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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 20, 2017 9:00am-10:35am BST

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hello. it's wednesday, it's 9am. i'm matthew price. welcome to the programme. there is one story developing. more than 200 people have died including over 20 children at one school after a devastating earthquake hits central mexico. the quake toppled buildings in the capital, mexico city trapping many under the rubble. witnesses have been describing the moment that it struck. translation: we left and when we left the building started collapsing. i mean 30 seconds after we left, the building came down. hundreds of volunteers have joined emergency services in the search for survivors. we're going to have the latest for you throughout the programme. hurricane maria has begun lashing the us virgin islands with winds up to 200mph. residents across the region have been warned that the
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results could be catastrophic. three weeks after this programme revealed that some women are having to under go hysterectomies that some women are having to under go hysterectom ies to that some women are having to under go hysterectomies to remove a sterilisation device. the manufacturer has withdrawn it from sale across the eu. women told us they had been left in excruciating pain. it felt like i was being stabbed over and over and there was a hot burning pain that never ended. manufacturer is saying this morning that the decision is entirely commercial and not linked to safety. we'll have all the details. 0ur our top story today. a devastating earthquake has hit mexico. it has killed nearly 250
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people. it was a magnitude 7.1 quake and hit at around lunch time and mexican officials say 248 people are confirmed dead. about half of those are in mexico city. at least 26 children are thought to have died in just one school that collapsed and another 30 pupils are missing. the earthquake brought down dozens of buildings in the capital and the surrounding areas. the emergency services, with the help of hundreds of volunteers, are desperately sifting through the rubble at this moment in an effort to find survivors. 18 people have been pulled alive from the rubble of a building in the capital. james cook sent us this latest report. sirens. in mexico city they are struggling to save lives. this is one of the most densely packed places on earth. more than 20 million people live here, and this earthquake has hit them hard. translation: we left,
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and when we left, the building started collapsing. i mean, 30 seconds after we left the building came down. in the minutes after the quake, columns of dust rose into the air, hinting at the devastation. in the capital alone, dozens of buildings, including schools and office blocks, were destroyed or damaged. schoolchildren are among the dead. the president says it's a national emergency. we are here in mexico city to help those people affected. members of my cabinet are helping in the operation. there are medical centres available and public hospitals are opening up their services to everyone. the huge tremor struck around lunchtime, prompting panic and sending people running into the streets. fires have been reported and people are being urged not to smoke because of the danger from gas lea ks. these distressing pictures appear to show a building coming down sometime after the initial shock. 0n the streets of the city,
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a field hospital with doctors treating patients anywhere they can. and it's clear that the damage goes well beyond mexico city. the epicentre of the earthquake was actually more than 100 kilometres to the south—east in puebla province, the reports of deaths and damages are widespread. earthquake alarms did sound, but some residents apparently thought they were part of a day of drills on the anniversary of a devastating quake in 1985. now 19th september will be remembered in mexico city for not one, but two disasters. one of the focal points of the rescue operation is a primary school in the city, where at least 20 children are known to have died. two teachers have also been killed, while more than 30 people are missing.
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hundreds of people, including police, soldiers, marines and members of the public have been working tirelessly to search for survivors. there are reports that two people were rescued from the rubble. jennifer swaddle teaches at the another school in mexico city. she was in a class when the earthquake struck. here she explains what happened. just as we were leaving the classroom, our outside wall collapsed, so that was really frightening, and nothing really prepares you, obviously you do your best to be professional and calm, but it's hard to kind of disguise your fear. and obviously the students were very frightened, so it was a real, real tough task trying to remain composed. we have a procedure, which is a very sensible one, which is to leave all your belongings, but unfortunately with those belongings were mobile phones, and there was absolutely no way we were going to let students go back into the classrooms, so there was a communication issue. and obviously a lot of them
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were worried about parents who were working in the city centre and so on, so that was really frightening as well, the aftermath and confusion. jesus chairez, from dallas, texas, was in the centre of mexico city when the earthquake happened. he said it was clear straight away how strong the quake was. i was in the subway station, and i got out of the subway stop and i walked into the street and i heard the alarm. and you usually have 60 seconds to get to open ground, but the ground started shaking right away, and we were looking at all the tall buildings around us swaying back and forth with lots of dust blowing in between them. it was very scary. the ground was moving underneath you, and you are just totally without control. it's very, very scary, and it was hard not to get emotional, and a lot of people were getting emotional. we can speak to daniel lieberson, a businessman who is in mexico city. and vanessa buendia
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who lives and works in the south of the city. va nessa, vanessa, let's start with you. can you just describe what happened when the earthquake hit where you were? yes, well, thank you. actually i was just taking a shower when i was coming out, my roommate, i heard her yell, "earthquake". coming out, my roommate, i heard her yell, " ea rthquake". i coming out, my roommate, i heard her yell, "earthquake". isaw coming out, my roommate, i heard her yell, "earthquake". i saw the chandelier in my room swinging from side to side. i grabbed a towel and iran side to side. i grabbed a towel and i ran out side to side. i grabbed a towel and iran out and then i remember i left my phone. my parents live outside the city, i needed to reach them so i went back in and i could hear the furniture, you know, toppling and the ceiling cracking and everything. so, it was kind of foolish of me to do that, but i got out safely and the most shocking thing was that
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still outside, you could see the house moving and you could see the floor underneath you actually jumping up and down. it's frightening. what a frightening experience. presumably if the floor is moving like that, it's difficult to run? it's very difficult actually because you get a little bit light headed so you're trying to get outside as quickly as you can, but at the same time, i mean, you can't because physically, it's very difficult. daniel, if we can come to you and obviously we can see the night—time in mexico city at the moment which will, of course, make it more difficult for the rescuers who are attempting to do things. what was your experience and what's the city like at the moment? thank you very much. i think it's very similar situation. i was on the 26th floor of the hilton hole tell which is the second highest building in mexico city. you had to crawl out. right now, as you said, it is night—time. the officials, the police have told
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us the officials, the police have told us to stay off the streets. there is only ambulances, fire engines and some volunteer trucks going by because there is people trapped in the rubble and there is a lot of looting going on we've been told. some of the stores have been damaged, the doors and the windows and people are taking advantage and entering the stores so they have asked us to stay off the streets. mexico city was built on a lake bed. so we really feel the 7.1, it feels a lot stronger. i used to live in chile and africa and kenya, near the rift valley and this was much, much stronger. it's clear that you are very high up in the hotel that you're staying in at the moment. were you in that room when it happened? i'm in the 25th floor. i was on the 26th in a business meeting and everyone knew it was an earthquake, but there was no way to get out. we couldn't go down the stairs until later, but when we went down the stairs, the water main had broke and there was a lot of water flowing down the stairwells and there was a woman who had to be
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carried out. she was in a wheelchair and she was carried down 20 flights of stairs, so it was a frightening time. a lot of people are sleeping in the lobby of the hotel now because they are afraid that there is going to be some aftershocks. because they are afraid that there is going to be some aftershocksm sounds frightening what you're both describing. i wonder daniel if we start with you and then vanessa. what goes through your mind apart from get out? i think what goes through your mind is, you know, oh my god, i hope this doesn't go on for very long. i had my god, i hope this doesn't go on forvery long. i had the my god, i hope this doesn't go on for very long. i had the experience in africa that it would start small and get bigger. so you just don't know how long it's going to be. i always think about hurricane. a hurricane tells you it is coming. an earthquake, you just never know when and how long and how strong. i think that's the big thing. it is the fear of the unknown. vanessa? yeah, well, for me, it's very aware from where i live that you can actually feel earthquakes, so just feeling live that you can actually feel earthquakes, sojust feeling it, it
