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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 21, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello it's thursday, it's 9am, i'm chloe tilley, welcome to the programme. mexico asks other countries for help in a race against time to find survivors after tuesday's devastating earthquake. in mexico city, rescuers are trying to reach three trapped people including a 13—year—old girl at the site of a collapsed school. translation: when she told us her name she also told us there were two other kids and other bodies but at this point we do not know if they are dead or alive. we are able to hear three different people. we'll have the latest from the scene. also this morning, should cyclists face tougher penalties for riding dangerously? the government launches a review into whether the law needs to change. and why police in some parts of the uk are asking charities to help them keep the community safe. most police want to deal with criminals, not people going through crisis. sometimes policing is not even the right response for minor
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crime. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until ”am this morning. do get in touch with us if you're a cyclist — what do you think about this new plan? we also want to hear from you if you've witnessed dangerous cycling or even been hit by someone on a bike. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today — mexico has asked other countries to provide specialist teams and equipment to help search for survivors after the devastating earthquake on tuesday in which at least 230 people were killed. in mexico city, emergency workers are still trying to reach people trapped under the rubble of a school where 21 children and five adults are known to have died. rajini vaidya nathan reports. after the horror of the earthquake, there is hope. these young children were pulled alive from a primary school
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in the south of mexico city. people looked for those trapped. at least 20 children were killed here. it was on tuesday at lunchtime that the powerful earthquake struck mexico. as buildings collapsed, people ran for cover. across mexico city, the search for survivors is continuing. as you can see, people are going in to try and help. this six storey building in the distance is the focus of their work. antonio and dolores' sonjuan worked as an accountant in the building.
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he last spoke to his parents hours before the quake hit. for the past day, they have watched as rescuers pick through the rubble, but there is still no sign of their son. we still believe he will make it out alive. i would dig him out myself if i could. antonio tells me. many volunteers have turned up with their own tools to do their bit. there is lots of people under the buildings, that's the problem. lots of people trapped and that is something, november is helping. at times, the crowd was asked to be silent so rescuers could call out to any survivors still stuck in the debris. more than 20 people have been rescued from this building, but as time passes, the chance of people being reunited with their loved ones is becoming ever slimmer. let's get a summary of the rest of
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the day ‘s news. a night—time curfew has been imposed in puerto rico which has been devastated by hurricane maria. many areas have been flooded, homes have been destroyed, and much of the island is without power. the governor has called the impact of the storm "nothing less than a disaster" and says it may take months for electricity to be completely restored. our correspondent will grant is in puerto rico. when it hit it turned out to be the most powerful storm to hit puerto rico in almost a century and it really felt like that. all the islanders who were hunkered down, whether they were in their homes or with friends and family or even in emergency shelters would have heard the most incredible sound of the winds, the rain lashing down. it lasted for several hours. what we are seeing now lasted for several hours. what we are seeing now are lasted for several hours. what we are seeing now are the last vestiges of the storm as it makes its way of
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the territory of puerto rico and i wrote back into the caribbean. an overnight curfew is in place, put in place by the governor and that will be in place for several days, partly to protect people from themselves, lots of accidents can happen in the darkness, particularly with cables down. widespread flooding is expected to be reported from the moron mort regions but thankfully there have been no reports of large scale loss of life. a group of ryanair pilots has rejected an offer of cash bonuses of up to £12,000 to work extra shifts, and help reduce cancellations. the airline has cancelled more than 2,000 flights over the next six weeks because of what it claims was a mistake with holiday rotas. frankie mccamley reports. it is europe's biggest airline, carrying 120 million passengers last year. and it is not shy when it comes to trumpeting its own success. fanfare.
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welcome. you have arrived on another rya nair flight. the irish airline is being forced to cancel about 50 flights a day until the end of october, claiming it messed up on its holiday rotas. to make sure it does not have to cut even more flights, it is offering crews a cash bonus of £12,000 to work extra days. but in a letter seen by the bbc, pilot representatives from 17 of the companies 80 bases have rejected the offer, calling for better contracts and working conditions instead. the fundamental approach of ryanair to how it employs pilots is at the heart of this issue. and also trust, many pilots, though they see the offers, many of them have said to us we actually don't believe they will honour these agreements if we sign up to them. as for those who have had their flights cancelled,
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the airline says it will refund passengers or book them onto other flights, awarding compensation to those due to fly out within two weeks. frankie mccamley, bbc news. detectives investigating last week's terror attack on a london underground train at parsons green tube station have arrested a sixth person. a 17—year—old boy was detained in thornton heath, in south london, just after midnight. the five other people in custody are all men, aged between 18 and 48—years old. tougher penalties could be introduced for cyclists who injure or kill pedestrians — as part of an urgent review of all aspects of cycling safety. one idea being considered by the government is a new offence that's the equivalent of causing death by careless or dangerous driving. it follows a number of high profile incidents involving cyclists colliding with pedestrians. andy moore reports. do you feel any remorse, charlie? on monday, charlie alliston was jailed for 18 months for cycling
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into and killing a pedestrian in london last year. kim briggs was on her lunch break when she was hit. she suffered serious injuries including a fractured skull and died in hospital a week later. he was driving a bike without a front brake which was illegal. he was cleared of manslaughter but found guilty of bodily harm, an offence dating back to 1861. after the sentencing, mrs briggs' widower called for a change to the law. to have to rely on manslaughter or a victorian law that does not even mention causing death tells us that there is a gap. the government appears to be working to close that gap. they are looking at creating a new offence for cyclists, similar to motorists who cause death by careless driving. some cycling groups point out the number of deaths caused by cyclists remains extremely low,
