected to intensify even further in the coming days. sarah corker, bbc news. philip avery is here with me from
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the bbc weather centre. this is a case of, here we go again. pretty much. i noted it is on a similar tracks, similar, yes, but when we talk about how intense these winds are at the core, we are only talking about 60 kilometres or so across for the most devastating winds. let me show you some pictures of where we have been thus far. we tracked it over the past few days coming across the atlantic. dominica is right in the atlantic. dominica is right in the centre, at the very wrong place. asi the centre, at the very wrong place. as i say, right in the heart of those very strong, headline making winds. this is another representation of where we are with regards to the rain. these things come with a triple whammy. we could be looking, as this is the moves over to the west, as —— of a rainfall of 30 centimetres or so. and in the coastal waters, a storm surge of about three meters. this is
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the track that the americans expect to see. tuesday is going to be all over the british virgin islands again, where we were with. the us virgin islands as well. wednesday is going to be all about puerto rico. with the sort of intensity that we've already described. some of those winds, it could be a four, it could be a fight. the reason we are deliberating between the two is because those winds are 155 mph. if they went to 157 mph, they would be a category five. we are on a four, we are very close to a category five. dominica hasn't actually ever seen a five. dominica hasn't actually ever seen a category five since records began, and that goes all the way back to 1851. why is it that there are so many back to 1851. why is it that there are so many hurricanes? we are in hurricane season, but category five storm is, it is not so common to see them in quick succession. there are only five years when we have had two category fives in this neck of the
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woods. 2007, 2005, then going back into the 60s, the 93rd ewan 1933. the conditions are perfect. sadly, for the caribbean, they are perfect. they are on the flight path. the steering mechanisms of firing them right at the caribbean. the water temperatures are couple of degrees of what we would expect for this time of year, 28—29d. you only need 26 to keep these things going, that is the source of the moisture and the power. what is happening in the atmosphere is we don't have the winds pulling them apart. when they start off, they are quite fragile, ha rd to start off, they are quite fragile, hard to imagine, but they are quite fragile beasts. 0nce hard to imagine, but they are quite fragile beasts. once they get up to category five, they are the boss in town, no doubt about it. but it helps if they are not being pulled this way and that. i'm afraid the atmosphere is perfect, right here, right now. philip avery, thank you. matthew price is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. thanks, chloe. good morning, the
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other main story this morning comes out of me and laugh. —— i am. myanmar‘s leader, aung san suu kyi, has insisted her government is trying to end the crackdown on the rohingya muslims. 400,000 have fled to neighbouring bangladesh, in an exodus described by the un as "ethnic cleansing". speaking about the crisis for the first time, she said she felt deeply for all of the people affected. i understand that many of our friends throughout the world are concerned by reports of villages being burned and hordes of refugees fleeing. as i said earlier, there have been no conflicts since the 5th of september, and no clearance operations. we, too, are concerned. we want to find out what the real problems are. there have been allegations and counter—allegations, and we have to listen to all of them. the former foreign secretary william hague is the latest senior tory to intervene in the row over how the conservative party should manage brexit. he's written a newspaper article
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warning that divisions over brexit could see the conservatives lose power. theresa may and borisjohnson are set for a potentially awkward reunion at the united nations general assembly later, after the foreign secretary was accused of "backseat driving" by setting out his own vision for post—brexit britain. ryanair has published a full list of the 2000 flights that it's cancelling over the next six weeks. the budget airline has admitted it "messed up" the planning of holidays for its pilots. 400,000 passengers are likely to be affected by the error. the operator faces a compensation bill of more than £17 million. tom burridge has more. the online tide of extremist propaganda from so—called islamic state is not slowing down, according to research. they say that people in
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the uk make more attempts to find jihadist material online than those in any other european country. the group is calling for new measures that would see technology companys ta ke that would see technology companys take on more responsibility as publishers and distributors of this content. police have been given more time to question two men arrested in connection with the parsons green attack. the men are being held at a police station in south london. searches are continuing at two houses and a restaurant. rochdale council has issued an apology to all those who suffered sexual or physical abuse while they were children in its care. many of the assaults took place at two schools linked to the late politician cyril smith. the council's chief executive said he couldn't turn the clock back, but said he would make sure the authority did its best to safeguard children and young people in the future. more than 100 firefighters have been tying to put out a fire at a warehouse in north london overnight. 20 engines were sent to the location at white hart lane in tottenham.
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footage from the scene shows the large building well alight. one person was taken to hospital, but their injuries are not thought to be serious. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. we will have more at 9.30am. we were asking about whether you felt that parents should be penalised for not vaccinating their children, it is an idea which has been brought through in germany. lots of you getting in touch already. christine on facebook says, yes, they should be penalised. 0thers yes, they should be penalised. others should not have to suffer as a result of the ignorant and selfishness. we will speak to a couple of parents who decided not to vaccinate their children in a couple of minutes. do get in touch with us using the hashtag, and you can text. let's get some sport. 0lly foster is with us this morning. there's an important match for the england lionesses later today, important in so many ways.
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yes, it should be a very exciting time of the season full of optimism for the england women and the start of world cup qualifying, they faced russia at prenton park, home ground of tranmere rovers. they have had back—to—back semifinals of the past two major championships under the stewardship of mark sampson, the manager. but the last month or so we have learned of all of those allegations that he has had to face. england's most successful manager. any early, it complaint against him last year regarding remarks that she claims that he made. they were first dealt with by the fa in turmoil. she says they were racist in nature and prejudicial. there was an independent inquiry that concluded backin independent inquiry that concluded back in march that cleared samson of any wrongdoing. it was also discovered that she was paid £80,000. the fa say, to avoid
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disruption. not hush money, they say, at all. she wasn't part of the euro squad in the summer and she is not part of this squad. subsequent witnesses have come forward seeming to incorporate her religion —— seeming to corroborate her original evidence. they have gone back to katherine newton, who conducted the original inquiry, to look at the evidence against. it is against this backdrop that england going to the world cup qualifier, and here is the manager. i made it clear, we addressed it at the start of the camp and we made it clear that we need to focus on this game and prepare as well as we can. the important thing is to be professional. we understand there is a huge media and public interest in the investigation. but from our point of view, the players have a job to do. we are representing england, and these players have worked incredibly hard the whole lives to represent england. we will focus on that and make sure that we can do is the best performance that we can support that we can produce. samson may have two appear before a
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parliamentary select committee. he has spoken about how these allegations have put him in a difficult position emotionally. the position this evening, in the bag at prenton park. that matches on bbc two at 7pm. we will be talking about this later with a former england keeper. and getting a sense of what it's like to play and the mark sampson. but what are the players around him right now having to say? those players in the squad, i don't think we'd expect anything else, really, other than support for the manager. these allegations do go back about one year or so. so a lot of those players weren't privy to these alleged conversations that happened. but these are the allegations have come forward. but jodie taylor there, i can spot her amongst the squad warming up, she was just one of the players that said that they are fully behind the
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manager. olly, good to speak to you, we will catch up with you later on. several european countries have brought in tough measures to punish parents who refuse to vaccinate their children, following a measles epidemic which has seen thousands infected and caused at least 35 deaths. germany is imposing fines of more than £2,000, while in italy, unvaccinated children will be banned from state schools. and in france, parents will be legally required to vaccinate their children from next year. here in the uk, parents are encouraged to immunise their children — but the final decision is up to them. and while immunisation rates here are higher than much of the continent — including for the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine — take—up has been gradually declining in recent years, and is lower than the target of 95% in some parts of the uk. 0ne mother, jo walton — whose daughter sarah was left seriously disabled when the measles virus returned 2a years after her
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initial childhood infection — told us why she feels the government should consider penalties against parents who choose not to vaccinate their children. music from the moment she arrived in the middle of a snowstorm, she was a beautiful child. is she created sunshine around about her. she went to see her gp.