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was quite alarming. i started thinking the first thing was my family and my friends. within minutes i started getting videos and photos through my whatsapp about what was happening in the city. so, that was really the distressing because it took me between 60 and 90 minutes to get hold of my parents and most of my parents. so that was my pain main worry, how can i help? if we try to leave the house, traffic was congested and it was horrible and we went to a shop and people were just, you horrible and we went to a shop and people werejust, you know, buying everything they could. so, that was distressing not being able to speak to people and just not knowing how to people and just not knowing how to help. and what vanessa is the alert system like? well, we do have an alert system. it's an app. it goes off about 30 to 40 seconds before the actual earthquake hits, but today, the epicentre was just 50 to#o but today, the epicentre was just 50
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to # 0 kilometres from the city so we had actually no time. sorry, you're both talking in terms of the fa ct you're both talking in terms of the fact that, earthquakes are a relatively common occurrence in mexico. we know that there was the one a couple of weeks ago. and yet this one seems to have done more damage and sadly caused more death than previously ones recenty? yes, that's mostly because a, the epicentre was closer to the city for starters and secondly, the last earthquake was much more asilltry which means that things move from side to side. this occasion things moved from side to side and also they werejurping moved from side to side and also they were jurping up and down so that's what made the damage worse. daniel, you talked about the curfew in place. how would you characterise the response so far? mexico, we still class it as a developing country, but it is a richer nation thanit country, but it is a richer nation than it was in the past. it has got resources . than it was in the past. it has got resources. do you think it has what it needs to cope? i think it does. as you mentioned, today there was a
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sill lation because in 1985 there was a big earthquake in mexico city so was a big earthquake in mexico city soa was a big earthquake in mexico city so a lot of people were trained and in place. we saw a lot of people out there immediately. they took us across from the hotel to the park. they brought water to people, they we re they brought water to people, they were helping people who had fallen down and people with broken arms, mexico did a really good job. a lot of buildings collapsed and i still wonder if a lot of those buildings truly meet the earthquake code that's required in mexico. 0r truly meet the earthquake code that's required in mexico. or if they're just so old and they have gone through so many earthquakes that itjust gone through so many earthquakes that it just accumulated and that caused the down fall of those buildings. it is the middle of the night. the city behind you, perhaps you can show us a little bit of it, does it, is it less busy than it normally would be? absolutely. there are almost no cars and this is one of the biggest cities in the world in terms of population. and like i
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said, ambulances, fire engines, a few police cars going around, but they've told people to stay off the streets and you know not to be out there. they said it's dangerous because there could be a smaller earthquake, butjust because there could be a smaller earthquake, but just because because there could be a smaller earthquake, butjust because they shouldn't get in the way. so there is maybe a few cars going by. i don't see any right now at all. but it is 3am in the morning and usually this is more like new york city, you will see a lot more cars 24 hours a day. va nessa, day. vanessa, in terms of the damage in the area that you are in, can you assess it? have many people died? well, my neighbourhood particularly is quite safe, butjust nearby, we have a university. it is the university i went to. the buildings are connected through bridges and all the bridges fell down. a p pa re ntly all the bridges fell down. apparently there is about 40 people injured and five people already declared dead. also some people were
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saying there was four people died in another area and the school you were mentioning earlier, that's most of the damage here, you know, down south. if you go to the areas where daniel is, it's much worse. traditionally this happens, they are the worst hit areas and in 1985 they we re the worst hit areas and in 1985 they were completely destroyed and now, most of my friends that live there andi most of my friends that live there and i used to live there, they can't go back home because the structures arejust, well, go back home because the structures are just, well, they go back home because the structures arejust, well, they can't go back home because the structures are just, well, they can't be reliable. you mentioned the school which we still believe there are children trapped, do you have any knowledge of what is happening there and what sort of a school it snis is? from what i understand it is a kinder gar ten and they were saying there was 22 dead, but i think they found a pocket of 20 children are ok. i
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can't confirm that. but i have been hearing on social media and on the television those are the rumours. there is nonstop footage about the school. they're trying to bring a lot of equipment, it is very difficult to get the kids out and the structures that fell are very old and have survived many earthquakes. so we are talking children of three, four, five years old? yes mostly. up to six years old i think. that is a chilling note to end it on, but let's hope that emergency rescue operation getting to them. thank you both very much. stay safe as well with the thought of aftershocks. thank you for staying up and joining us. in the past few minutes mexico red cross
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said it is providing paramedics to help support rescue work. the group is asking people to donate equipment such as shovels and lamps. 0ne pre—budget reporter —— one reporter has given us the latest. there is chaos and dozens of people thatjust didn't know what was going on. but they wanted in some way to help many residents remained outside for hours after the shaking. it has been obviously a tragic and very distressing day here. the death toll is going to rise. there are still rescue efforts under way in different parts of the country and here in mexico city this is a place
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still in shock. dozens and dozens of buildings were destroyed. and the death toll will rise. my understanding is that at least in the capital here, at least 50 buildings collapsed and we have to remember this is a city prepared for these kind of earthquakes, because and on this very same day 32 years ago, an earthquake struck the capital and left around 10,000 people dead. since then, construction regulations have been put in place, they're much tougher. but still they're not enough to resist quakes like this one. the advice and clearly thousands of people here have been following it, is to be on the streets. i haven't,
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i don't know of many people going back to their home and houses, because in many cases it's not clear that the damage of those constructions could have suffered. so clearly the message now is to be on the streets. that probably is the safest place to be. luckily in the last ten hours, i haven't felt any aftershock here in mexico city. we'll bring you the very latest updates from mexico throughout the programme. that rescue operation continues at the school. the kindergarten we understand in her part of mexico city. perhaps 20 or 30 children as young as three years old could still be trapped. they believe there is a pocket in which a group of children
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at least are in and they're trying to get help to them. we are going to be following that. and all the other developments coming out of mexico. you can also follow live updates on the bbc website at bbc.co.uk/news. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. as we've been hearing, a devastating earthquake has struck central mexico, killing nearly 250 people. about 20 children are known to have died in just one school after it collapsed — and at least 30 other pupils are missing. the 7.1 magnitude quake toppled dozens of buildings in the capital, mexico city — where a state of disaster has been declared. rescue workers are continuing to sift through the rubble in an effort to find survivors. hurricane maria has begun lashing the us virgin islands in the caribbean where residents have been warned
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the impact could be catastrophic. the category five storm has once again intensified, with winds now gusting at 165mph. people in the virgin islands and puerto rico are being adviced to find shelter. police investigating last week's bombing at parsons green tube station in london have made a third arrest. a 25 year old man was detained yesterday evening in newport in south wales, and a search was carried out at an address in the city. two other men remain in custody. a major pharmaceutical company has withdrawn sales of a sterilisation implant from every where except the us after it was exposed to have dangerous side effects. the firm said the decision to stop selling essu re said the decision to stop selling essure was taken for commercial reasons. essure was taken for