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compared with the number of cyclists and pedestrians killed and injured by motorists. the consumer group which? is advising people to stop buying fridges and freezers which do not have fully fire—proof backs. the concerns relate to appliances with flammable plastic backs which we re with flammable plastic backs which were unlikely to be the direct cause ofa were unlikely to be the direct cause of a firebug can flames spread. representing nearly half the market. the industry has insisted all fridges and freezers sold in the uk adhered to legal safety requirements. theresa may will chair a meeting of her cabinet this morning to discuss a major speech on brexit which she will deliver in italy tomorrow. the prime minister has insisted that the government is working together to get the best deal for britain — despite the foreign secretary, boris johnson, setting out his own vision for brexit in a recent newspaper article. people wanting to give up smoking are being officially advised
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to try e—cigarettes — despite a lack of evidence about their long term effects. public health england is including e—cigarettes in its annual "stop—smoking" campaign for the first time — it says they can be one of the most successful means of quitting smoking. jenny walrond reports. 0ver1 million people have used the stoptober challenge to quit smoking. this campaign has inspired over 1.5 million attempts to quit smoking since it started five years ago. the number of people successfully quitting is at the highest for at least a decade. success rates for people on the lowest incomes has gone up as well. that may be down to e—cigarettes. more than half of smokers turn to e—cigarettes when they want to quit. this year, for the first time, public health england will use
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the stoptober campaign to recommend people try e—cigarettes if they have struggled to give up in the past. experts admit it is not without risk but is significantly less harmful. they don't contain many of the nasty products in tobacco. they are about 95% less harmful than tobacco smoke. having said that, we all acknowledge that longer term research is needed. the number of people who smoke has steadily dropped in recent years, but it is still the main cause of preventable death in the uk. while experts acknowledge there is little evidence of the long—term benefits or harms of vaping, smokers are being advised they are more likely to quit if they combine e—cigarettes with local stop smoking services. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9:30am.
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getting in touch with us already about that cycling story, john on facebook saying it is about time the law was updated and they should be encouraged to take out insurance if they are regularly on the road. another one seeing we have cycle lanes but where i live they are not used instead they are all over the road, riding slowly, hardly any wonder the drive drivers mad. they are selfish and think they should get priority. move into your cycle lane and stay there. another on facebook saying they know someone who was killed by a cyclist on the pavement doing 25 mph and all they got was one—year suspended sentence in jail. got was one—year suspended sentence injail. not good enough. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport, we have been
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talking for so long about mark sampson, the england women's football coach, he has now been sacked? yes, we have been following this situation, the former england women's head coach mark sampson, you might remember he faced allegations of bullying and discrimination, he was cleared but has now been sacked for something completely different. it is claimed a whistle—blower came forward to make contact with the fa to make them aware of the full details of safeguarding allegations made against him in 2014. this was his last match in charge of england, a world cup qualifying win. those charges i have mentioned relate to his time as bristol academy manager and when i say the fa was made aware, the safeguarding unit investigated those claims and cleared him to continue in football in early 2015. so two questions, why are the fa now seeing the 2014
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investigation revealed clear evidence of inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour by a coach? and if they believe it to be true i was mark sampson able to stay as head coach of the england team? big questions. the fa say he is not a safeguarding threat and is free to continue coaching. we will get a reaction from a former player but here is a little of martin glenn, the fa chief executive, he defended their handling of the situation. the fa chief executive, he defended their handling of the situationlj actually feel positive with how we have dealt with eni aluko's concerns and how we have dealt with mark sampson. we have come out front and self disclosed. we have taken eni aluko's concerns seriously with not one investigation but two. and the moment we saw the bigger picture in respect to mark we have dealt with that. social media is full of fans of people following the sport who are asking the same questions. i cannot answer those questions and i
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wa nt cannot answer those questions and i want them answered. if they put him into that position and gave him all the resources and the backing and that has moved the game forward because of it, then why retrospectively, you think, his position is untenable? it's confusing. it is confusing, mark sampson sacked but allowed to continue in football and the media reaction has been strong, many believe the fa is in crisis and the levels of accountability need to be higher. tracy crouch sports minister said yesterday she wants assurances this will not happen again, i think we will hear more on this in the next few days and weeks. let's talk about chris froome. well, what a year it has been for great britain's chris froome — the first winner of the vuelta a espana and tour de france in the same year since 1978. unfortunately he couldn't take gold at the road race world championships but finished with a bronze medal yesterday in the time trial,
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which was won by tom dumoulin of the netherlands. froome though, ends the championships with two bronze medals, having also finished third in last sunday's team time trial with team sky. a smile on his face at the end of the season. and before i go we will have more on that mark sampson ‘s story just after ten o'clock. richard conway will be here to give us more richard conway will be here to give us more context about what is going on at the fa. thank you, we will speak to you then. rescuers in mexico city, with the help of hundreds of volunteers, have been working into the night through thunderstorms and downpours in a search for survivors of tuesday's devastating quake, which has killed more than 230 people. perhaps the most agonising search was at a junior school where 21 children, aged between seven and 13, were killed when the building collapsed. at least 30 children are still missing. but one small ray of hope amongst the devastation: search and rescue teams said they had made contact with a young girl inside the rubble of the school.