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she went through the fact that she felt as if she was behaving like she'd had a stroke. and then she finished off the consultation by saying i keep bursting into tears all the time. so the gp diagnosed her as being depressed and gave her antidepressants. by the end of november she'd lost her ability to talk and to move and to eat. it's terminal. there's and no treatment for it. you don't bring your children into the world for this. i feel as if i've cheated her because i should have known more when she was a child. i should have known to protect her against measles and i didn't. measles isn't this benevolent
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childhood illness that everybody gets over. but it's actually an evil, cruel, devastating illness, which even when you think you've got past it can come back and bite you years later. you can vaccinate it out of existence. why aren't we doing it? i feel so strongly about it now that i feel that if parents decide that they aren't going to vaccinate their children then there has to be a consequence to that action. perhaps, as with being fined for taking your children out of school during term—time, maybe there's a place for fining those parents who do not have their children vaccinated before they start school. there's nothing that i can do. it doesn't matter how hard i work,
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how hard i love her, i can't make this thing go away. all i can do is look after her, and i will. i will look after whilst ever there's breath in my body all i can do is look after her, and i will. i will look after whilst ever there's breath in my body but i wish i didn't have too. because she should be out there having a life. the bma is calling for evidence to be submitted to the uk government on "the potential advantages and disadvantages of childhood immunisation made mandatory under the law". it is a contentious policy, but should the uk consider compulsory vaccination? we can speak now to lottie daley, who has got two children —
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aged three and five — and hasn't given her second child any vaccinations lacey haynes, who has a seven month daughter called fox. lacey hasn't given fox any vaccinations and hasn't decided whether she will going forwards. dr heidi larson is from the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. she's a professor of anthropology, and director of the vaccine confidence project and shirley cramer, who is the chief executive of the royal society for public health. thank you all forming in to speak to us. thank you all forming in to speak to us. lottie we watched that film and it is heartbreaking to see what can happen if you contract measles and haven't had a vaccine. why did you decide not to vaccinate your second child when you had vaccinated your first? well, there are thousands and thousands more cases of children being injured to that extent and more and even death when it comes to vaccination that we don't know about. the information just vaccination that we don't know about. the informationjust isn't there. so, for me, i am not
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anti—vaccine. i went along and did everything that i was told to do, but when my daughter had an adverse reaction and nearly died following her immunisations we ended up in intensive care for over a week. but i had to fight for quite a couple of weeks to get doctors to listen, that it was indeed whooping cough she had follow her triple vaccine in both legs. she had two and they were quite late on. it is always heartbreaking, isn't it, when you heartbreaking, isn't it, when you hear cases of people who have had adverse reaction to vaccines and people would always have sympathy with that, but the reality of the situation is public health england, the nhs, the world health 0rganization, all leading medical experts say that vaccinating your children is safe and it is the responsible thing to do? well, yeah, i think that's easy to say when you're not a victim of a vaccine injury with a child who has got a vaccine injury and you have got no
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accountability to get support for that child. the vaccine injury compensation fund is exempt for children under two. most vaccinations are given to children under two, and if they were to be injured ordie, under two, and if they were to be injured or die, there is nowhere for pa rents to injured or die, there is nowhere for parents to go because compensation is exempt for children that age. parents to go because compensation is exempt for children that agem is exempt for children that agem isa is exempt for children that agem is a hugely emotive issue and people worry about very much, you have got your vulnerable little baby. i have been there. they look at you. you stroke their arm and somebody shoves something in their arm and they scream and it is like, "how could you do that, mummy?" we have enough evidence and lives saved for years. globally we have had millions of children's lives saved. i appreciate from a public health prospective we look at this in the big numbers and there are a lot of personal
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experiencesen fortunately, there is a lot of misinformation out there. when somebody reports an adverse event that doesn't mean it was necessarily caused by the vaccine. these events are reported because they happen about the same time as they happen about the same time as the vaccine and they need to be investigated and i think we need to do better in clarifying which of these reported suspected events are actually caused by the event because they are causing a lot of confusion in the public. do you feel confused? do you feel like you're not getting enough information and that's why you decided so far not to vaccinate your baby? i feel sceptical of saying something is completely safe. you walk into a gp's surgery and you are told by someone who hadn't had an education to know what's in the vaccines. they don't know all the information. they are telling you within five minutes, this is safe, but there is a whole other story as lottie is pointing to, there is a grey area and if you want to have
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trust in that system then that needs to be provided as well. there needs to be provided as well. there needs to be provided as well. there needs to be all of the information so that parents... so you want evidence? so you feel parents should be given evidence to see it? evidence, yes, but to not just say the words, "this is safe." but to not just say the words, "this is safe. " that but to not just say the words, "this is safe." that isn't true. that is not true. it is true, isn't it, there is evidence that vaccines are safe ? there is evidence that vaccines are safe? the science is very clear that we need immunity. we need 95% of coverage of our children to make sure that we have population coverage and so, why say that is that it coverage and so, why say that is thatitis coverage and so, why say that is that it is about your individual child and i absolutely under when you look at your baby, you want to do the best for your baby and you're concerned about it, but actually, it's about your child and the children around your child. so for example, in sweden, they are very clear about their community responsibility. so if you have a vulnerable child say with leukaemia or some other illness you want every
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other child to be vaccinate sod that child doesn't die or get more ill. there are really good reasons, but to ta ke there are really good reasons, but to take up the lacey's point, we need to do better in talking to pa rents need to do better in talking to parents and having those individual one—to—one conversations. we have seen one—to—one conversations. we have seen that health visitor numbers for example are going down and i think health visitors are really important. practise nurses and others in primary care at answering the questions you might have about vaccinations and their safety because parents get fearful and you know we need to make sure the questions are answered. what about this european model of actually penalising parents who decide not to vaccinate? well, i think, that legislation is made to protect the public because i think also these are compulsory vaccinations to be able to go to school and i think for the sake of the other children in classrooms and for children for instance who might have leukaemia or
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other compromised illnesses who can't vaccinate, i would never say that vaccines are 100% safe. i don't think anything is 100% safe, but the nature of the reactions are mostly redness and swelling and for certain individuals who have underlying conditions, they shouldn't be vaccinated and that's like a child with leukaemia or that's why you have medical exceptions in a number of countries. but i think that some of countries. but i think that some of the, all of these legislations have come up in france, in italy, and germany and australia, they have only come up in the context of declining immunisation coverage and outbreaks and there was 35 and now there is 40, measles deaths in europe in the last year. that are totally unnecessary. we are one of the oldest most proven vaccines that exists. so, we have the short—term
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side—effects, redness, swelling, flu, but what about the long—term side—effects that perhaps aren't being linked? we have ivs and anxiety on the rise. we have all these illnesses on the rise like the report card of children right now... the bottom line is the medical evidence is there, as i have said already, whether it is the world health organization, whether it is public health england, it is the nhs saying that the medical evidence is there that the vaccines are safe and we have seen the film from jo. that's so short—sighted. we have seen the film from jo. that's so short-sighted. it isjust the reality. whether you like it or not... what's more interesting to look at here is whether we are going to increase the number of parents vaccinating their children through a carrot or a stick. so penalising them and saying you can't go to school or we're going to fine you, is that going to work? is it about talking to the likes of lacey and saying this is safe. perhaps we need a two stage process. we need to do
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more talking to parents and more explanation and more discussions really about the negative. i think anybody seeing jo's story this morning will have not really realised that that's a potential with measles. it isn'tjust about the 40 deaths in europe. it is the number of children that will have serious complications. there were 3,000 outbreaks in italy in the first five months of the year. in the uk, there are only 27 in that period of time. so we really, we are protected our children and most people want to protect, you know, young people. i do also take the point about the rising other issues coming up, but the tendency is to link it to vaccination because all children have had vaccination when in fact there are so many other things that could be contributing to autism, to ibs, to the other, the numberof autism, to ibs, to the other, the number of things additives and environmental things, other issues that have come up in our society in
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the world, we are using all kinds of chemicals and foods and products, we need to understand what is contributing and when i've been asked about the mmr autism thing, i said the only way we're going to appease parents in their anxieties about these other things are find out what is causing them. i mean with hpv we are looking at, we have groups of girls who are reporting chronic pain and fatigue, that they are linking it to vaccine nation, but when we look at the symptoms in the broader population of adolescent girls, they are all having them, whether they are vaccinated or not, the rates, the percentage of girls having the symptoms are the same. something else is going on that we need to understand. something else is going on that we need to understandlj something else is going on that we need to understand. i don't think there are any studies that show the two sides. it is worth saying and you raised there dr larson about the
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mmr vaccine. it was dr andrew wakefield, it was discredited. there are still parents who have won lawsuits in italy and the us. pa rents lawsuits in italy and the us. parents might be worried about it, but the science is convincing that says this is safe and it is safe to vaccinate your children. i have to say lots of people are getting in touch. julie saying, "why wouldn't you vaccinate your child?" margaret on facebook says, "0ne you vaccinate your child?" margaret on facebook says, "one of my daughter's had the measles vk sin nation and then had measles three yea rs nation and then had measles three years later." thomas says, "it is child abuse and should be treated as such if you don't vaccinate your child." the leader of myanmar, aung san suu kyi, has said that her government is doing all it can to tackle the refugee crisis involving rohingya muslims in the area. lord hague has become the latest senior conservative to intervene
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in the brexit debate, warning that the approach of senior ministers to the brexit negotiations appears to lack co—ordination. let's get the latest from our political guru, norman smith. so, norman, just tell us first of all exactly what we've heard today? well, why we, the speak an awful lot of talk in the past 48 hours seat drivers and front seat drivers, it's been like the wacky races here! but now we see a return to the tory old bangers, the tory veterans who have been around the block and got a few dents and bashes on them in a form of the former leader william hague and former chancellor ken clarke, who have waded into the debate with a blunt warning to the party to end the feuding over brexit or lose power. william hague writing in pretty stark terms in the daily
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telegraph, saying the party will come to grief. let me give you the words he used. he said the tories must pull together now, or see their grip on powerfall must pull together now, or see their grip on power fall apart. must pull together now, or see their grip on powerfall apart. you have to say, that is as nothing compared to say, that is as nothing compared to ken clarke, he was an old school bruiser, and this morning on the wi reless bruiser, and this morning on the wireless has been laying about arrestjohnson in pretty brutal terms. he described mrjohnson's uttera nces terms. he described mrjohnson's utterances about brexit as an irreleva nt utterances about brexit as an irrelevant nuisance. and he went on to say his views were simplistic and dishonest. 0uch! what does it tell us? ithink dishonest. 0uch! what does it tell us? i think it tells us that those tory elders who have been through the tory civil war is over europe are increasingly alarmed about what they've seen and folding with the sort of bust up between boris johnson and mrs may, and mrs may slapping him down. and there is now
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a wheel pressure as we head towards that the speech in florence at the end of the week for mrs may to try and keep all the sides of her cabinet together and avoid a major sort of rock the boat resignation moment potentially afterwards from borisjohnson. moment potentially afterwards from boris johnson. thank you, norman. coming up... the leader of mayanmar says that the government is doing what it can to help in the rohingya crisis. children in local authority care in rochdale who reported sexual and physical abuse were failed by the council, its chief executive has said. here's matthew in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. we are keeping a very close eye this morning on another hurricane in the caribbean this morning. hurricane maria has caused widespread damage to the caribbean island of dominica. the hurricane suddenly strengthened
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to a "potentially catastrophic" category five storm before making landfall. maria is the second hurricane to hit the caribbean this summer, after irma pummelled several islands earlier this month. fresh hurricane warnings have been put in place across the caribbean. myanmar‘s leader, aung san suu kyi, has insisted her government is trying to end the military crackdown on the rohingya muslims. 400,000 have fled to neighbouring bangladesh. the un has described the exodus as "ethnic cleansing". the former foreign secretary william hague is the latest senior tory to intervene in the row over how the conservative party should manage brexit. he's written a newspaper article warning that divisions over brexit could see the conservatives lose power. theresa may and borisjohnson are set for a potentially awkward reunion at the united nations general assembly later, after the foreign secretary was accused of "backseat driving" by setting out his own vision for post—brexit britain. ryanair has published a full list of the 2000 flights that will be cancelled over the next six weeks,
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after admitting it "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays. 400,000 passengers are likely to be affected by the error. the operator faces a compensation bill of more than £17 million. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. there's more at 10am. thank you, matthew. here's some sport now with 0lly foster. hello again. the england lionesses go mark sampson said the investigation into his conduct was putting them in a difficult position emotionally. inquiry that cleared him of racism and bullying may be reopened. england start the qualifying campaign tonight against russia. the premier league —— spurs face barnsley at wembley tonight.