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commercial reasons. theresa may will use a speech at the united nations later today to urge internet companies to take action against online extremism. the prime minister will host a meeting with other world leaders and firms including facebook and microsoft. police in brazil say a british woman has been murdered while attempting to kayak the length of the amazon. the body of emma kelty, a former headteacher from london, still hasn't been found. three people have been arrested over her death a drug used to treat lung cancer has been approved. it is estimated 13,000 patients could benefit. the
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drug is already available in scotla nd drug is already available in scotland on the nhs. now the sport. england's women have made a brilliant start to their world cup qualifying campaign. and it was quite the response to what has been a difficult couple of months particularly for their manager mark sampson, who's at the centre of allegations of bullying and racism — accusations he's been cleared of twice. his team beat russia 6—0 in tranmere, with the celebration following the first goal providing the night's most significant moment. nikita parris tucked home and then led her team over to sampson, the manchester city striker saying the celebration came naturally. and that she wanted to show that the team are united, while also stressing she can't celebrate on behalf of eni, referencing eni aluko — the former england player at the centre of the allegations. sampson seemed moved by the show of support. it was a difficult time, but it is a difficult time for everyone involved. it is a serious situation
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and everyone's aware of that. we have tried to be as respectful as we can. it is about the football and we have focussed on that and the staff have focussed on that and the staff have been incredible when you prepare well you can produce performances like that. well, aluko wasn't particularly impressed, issuing a pretty damning response via twitter. another player who's raised grievances against sampson also got involved. these the comments of former england forward lianne sanderson. all this a diversion from what was a very impressive night for england's women. they were 2—0 up before russia had a player sent off. lucy bronze profiting in typical style from the edge of the box. that made it 4—0 before toni duggan added two more in the second half. also last night, northern ireland were beaten 2—0 at home
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by the republic of ireland. so it's two defeats from their first two games in qualifying. thank you. three weeks after we exclusively reported on this programme that a sterilisation device available on the nhs could lead to complications requiring full hysterectomies, the manufacturers have withdrawn it from sale in all countries aound the world, apart from the us. the essure implant is used to permanently sterilise women, but can cause side effects and complications. bayer, which manufactures the implant, have put out a statement in which they say: "we would like to reassure all patients, especially those with essure, as well as health professionals, that this decision has been taken for commercial reasons and is not linked to any problems with safety or with the quality of the product." 0ur reporterjean mackenzie spoke
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to some women who said they'd been left with unbearable pain and were even driven to the brink of suicide. here's a reminder of her report. it felt like i was being stabbed repeatedly, over and over, and it was this hot, burning pain that never ended. i felt like i was dying, you know, something horribly, horribly wrong with me, like something was slowly killing me from the inside. it's scary how something so small can cause so much damage. if it was a person, i'd hate it. this is essure, a device used
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to permanently sterilise women. the coils are inserted into the fallopian tubes to block them. seen as revolutionary, the procedure doesn't require surgery. the device was sold to me on the understanding that it was a very simple procedure, that i'd be in and out of the doctor's office in ten or 20 minutes. it was the answer to all my prayers. that there wouldn't be any recovery time. it had far less risks attached to it than traditional sterilisation. the coils are made from nickel and small polyester fibres known as pet fibres. the fibres are designed to trigger inflammation inside the fallopian tubes, causing scar tissue to build up, which eventually blocks the tubes, sterilising the woman. but this has caused some women intense pain, and others have reacted badly to the materials. when you see what it's made of, you start to get worried immediately.
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carl heneghan has been looking at the medical evidence surrounding essure for the past three years. 10% of women are sensitive to nickel, there's an immediate problem. but it also made of a compound which is present in this, pet. when you heat this bottle, it will release compounds that are potentially dangerous into the water. now, that heating happens in the human body, and when you do that, it starts to release compounds into your body that actually can have all sorts of problems. no—one signs up for saying, "you know what?" "give me ten out of ten level pain and then make me have to have my uterus removed two or three years from now." that is outrageous, that is unacceptable, and yet we keep dismissing it. so basically shame on every doctor that knows about essure, that is not saying, "listen, this is something that i can't sign on with, i cannot continue to do,
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because of the risk to my patient." i wish it was never invented, i wish that i could go back all them years and say, "don't do it, emily." "do not do it." i wish i'd never heard of essure. i wish i'd never had it put inside of me all lived through the things that nobody should ever have to live through. nobody should go through what i went through, and yet there are so many women that still are. we can now speak to laura linkson, who you saw injean's report. she was fitted with essure in 2013 and needed a hysterectomy four years later in order to have it removed. laura, good morning to you, what is
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your reaction to this announcement that they're taking it off sale, apart from that they're taking it off sale, apartfrom in that they're taking it off sale, apart from in the united states?m is fantastic news. but we can't but think it is a calculated move from byer themselves. they say they believe it is safe and they say the positive risk benefit ratio remains unchanged. so they mean for women who don't want to have any more children it is worth using, but what happened to you says otherwise? it clearly says otherwise. they are protecting themselves against lawsuits, they are opening themselves up to a hole world of financial ruinment their ethos is science for a better life. patient safety has a priority, but their actions don't speak for that. they
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they're not going to have their licence removed. it cost them more to keep it on the market. licence removed. it cost them more to keep it on the marketlj licence removed. it cost them more to keep it on the market. i imagine after you spoke of what happened to you and others did as well on this programme a few weeks ago, that led to even more concerns about it amongst members of the public? we have had more women come forward to the support group that had no awareness that it was connected, the two with their health symptoms and the fact that they had essure. we have women coming forward every day to say i didn't realise it was essu re to say i didn't realise it was essure that was hurting me. there are so many women out there that don't know they are being harmed by this. it has given them negative press and negative media. any negative press will affect them and affect their sales adversely. so as affect their sales adversely. so as a direct result of your story on this programme, you say more and
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more women are coming forward who now believe they know what is being hurting them all these years? yeah. just the other day we had a woman in the group that had to have her uterus and kidney removed. it is having an adverse impact on people's lives. it is mant to be a permanent birth control. people are having organs removed and our lives are being turned up side down. it is playing russian roulette with our lives. how can they say who won't be affected by the adverse risks? it isn't worth the paper it is written on. maybe it is an insensitive question, but does this announcement from the manufacturers, does it help alleviate some of the pain, some of the suffering that you have been through? knowing that there isn't going, part of our, i guess, our
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little mission as a group of women that have band together on facebook was to prevent anymore women from being implanted. we know they are not meant to be implanting more women. it is up to the hospitals, but when they have no licence and no ce mark and it is removed from the market, that is a victory in a way, but they aren't thinking about the patients who have been affected, the patients who have been affected, the patients that are already broken by their device. what resource do you have, if any, to compensation from the company, do you know? i don't believe that we have. they are protected. in america they have the pre—emptive approval, but it doesn't seem that we have much recourse. they will argue that you were going to have the surgery. nobody has asked for the