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the girl told us her name, frida. did she tell you this? we know there are two other kids but we do not know if they are dead or alive. we know if they are dead or alive. we know there are three bodies but nothing else than that. the school was one of 16 in mexico city to suffer serious damage in the 7.1 magnitude quake which toppled dozens of buildings there. the epicentre was 80 miles southeast of the capital. it was the second earthquake to hit the country in a matter of weeks, and came on the 30th anniversary of the violent earthquake in 1985 that killed more than 5,000 people. let's talk now to paola feregrino. she survived the earthquake in mexico 30 years ago and has raised over £4,000 for the rescue effort there now. jesus daza, lives near the primary school
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which collapsed in mexico city, and saw a tower collapsing across the road when it hit. david pena, was in the epicenter of the earthquake in puebla when it struck. adrian guttierezjoins us from california, his granddad was in a hospital bed when the earthquake hit — many nurses are still trapped in the hospital. thank you all for speaking to us. david, i want to start with you. you we re david, i want to start with you. you were in the epicentre of the earthquake. give us a sense of what it was like. many will have seen the images which were shared on social media of houses and buildings just collapsing. tell us what it was like? it was completely horrible. it was like being hit really hard in the face. it was surreal. it is the noise your home makes when it is
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shaking, when it is moving. it is a matter of complete shock at the end of it. you don't know if it is coming back or if it will hit harder. everything is shaking. when it starts, we know that mexico has many earthquakes, we know that, do you have a split second to think what do i do, do i run or state, or do you go into autopilot? no, it is a little bit like being hit in the face. you don't expect it, you are doing your normal routine and then after that you start feeling a little bit dizzy, is this happening? after a few seconds pass, everything is moving, you cannot walk. your pictures on the walls are coming off the walls and what is really impressive is just the sound the ground makes. the sub ground, it is rocks hitting rocks. it is basically
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like you are in the sea in the middle of the city. you are in the epicentre of this quake, if you go outside now, give us a sense of what you can see, notjust the buildings but presumably there are people out on the streets? definitely. right now, downtown puebla is an accessible. normally you will see in the city of 6 million people, downtown puebla at least 2 million people live but right now it is not accessible. you see the old buildings and churches built in the 15005 buildings and churches built in the 1500s with bell towers completely in half. debris on the floor, people walking on the street, rocks falling over them. it is surreal, completely surreal. jesus, you are ten minutes away from the primary school which
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collapsed in mexico city, give us a sense of how people are reacting? presumably, there are many volu nteers presumably, there are many volunteers out there trying to help any children who might still be alive? hello and thank you for having me. yes, there is nothing else we can watch on the news. there is nothing else we can read about on social media, everyone is focusing on this rescue. everyone is wondering what is going on in the school. i am ten minutes away from the school which collapsed and i know a couple of friends who were helping out, trying to remove all the debris to rescue all these kids. they say they were around 100 kids at the moment of the quake, when the building just almost completely collapsed. we have seen basically around the news and around social
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media, all the photographs of hundreds of people helping out, hundreds of people helping out, hundreds of people helping out, hundreds of policemen, firefighters, members of rescue teams who are there and actually, just a few hours ago, i was looking out on social media, that even maybe if some of the construction which is still on, it may collapse even more. so we are all suffering from watching all day images which we cannot believe, that inside this building, which is almost completely collapsed, there are still some children inside. we are still some children inside. we are all concerned, even though these are all concerned, even though these are kids we don't even know, we are just concerned about our people. it
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is really sad to see this situation going on. what is happening right now? 0bviously, going on. what is happening right now? obviously, the rescue workers are trying to see if they can pull any survivors out of the rubble, but presumably, people are too frightened to return to their homes. are you literally seeing people sleeping on the streets? actually, there are some shelters around the city. there are lots of places for people to stay. actually, people in mexico city have been really nice with each other. they have set up lots of places, not just the shelters, but also people are opening up their homes, their own apartments, so that people who have lost their homes, or people who cannot come back to their own places, because they might collapse, i guess some people are just saying if you don't have a place to stay, i
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can offer you my own home, or my own apartments, which is something amazing, i think. i want apartments, which is something amazing, ithink. iwant to apartments, which is something amazing, i think. i want to bring paola inn at this point. it must be really ha rd paola inn at this point. it must be really hard sitting in london. i know you have family in mexico. just share with us some of your stories. gas, and to feel that, not knowing if your loved ones rok, it is incredible. it is like a nightmare. my incredible. it is like a nightmare. my cousins were working in the clinic when the earthquake struck. they went out to pull people out of the rubble of the nearby buildings which collapsed immediately. they worked all night in a&e trying to save lives. for us in the uk, as the mexican community, it is tough seeing this and we have been working out what to do. we setup a giving fundraising page. we have raised
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£8,000 which we have sent to rescue teams. and the feeling of not being able to help, it is very hard. teams. and the feeling of not being able to help, it is very hardlj wa nt to able to help, it is very hardlj want to bring in adrian as well. your grandfather was in hospital when the earthquake struck? yes, there wasn't much time for them to react. my grandad was explaining to us react. my grandad was explaining to us that —— my grandma was explaining to us that she had no time to react when it hit. she was thrown across to the wall. they were saying there wasn't much time, there wasn't like a minute where you were aware of that, there is an earthquake happening. that happened. my grandad was in the hospital bed. it turned out the roof came down and ended up taking the nurse with the roof and
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my grandad had to find someone to ta ke my grandad had to find someone to take him out. eventually, someone was able to bring him out in a wheelchair, but he was saying there was a lot of chaos. the doctor did not want to be in charge of the people there any more. there was a lot of chaos, a lot of running around, not knowing where people were. my family was very devastated and no one knew what was going on. here in america, we cannot do anything physically to be with them. that is what sucks over here. of course. other than that, there has just been a lot of chaos, like eve ryo ne just been a lot of chaos, like everyone has been saying. it has not been easy for anyone, whether you are in mexico, because you really don't know what is going on. are in mexico, because you really don't know what is going onm are in mexico, because you really don't know what is going on. it is that confusing picture. and for you