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england's one—day series against the west indies starts at old trafford today. jonny bairstow will keep his place up the top of the batting orderfor england. place up the top of the batting order for england. it starts at about 30 pm. former manchester united and england defender rio ferdinand is going to try his hand at boxing. the 38—year—old says, i've won titles, now i'm aiming for a belt. i will have the full round—up after 10am. the leader of me and mark, and some sukhi, has said her government has done all she can to tackle the crisis. the nobel prize winner said that troops have been told to exercise restraint and peace is the top priority. she has been under international pressure for failing to do more to help the rohingya is. let's here some of what she had to say. there has been much concern over rakhine. it is not the intention of the government to apportion blame or responsibility.
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we condemn all human rights violations and unlawful violence. we are committed to restoration of peace, stability and rule of law throughout rakhine. security forces have been instructed to adhere strictly to code of conduct, to exercise all due restraint and take full measures to avoid collateral damage and harming of innocent civilians. human rights violations and all other acts that impair stability and harmony and undermine the rule of law will be addressed in accordance with strict laws ofjustice. we feel deeply for the suffering of all the people caught up in conflict. let's speak now to mark farmaner, director of the burma campaign uk,
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and has met aung san suu kyi twice in myanmar. matthew smith is chief executive of human rights organisation fortify rights, and has been addressing the un security council on the ongoing situation in myanmar. anita schug is a rohingya refugee who fled myanmar as a young girl. she's now a human rights activist for the european rohingya council. thank you for taking the time to speak to us today. anita, just give us speak to us today. anita, just give usa speak to us today. anita, just give us a sense speak to us today. anita, just give us a sense of what it was like to grow up in me and mark as a rohingya muslim? when i left the country, i was very muslim? when i left the country, i was very young. i was around 4—5 yea rs was very young. i was around 4—5 years old. i remember how we had been treated. i was born in young doing, and my father and my mum used to stay there. i have an elder sister. as a young child, i remember an incident when i visited with the whole family to the zoo, and we were
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called by the general public... my mum, for example, she is not at all of any dark complexion. but because we are there hinges is equal the rohingyas. when i was born, my mum was refused to be admitted to the hospital. she was denied of any medical care. my mum had a lot of complications. the consequence she bears today it for the medical side. my bears today it for the medical side. my father is a chemical engineer. he was the only rohingya in the rangoon paper mill. because of that committee was targeted several times. there was an incident when some technical problem was there, and my father has been disappeared. we asa
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and my father has been disappeared. we as a family did not know where my father was taken. and after many days, she returned without any legal representation for him. when i was around five years old, we decided to visit our grandparents, taking a risk that we would not be allowed to go back to rangoon. after having a summer vacation, the whole family was not allowed to join summer vacation, the whole family was not allowed tojoin rangoon. and my father was targeted by the military. that was the reason why we had to flee. we did not accompany him in his plight. but later we joined him from bangladesh to pakistan. and the amount of violence against the civilians is horrendous. i remember incidents when we were not able to go back to rangoon. a
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small children, when we used to go and buy things from the shop, the rakhine local people used to see us alone or in a group, they used to beat us for no reason and they used to shout out a slogan, go back, go back. as a child, i had a from a tight life. —— i had a very traumatised life. rohingyas are not respected as humans. we are called bengali is. 0utside, they are calling as burmese. we do not have any human dignity. so we are harassed... anita, forgive me from interrupting. i can tell from the passionate way you are talking about what you have been through how much it has clearly deeply affected you, and many people watching the tv footage of what is happening right now in that country may well be scratching their heads at aung san
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suu kyi's response. i want a brilliant matthew smith and mark. matthew, what you make of —— i want to bring in. what you make of aung san suu kyi's speech. jonathan head, our correspondent, said she was either misinformed or not telling the truth of the situation. yes, and i think it might be a combination of both. you know, aung san suu kyi wonders why people are fleeing to bangladesh. we'd be happy to share information about that. the whole world can cyp plus lean to bang the dash. i think right now, what myanmar needs is leadership on this issue, but we are seeing is anything but that. she is obfuscating the fa cts , but that. she is obfuscating the facts, and essentially continuing this process of misleading the international community. not to mention the speech was an english. right now, the people of myanmar or in desperate need of guidance on this issue. the tensions are very high throughout the country. and those tensions are not being calmed
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down through not only the civilian leadership but of course the militarily to ship as well. mark, people watching this may be familiar with aung san suu kyi. she has won the nobel peace prize. they may be scratching their heads and saying, if she has won the nobel peace prize, why is she not speaking out about what some people have described is so bright as a genocide and ethnic cleansing? we are all scratching our heads and wondering why, it is inexplicable. she said, we need to know why these people have fled to bangladesh. everybody knows why. the military are carrying out clearance operations, they are being attacked, the villagers are burnt and people are being shot. she is saying we need to find out why, it is extraordinary. this speech, which the international community was hoping would be a mark of change in her approach, has just was hoping would be a mark of change in her approach, hasjust been business as usual and denial as usual. there is an issue with the militarily in myanmar. although she is the defective leader, the
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military has huge power in that country. is she fearful of speaking out against the? —— is so so like she is the de facto leader. there is almost into government system in burma. she controls the civilian led government that has certain powers, but the military are independent, they control the police, security services and themselves. she can't order them to stop, the military offence that is going on. but she is denying that these abuses have taken place. she said the military clea ra nce place. she said the military clearance operations have stopped on the 5th of september. they have not. nothing applies —— obliges her to a act as a cheerleader for the military, it is a role she has chosen to play. matthew, i have spoken to correspondence in bangladesh and our correspondents here in london, and many of them have told me, within myanmar is off, the people do not support the rohingyas, and what aung san suu kyi
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is saying is reflective of the view within the countries that pillow thatis within the countries that pillow that is true to set an extent. myanmar has a vibrant and strong civil society one thing that we have noted the last year is that civil society organisations in various parts of the country have had a voice of reason on this, more than 50 organisations throughout the country called for an independent investigation that in some ways led to the establishment of a fact—finding mission at the un human rights council. most recently, a women's organisation that called for all people of conscience to stand up and oppose the military‘s human rights violations that are taking place in rakhine state. there are certainly a lot of people in myanmar who's thinking has been shaped in the wrong ways on this. and there are people who have deep—seated discrimination and discriminatory
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views toward the rohingya, and also towards other ethnic nationalities in myanmar. so in a way, what's really needed is a moral leader, with someone who has the stature like aung san suu kyi do have m essa g es like aung san suu kyi do have messages that are promoting and protecting human rights. but also beyond that, what's really needed right now urgent action. what's more important right now is urgent action. we at documenting massacres, villagers being phrase. u nfortu nately, villagers being phrase. unfortunately, that action is not coming. thank you all so much for speaking to us this morning. coming up: england's women's football team open their qualification campaign against russia this evening — the first match since their coach mark sampson was accused but cleared of racism against player eni aluko. the head of rochdale council has
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apologised for failing to stop the aboos of children over 50 years. the council acknowledged unforgivable failings and say they have cast a large shadow over the town. here with the latest on this story is our reporter anisa kadri. what have the council said? they have said their response to reports of child abuse over many decades was unforgivable and much of that abuse took place at two schools in in rochdale. the scale of the abuse that was taking place there, more than 40 men have recently come forward saying that at one school they were abused and more than 20 of them say they were abused by the late mp cyril smith, a liberal mp who died in 2010. he was the subject ofa who died in 2010. he was the subject of a sex abuse allegation and
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investigated over decades, but he was never prosecuted and he was even honoured for his work. well, the council has‘s apology now comes ahead ofan council has‘s apology now comes ahead of an inquiry into child sex abuse next month. they say they can't turn back time, but they will do their individual best to safeguard children and this inquiry is going to look at the situation in rochdale, these claims of historical sex abuse allegations, but it will be looking at other areas of public life including what happened in the army and the roman catholic church as well. thank you. joining us now from our salford studio is richard scorer, a lawyer for victims of abuse in rochdale. thank you forjoining us. what's your response to this statement this morning from rochdale council? well, i think this apology is welcome as far as as it goes, but of course, it is very long over due. the evidence of abuse at both cambridge house and
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knowle view. the men who suffered this abuse had to wait a long time for it. so, it is good as far as it goes, but it is not before time. have you spoken to any of the victims that you represent? just give us a sense of how important it is for them? well, i think that the biggest issue for the many, many victims of abuse at both the schools, was the sense that not only they suffered appalling abuse, but they suffered appalling abuse, but the perpetrators were allowed to get away scott free and that's particularly so with cyril smith who was the subject of numerous police investigations and the first police investigations and the first police investigation into cyril smith in relation to cambridge house took place in the 1960s and there was a recommendation he should be prosecuted at that time, but he wasn't. so, that failure to hold to account the individuals who were responsible for this, i think, has
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added insult to injury over many yea rs. added insult to injury over many years. looking ahead to the independent inquiry into child sex abuse next month, how significant is that statement today and the recognition by the council ahead of that inquiry? well, i think we have to be honest about what's happening here. the reality is we're starting the hearings shortly in the abuse inquiry and it's clear there is that a lot of evidence will come out which will show significant failings in rochdale council and i think that's the context of the apology that's the context of the apology that we've had overnight. it is because of the evidence that's going to come out that this apology has been made in my view. thank you for speaking to us this morning. thank you. tonight england's women footballers play russia in a world cup qualifier but a lot of the attention will be on the team's manager mark sampson. after facing allegations of bullying and discrimination, he will lead his team in their first match since their semi—final exit at the euros tonight. he was accused of racism by one of his players, eni aluko. but an fa internal review found
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no evidence to support the striker‘s claims. mark sampson has denied any wrongdoing and has the backing from people within the game, including england captain steph houghton. last month eni aluko spoke to dan roan about the bullying and discrimination she says she was subjected to. in 2014 we had a big game against germany. it was at wembley and we had a big list of family and friends who would be coming to the game. i found myself next to mark sampson, next to the sort of board, and he asked me which family members, who is coming to watch the game for you? and i said, i've got family coming in from nigeria actually. i've got family flying in. and he said, "make sure they don't come over with ebola". how did you feel? when that was said did