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side—effects that we had. the days spent in bed. the bleeding. everything that has happened to scores of women, nobody has asked for any of that and it doesn't seem that it for any of that and it doesn't seem thatitis for any of that and it doesn't seem that it is going to be an easy way if we do seek compensation from them. it's not going to be an easy road at all. they are not going to make it easy for us. you spoke modestly about what you called your little facebook group and yet, it has clearly done amazing powerful things. i wonder whether you will be using that in the united states where, of course this is according to the manufacturers still going to be available to women? there is a massive facebook group initially that started in the united states. 0urgroup that started in the united states. our group spurred off from that group andi our group spurred off from that group and i have been a member of that group for some years now, but there are so many women out there. there are thousands more women and i think that's why it hasn't been brought in the legal system. their legal system works differently and
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it will have an impact on them negatively within their market. they will be admitting liability i think by pulling it there, but i think it is coming. well, laura thank you so much forjoining us at short notice. i'm glad that you could join us reflecting on a little bit of good news. thank you for your initial film for this programme. thank you very much indeed. no problem, thank you. let's return to the earthquake that's devastated mexico city. the death toll is expected to rise. the epicentre of the quake was 75 miles from the capital, mexico city. dozens of buildings have been sent crashing to the ground and millions have been left homeless. 20 children are known to have died in one school
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after it collapsed. emergency volu nteers after it collapsed. emergency volunteers are sifting through the rubble at that school in an effort to find survivors. we heard earlier from vanessa, describing that school asa from vanessa, describing that school as a kindergarten and with children as a kindergarten and with children as young as three or four years old who she believes are still in that building. well, laura was in the down down area of mexico city. she has been telling the bbc how strong the tremor was as well as how impressive the response has been. we began to feel the earth move. we ran down the stair ways and the movement was intense. wejust had ran down the stair ways and the movement was intense. we just had an earthquake less than two weeks ago that was very strong, but this one was even stronger and the way it moved and an earthquake kipped of attacks your basic security because
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it's something that you assume won't happen, although we know it is a seismic zone. we went out into the street. everyone got out of the building. in the street, the streets we re building. in the street, the streets were filled of people who had evacuated buildings. they were crying. they were hugging. you could see the dust in the street from buildings that had fallen. you could see smell the gas. there were instructions don't light a cigarette. be careful. come away from buildings. there was broken glass. after that, the sirens began. of the rescue operations. they treated a wounded woman - a block the street. we she was struck in the street. we don't really know what happened to her. but this was unfortunately a typical scene at this time. since then, we were instructed not to drive in order to facilitate circulation of emergency vehicles
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and we watched brigades of rescue workers form spontaneously, mostly young people who are going out to remove rubble. that's one of the things that's heartening to see when a disaster like this strikes. the response of the people and overall, the image of looting or people taking advantage is really not what happens. it's certainly not what happens. it's certainly not what happens or what's happening right now in mexico. there was a call at the national university for young people at 10pm tonight to go to take a quick course in rescue work, to be able to relieve the brigades that are out there now and thousands of young people arrived. they have been working all night. people offering water. people looking, forming networks on the social networks as well to try to help locate people that are missing. so, there is a tremendous sense of solidarity amid the tragedy. that's the latest coming in to us on
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the earthquake in mexico. we will talk about another natural disaster. the latest in a line of devastating caribbean storms, hurricane maria, has developed overnight into one of the most powerful atlantic hurricanes of all time. after battering the island of dominica yesterday, the storm is due to hit the us virgin islands and puerto rico today. it's also set to devastate the british virgin islands, not with a direct hit, but with dangerous storm surges. in puerto rico, residents are bracing themselves for maria atto arrive. in puerto rico, the governor is asking people to pray for the island and warned the storm was likely to be the worst in living memory. as i speak to you right now the us territory of puerto rico is just hours away from being hit by hurricane maria, which the experts at the national weather service are describing as catastrophic. we have not experienced an event of this magnitude
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in our modern history. maria is a category five hurricane, with wind gusts of more than 200mph. the storm has doubled in size overnight, with hurricane strength winds stretching sixty miles in all directions. the storm's central pressure is 908 milibars, one of the lowest ever recorded. let's talk now to dominica's representative in the uk, high commissionerjanet charles and the attorney—general of dominica, levi peter. we're alsojoined from plymouth by leo whittings who was living on tortola in the british virgin islands when irma hit, he has since been evacuated to the uk and dr dann mitchell, a climate scientist at university of bristol. have you managed to get anymore
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information out? the last direct communication i had, with dominica was yesterday morning at about 7am. 7am with the prime minister and colleagues. from that time i have had no direct community wages with either members of cabinet or anybody else on dominica. nor has anybody who i know been able to have similarly to have direct contact. i have understood and received reports that there have been one or two reporters indicating from the locality that they are there that is extensive damage and even some deaths. but so far as when i was in communication up to yesterday morning with dominica, the prime minister and my cabinet colleagues we re very minister and my cabinet colleagues were very clear that the damage to the country was widespread. at that time, 7 o'clock here, it was the early hours of the morning over there, so still darkness, what they we re there, so still darkness, what they were waiting for with trevdation was
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the hours of daylight so that they could go out and actually assess the full extent of the damage. but obviously, since we have not had communication since daylight hours, i can't say precisely, but certainly i have had one or two reports that suggest in certain roofs in the order of 95% of the roofs in some areas have gone. a large number of the structures have been either extensively damaged or destroyed. there has been damage from the rivers because there are many rivers and streams in dominica and you and your viewers may recall that two yea rs your viewers may recall that two years ago, almost to the month, august of 2015, tropical storm erika reeked havoc on dominica. that has been replicated. so have the rivers, the water damage as well as the wind damage. it does sound pretty horrific. the storm has passed
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through dominica. we are trying to get information from there, but it is on its way, not directly to tortola, but the big fear for your island presumably has to be the storm surge? yes, especially in the lower lying areas with a storm surge that large with the damage that has already happened on the island, i'm just, we have to pray for the people that are left there. and the fact that are left there. and the fact that not many of them, many of them are out of the their shelters at the moment? yes, there is 30,000 people on that island. there is 4500 homes left. these people have nowhere to go. when we were on the island and when we knewjose was coming, our hearts sank. that storm is hitting tortola as we speak and i'm just praying for my friends who are left
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there. i bet you are. i bet you feel a long way away from home. dan mitchell, can i bring you in, please? another storm. this is what we expect with climate change, isn't it, more powerful storms? yes, i mean we are during hurricane season at the moment so the number of storms, i mean we do have a lot of hurricanes. under climate change we do expect to see stronger storms, not necessarily more storms though. and would you think that the intensity of these storms is, can we link it to climate change? yes, i mean, we haven't detected anything in our observational records yet on that matter, but our climate models, these are models that we use to project future climate, the same ones that we use for weather forecasting, they are showing we will get warmer sea surface
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temperatures and it is the warm sea surface temperatures which are really intensifying the storms. thank you very much. janet, i mentioned to leo, he must feel a long way from home, he clearly does, so too must you? yes, i do. is the fact you can't get news from there a bad sign or does it mean the communications system are down. there a bad sign or does it mean the communications system are downlj think the communication systems are down, it could be a bad sign, but we are hopeful it is just a sign of the communication systems a as attorney general said, we know there has been extensive damage, but not hearing anything is giving us some anxiety and we are praying that whatever the news that will be coming out from the country won't be too heart—breaking. the country won't be too heart-breaking. we all are thinking of your country and the other places in the caribbean. to all four of