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paola, being so far away has been hard. are you write that —— am i right that she lost a classmate? yes, there was some grumbling and so many people got trapped. it has been so many people got trapped. it has been so hard for people. the city has come to a standstill and it will ta ke come to a standstill and it will take so long to come back to life. of course. thank you so much force be keen to ask about that today. —— thank you so much for speaking to us about that today. still to come. theresa may will be in florence speaking about brexit. i wa nt to in florence speaking about brexit. i want to bring you some cycling comments which are coming in to us. we are looking at the change that the government is potentially looking at. mike says i am visually
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impaired person. what annoys me is older children riding bikes on foot paths. peter says cyclists should have compulsory tax and insurance. paul says there should be stricter laws governing cycling. i have lost count of the number of people who jump count of the number of people who jump red lights. they ignore pedestrian crossings and have blatant disregard for others' safety and the rain. brendan says he cycles and the rain. brendan says he cycles a lot and the number of pedestrians who walked out in front of you without looking is surprisingly if anything, about all won on bicycles should be compulsory. keep those comments coming. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. mexico has asked other countries to provide specialist equipment and to help search for survivors after the earthquake on tuesday in which 230 people were killed. emergency workers are still trying to reach people buried under
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the rubble of a primary school. rescuers say a thermal scanner has detected survivors trapped between slabs of concrete. a night—time curfew has been imposed in puerto rico which has been devastated by hurricane maria. many areas have been flooded, homes have been destroyed, and much of the island is without power. the governor has called the impact of the storm "nothing less than a disaster" and says it may take months for electricity to be completely restored. a group of ryanair pilots has rejected a cash bonus to work extra shifts to help reduce cancellations in the coming weeks. the airline was forced to cancel 2,000 flights over the next six weeks because of mistakes on holiday rotas. pilots' unions are now asking for new contracts and better working conditions. detectives investigating last week's terror attack on a london underground train at parsons green tube station have arrested a sixth person. a 17—year—old boy was detained in thornton heath, in south london, just after midnight.
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the five other people in custody are all men, aged between 18 and 48—years old. an urgent review into whether a new law is needed to tackle dangerous cycling has been launched by the government. it follows the high—profile conviction of a cyclist who struck and killed kim briggs as she crossed a road in london last year. charlie alliston was charged with an offence originally designed for horse and carriage drivers in the 19th century. theresa may will chair a meeting of her cabinet this morning to discuss a major speech on brexit which she will deliver in italy tomorrow. the prime minister has insisted that the government is working together to get the best deal for britain — despite the foreign secretary, boris johnson, setting out his own vision for brexit in a recent newspaper article. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.00. let's get the sport. hello again, fa chief executive
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martin glenn has defended her decision to sack england women's head coach mark sampson. in 2015 the fa decided he was not a safeguarding threat but he was dismissed yesterday for what the fa called inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour with the male players in a previous role. but he still free to coach. 0n the field last night marcus rashford scored twice for manchester united as they reached the fourth round of the league cup with a 4—1 win the fourth round of the league cup with a 4—1win over burton albion of the championship. the last 16 draw is available the bbc sport website. and finally chris froome says he has no regrets about a bronze medal in the time trial at the road world championships in norway, he called ita championships in norway, he called it a long and amazing season, he has done fantastic. we'll be back with more sportjust after ten. the prime minister will meet members of her cabinet shortly, to brief them on a key brexit speech she is making tomorrow in italy. it comes after a difficult week for the government. chris mason is in
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westminster for us. how important is this meeting?m how important is this meeting? it is important because ultimately the cabinet has two sign off on the speech the prime minister will give in florence. we have seen the first couple of arrivals, gavin moynihan is on arriving in the last five minutes or so and the business secretary greg clark a few minutes before that. this as we get the latest insight into the wranglings that have gone on internally. an article in the daily telegraph this morning by nick timothy, former chief of staff to theresa may until the disastrous election of a couple of months ago, from their perspective anyway. says the treasury is reluctant to mention the positives of brexit such as the brexit dividend, the public money which will be freed up. he ends the
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article by saying borisjohnson and philip hammond who have also been on brexit delivers this summer must understand the surest route to a bad deal or no deal at all is to carry on behaving as they are. they must stop their games now because the sta kes for stop their games now because the stakes for britain's future are too high. that's an insight into those disagreements as i look around to see if anyone else is arriving but i don't think so. these, the highlights or lights depending on your perspective on a week of cabinet turn oil. i do not want to managing the brexit process. we have theresa may managing that process, she is driving the car and i'm going to make sure that as far as i and the rest of the cabinet are concerned we help her do that. the uk government is driven from the front and we have the same destination in our sights and that's getting a good deal for brexit. as for back—seat driving, there is one driver in this car to use amber's metaphor which is often used, it is
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theresa. we are very clear we all have one focus and we are working together to achieve that aim which is the best possible deal for the united kingdom in leaving the european union. if you do not get what you want in this transition are you prepared to resign? well... ifi may say, i think you may be barking slightly up the wrong tree... do you feel bruised or slapped about by the prime minister? on the contrary, i have not seen any evidence of that whatever, what you have is a government working together to deliver a glorious brexit. are you as one? so how much is resting on this brexit speech the mr mackle make tomorrow? it is so important, we saw a big speech back injanuary,