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you challenge him at the time? did you say that's unacceptable? no, i laughed. i laughed because, i mean, i was in shock, i didn't know, you know, i didn't know what to say. 0ne one of the players spoke to the bbc. mark sampson gave me a chance to play for england and not only getting the opportunity, it's the technical detail. you know, it's improving me as a footballer and as a person. i've said it before and i'll say it again, this is the most together team i've ever been involved in. the most positive environment and best team culture i've been involved in and i've
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obviously been involved with a lot of clu bs obviously been involved with a lot of clubs so that along with the football side of things has really helped me develop as a player. well, the fa could re—open their inquiry into sampson after it was alleged he asked mixed race england midfielder drew spence whether she had been arrested during a tournament in 2015. mark sampson denies racially abusing either eni aluko or drew spence. we can speak to rachel brown—finnis, former england keeper who played for the lionesses under mark sampson and the labour mpjo stevens, member of the digital, culture, media and sports select committee and chairs the anti—racism campaign group, show racism the red card. rachel, first of all, i have read lots about the atmosphere playing under mark sampson. it is very relaxed and jovial, a very different environment to under hope powell. so give us your experiences of playing under him as a manager? problem with sound
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now that, would suggest we have problems hearing rachel there. we can see her, but we can't hear her. we will try and clear up the line. let's speak to joe stevens. jo, we will try and clear up the line. let's speak tojoe stevens. jo, what do you now want to hear from the fa? mark sampson has been cleared by an fa internal review and an independent inquiry? well, i have some concerns as does the digital culture, media and sports select committee in parliament about the way in which the fa have carried out their investigation and so we are going to be calling senior executives from the fa to come to parliament next month in order for us parliament next month in order for us to question them about the processes involved and i should say that, you know, it's not for us to judge whether or not the allegations that have been made are valid or not, that's not what we will be doing, but we do have grave concerns about the reported process that was used by the fa and certainly from my
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personal prospective i would like to see a fresh investigation by the fa, led by somebody completely different to ensure that there is a proper investigation that is fair, transparent, and thorough, that eve ryo ne transparent, and thorough, that everyone can have confident in both mark sampson and the people who have made complaints. as i have said, he has been cleared by two investigations, an internal review an independent inquiry. you say you have grave concerns, specifically what are the concerns? well, it has been reported that eni aluko wasn't called to give evidence at either of the investigations. that on the first occasion, when the internal investigation was done by the fa, that she was advised of the outcome of the investigation before they had finished speaking to people who were involved in the investigation who we re involved in the investigation who were giving evidence to it. in the independent inquiry, led by and
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independent inquiry, led by and independent barrister, catherine newton, again she want called to give evidence. i think if you are looking at governance in any organisation, whether it is in a sports organisation, or in a business, you know, you would expect that somebody making a complaint would be asked to come to a hearing to give about their complaint and that the person deciding on the merits or otherwise of the complaint would hear any relevant evidence before making the decision. there is also the fact that the fa have made also the fact that the fa have made a payment, a substantial payment to eni aluko of £80,000 as a result of complaints and we will be interested to know why that payment was made bearing in mind the outcome of their investigations. so are you saying that you feel that the fa internal review, the independent inquiry, essentially we re independent inquiry, essentially were inadequate? my personal view based on what i've heard so far and this is the view that's been expressed by our committee which is why we're doing an inquiry into this is that the investigation so far
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have not been what we would expect to see as fair transparent and thorough. now, we'll call the fa senior executives to come and give evidence to tell us what has happened so that we can hear first hand from them about what they have done and the way in which they have done and the way in which they have done it. and then we will take a view as to whether or not we think it is adequate. i moon, sports governance has been in the headlines for many years across all different sports for all the wrong reasons and you know if you're the victim of what you either perceive as real or you perceive as discrimination or similar, you know, abuse in your workplace or in your sports governing body then you would want your complaint to be investigated properly and there are perfectly sensible procedures in place across lots of organisations and what we will want to see is whether or not the fa followed those safe sort of accepted, fair transparent and thorough processes. we have managed to connect with
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rachel. it is only on the phone, but rachel, i know that mark sampson has been very supportive to you. is this a distraction, do you think it is now a time when the team has to get on being managed by him? yes. i think that's what every single memberof the team think that's what every single member of the team would want is for this, not to go away in any sort of negative sense, because i think it should be thoroughly investigated as per se grievance that is taken up by a player or per se grievance that is taken up by a playeror memberof per se grievance that is taken up by a player or member of staff, but as faras a player or member of staff, but as far as getting on and having a game and we have got a world cup qualifier starting tonight and other games will come in quick succession and the domestic leek starts at the week and the girls want this to go away. we want people to be watching us away. we want people to be watching us for the product and not the ongoing saga really that people think of when they hear about women's football at the moment. thank you for speaking to us. thank
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you tojo stevens. let's get the latest weather. we have a major hurricane crossing the caribbean. maria made land fall. we saw wind speeds up to 160mph. as it tracks its way north—west wards, we will see huge storm surges with it. it is heading towards puerto rico so there is the potential for further damage as it tracks its way north and westwards, but it is much quieter here back in the uk. we have high pressure in charge of our weather. so finally we can look forward to dry conditions. low pressure close by to the west so we will see a bit more cloud across northern ireland as we go through today. so, if we take a look at the satellite picture, you can see there is quite a bit of sun sheurpb around. a little bit blustery across northern ireland —— sunshine around. a little bit blustery across northern ireland. as we go into the afternoon, we will see not a shower
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in sight really compared with the past few days. the temperatures picking up after a rather chilly start. the winds are light. so in the sunshine not feeling too bad, but as we head across northern ireland, we do have a lot more cloud around with rain arriving late afternoon and into this evening. scotla nd afternoon and into this evening. scotland not doing too bad today either. more sunshine on offer with the temperatures getting up to about 15 celsius. as we head on into tonight, we will see the rain band getting into northern ireland and western parts of scotland. much of the country should be dry and feeling less chilly compared with the past few nights. we will see mist and fog patches forming. 0vernight temperatures ranging from eight to 14 celsius. as we head on into tomorrow, we have this weather front which is going to bring some wet and windy conditions to western parts. further inland, it is drier and it is brighter as we have high pressure to the south east of the british isles. so also we have much warmer air pushing up from the south as
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well. so we will start to feel mild and muggy as we head towards the end of the week. so if we take a look at the map on wednesday. we have the rain across northern ireland, getting into parts of scotla nd northern ireland, getting into parts of scotland by the afternoon. western parts of wales, devon and cornwall, but the further south and east you are, sunshine on offer, but the risk of showers as well. the temperatures tomorrow, on the mild and muggy side, ranging between 13 to 19 celsius. 0n to 19 celsius. on thursday, this rain band is slow moving. behind tsomething drier and brighterfor northern moving. behind tsomething drier and brighter for northern ireland and parts of scotland. further south and east, hanging on to the drier weather. the temperatures ranging between 13 to 20 celsius. it is warming up as we head towards the end of the week. friday, still we have low pressure to the west bringing wet and windy conditions to western parts. further south and east, it's dry and feeling warm with the temperatures getting up to about
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19 celsius. hello, it is tuesday, it is 10am, i'm chloe tilley, welcome to the programme. another powerful storm has battered the caribbean, with winds of up to 160 mph. hurricane maria has grown suddenly in strength and is devastating homes on the island of dominica. the islands prime minister predict grave losses and matic destruction. we have paradise, but this is what we have to go through —— massive destruction. we've done it before, and we'll do it again. we will be speaking to the chairman of the dominica disaster relief fund, who is concerned about the families there. it is to miss the material on there. it is to miss the material on the web attracts more clicks here in the web attracts more clicks here in the uk than any other country in europe —— extremist material. the uk than any other country in europe -- extremist material. you know, this is a whole new domain of warfare, along with brown, sea and air. you now have cyberspace, a new battle space, if you will. will be asking the author of this research
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about his findings. and we will be speaking live to the brownlee brothers, the famous british triathletes who shot to fame at london 2012. good morning. we are tracking another storm in the caribbean this morning. hurricane maria has caused widespread damage already go the island of dominique. it suddenly strengthened into what is being called a potentially catastrophic category five storm before making landfall. maria is the second hurricane to hit the caribbean this summer after irma pummelled several islands earlier this month. fresh hurricane warnings have been put in place across the caribbean. the dominic king prime minister wrote on facebook that his country had lost all but money can buy. myanmar‘s leader, aung san suu kyi, has insisted her government is trying to end the crackdown on the rohingya muslims. 400,000 have fled to neighbouring
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bangladesh, in an exodus described by the un as "ethnic cleansing". i understand that many of our friends throughout the world are concerned by reports of villages being burned and hordes of refugees fleeing. as i said earlier, there have been no conflicts since the 5th of september, and no clearance operations. we, too, are concerned. we want to find out what the real problems are. there have been allegations and counter—allegations, and we have to listen to all of them. the former foreign secretary william hague is the latest senior tory to intervene in the row over how the conservative party should manage brexit. he's written a newspaper article warning that divisions over brexit could see the conservatives lose power. theresa may and borisjohnson are set for a potentially awkward reunion at the united nations general assembly later, after the foreign secretary
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was accused of "backseat driving" by setting out his own vision for post—brexit britain. ryanair has published a full list of the 2000 flights that it's cancelling over the next six weeks. the budget airline has admitted it "messed up" the planning of holidays for its pilots. 400,000 passengers are likely to be affected by the error. the operator faces a compensation bill of more than £17 million. police have been given more time to question two men arrested in connection with the parsons green attack. the men are being held at a police station in south london. searches are continuing at two houses and a restaurant. rochdale council has issued an apology to all those who suffered sexual or physical abuse while they were children in its care. many of the assaults took place at two schools linked to the late politician cyril smith. the council's chief executive said he couldn't turn the clock back,
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but said he would make sure the authority did its best to safeguard children and young people in the future. the liberal democrat leader sir vince cable will close his party coffers in bournemouth by insisting that britain needs political adults from all parties to push against the ha rd from all parties to push against the hard brexit. he will also repeat his call for any deal with the eu to be put to a referendum, and warned ministers against acting like dictators. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. we will have more at 10.30am. thanks, matthew, speak to you then. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. 0lly foster is with us this morning. there's an important match for the england lionesses later today, important in so many ways.