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you, thank you. we have some breaking news that is coming ow. 0ut. british police say they have arrested two more men in wales over the attack in parsons green tube station. we will get more on that when we get more information. but two more people arrested in wales as a result of the police investigation into the parsons green tube attack. now back to the quake. 0ver100 people have die rd in mexico city. the quake took place when many people were taking part in an earthquake safety drill. we can
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speak to one of the country's leading seismologists and he looks at the dangers of earthquakes. thank you forjoining us. what would you say in terms of strength of the earthquake that the overall impact will be seen to be once we get a better picture from across mexico of what happened ? better picture from across mexico of what happened? this is a magnitude 7.1 and anything above 7 is something that we call major. it is not a great earthquake. the one that hit about two weeks ago, 8.1, that was a great earthquake there. doesn't sound as if there is a big difference between 8 and 7.1. but the scale goes up in steps of 30. so this was 30 times less powerful than the one that hit mexico two weeks ago. but what matters is the location. this earthquake has happened in central mexico, very densely populated. a large number of
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people and large cities and in the case of mexico city particularly, it is built on very soft lake sediments and any sort of earthquake shaking is imply if i —— am if i —— amplified. the fact that mexico as we we re amplified. the fact that mexico as we were hearing from our guests, mexico is used to earthquakes, they have been putting in a lot of work over the last couple of decades to make sure their buildings are more resista nt to make sure their buildings are more resistant to this sort of quake. yes and that will have paid off, but you can't protect everything. mexico has very good earthquake engineers, they know their stuff and they're capable of building major projects that will resist earthquake shaking. but the
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difficulty is when you have got a large city somewhere out in the country, is that expertise being employed every where? particularly in terms of things like ordinary housing. it's often not easy to make sure that all buildings are constructed to the same standard. and another thing that is important is that people know what to do. i have heard reports from the earthquake that when the shaking started, people ran out into the street. what happens in an earthquake when it starts damaging buildings is bits of the building fall off and fall into the street. people ran out of their houses, into the street and were hit by stones and glass falling from the buildings. this is something you have to avoid. it is very frightening what has happened in mexico and we will continue to get
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updates on this. thank you for joining us. thank you forjoining us. a quarter of girls and one in ten boys have symptoms and signs of depression atjust14—years—old. that's the conclusion from a major new piece of research from university college london. their millennium cohort study has been analysing more than 10,000 children who were born in 2000 and 2001. experts say the study is the most "compelling evidence" and "concrete proof" that large numbers of young children are struggling with the condition. there are calls for the findings to feed into the government's update on childrens' wellbeing due next year. let's talk now to natasha devon, who is the government's former mental health tsar. dr fiona pienaar has 30 years experience of child psychology and counselling in schools. anne longfield is the children's commissioner for england and joins us from helsinki.
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ross nation developed mental health problems when he was 14 and wants symptoms in young boys to be recognised better you were the government's mental health advisor, what do they need to do more to address mental health in children? all four of you nodding as i read the introduction. ross, can you tell us the introduction. ross, can you tell us about what happened to you? yes, i usually talk about being around 14 when my mental health journey as it we re when my mental health journey as it were started. i think that maybe i had symptoms and issues maybe before that, but 14 was where there was a major catalyst in that i had glandularfever. i major catalyst in that i had glandular fever. i was at a major catalyst in that i had glandularfever. i was at a grammar school at the time and, that was quite a high pressure environment, a lot going on around me, with coming from a low income family and my mum
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being a single parent, so there was a lot of stress at home as well. but getting glandularfever, a lot of stress at home as well. but getting glandular fever, i a lot of stress at home as well. but getting glandularfever, i kind of was bed—bound for about six weeks. after that, the pressures of trying to get back into school, i didn't catch up and i didn't feel i could catch up and i didn't feel i could catch up and i didn't feel i could catch up and i was in an all boys school and didn't feel emotionally equipped to talk about was going on with my friends and stuff and i started to become isolated. eventually just made, my started to become isolated. eventuallyjust made, my confidence was hit, i didn't feel like i was going catch up at school. i felt really useless and helpless and that kind of escalated into depression and what i now recognise as pretty bad anxiety. natasha, ross mentioned the fact he came from a relatively low income family. that seems to
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play a part in this. it does. i should say first of all that there isa should say first of all that there is a difference between having a mental illness and exhibiting symptoms of a mental illness. in the former case you would want to treat it with therapeutic intervention. symptoms are often environmental and we know there is a link between poverty and poor mental health. during the past four years, the thousand richest people in the country have increased their personal fortunes by £519 billion and we know a million children are living in poverty, and those numbers are set to rise by 23% by 2020. you would say that there could be a knock on impact and there will be a knock on impact and there will be a knock on impact on mental health. you can't divorce their mental health from their environment. these are not individual problems, they're
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social problems f the government is invested in this, they should look at austerity. the government says they're treating an extra 30,000 children this year and young people and they're putten extra £280 million funding into it. bearing in mind the results of this survey, is this enough? i think the answer is no. this is yet more evidence of the scale of the issue, but also the urgency of the issue and undiagnosed mental health conditions are a big priority for me and i hear from young people all the time. we know there is a growth from adult surveys and young women in particular are having experiencing poor mental health. that starts much earlier.
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these are findings which again show how important it is that is understood and that there a is real practical solution for young people that they can get access to. fiona, you have a lot of experience in working with people affected by this, i'm thinking of my own daughters in their own local state primary school and the other day my six—year—old said, if i get frustrated, my school has told me to sit and close my eyes and breathe. things like that must help? yes the earlier you get in the better. 0ur charity focussing on teaching skills like that and providing training to teachers so they can spot signs — if a child becomes withdrawn or becomes more outspoken. you watch the change in behaviour. what do we ——
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more outspoken. you watch the change in behaviour. what do we -- what to do we for those who are teenagers and need attention? yes, we all have moods and certainly we know that in adolescence, young people are starting to become independent. how do parents notice something that is a problem? that is very important. watching out for, i mean moods are common. but watching out for consistently low mood, perhaps if they lose interest in things they we re very they lose interest in things they were very attached to, if they start to become withdrawn and the important thing is to reach out. and try to talk to them about it. not forcing the issue and if they don't wa nt forcing the issue and if they don't want to talk to you, suggest they may talk to somebody else and you can always talk to a gp. ross, how do you think people can be helped
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earlier. the kind of education side is part of it. i think if i much earlier had known about mental health and more about my emotions and my thoughts and basic cbt kind of knowledge that your thoughts affect your emotions and your thoughts are not facts and you can challenge them. and just a bit more ofan challenge them. and just a bit more of an education about how to understand yourself. the gender difference here is interesting, because i doubt that it's the case that males are experiencing less symptoms so much as maybe the terminology doesn't fit them. when i was reading this study, it spoke about crying and, as a kind of young male, i was very averse to crying.