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she still refers to that almost every time she talks about brexit. the crucial challenge he faces tomorrow is simultaneously keeping her cabinet together and the government together in terms of strategy on brexit whilst at the same time trying to unlock what seems to be the blockage in the negotiations going on in brussels. can she say enough to ensure that in the next round of negotiations progress can be made without saying so much that some in her cabinet feel uncomfortable about what she is saying? we are told there will be an open and generous offer from theresa may tomorrow to try to ensure and reassure other european union members they will not lose out as a result of britain leaving the european union but one minister telling the bbc this morning they are nervous about the prime minister showing too much of her hand about the divorce bill, how much the uk will pay the eu on departure, for fear that chips away at the
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leveraged the uk may have further on in negotiations. thank you for talking to us. with us in the studio are two political insiders to give us the inside track. from the financial times we have sebastian payne, katy balls is a political correspondent at the spectator and harry hill from conservative home. it is henry not harry isn't it? i knew that, that is why i corrected it. first of all, sebastian and katie, what have you made boris johnson's intervention, is this game playing as chris mears and was saying? is this his political ambition or is itjust boris?|j think it is all those things, it certainly is just boris, we heard from the prime minister that boris is boris with an almost reluctant sigh that it had happened again. bringing him into the cabinet, this was the calculation made, he is not
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conventional, he will speak out and surprising in some ways he's not done it before this. i think the timing was surprising and the content, it's what he said all through the referendum so that wasn't shocking. it was the fact he did itand wasn't shocking. it was the fact he did it and how it was packaged with columns and a leader column saying this is a kind of brexit leadership we need. he was a formerjournalist ‘s only what he was doing, how it had come across. we have heard him bumbling, idid had come across. we have heard him bumbling, i did not mean anything, but he knew what he was doing. it is easy it's easy to see everything as leadership manoeuvring, but it's also anxiety about what concessions over theresa may was about to make. i think now he's done this theresa may has been reminded she needs to keep them onside but he has realised he needs to compromise with what he wants. ultimately it's all about the
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transition period and the problem theresa may has is what comes after that. let's bring in henry, from a grassroots perspective, how are people responding to boris's intervention? i think most party members share boris's concerns about the process, they want to make sure the process, they want to make sure the prime minister stays on the path she set out a year ago when she said we would get control of our money and laws and leave the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice but one thing we have is party members are really tired of cabinet infighting. 0ver are really tired of cabinet infighting. over the summer we are really tired of cabinet infighting. 0verthe summerwe had all this briefing and counter briefing when we thought there might bea briefing when we thought there might be a leadership contest. the result isjacob be a leadership contest. the result is jacob reese—mogg got be a leadership contest. the result isjacob reese—mogg got to be a leadership contest. the result is jacob reese—mogg got to the top of our future leader survey and nobody thinks he is going to be leader but it's a sign from party members they want the cabinet to back up and get behind the prime minister. there was a poll of voters
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i think minister. there was a poll of voters ithink in minister. there was a poll of voters i think in borisjohnson's own constituency which says the same thing. so is this less about boris johnson and more about the prime minister and the weak position she is end? if anyone else would have done this she presumably would have sacked them? exactly. it's a warning shot from boris, look what i can do, ican get shot from boris, look what i can do, i can get the whole country to talk about me with one article. no one else can do that but it is about theresa may because her cabinet is a compromise, put together last year to try to bring the party together after the divisions of remain and leave. everyone thought she would reshuffle and make it more of a theresa may cabinet but then we had the election debacle so she cannot do that and with this boris business it seems she cannot do it now. i think one should she gets to this speech, conference, the next 2—macro and is brexit talks, the eu summit and is brexit talks, the eu summit and the budget, if she can get
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through all that without losing all her political capital she should have a reshuffle. that is a lot but if she can get to that stage then she can get a cabinet which reflects farand she can get a cabinet which reflects far and this is the calculation, can we get rid of boris, do we need to keep him where he is? but a lot of grassroots tories will be glad he is speaking about the positives of brexit because a lot of people are treating it like a problem. is she weak? i do not think she is strong. but i think this week has justified the decision to call the snap election. it backfired but you can see why, with the small numbers she has it looks impossible for her to do something without getting resignations. you can see why she wanted a big majority in order to put one side of the brexit debate because at the moment i don't see how she will get through everything mentioned without having people resigning. and that would be
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catastrophic or not? it defends what the feeling of the general party is. if they take her side and agree you would not get a leadership challenge but it increases the chance of the government having one if you have a divided party which tends to happen if you introduce europe to the conservative party. people watching this at home will be thinking this is boring, so divided, get on with it and stop infighting, take as out of europe and get a good deal, that is what most people will be thinking, do you feel the prime minister is weak and able to deliver that for people? the prime minister has been undermined by the general election and it does not help but before that she was so i'm collegial because it means she had no goodwill with the cabinet and now they are emboldened and she has no authority to keep them in line. we had that fractures summer where they were briefing against each other. but the fa ct briefing against each other. but the fact none have emerged as the
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leadership contender, and attractive contender, actually it makes theresa may's position stronger than some might think because the party knows if they get rid of her now we are going to have a leadership election dominated by brexit, none of the candidates are attractive to the grassroots membership and it will certainly be a complete disaster. so that gives the prime minister some breathing room. the general opinion now is that she will stay until brexit formally happens in 2019. she will have a reshuffle to try to give some of the 2010 and 2015 in take a bit more government experience to make them viable in a leadership contest. so she is not strong and does not have the authority to drive through a transformative domestic agenda as she wants but she's not as weak as people including myself but she might be in the immediate days and weeks after the election. sebastian is this a lesson in keeping your enemies closer or not?