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mark sampson says the investigation into his conduct has put him in a difficult place emotionally. they start their world cup campaign against russia at crimea. the chelsea player —— at tranmere. an independent inquiry cleared him of racism and bullying. she was dropped from the squad but paid £80,000 according to the fa to avoid any disruption. fresh player statements may seem disruption. fresh player statements may seem that inquiry reopen.” disruption. fresh player statements may seem that inquiry reopen. i made it clear the other day, we address it clear the other day, we address it at the start of the camp and we made it clear that we needed to focus on this game. the important thing is to be professional. you know, we understand that there is a huge media and public interest in these investigations. from our point of view, the players have got a job to do. we are representing england, and these players have worked
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incredibly hard the whole lives to be given the opportunity to represent england. so we're focused on that, and making sure that we produce the best ever performance that we possibly can. it's going to bea that we possibly can. it's going to be a tough start. russia and wales are the toughest opposition in our group. to start with russia is a big game, especially off the back of a tournament. we're all aware that they're going to be quite physical, they're going to be quite physical, they're going to be quite physical, they're going to be direct, there are going to be a tough game, but they are ready for it. you can watch that match live on bbc two. coverage sta rts that match live on bbc two. coverage starts at 6:30pm, kick off at 7p. northern ireland's women are playing ina northern ireland's women are playing in a world cup orfight against northern ireland's women are playing in a world cup or fight against the republic of ireland. that is on the red button and the bbc sport website. premier league teams in europe received a bayern in the last round, but they entered the fray in the league cup. borussia pochettino said he is going to give his younger players a chance at wembley, it could be important in the development. but like most of the top teams, this competition is way down the list of priorities. for a player that maybe doesn't play too much, it's a good opportunity to see them and to watch them and to try
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and maybe fight to be in the starting 11 more regularly, not inconsistent. the former manchester united and england defender rio fawdon and hung up his boots a couple of years ago, but he's going to be lacing up his gloves for a tilt at boxing —— rio ferdinand. he's 38, and his move is being promoted by a leading bookmaker, betfair. there has to be a question about how serious this all is and whether it is just a publicity stu nt. whether it is just a publicity stunt. this is how he has heralded the change in sporting direction, a very glossy video. remember, freddie fli ntoff very glossy video. remember, freddie flintoff doubled in the sport with a one—off pro fight of four rounds. sheffield united defender curtis woodhouse did really well at it and became rajesh light welterweight champion five years ago —— british light worldwide. we will see what success rio ferdinand has. he looks
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infairly success rio ferdinand has. he looks in fairly good shape. better than me, anyway! iwon't in fairly good shape. better than me, anyway! i won't take him on! i will be back with headlines in the next half—hour. studio: don't put yourself down, 0lly! see you in half an hour. hurricane maria has been upgraded to a category five storm. the winds we re a category five storm. the winds were so a category five storm. the winds were so powerful that it for the roof off the house of the governor of dominica. he took to facebook and wrote... my roof is later he wrote... i have been rescued. hurricane warnings are in place for puerto rico, antigua and the british virgin islands. 0ne woman in the british virgin islands, francine, lost her house in burma. she told the bbc‘sjeremy cook that she is dead of what will happen when maria hits. we really need help your —— she is scared of what will
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happen. because a lot of people are suffering. are you strong enough to ta ke suffering. are you strong enough to take another hurricane again? well, no, but what can we do? hope and pray. i'm sorry... but it's terrible. we don't know what to do. i believe that we've got to face it. maria is expected to follow a similar path to hurricane, which devastated the region last week, leaving 37 people better. the governor of the british virgin islands said they had never experienced this level of devastation before. this is an unprecedented event, to have one category five followed by another category five followed by another category five. i am in the capital here, up to about 80% of buildings destroyed or damaged. it is a huge challenge for us to be able to ensure that people have safe shelter and that we are prepared and that we can bounce back quickly. but the response we had on the back of hurricane has given me confidence
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that with support from the uk and other governments, we've got our position in a place where we can try to make sure that we've got enough people in the shelters. we're doing all that we can clear up debris. which the risk is it turned into literally flying missiles at 165 mph and does hit us. but our priority is getting that response right and being ready to bounce back very quickly if it does hit us. let's speak to vincentjohn. he's the chairman of the dominica uk association and the dominica national development and disaster fund, which is based in east london. thank you for speaking to us. i do managing to get through to people in dominica to really get a sense of how badly it has been affected? it's been extremely difficult. numerous telephone calls have been made and it's extremely difficult to get in touch with the island. i think the
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radio station is further. certainly the telephone network. so we are really trying to rely on people between the islands who might be close and can actually make contact. it's an extremely challenging situation at the moment. how is information getting out in that sense? i mean, we're hearing that it's been hit and we know that for example by storm suddenly increased massively in a very short period of time. do you know how much time people were given an dominica to prepare for this? i think as sufficient time has been provided, the government has been really pressing in informing the people to ta ke pressing in informing the people to take the necessary action to actually ensure that the property is well embraced to deal with the hurricane. unfortunately i believe the hurricane became even stronger as it hit dominique, beyond category
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five. this makes it really difficult foran five. this makes it really difficult for an island to cope with. another prime minister's home, his roof was taken away. the hospital was very badly damaged, and the radio station, which is a very substantial building, was unable to actually remain on air. in spite of all of the preparations made, and the very good infrastructure in terms of preparations for disasters in dominica, we get them very frequently, the last one being in 2015 with tropical storm errigo, it isa 2015 with tropical storm errigo, it is a challenge. the difficulty for the island people to actually deal with such a massive falls. so, you believe that the government will be able to cope with this?” believe that the government will be able to cope with this? i don't think the government can cope without external assistance. we would need substantial help, really, i believe the last report i heard was that everything that was available has been destroyed. so there may be calls for action in terms of foodstuffs and clothing
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etc. but in the medium to long—term problem will be the infrastructure, because without a proper infrastructure, the island will suffer for infrastructure, the island will sufferfor a long time. so the inputs from the various international organisations and governments around the world... will be necessary. well done for grabbing that, that was good timing! just tell us, for you, from here, it must be incredibly frustrating trying to quarter might help —— trying to coordinate help, and you are getting a lack of information. what's your rollover the coming days? what are you doing to try and get help and re—establish communications with people? well, i speak very closely with the high commissioner, ms janet charles, i have spoken twice today, and we have a meeting this evening to discuss our response. most of the information that we get will be through the high commissioner, because she does have direct links and lines with officials in dominica. and the intention really is to look for an existing strategy
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for the aftermath of such a major storm and see whether it is sufficient and robust enough, and see whether we can get people around the uk to assist us and ensure that we respond effectively. vincent john, thank you for speaking to us. gluk we talk to the author of a report which says that online jihadist propaganda is accessed more in the uk than any other european city. they are the most famous british triathletes ever — alistair and jonny brownlee sealed their place in olympic history in london 2012 when alistair won gold and jonny won bronze, followed by another gold in rio 2016 for alistair and jonny winning silver this time. whilst they spend their lives competing against each other, they are still brothers first and foremost with no better demonstration of this than the dramatic moments when alistair helped jonny over the finishing line at the end
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of the triathlon world series in mexico last year. alistair is currently recuperating from hip surgery so isn't competing for the rest of the year — whilejonny is due to take part in this weekend's super league triathlon injersey. jonny and alistair can talk to us now. it's great to see you both. i was looking out of the corner of my eye as i was reading that talking about that dramatic moment in mexico, i wonder if that sometimes irritates you, there was not a flinch on the face, but that must be what all the media ask you about now? i think so. what all the media ask you about now? ithink so. it isjust what all the media ask you about now? i think so. it isjust funny for us because we spent our lives being athletes and professional athletes and you feel like you achieved a lot and you expect, i suppose, what you get asked about and what people pay attention to and get enthused by is your results. and for us, that wasn't a great result. jonny was trying to win the world title. that does kind of confuse us
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a bit, but we are more than used to it now. listen, we can watch it now. i was on holiday a few weeks ago with my daughters and i was explaining to them what you had done. they were perplexed by the whole thing and when i told them i was talking to you this morning, they were so excited because they brought it was lovely that brotherly love ca m e brought it was lovely that brotherly love came ahead of competing. in the heat of compete, how do you separate that? at the time i was very, very confused. i can't remember what happened, but we are good at competing together. we race as a team and that involves tactically on the swim and we can help each other on the bike. so we do very much compete as a team first and then start racing towards the end, but maybe this time mexico, that was the most extreme version of team tactics you have seen in your life. like i said it is strange for me to get known for that and get recognised for the person who collapsed at the finishing straight. tell us what was
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going through your mind if you would alistair as you were running along? well, it was the last race of a long year. it was a couple of months after the olympics and i thought go to mecs ke and jonny can win the world title. a fantastic end to a fantastic year and that would be the using on the cake and i run around the last corner after a race that's two hours long in the blistering hot mexico heat and think fantastic, you know, i have got to get round this corner and jonny has won and i will come back and he is world champion and on the last corner, i run round and on the last corner, i run round and see jonny swaying and on the last corner, i run round and seejonny swaying all over and on the last corner, i run round and see jonny swaying all over the place and collapse into someone's arms. i suffered from heat illness myself a few years before. without anything really going through my mindi anything really going through my mind i was like, "i have got to get him and get him towards the findish line." half—way to the finish line so line." half—way to the finish line so 100 meters before, i need to get
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him across the line before anyone catches us because he can still get some points in the world series and then you know worrying about getting him to the doctor's and stuff. at that point i'm looking behind to make sure we can get to the finish line before anyone catches us. you threw him over that line! when i first saw him i thought, "what an idiot." i knew in that heat, the limit that the margins between things going right and wrong are so small and he had just gone that bit too far into the red and started overheating. i thought if he just held on, he had a massive lead, he could have eased off in the last few kilometres, my first emotion in a frustrated brother way was what an idiot. he should havejust been relaxed a bit more and got to the finish line. i want to talk about those fine lines between success and failure. let's facet those fine lines between success and failure. let's face t you guys know success and people probably didn't know much about triathlon until you came along. let's reflect at your
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su ccesses . came along. let's reflect at your successes. we can see alistair winning gold and jonny winning bronze at the london 2012 games. i'm hoping we can see those images soon. then you went on to rio 2016 and there is always pressure for to go on and repeat such an incredible performance in front of a home crowd. alistair taking gold and jonny taking silver as well. did you feel pressure going into 2016 after that huge success of london 2012? and everything that goes with that? how did you feel, jonny?” and everything that goes with that? how did you feel, jonny? i felt incredible pressure going into rio. probably incredible pressure going into rio. pro ba bly less incredible pressure going into rio. probably less than london. london 2012 was my first 0lympic probably less than london. london 2012 was my first olympic games and it was a home 0lympic 2012 was my first olympic games and it was a home olympic games which meant there was a lot pressure as an athlete. there was countdown clocks everywhere, our local swimming pool had a countdown clock from 500 days to go and every time you went swimming another day went by. you