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it wasn't a thing i did. so when this, when i was being asked about symptoms and i got diagnosed with depression, there were things i didn't relate to and i think we need to look at how as a society we treat males differently and i think that the fact that there is such a high suicide rate in young males, show its it is affecting males as well. maybe the numbers aren't representative of that. natasha, we have to be brief, but there is a lot of policy challenges in what ross said? yes one thing ross mentioned was academic pressure. we need to look at the increased testing regime and the anxiety that we are putting on young people through the education system. of course i agree with education and increasing resilience and communication and all the things that have been mentioned here. but that is applying the factor 50. we need to look at ways
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to turn down the heat. thank you very much. now the latest weather. today will be a largely dry day. we have seem splashes of rain at moment in western england and some heavier rain moving across northern ireland and western scotland. and that will get across waste wales and south—west england later. but ahead of it for the rest of wales and central and eastern parts of england and dmrand nd scotland it should be dry with some sunshine. temperatures in the south up to 20 wrun. — e—— went one. in the countryside in the south—east it will be cold. tomorrow we start with rain in the west. again slowly advancing through the
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day. brightening up in northern ireland and western scotland, west wales and the south—west. but hanging on to the sunshine in the far south—east for longest and here highs of 19 or 20. hello. it's 10am. i'm matthew price. our top story today — a devastating 7.1 magnitude earthquake has hit mexico. over 200 people are confirmed dead and dozens of buildings in mexico city have collapsed. it was imto be to stand up. you had to crawl out. the quake toppled buildings in the capital, mexico city, trapping many under rubble. witnesses have been describing the moment it struck. translation: we left, and when we left, the building started collapsing. i mean, 30 seconds after we left, the building came down. hundreds of volunteers joined emergency services in the search for survivors. we'll have the latest throughout the programme. hurricane maria — the second
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category—five storm to hit the caribbean this month — is due to hit puerto rico and the virgin islands today. three weeks after this programme revealed that some women are having to undergo hysterectomies to remove a sterilisation device used on the nhs — the manufacturers withdraw it from sale across the eu. women told us they'd been left in excruciating pain. there are some women who didn't know they were being harmed by this. it is giving them negative press and negative media. any negative press will affect their sales adversely so they're pulling it before they're pushed. the manufacturer says the decision is entirely commercial and not linked to safety. an earthquake has killed 200 people
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#5 an earthquake has killed 200 people # 5 miles from mexico city. the magnitude 7.1 quake hit at lunch time. mexican officials say 248 people are confirmed dead. a third of those in mexico city. at least 26 children are thought to have died in just one school that collapsed and another 30 pupils are missing. the earthquake brought down dozens of buildings in the capital and the surrounding areas. emergency services, with the help of hundreds of volunteers, are desperately sifting through the rubble in an effort to find survivors. 18 people have been pulled alive from the rubble of a building in the north of the capital. sirens. in mexico city they are struggling to save lives. this is one of the most densely
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packed places on earth. more than 20 million people live here, and this earthquake has hit them hard. translation: we left, and when we left, the building started collapsing. i mean, 30 seconds after we left the building came down. in the minutes after the quake, columns of dust rose into the air, hinting at the devastation. in the capital alone, dozens of buildings, including schools and office blocks, were destroyed or damaged. schoolchildren are among the dead. the president says it's a national emergency. we are here in mexico city to help those people affected. members of my cabinet are helping in the operation. there are medical centres available and public hospitals are opening up their services to everyone. the huge tremor struck around lunchtime, prompting panic and sending people running into the streets. fires have been reported and people are being urged not to smoke because of the danger from gas lea ks. these distressing pictures appear to show a building coming down
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sometime after the initial shock. 0n the streets of the city, a field hospital with doctors treating patients anywhere they can. and it's clear that the damage goes well beyond mexico city. the epicentre of the earthquake was actually more than 100 kilometres to the south—east in puebla province, the reports of deaths and damages are widespread. earthquake alarms did sound, but some residents apparently thought they were part of a day of drills on the anniversary of a devastating quake in 1985. now 19th september will be remembered in mexico city for not one, but two disasters. one of the focal points of the rescue operation is a primary school in the city, where at least 20 children are known to have died.
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four adults have been killed there and 38 people including 30 pupils are still missing. hundreds of rescuers including police, soldiers, marines and members of the public have been working tirelessly to search for survivors and there are reports that two people have been pulled from the rubble. earlier i spoke to vanessa buendia, who lives and works in the south of mexico city. she described the moment she realised there was an earthquake. i was just taking a shower when i was coming out, my roommate, i heard her yell, "earthquake". so i saw the chandelier in my room just swinging from side to side. so i grabbed a towel and i ran out and then i remember i left my phone. my parents live outside the city, i needed to reach them so i went back in and i could hear the furniture, you know, toppling and the ceiling cracking and everything.
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so, it was kind of foolish of me to do that, but i got out safely back in and i could hear the furniture, you know, toppling and the ceiling cracking and everything. so, it was kind of foolish of me to do that, but i got out safely and the most shocking thing was that still outside, you could see the house moving and you could see the floor underneath you actually jumping up and down. it's frightening. what a frightening experience. presumably if the floor is moving like that, it's difficult to run? yes, it's very difficult actually because you get a little bit light headed so you're trying to get outside as quickly as you can, but at the same time, i mean, you can't because physically, it's very difficult. daniel is an american working in mexico city. i was on the 26th floor of the hilton hotel, which is the second highest building in mexico city. it was impossible to stand up.
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you had to crawl out. right now, as you said, it is night—time. the officials, the police have told us to stay off the streets. there is only ambulances, fire engines and some volunteer trucks going by because there is people trapped in the rubble, and there is a lot of looting going on, we've been told. some of the stores have been damaged, the doors and the windows and people are taking advantage and entering the stores so they have asked us to stay off the streets. mexico city was built on a lake bed. so we really feel the 7.1, it feels a lot stronger. i used to live in chile and in africa and kenya, near the rift valley and this was much, much stronger. it's clear that you are very high up in the hotel that you're staying in at the moment. were you in that room when it happened? i'm in the 25th floor. i was on the 26th in a business meeting and everyone knew it was an earthquake, but there was no way to get out. we couldn't go down the stairs until later, but when we went down the stairs, the water main had broke and there was a lot of water
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flowing down the stairwells and there was a woman who had to be carried out. she was in a wheelchair and she was carried down 20 flights of stairs, so it was a frightening time. a lot of people are sleeping in the lobby of the hotel now because they are afraid that there is going to be some aftershocks. juan paullier is a reporterfor bbc mundo who is in mexico city. he gave us the latest. the scene was chaos and dozens of people thatjust didn't know what was going on. but they wanted in some way to help many residents remained outside for hours after the shaking. it has been obviously a tragic and very distressing day here. the death toll is going to rise. there are still rescue efforts under way in different
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parts of the country and here in mexico city this is a place still in shock. dozens and dozens of buildings were destroyed. and the death toll will rise. my understanding is that at least in the capital here, at least 50 buildings collapsed and we have to remember this is a city prepared for these kind of earthquakes, because and on this very same day 32 years ago, an earthquake struck the capital and left around 10,000 people dead. since then, construction regulations have been put in place, they're much tougher. but still they're not enough to resist quakes like this one. the advice and clearly,
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thousands of people here have been following it, is to be on the streets. i haven't, i don't know of many people going back to their homes and houses, because in many cases it's not clear what the damage of those constructions could have suffered. so clearly, the message now is to be on the streets. that probably is the safest place to be. luckily in the last ten hours, i haven't felt any aftershock here in mexico city. you heard his belief that the death toll will rise. we will keep you up—to—date with that story as it develops throughout the morning. but it is now10.10am. develops throughout the morning. but it is now 10.10am. it is time to get a summary of the news today with annita. police investigating last week's