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i think it shows the pros and cons of that. winnie gave boris the job it was essentially saying the stakes are low, everyone thought he was going to be prime minister last summer, michael gove stabbing him in the front, back and side so he wasn't and his aspirations fell apart. the calculation was if we bring him in we have to keep him onside, qichen in the foreign office which she has described as a gilded cage. he is bound by collective responsibility so cannot speak out and he has pushed the bones of collective responsibility this week. for theresa may it probably was the right decision, he's a big hitter and henry was just saying theresa may's biggest asset is now one can challenge her, there is no obvious successor. if boris was on the backbenches he would definitely be lining upa backbenches he would definitely be lining up a challenge. we will find out, this isn't going away, thank you all for coming to talk to us. coming up, dangerous driving laws
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could be extended to cycling. if you area could be extended to cycling. if you are a cyclist or pedestrian who has been hit get in touch. we are going to be discussing mess around 1045, we wa nt to be discussing mess around 1045, we want your thoughts on that, the hashtag is a victoria live. a group of ryanair pilots has rejected a cash bonus to help reduce cancellations after rota problems forced the airline to cancel 2000 flights over the next six weeks. and passengers are reporting problems with refunds and compensation. mike cartwright is at stansted airport. ryanair goes from worse to worse. pilate say we will not worked extra days even if you give us more money? that is right. michael 0'leary described this as a mess and perhaps to get out of a mess you offer a one—off cash bonus to work extra
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hours. we understand he has offered £12,000 to pilots and £6,000 to first officers. but in this letter seen by the bbc, we understand that representatives of 18 of the airlines at airports have rejected this, perhaps to broker a new deal. in the letter they say the pilot market is changing and ryanair will have to change the way pilots and management work together. they say to stop the large number of pilots leaving to greener pastures perhaps new contracts are the way to go. earlier in the week we heard michael 0'leary say they do not have a shortage of pilots, despite the fact that we know in recent months 140 of those have moved to other airlines. just to give you a flavour of what is going
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on here, this is ryanair‘s hub in the uk, around 19 flights in and out of here have been cancelled. 0n the website they are offering refunds or alternative flights. there have been alternative flights. there have been a problem with consumer groups asking why are they not offering compensation? and in the papers we are hearing stories of passengers rebooking their flight and having to pay for extras like extra leg room and extra luggage and so on. this is and extra luggage and so on. this is a story which is rumbling on from ryanair. it will not go away. michael 0'leary has come out and apologised but later on today or beginning now in dublin is there a gm and we understand a lot of this will be discussed there. i am sure a lot more will come out today # there agm. a number of police forces in england are giving grants to christian charities who work with vulnerable groups in their areas. it's currently being done in eight parts of the county. the police say they're helping the charities deal with people who simply need advice and support — so that officers don't have to divert resources from fighting crime. senior officers deny the grants amount to policing on the cheap — as chi chi izundu reports. essex police, what
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is your emergency? hello, if you have got an emergency and you need the police, can you press the number on the key pad to let me know you're there. i am here but you lot can't help me. i'm just listening to you so i can waste time out here. 52 times — that is how many 999 calls the guy who missed his train made in one evening. you've missed the last train home? yes, but i don't get it... those types of calls, many of which come from people who have mental health issues or are intoxicated, clog up the call centres which prevent real emergencies getting through and takes police away from dealing with crime. if i've got this right, you are ringing to complain that your neighbours have left dirty clothes outside your house? yes, yes. you know... let me interrupt you there. number one, not a police matter. number two, definitely not an emergency. police numbers have dropped in many areas of the uk and it's meant forces have to rethink how they're spending their cash. most police want to deal
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with criminals, not people going through a crisis. sometimes, policing isn't even the right response for minor crime. anything to prevent has got to be good and the way forward. however, we would like to have more officers. essex police say per head of the population, they're the least funded force in the country, covering some of the most deprived parts of the uk. they also say that 80% of the calls they get to their emergency control room are not what they would consider to be police business. we are seeing increasingly mental health services, social services, children's services are increasingly fractured and there are gaps emerging. i think public safety is much more about how we come together. the coming together for some forces means using the help of charities. some of those initiatives involve domestic abuse advocates who come in, understand the experiences of people going through domestic abuse
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crises, or victimhood. we also have work with other voluntary groups who come in and do work with young people in the night—time economy and they fill some of the gaps my officers would like to do, but because they're so thinly stretched just don't have the time and capacity to do so. step forward the cinammon network who hope to relieve that stretch. essex police through their police crime commissioner's office have paid the christian charity £23,000 to help fund a number of projects to pick up the slack from their officers. each charity doesn't get a cut of the budget, maybe just a few thousand pounds to get them started, have leadership training and give them support, things like that. then the church has to match how much the police put in and it's hoped within a year that charity will become self—funding. now everyone who takes part does it on a voluntary basis and in order to access the grant,