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got asked on the street and if you we re got asked on the street and if you were fit. london was far more pressurised than rio and after london, there is a kind of feeling that you have not achieved what you wa nted that you have not achieved what you wanted to achieve, but i have got that 0lympic wanted to achieve, but i have got that olympic medal that's all i wa nted that olympic medal that's all i wanted to do as a kid. going into rio, people expect you to do it again. people don't realise one, how ha rd again. people don't realise one, how hard it is and how small the margins are to get things wrong or things that aren't in your control that can go wrong and many people thought it was a guaranteed medal opportunity which it wasn't, you know, in sport, sport is sport, but we're used to pressure. having each other helps with that. we can work together and also, when you are on the start line, we can joke also, when you are on the start line, we canjoke around also, when you are on the start line, we can joke around together and that does make a big, big difference. we're seeing pictures there ofry owl. how much does the heat make a difference? clearly, london 2012, there were moments where it was quite warm in london, but it is not the same as when you are in rio? yes, the heat makes a big difference. about two years out from rio when we started to know what the
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course was like, the kind of, you know the temperatures that would be on the day and you start preparing and within of the things about triathlon, it is a different event every time you do it, depending on what the swim conditions are like, the temperatures and whatever and the temperatures and whatever and the course, so, once we started knowing about that, you kind of sit down and you think right, what are the main factors here, the challenges that we have to overcome and find a way to overcome to well not guarantee, but give yourself the best chances of success and obviously one of those was the heat. the second one was the course, the hill on the buk. so, youjust the second one was the course, the hill on the buk. so, you just start planning how possibly can we adapt and deal with the heat? talk to fisolgists and scientists and do your own research and we came up with a plan to spend a bit of time, two we e ks with a plan to spend a bit of time, two weeks in brazil before the race, but about six weeks before we started what is called heat adaptation andically ma advertisation and training in lots of clothes and spending time in a
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sauna! it sounds really fun, but it's probably the least pleasant thing i have done in my life, doing a really hard session and then trying to sit—in a sauna for half an hour afterwards, it is horrendous. i guess that's when it comes in you quys i guess that's when it comes in you guys being together and working together. you must get sick of each other because you are basically working together and doing interviews, do you live together? no. laughter after london 2012 i moved out into my own house. i was sick of him by then. we get sick of each other and we then. we get sick of each other and we get on very very well for the amount of pressure we have to go through together. do you argue? alistair is normally late to things. and jonny is normally wrong! laughter tell me a little bit about the pride you must have, the fact that i mean i hope you don't mind me saying there, many people probably before 2012 didn't know much about
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triathlon and couldn't name the three elements and didn't know what order you did it in. but you have elevated that sport to the front of newspapers, interviews, you must ta ke newspapers, interviews, you must take pride in that? yeah, i think we do, you know, we both started doing triathlon when we were six, seven and eight, when you said you did triathlon no one knew what it was. fast forward a few years and people might have an idea and fast forward a few more years and people might know someone who has done one and you get stopped in the race and you get asked what was wrong with that race last week and jonny had a good race. it has been a pleasure to be on the cusp of its increasing popularity. we have been part of that, and a big part, but there have been lots of other factors, the massive drive in amateur participation has been fantastic.
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people realising that triathlon is the new 10 k tone ter and it has been wonderful to see and long may it continue. jonny, lots of people talk about legacy post 2012. they have talked about how important it is. have you seen more young people getting involved, alistair talking there about adults doing it, but young people must be inspired by what you two are doing? it is something we take seriously. we started our own foundation. we started our own foundation. we started that four years ago and we put on kids events around yorkshire and around the country and we've got and around the country and we've got a few next week and so far we have got about 10,000 kids who have done a triathlon for the first time. these are kids who have sometimes never swum before and never seen a bike before and they turn up to one of our foundation events and they go away after doing a triathlon what and geta away after doing a triathlon what and get a little medal and some prizes as well and they love it and it's something that we think is
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very, very important. to get kids involved in the sport and if we can get kids involved in triathlon, that's better. why did you pick triathlon. 0f that's better. why did you pick triathlon. of all the sports, that's within of the hardest to take on as a kid? yes, i don't think, no, it happened a long time ago. we did our first triathlon when we were eight or nine years old. at that point, it's just something else to do and have a go. jonny was doing all kinds of sports and i was doing all kinds of sports and i was doing all kinds of different things and it was something to have a go at and slowly through our teens, the other sports fell away and triathlon was the thing that we both loved and i think there is lots of reasons. i think obviously we like endurance sport and we're natural, i suppose, endurance athletes. i think i was fascinated by the technical and the tactical aspects of it, the three sports, jumping on and off your bike, the tactics of how to race and the technicality of how to train for the technicality of how to train for
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the kind of a novel, endurance sport andi the kind of a novel, endurance sport and i think that kind of really fired up my imagination. i know alistair you're recovering from hip surgery, aren't you at the moment? how is your recovery going? i know you're not competing for the rest of the year? it has been hard not being able to compete as i would love to do and i have had to sit out and watch a lot of races. it got to the point where i knew i was going to have to have this operation on my hip and! to have to have this operation on my hip and i thought if i'm going to do it, get it done now. it was about six weeks ago and the recovery has gone as well as it could do. all types of recovery from this kind of thing is too slow, but i think it has gone as well as it could and i'm hoping, this morning was one of the first time i've swum with a squad in two months. so that was nice. i'm hoping to start doing a bit more training over the next few weeks to be ready to go to next year. jonny, do you rub your hands together that alistair is not competing at the moment, or do you miss him?” alistair is not competing at the moment, or do you miss him? i miss him. i have not had my finest year
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this year. we have both had bad luck with injury and illnesses and maybe a bit tired after last year, last year was a big year, the olympics and you spend a lot of time preparing for that one day and i have had a bad year because of that. and also the other reason my year hasn't been as good, i have not the had person in the races to help me out. my partner next to me in the swim and on the bike to really help me and race the same way as me and i do miss alistair racing there next to me, but it's something that i might have to get used to in the future. well, you are competing in the super league triathlon and we wish you luck. alistair, are you 30 now, is that right? not quite! don't age me prematurely! sorry. sorry. not until next april. so you have got a bit of time. you're putting so much stress on your body. what is the age where you
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have to start thinking of retirement? i'm thinking of tokyo 2020 and are you going to be there? a lot of people seem to be asking me this question about retirement which isa this question about retirement which is a bit depressing! sorry. yeah. someone said do you want to come across to the world championships the last weekend in rotterdam? they said would you like to present the medals to the juniors? that's for retired athletes. it is a sebstive issue, i think. retired athletes. it is a sebstive issue, ithink. traditionally, triathletes can go into their mid—30s and later. it is an endurance sport and that tends to be ok. that said, we have both trained from being very young and me especially has taken the attitude that i would prefer to get the most out of myself even if that did mean it shortened my career to some extent, but i'm hoping to carry on racing for a good few years yet and yeah, i moon, i'm not completely decided about going to tokyo, but we
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will see in the next few years, if i think i can go and be competitive to win, i'll definitely be trying to go and doing everything in my power to be there on that start line in the best possible shapement especially there is the relay in the olympic games in tokyo, not only is it a fantastic event, it is really fun to do, buta fantastic event, it is really fun to do, but a chance to win two medals which is really exciting. let me read you a couple of comments. one text, really tremendous lads. i do plenty of injuries work, but nothing like those. charlie on facebook said, it's great to see brothers that see family as so important in every way, which so many of us take for granted. much respect. best of luck for the triathlon this weekend. alistair, good luck with your recovery, and sorry for ageing you very slightly! no problem thanks a lot, goodbye. coming up... housing associations are warning
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there is a crisis in social housing, calling on the government to give funding to what they called generally affordable homes. 400,000 passengers are likely to be affected by ryanair‘s are in planning pilot holidays. the airline has published a list of the 2000 flights they will be counselling in the next six weeks. —— they will be cancelling. let's get the news with matthew. good morning. we are keeping a very close eye this morning on another hurricane in the caribbean this morning. hurricane maria has caused widespread damage to the caribbean island of dominica. the hurricane suddenly strengthened to a "potentially catastrophic" category five storm before making landfall. maria is the second hurricane to hit the caribbean this summer, after irma pummelled several islands earlier this month. fresh hurricane warnings have been put in place across the caribbean. the dominican prime minister wrote on facebook that his country had
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lost all that money can buy. myanmar‘s leader, aung san suu kyi, has insisted her government is trying to end the military crackdown on the rohingya muslims. 400,000 have fled to neighbouring bangladesh. the un has described the exodus as "ethnic cleansing". the former foreign secretary william hague is the latest senior tory to intervene in the row over how the conservative party should manage brexit. he's written a newspaper article warning that divisions over brexit could see the conservatives lose power. theresa may and borisjohnson are set for a potentially awkward reunion at the united nations general assembly later, after the foreign secretary was accused of "backseat driving" by setting out his own vision for post—brexit britain. the liberal democrat leader sir vince cable will close his party conference in bournemouth by insisting that britain needs political adults from all parties to push against the hard brexit. he
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will also repeat his party's called for any deal with the eu to be put toa for any deal with the eu to be put to a referendum, and for one against ministers acting like dictators. —— and will warn against ministers. ryanair has published a full list of the 2000 flights that will be cancelled over the next six weeks, after admitting it "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays. 400,000 passengers are likely to be affected by the error. the operator faces a compensation bill of more than £17 million. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. we are tracking the hurricane in the caribbean, and hopefully will be able to bring you some eyewitness reports. here's some sport now with olly foster. hello again. the england lionesses's manager mark sampson said the investigation into his conduct was putting him in a difficult position emotionally. an inquiry that cleared him of racism and bullying may be reopened. england start their world cup
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qualifying campaign tonight against russia. one of tonight's ties sees spurs face barnsley at wembley. england's one—day series against the west indies starts at old trafford today. jonny bairstow will keep his place at the top of the batting orderfor england. it starts at 12:30pm. former manchester united and england defender rio ferdinand is going to try his hand at boxing. the 38—year—old says, "i've won titles, now i'm aiming for a belt". that's all the sports news for you this morning. i will be back on bbc news after 11am. studio: thank you, olly. the national housing federation is calling for the government to spend more on social housing to urgently increase the availability of what it calls "genuinely affordable homes". they claim that the government is spending less on building social housing than in the 1990s, although demand for homes shows no signs of slowing down.