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bombing at parsons green tube station in london have made a third arrest. a 25—year—old man was detained yesterday evening in newport in south wales. hurricane maria — the second category—five storm to hit the caribbean this month — has reached the southernmost reaches of the virgin islands and is heading for puerto rico. it's bringing heavy rains and winds now gusting at up to 200mph. yesterday it wreaked a trail of devastation across the island of dominica. people in the virgin islands and puerto rico are being advised to find shelter. a major pharmaceutical company has withdrawn all non—us sales of a sterlisation implant three weeks after this programme exposed it has dangerous side effects. the german manufacturer bayer, said the decision to stop sales of the essure implant was being taken for commercial reasons, but this programme has spoken to women who say they have been left in chronic pain
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and have even needed hysterectomies in some cases. the measles, mumps and rubella target for five—year—olds has been met for the first time in england. the figures published show the 95% target set by the world health 0rganization was reached for the first time in the period 2016 to 2017. theresa may will use a speech at the united nations later today to urge internet companies to take action against online extremism. the prime minister will host a meeting with other world leaders and firms including facebook and microsoft. police in brazil say a british woman has been murdered while attempting to kayak the length of the amazon. emma kelty, a former headteacherfrom london, had been documenting her expedition on social media but stopped posting six days ago. her body has not yet been found, but three people have been arrested over her death. a drug which can extend the lives of people with lung cancer is to be made available
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on the nhs in england. the drugs watchdog, nice, had originally said that nivolumab was too expensive, but its manufacturers agreed to reduce the price. it's estimated that up to 1,300 patients with advanced forms of lung cancer could benefit. the drug is already available on the nhs in scotland and some patients in wales will also receive funding for it. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. thank you very much indeed. there are some who are getting in contact about the withdrawal of essure essure. this implant which has been withdrawn by the manufacturer for commercial reasons, they say. it is a story that we've been breaking on this programme over the last few weeks. kim has been in contact on facebook saying she is currently fighting with the nhs to get her‘s removed. the surgeon, she says, is refusing to see her at the moment. there has been some reaction, a text
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from davina, reacting to the discussion we had about mental health and problems with depression and anxiety with young people. she says, "our gp is not interested. she lives in london and asked for help for her children after the death of her husband from motor neurone disease. her eldest suffered heart problems. she has been hospitalised for anorexia and says the gp initially dismissed the concerns as having an eating disorder. that matches a lot of what we heard in terms of our experts who say on terms of the policy level there needs to be more education at there needs to be more education at the school level but in the health system as well. get in touch with us. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. right, let's head over to our sports desk now and hugh has all the sport
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for us. good morning. # it has been a difficult couple of months for the england women's team and particularly their manager, but they put it almost completely behind them to open their world cup qualifying campaign with a 6—0 thrashing of russia in tranmere. i say "almost" completely because nikita parris' celebration of the first goal at prenton park seemed to send a message of support for mark sampson who is at the centre of allegations of bullying and racism, accusations he's been cleared of twice. it was a difficult time, but it's a difficult time for everyone involved. it is a serious situation and everyone's aware of that. i think we have tried to be respectful. but it is about the football and the players have focussed on that. the staff have been incredible as well. and when you prepare well and give yourself a chance to produce performances like tonight. northern ireland's women have lost two out of two after being beaten 2—0 by the republic of ireland. rachel furniss with an own goal
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to hand the republic the lead. megan campbell completed the scoring in the second half. premier league sides stoke and burnley were both knocked out of the efl cup by lower league opposition last night. crystal palace got their first win under new boss roy hodgson, but liverpool were beaten by leicester at the king power. islam slimani rounding off a 2—0 win after shinji 0kazaki got the first. liverpool haven't won any of their last four games. jonny bairstow took advantage of his chance as an opener to help england win the first one day international against west indies with his first 0di century. bairstow reached 100 as england easily chased down 205 to win the match at old trafford by seven wickets. ben stokes hitting the winning runs with more than ten overs to spare to take a 1—0 lead in the five match series — the second game is tomorrow at trent bridge. that is it for now. more a little bit later. thank you. the latest in a line of devastating
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caribbean storms — hurricane maria — has developed overnight into one of the most powerful atlantic hurricanes of all time. after battering the islands of martinique and dominica yesterday, the storm is due to hit the us virgin islands and puerto rico today. it's also set to wreak havoc on the british virgin islands, not with a direct hit, but with dangerous storm surges. in puerto rico, residents are bracing themselves for maria to arrive in the next few hours. hundreds of shelters have been set up for those who couldn't leave in time. the governor is asking people to pray for the island and warned the storm was likely to be the worst in living memory. asi as i speak to you, puerto rico is hours have being hit by hurricane maria. we have not experienced an
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event of this magnitude in our modern history. maria is a category five hurricane, with wind gusts of more than 200mph. the storm has doubled in size overnight, with hurricane strength winds stretching 60 miles in all directions. the storm's central pressure is 908 milibars one of the lowest ever recorded. joining me from reading is dr nick kilngaman, a climate scientist with expertise in hurricanes, and from and we have brigadierjohn bridge. he is on barbados. if we start with you, what are you seeing and hearing where you are? we are tracking hurricane maria very closely. 0n barbados, we have had some strong winds. but nothing like they had. it
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is still a category 5 and it was over us virgin islands last night and that will be affecting, and was mentioned our concern for the british vierjen islands is the fact it will bring some heavy rain and our concern is the flooding and the storm surges, particularly given the british virgin islands, all the vegetation was stripped off during hurricane irma. so we are concerned about the flooding there. has it reached the british virgin islands yet? the front edge in terms of the early winds, sbhutly. it is —— absolutely. it is moving quickly towards puerto rico now. the effects will be have been felt on the british virgin islands. all the personnel there hunkered down during the worst of it. we hope they will be up and back in communication within the next hour. the worst in
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terms of the winds will have been over the last few hours as i understand it. in terms of military there, what preparations were they able to make beforehand, our correspondent yesterday said that the big fear was that the debris that will be left by irma could be whipped up again and be deadly? we continued up to the last safe moments. we continued to remove the debris. particularly trying to get clear of the drainage ditches. so we did everything we could until the last moment and the teams out there hunkered down, so they were ready and our intention is we are able the moment the hurricane is clear, one of the first things i will do ask them to confirm the state of runway. that allows me to continue the inload of aid and other support as require. that is the plan and they
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did everything they could until the last moment. john bridge, don't go away. let me bring in an expert on storms. it felt, reading this piece, like another worst hurricane. can you put this in context? so maria, like irma, is the most powerful category, a category 5. it is a storm capable of causing catastrophic damage to many of the islands that it is going to strike. what is significant about this, is it the fact that, is this year different, or is itjust their paths happen to coincide? this year has been highly unusual both for the numberof been highly unusual both for the number of storms we have seen in the atlantic and around the carr
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ribbian. -- caribbean. is think any reason for that? there are some factors, first there has been very strong thunder storm activity over africa. a lot of atlantic hurricanes form from disturbances over africa and pass out over the atlantic where, they strengthen over the warm waters. the waters in the atlantic have been warmer than normal. also there has been a favourable alignment of winds through the atmosphere. often with the storms as they develop, they are pulled apart by winds in the atmosphere. this year, the winds have been aligned very favourably for the hurricanes to develop. all of those factors, if you think about them, is there any and this of course will be what a lot of people will be wondering, is there lot of people will be wondering, is islanders get back on their feet7m addition to the british virgin islands one thing we are continuing