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the charities have to agree to serve those in need, no matter their faith or background. how do i know what the experience of an ethiopian woman living in thurrock is like today? i don't. but working with voluntary groups who can help us to understand that, working with domestic violence advocates who look at the welfare and the journey away from domestic abuse, that's what makes a real difference. the police officers can't do everything all the time. they try and be educational professionalists, sexual offence experts, you know, they can't be, we need to work more effectively with those who know what is going on in local communities. i want to thank you for giving us the lord jesus christ who himself showed us to love one another... another christian charity that gets £2,000 from police is street pastors. we come down into the town from the office and already interacted with a homeless guy who we just checked how was he doing, was he warm enough, has he got facilities and, has he had a drink, something to eat today. he seemed in good spirits, so we spent a bit of time and we've
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also caught up a little bit with how is he getting on with some of the processes that he's trying to do with the council. he's trying to get himself back on the housing ladder. bye—bye... we buy lollipops to give out, water and flip—flops. they're the main tools, so water to introduce ourselves to people sometimes, but in that introduction and that rehydration, it actually helps in the instance where alcohol is an issue. lollipops, we find if you are going to go up into what could be a confrontational situation, offer a lollipop and then itjust distracts for a couple of minutes and then we also like to give ladies that are walking around and taken off their shoes, going to be treading on all sorts of horrible things, we like to give them flip—flops. so we give all of this away free. from the people we kick out, we don't know what happens to them afterwards, whether they've gone home or not. it's nice to know there are people walking about making sure
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if they have not made it home, they are going to get home and get the help that they need and everything like that really. it's nice and it makes a big difference. why faith groups in particular? i think the straightforward answer is because they want to. what we are doing here is, we are enabling people who want to do good in their community to do it in a structured way in collaboration with the police service, so that, you know, we are trying to achieve goals that are going to make a difference to the night—time economy or to young people. in sussex where a charity's received money, police say they've seen a fall in antisocial behaviour and violent crime on friday and saturday nights. so far, eight police forces have signed up, but bosses are hoping at least half of all the forces across the uk willjoin within five years. policing resources like the resources of every public agency are more limited than ever.
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and actually, one of the ways of making the money they have go further is by building collaborations and partnerships with others. so actually, by working with churches, the police are seeing or creating a partner that leverages the money they do have to make an even bigger difference for the strength and safety of the communities. out of a local church like this here in harrogate comes baby basics, one of around eight projects that's been awarded a grant by north yorkshire's chief constable. it's got about £2,000 and its aim is simple, to help new mums and dads. do you think mums and dads really struggle when it comes to a newborn and having to get the basics but they don't want to say, so they might steal a babygro or formula or nappies just because they can't think of where else to go? i think it gets to a point when you've got to provide for your baby and you don't have enough stuff that you might have to do that.
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it's happened. i know that harrogate's not known for things like that, but i know quite a few mums who can struggle to that point where it'sjust too much for them and they don't know where else to go. we have been able to tackle root problems, things that may have escalated into something else, so we have been able to provide these things that maybe some families wouldn't have been able to get because of financial difficulties or for whatever reason. so we have been able to tackle the causes before consequences get too bad. so mum's lost one of her children. she's onlyjust realised she's got three instead of four. back in essex, volunteers are being used to help with the workload of police community support officers who focus on community issues and crime prevention, but their numbers have been cut by the hundreds. should you come across a three—year—old, we'd be obliged. thank you... without looking, the child boarded the bus and the bus pulled away.
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then mum realised one of her children were missing. found safe, returned to mum so mum and child all happy. for police special constables, ian grant and debbie edwards, such is the demand on their time, they can't even walk a beat as much as they'd like to and something that used to be a routine part of theirjob, advising neighbours about being safe after a spate of burglaries, has largely been passed on to volunteer groups. hello, sorry to disturb you. was you aware one of your neighbours had a break—in... some would argue it's sad when something like the police authority has to rely on volunteers. but unfortunately, that's the way forward. is it the way forward? it's like saying these days, are food banks a good thing? we shouldn't have food banks.