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meanwhile, more than a million families are currently on the waiting list for social housing, and the government spends vast sums of money providing housing benefit for individuals to rent property in the private rental market. it added that since 2011 no government money has been made available in england form of paid people to rent. the government said building homes is its absolute priority. with me in the studio is david smith from the residential landlords association, and andrew spooner, who is a resident of a housing assosciation property. and joining us from birmingham is ruth davidson from the national housing federation. we are hoping to speak to her in the next few minutes. andrew, i want to start with you. just explain to us the benefits you think there are too living in social housing? well, i mean obviously i can only speak from my perspective and my experience. i think for me at the point where i was offered social housing, which was offered social housing, which was 25 and 25 years ago, i mean, i'd been homeless, i had specific issues, health problems and so on. it provided me a level of stability that don't gasmi a sort of platform from which to go to university,
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establish myself a bit more. originally i lived in what is called a housing co—operative on the south bank in waterloo, quite fond of an queen street. it's a self managed housing association. the tenants manage their own property, we looked after our own garden. so it was kind of like a housing association with strong tenant involvement. the rents we re very strong tenant involvement. the rents were very low. so then it means you've got... i think one of the things is, when you submit your —— when your rent is low you can be spending money in the wider economy, there were grants to renovate the property but we were entirely self—sufficient. we read in and paid for it. we weren't being subsidised ina for it. we weren't being subsidised in a massive way by the state. so there is those benefits. and there was a kind of real cross—section of the community, civil servants, cabbies, black cab drivers, there was a real cross—section of the
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community there. and i think we've kind of got away from that with this type of social housing as opposed to public housing, where public housing was sort of everybody, rather than social housing, which isjust was sort of everybody, rather than social housing, which is just for the poor the people who are really struggling. in london, particularly in the south—east, you look at the rest of the country, rents and house prices are not as dramatic. you can get a bit trapped within the sort of public housing sector. it's very ha rd public housing sector. it's very hard for me now to make the decision on the street i live in to buy a one bedroom flat is £400,000 or £500,000, and icon for that. you get trapped within that sort of setup. there is benefits and drawbacks. the issue that has come out in this report today is that it costs £21 more every week to put somebody in private housing rather than social housing. that is housing benefit. and many people would say that that is wasted money. that is a statistic that ignores the fact that private
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sector landlords pay tax, whereas of course social landlords as charity generally don't. private landlords put some of the money back into the syste m put some of the money back into the system that we are getting. i think it's a very unfortunate... at the end of the day, i completely agree that the government has not invested enoughin that the government has not invested enough in housing across the board. certainly the caps on social housing investment are wrong and they should be lifted immediately. and i would hope that the chancellor will think very carefully about that in his budget shortly. but to suggest that private sector landlords are profiteering off housing benefit is completely unreasonable. in 2016, the top ten highest—paid chief executives in social housing and a quarter of £1 million or more each. the highest—paid was paid £500,000, and most of them took pay rises of more than 10%. that's not exactly an industry in crisis. the reality is that private rents are more expensive than social housing. we heard from andrew, the security aspect of it. many people, they may be only have a rental agreement with
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a private landlord for six months or one year. if you have a family or children in schools, that can be very unsettling, can't it was but yes, rents are high and that is completely true. but social housing rents are rising faster than private sector rents because the government has insisted that they should. on average, they are increasing faster across—the—board. average, they are increasing faster across-the-board. i was going to say, george osborne brought in a policy that the rent should go down 1% every year, so my rent has actually gone down over the last year. has it significant that was yellow well, it has gone down 1%. but new rents are going up and they are being charged at a higher level. they are calling for social landlords to be able to charge higher rents, and push the amount of money that they will take.” higher rents, and push the amount of money that they will take. i mean, i have friends who have private landlords, i have a friend who was a single mother, and it came to the point where her contract was being renewed. the landlord started to
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make almost sexual advances on her and she rebuffed them and she was sort of... the tenancy wasn't renewed. there are these issues. i feel, i personally recognise that there should be private landlords, it's an important part of the sector. i would like to see private landlords behaving more socially responsible, looking to give longer contracts, maybe agreeing to not put the rents up so high. maybe the government could be involved with that, reducing tax for landlords if they sign up to that either agreement. ijust think they sign up to that either agreement. i just think that there has to be a sort of non—ideological kind of way of resolving this state that the private sector, the third sector all working together to find solutions. because people are struggling out there, and it does affect the wider economy, because people are not spending money. people in london paying £1000 or £1200 a month in the private sector for one studio flat, if they were paying £800 a month they would have £4oo paying £800 a month they would have £400 a month extra in the pocket.”
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absolutely agree, and i'm certainly not going to defend landlords who are doing outrageous behaviour, i think they should be taken out of the sector completely.” think they should be taken out of the sector completely. i want to bring in ruth davidson. we were hoping to speak to her from our birmingham studio. things have conspired against us and there has been a fire alarm! roof is kindly joining us on the phone. ruth, i don't know how much you manage to hear of andrew's solution, but what is the national housing federation saying about the housing crisis?” heard that some might a tiny little bit about that, but no more. we have gone from a situation where the government is pending more than —— £11 billion six years ago in bricks and mortar home to spending just £5 billion on that. but overall, the amounts that they are spending in terms of spend on housing is £30 billion. it'sjust the £25 billion is housing benefit. and £9 billion
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is housing benefit. and £9 billion is going into the pockets of private motherboards. and there is a place for private landlords, but that is just dead money as far as housing is concerned. you know, you spend the money with social landlords, and any profits that are made are reinvested in homes. there is a big opportunity at the moment for the chancellor. there is £1 billion in a pot that was there. to homes. it's good that goverment's innovate and trying to use beans, but starter homes has not worked and there is not then pop it ta ke worked and there is not then pop it take up. they could take that £1 billion and get 20,000 genuinely affordable housing. will bring the benefit bill down. i probably made the point, profits are invested, but a lot of people get paid first, they get paid a lot. most private sector landlords are basic rate taxpayers. most of one or two poems and most of them are holding these properties as pensions. they have been providing these houses, yes, absolutely we
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should have more social housing, but simply criticising the private sector is not the way to achieve it. the goverment's needs to build more homes across the board of every type. thank you. there is no disagreement from me. it's not a criticism from private landlords. basically, if we build genuinely affordable homes, as well as investing in homes for sale and shared ownership, the genuinely affordable rental homes, they are cheaper than renting in the private renting sector. there are economic benefits in terms of cementing jobs in places and bringing newjobs, and there are longer tenancies. more sta ble there are longer tenancies. more stable homes for people to bring up families and for those families to thrive. the government is making interventions in every bid of the housing market at the minute. it's just not putting any money behind genuinely affordable rent. and it needs to do that. and as i said, there's an opportunity there at the minute, there is £1.1 billion which
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is sat there that could be used to build 20,000 genuinely affordable homes. ruth, thank you forjoining us. of course, the government would say it is a top priority to look at building more housing. thank you for joining us. ryanair has published a full list of the 2,000 flights that will be cancelled over the next six weeks, after admitting it "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays. 400,000 passengers are likely to be affected by the error. the operator faces a compensation bill of more than £17 million. before we talk to our transport grosmont ko, richard westcott, let's here from some of them —— transport correspondent richard westcott. we are about halfway through. it's going to be an all—dayjourney. a taxi and some planes. it's been a really frustrating experience. frustrating and costly. we have had to pay out hundreds of pounds extra to pay out hundreds of pounds extra to book another hotel and extra flights to get back. the communication from ryanair has been absolutely atrocious. we don't even know why it's been cancelled.