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to do is push stores of aid and personnel forward to the turks and caicos. we are concerned about the impact there. we are continuing to work closely with dfid to make sure we ensured the aid is preconfigured so as the hurricane passes through we can get our personnel out and link them up with addition aid and distribute that or help with the reconstruction. and the other one is we have hms ocean who arrives on 22nd, that is friday, she comes loaded with about 60 tonnes of uk aid, which we can distribute. we are doing planning with the governments of the islands to work out where the best place for that aid is to go and
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so we are doing planning with. so we can so we are doing planning with. so we ca n follow so we are doing planning with. so we can follow up with this significant additional aid and she brings a significant package of helicopters. which will assist in terms of getting the aid forward. you're dealing with a number of different islands and with an uneven picture of need, so, you are going to be, now you will be able to use helicopter and even if runways are destroyed, the helicopters can get aid in? yes we have helicopters at the moment and we have got some at the moment and we have got some at the moment and this will increase the moment and this will increase the capacity. the danger with helicopters, they create a significant down draft as they fly in. so we have to be careful we don't make the situation worse by
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flying large helicopters over and picking up the debris. john bridge thank you very much indeed. a7.i a 7.1 earthquake has hit mexico. we will have the latest. a thousand musicians will play 300 secret gigs in more than 60 countries in aid of refugees. we will speak to one of the artists taking part. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. a devastating earthquake has struck central mexico. nearly 250 people are already known to have died — according to the country's national disaster response agency. the 7.1 magnitude quake toppled dozens of buildings
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in the capital, mexico city — where a state of disaster has been declared. rescue works are continuing to sift through the rubble in an effort to find survivors. 26 children have died injust one school after it collapsed — and about 30 others are missing. police investigating last week's bombing at parsons green tube station in london have made two more arrests this morning. it follows the arrest of a 25 year old man yesterday evening in newport in south wales. two more men — aged 30 and 48, were detained at a separate address in the city early today. hurricane maria — the second category—five storm to hit the caribbean this month — has reached the southernmost reaches of the virgin islands and is heading for puerto rico. it's bringing heavy rains and winds now gusting at up to 200 miles an hour. yesterday it wreaked a trail of devastation across the island of dominica. people in the virgin islands and puerto rico are being advised to find shelter. a major pharmaceutical company has withdrawn all non—us sales
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of a sterlisation implant — three weeks after this programme exposed it has dangerous side effects. the german manufacturer bayer, said the decision to stop sales of the essure implant was being taken for commercial reasons, but this programme has spoken to women who say they have been left in chronic pain and have even needed hysterectomies in some cases. theresa may will use a speech at the united nations later today to urge internet companies to take action against online extremism. the prime minister will host a meeting with other world leaders and firms including facebook and microsoft. police in brazil say a british woman has been murdered while attempting to kayak the length of the amazon. emma kelty, a former headteacherfrom london, had been documenting her expedition on social media but stopped posting six days ago.
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her body has not yet been found, but three people have been arrested over her death. a drug which can extend the lives of people with lung cancer is to be made available on the nhs in england. the drugs watchdog, nice, had originally said that nivolumab was too expensive, but its manufacturers agreed to reduce the price. it's estimated that up to 1,300 patients with advanced forms of lung cancer could benefit. the drug is already available on the nhs in scotland and some patients in wales will also receive funding for it. that's a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o'clock. we they're1—0 up in the five match series with the next one tomorrow. that's it for now. more later. hugh, thank you very much indeed. more on the top story, the devastating earthquake that struck central mexico. it has killed more than 200 people. the epicentre was in puebla state. it was a 7.1 quake
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and it hit in the early often in mexico. mexican officials say 217 people are now confirmed to have died. athird people are now confirmed to have died. a third of those in mexico city itself. that's down on figures that were released earlier. at least 22 children from the same school have been killed after the school building collapsed and another 30 are missing along with 12 adults. the earthquake brought down dozens of buildings in the capital and the surrounding areas. emergency services and volunteers have been working through the night, desperately sifting through the rubble in an effort to find survivors. 18 people have been pulled alive from the rubble of a building in the capital. jennifer swaddle teaches at another school in mexico city. she was in a class when the earthquake struck. here she explains what happened. just as we were leaving the classroom, our outside wall collapsed, so that was really frightening, and nothing really prepares you,
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obviously you do your best to be professional and calm, but it's hard to kind of disguise your fear. and obviously the students were very frightened, so it was a real, real tough task trying to remain composed. we have a procedure, which is a very sensible one, which is to leave all your belongings, but unfortunately with those belongings were mobile phones, and there was absolutely no way we were going to let students go back into the classrooms, so there was a communication issue. and obviously a lot of them were worried about parents who were working in the city centre and so on, so that was really frightening as well, the aftermath and confusion. we have got another eyewitness from dallas in texas. he was in the centre of mexico city when the earthquake happened and he told us that it was clear straightaway how strong the quake was. i was in the subway station, and i got out of the subway stop
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and i walked into the street and i heard the alarm. and you usually have 60 seconds to get to open ground, but the ground started shaking right away, and we were looking at all the tall buildings around us swaying back and forth with lots of dust blowing in between them. it was very scary. the ground was moving underneath you, and you are just totally without control. it's very, very scary, and it was hard not to get emotional, and a lot of people were getting emotional. their stuff very well and so they're capable of building major projects that will resist earthquake shaking, but the difficulty is, when you've got a large city somewhere out in the country, is that expertise being employed everywhere particularly in terms of things like ordinary housing? it's often not easy to make sure that all buildings are constructed to the same standard and another thing that's also important is that people know what to do and i
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heard quite a number of reports from this earthquake that when the shaking started people ran out into the street. now, what happens in an earthquake when it starts dabbling buildings is that bits of the buildings is that bits of the building fall off and they fall into the street. so, people ran out of their houses and into the street and we re their houses and into the street and were hit by stones and glass falling down from the buildings and this is something that you really have to avoid. that's the latest scientific opinion on the earthquake in mexico and mexico city. we will, of course, keep you up—to—date with the news and developments coming out of there throughout the day on bbc news. there is another story that is developing this morning. it is one that we exclusively reported on three weeks ago on this programme. a sterilisation device available on the nhs could lead to complications requiring full hysterectom ies — the manufacturers have withdrawn it from sale in all countries aound the world apart from the us. the essure implant is used
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to permanently sterilise women, but can cause side effects and complications. bayer, which manufactures the implant have put out a statement in which they say. "we would like to reassure all patients, especially those with essure, as well as health professionals, that this decision has been taken for commercial reasons and it is not linked to any problems with safety or with the quality of the product. according to our scientific assessment, the positive risk benefit ratio of essure remains unchanged. the safety and effectiveness of essure is supported by over ten years of scientific research and real life clinical experience". our reporterjean mackenzie spoke to some women who said they'd been left with unbearable pain and were even driven to the brink of suicide. here's a reminder of her report. it felt like i was being stabbed repeatedly, over and over, and it was this hot, burning pain that never ended. i felt like i was dying,
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you know, something horribly, horribly wrong with me, like something was slowly killing me from the inside. it's scary how something so small can cause so much damage.
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