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weirdest really desperate to get home now. we managed to get flights tojohn lennon airport, liverpool, at the cost of £1500. and then we had to get a taxi for the cost of £100. back to manchester to collect our car £100. back to manchester to collect ourcarfor £100. back to manchester to collect our carfor our £100. back to manchester to collect our car for ourjourney home. ryanairare an our car for ourjourney home. rya nair are an absolute our car for ourjourney home. ryanair are an absolute disgrace. we have made a mess up. it is limited. although, because of our size and scale, it does affect a large number of passengers. our transport correspondent richard westcott is here now with the latest. has every single passenger affected now be notified ? has every single passenger affected now be notified? we are assuming so, because they said that all of the e—mails would go out last night. it's a lot of people, obviously. you can go onto the website and see how many flights are cancelled and which ones i cancelled up to the end of
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october. that's the key thing, over the weekend they only put up the cancelled flights up until wednesday. if you were flying until the rest of september, you had no idea if your flight was going to be cancelled and whether you had to make alternative arrangements. but they have said, basically by the end of yesterday they would tell eve ryo ne of yesterday they would tell everyone whose flight is going to be counselled that the flight has been cancelled. touch wood, that has happened. the advice is, if you have had the e—mail thing your flight is cancelled, what can you do brasil if they can rebut you on another flight, they can rebut you on another flight, you can get your money back, and if you are flying in the next two weeks you are entitled to some compensation. this is an interesting area. how proactive or airlines when it comes to telling people what they are entitled to's this is under eu laws. there has been criticism of lots of airlines that they are —— they don't let people know they are entitled to money. how would you know? it is completed. the consumer group witch said that ryanair needs to proactive league gives to people money whether they asked for it or
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not. michael o'leary said yesterday eve ryo ne not. michael o'leary said yesterday everyone who is owed some money will get some money. but i guess the thing is, if you are flying in two weeks or less time and your flight has been cancelled, you could get some money back. as well as getting you flight. i once flew with an airline who smashed the wheel of the buggy of my baby and trying to get any compensation. i was given a fax numberand compensation. i was given a fax number and that doesn't make life easy, does it? have they given details about how you would go about getting compensation? there is a link on the website. when i was on it yesterday, it said, "we are offering you a new flight and you are you can get your money back. you had to go to the bottom where it said eu directives to find out about the money as well that you could get back. it was dropped to the bottom. there was criticism of that, that u nless there was criticism of that, that unless you knew what you were looking for you wouldn't be
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entootled to it. there are websites that tell you to go and do this type of thing. richard, thank you. onlinejihadist propaganda attracts more clicks in the uk than any other country in europe, a new report, out this morning, has revealed. britain is the fifth—biggest audience in the world for extremist content after turkey, the us, saudi arabia and iraq. the think—tank, policy exchange, suggests the british public would support new laws criminalising reading content that glorifies terror. the government has told internet companies like facebook and google to do more to to remove jihadist material. this is what the prime minister had to say in the wake of the london bridge terror attack in june this year. we cannot allow this ideology the safe s pa ce we cannot allow this ideology the safe space it needs to breed. that's what the internet and the big companies that provide internet based services provide. we need to
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work with allied democratic governments to reach international agreements that regulate cyberspace, to prevent the spread of extremist and terrorism planning. and we need to do everything we can at home to reduce the risks of extremism online. we can speak to dr martyn frampton, policy exchange's co—head of security and extremism, and lead author of this morning's report. in our birmingham studio is zubeda limbada, director of connect futures — an independent think—tank which works alongside police forces and communities to tackle radicalisation. thank you both for talking to us today. martin, first of all, just explain what you found and why you think this is the case in the uk particularly? well, what the report shows is that extremist content remains relatively easily accessible, findable on the internet andi accessible, findable on the internet and i think what's trouble about this is we have seen a lot of
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initiatives brought forward aimed at removing content and removing individual accounts on twitter and it just doesn't seem individual accounts on twitter and itjust doesn't seem to have dented the capacity of the sort of broad jihadist movement to put the content online and the scale of the this problem is such as this very much chimes with the broader threat that we face and clearly this is something the security services have talked a lot about, the large numbers of people that are of interest and concern as regards of being susceptible to this kind of content and this is part of the same picture and the question, i think, is how do we begin to develop a more comprehensive and strategic approach to dealing with challenge. is this about there are more people in the uk that are interested in this material, and therefore, they are clicking or are there other countries better at blocking at it? it is hard to kind of give a precise a nswer to it is hard to kind of give a precise answer to that. what the data shows is that from the sample of material that we looked at, people, the uk is the fifth most frequent location in the fifth most frequent location in the world where people are clicking on this material. and i think it does come down to there being a
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significant audience for that material in the uk. and of course, that's the troubling aspect of this. do you think that a enough is being done to counterbalance that extremist material that is out there? i think, again, extremist material that is out there? ithink, again, with extremist material that is out there? i think, again, with the whole technology aspect in terms of what material is out there, i think it's a ongoing battle, both in terms of the content that's put out, that's proactive, and that's challenging and in terms of countering particularly with extremist groups both far—right and what islamists put out, so it is an ongoing aspect to this that will not end immediately and i think to kind of look at the report in a broader sense i think i welcome some of the suggestions that are put forward in terms of you know moving away from just kind of who has a responsibility, but it raises important questions about who that right belongs to? is it for the
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government to push technology companies through legislative manners to say to remove the content for example? sol manners to say to remove the content for example? so i think personally that's problematic. i think we all have to do this without anything legislation is the way forward and i think we need to be more preventative from the communities, from the young people, from organisations like ours for example, who are working with technology companies, but also putting our counter narrative content. so for example, stories of former extremises and hearing from individuals —— extremists and hearing from individuals as to a balance to what is produced daily.” wa nt to balance to what is produced daily.” want to ask you what do you think the solution is? do you think it is about tightening laws and forcing the likes of facebook and google to clamp—down on this?” the likes of facebook and google to clamp-down on this? i agree with a lot of what was just said. a key point is social responsibility and we are behind the curve, the social media landscape has transformed so much in the last two decades that we
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asa much in the last two decades that we as a society are struggling to catch up as a society are struggling to catch up and understand what are the norm of behaviour you expect from people online and what's the regulatory framework for managing this problem. whether it is in terms of supply and it's availability, there is more that can be done from the technological companies. i think they have huge influence on our lives and with that does bring a sense of responsibility and there is more they could be pushed to do. i think government can and should be and is being robust about what it expects from the technological companies. we need to think about how do we curtail the demand for this material and that's where we asked the government to think about should it attempt to kind of read across from the sphere of tackling child pornography where we have a strict framework for trying to control possession and consumption and asking what the right balances between liberty and security on these issues? thank you very much for speaking to us. a powerful hurricane has struck dominica in the caribbean,
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there are a lot of people in the uk trying to contact their loved ones. marie—therese junkerre is from dominica and runs a residential care home for the elderly there. shejoins me now from her home in east london. jemma, talk to us about what you are hearing about what has happened. well, we have been a little bit spared here again where we have with irma. the strongest gusts have been 62mph. the power is out across the island, but nothing as dramatic as the devastating reports we're getting from our neighbours in dominica. the reports coming out are catastrophic to say the least. we
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hear it is their first ever category 5 storm in recorded history. jemma, i mean, we spoke to you a couple of weeks ago, this is an area of the world that has been already devastated by hurricane irma and presumably there is real worry where you are as well as in other caribbean islands about what could be happening? what could be around the corner. there is a sense of disbelief that we're experiencing this againjust two disbelief that we're experiencing this again just two weeks after irma came through the region. not the same islands, but a very similar path and some of the islands that we re path and some of the islands that were devastated two weeks ago are now under cu rfews were devastated two weeks ago are now under curfews and bracing themselves for further damage just when people were starting to recover a little bit emotionally and trying to pick you the pieces and now to have to go through this again, it's pretty devastating. and maria, for you, you're trying to contact loved ones back home, is that right? yes,
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loved ones as well as staff in relation to the facilities which we re relation to the facilities which were a relation to the facilities which were a stone's throw from the, they are located a stone awes throw from the prime minister's home which the roof came off last night so i'm worried about my residents. have you been able to get any contact at all? is there any communication whether it is internet or mobile phone? no, my last communication was at 2am our time this morning. i managed to get through to a relative who works at the hospital and at the time, it was pretty bad. but since then the line cut off and i have not been able to make any contact with anyone. we know that with this hurricane, it increased in intensity pretty quickly. were people prepared? did they have enough time to prepare for this? i believe so because after the
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effects of erika two years ago, there is a lot more preparedness and there is a lot more preparedness and the whole country was shutdown yesterday. the prime minister was online. the disaster committee was in full operation. sol online. the disaster committee was in full operation. so i do know that the island was prepared. however, i don't know that you can ever prepare for a category 5 hurricane. they did the best that they could, i'm just worried about these elderly folk that we are looking after that they are safe and well. of course. well, thank you for speaking to us. . our guest was speaking to us. . our guest was speaking to us from east london. she is concerned about not being able to reach her friends, family
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is concerned about not being able to reach herfriends, family and colleagues. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. thank you for your messages. have a lovely day. well, we do have fairly quiet conditions across the british isles today. that's due to high pressure. there is a lot of sunshine around and more cloud across northern ireland where you are closer to an area of low pressure. but it should stay dry for much of daylight hours. in the sunshine and the light winds it will feel pleasant with the temperatures up to about! celsius. as we head on into tonight, we will start —— 17 celsius. as we head on into tonight, we will start to see rain. the bulk of the country will
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be fine with clear skies and feeling chilly with temperatures ranging between eight to 14 celsius. tomorrow, we have a ridge of high pressure a cross tomorrow, we have a ridge of high pressure across the south and the east. further north and west, this area of low pressure and this cold weather front bringing wet and windy conditions, but staying dry the further south and east you are. feeling pleasant in the sunshine tomorrow. much milder air across us and feeling muggy with the temperatures up to about 19 celsius. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. hurricane maria causes widespread
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damage to the island of dominica after being upgraded to a category five storm. the wind is now predicted once again to top again 100 miles an hour. every piece of this would and this plastic and these metal roofing sheets become potentially deadly airborne missiles. myanmar‘s leader, aung san suu kyi, denies reports of conflicts that have led more than 400,000 muslim rohingyas to flee to bangladesh. there have been no conflicts since the 5th of september and no clearance operations. we too are concerned, we want to find out what the real problems are. her comments come as the head of the un fact finding mission on myanmar says his team has received widespread

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