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they shouldn't be there in the first place. no—one should be hungry, should they... chief constables say it's not policing on the cheap, it's a necessity for their officers to get on and deal with serious crime. we have got two choices, we can stop, we can just become one of those old—fashioned police forces thatjust respond to crime, turn up when it's all gone wrong, don't provide support to domestic abuse victims, don't try and understand what is going on with young people who are out too late and drunk too much. that's not the type of policing we want in britain. we want a police force who says, with a small investment with volunteers who want to do that little bit more or bring that insight from their profession, we can do so much more. lots of you getting in touch with us this morning about the review by the government into whether there should be new laws to tackle cycling which
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is dangerous, essentially like the dangerous driving law. an e—mail from john says cycling is a healthy eco—friendly form of transport which should be encouraged, not demonised. it is best for all concerned when cyclists, motorists and pedestrians are kept apart. what is needed are more cycle routes, not mourn a just and on. and e—mail says dan says use the cycle lanes that i have had it with pedestrians who block them. one quy with pedestrians who block them. one guy swung a fist at me when i warned him that he was in a cycle lane. let's get the latest weather update. hello, good morning, everyone. we had a decent start across the uk. a nice start in stevenage, in hertfordshire. it has not been like that for all of us. we have had some outbreaks of rain. as the rain moves
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through northern ireland, the skies are through northern ireland, the skies a re pretty through northern ireland, the skies are pretty dark and grey. at least it is improving here. we will see some sunny spells developing across northern ireland and western areas of england and wales into the afternoon. the rain continues to push its way further east. it could be heavy for a time over the next couple of hours or so. for scotland, while the rain will linger on, there will be some sunny spells. feeling fresher into the afternoon. temperatures are 13 or 14 celsius. funny spells the northern ireland. the chance of the odd heavy, thundery shower. in the far east of england, head of this area of rain, still quite warm. the cloud will increase the temperature is about 19 or 20 celsius. still some rain in central and southern areas but in the south—west, drier and brighter. the weather front associated with the rain will continue to clear eastwards. then we have that ridge of high pressure. with clear skies, it will be colder than it was last
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night. in the countryside, temperatures down to four to 6 degrees. in the towns and cities, about eight or 10 celsius. heavy rain spreading into northern ireland. that will move its way into scotland. some patchy rain into wales, the midlands and the north by the end of the day. temperatures around the mid to high teens. going into the weekend, we have a big area of low pressure situated out towards the west. we can see the isobars are really squeezed together. strong winds across the western areas. high pressure towards the east. that is influencing most things on saturday. foremost, it is dry. there will the odd shower and sunny spells. any rain should hold off by the far west. by sunday the rain will move its way through. it will be patchy across scotland, wales and the south—west of england. towards the
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east it should be drier. i want to give you a quick update on hurricane maria. it is towards the north—east of the dominican republic. 0ver maria. it is towards the north—east of the dominican republic. over the next few days it will continue to bring some heavy rain and strong winds. it is just tracking to the east of the turks and caicos islands. i will keep you up—to—date on our website. bye—bye. it is thursday, it is 10am, i am chloe tilly. mexico asks other countries for help with specialist teams and equipment as the desperate search for survivors of tuesday's earthquake goes on — 3 people are believed to be trapped alive in the rubble of a school. we cannot believe that inside this building there is almost completely collapsed, there are still some children inside. we'll hear from the red cross who are helping provide that specialist help. james herbert died in police custody while suffering with mental health problems — his death should have been prevented — now the police watchdog is using his case as a lesson for all police forces — we'll be speaking to them and to james' father shortly.
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tough new laws for cyclists are being considered after the death of kim briggs who was killed as she crossed the road in central london. her husband welcomed the news. this is not in any way anti—cycling, it is not in any way anti—cycling, it is that her case was special in that they were able to bring a manslaughter charge but that is very unusual. had they not been able to do that we would have been left with just the victorian law. what do you think? get in touch in the usual way on your screen now. good morning, here's annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. mexico has asked other countries to provide specialist teams and equipment to help search for survivors after the earthquake on
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tuesday in which at least 230 people we re tuesday in which at least 230 people were killed. in mexico city emergency workers are still trying to reach a number of people buried under the rubble of a primary school. a senior official told the bbc they include a 13—year—old girl who is sheltering under a table. david was close to the epicentre of the earthquake and told us about the moment it struck. it was completely horrible, it was like hitting really ha rd horrible, it was like hitting really hard in the face. it is something surreal, it is just noise, your home when it is shaking and moving, it's com plete when it is shaking and moving, it's complete shock. you don't know if it's coming back, you don't know if it's coming back, you don't know if it's going to be harder, everything is just it's going to be harder, everything isjust shading. it's going to be harder, everything is just shading. and it's going to be harder, everything isjust shading. and night-time cu rfew isjust shading. and night-time curfew has been imposed in puerto rico which has been devastated by hurricane maria, many areas have been flooded, homes destroyed and much of the island without power. the governor has called the impact
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of the storm nothing less than a disaster and says it may take many months for electricity to be com pletely months for electricity to be completely restored. a group of ryanair pilots completely restored. a group of rya nair pilots have completely restored. a group of ryanair pilots have rejected a cash bonus to work extra shifts to cover cancellations. the airline was forced to cancel flights due to m ista kes forced to cancel flights due to mistakes with holiday rotors. pilots are asking for a new contract and better conditions. detectives investigating a terror attack at parsons green tube station last week have arrested a sixth person. a 17—year—old boy was detained in thornton heath in south londonjust after midnight. five other people in custody are all men aged between 18 and 48. an urgent review into whether a new law is needed to tackle dangerous cycling has been lodged by the government. it follows the high—profile conviction of a cyclist who struck and killed kim briggs as she crossed a load in london last year. charlie alliston was charged with an offence
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originally designed for horse and carriage drivers in the 19th century. the consumer group which is advising people to stop buying fridges and freezers without fully fireproof backs. concerns relate to appliances with flammable plastic bags which are unlikely to be the direct cause of a fire but can help fla mes direct cause of a fire but can help flames spread. according to research there are at least 236 models on sale representing almost half the market. but the industry has insisted all fridges and freezers sold in the uk adhere to legal safety requirements. people wanting to give up smoking are being officially advised to try e—cigarettes despite a lack of evidence about the long—term effects. public health england is including e—cigarettes in its annual campaignfor including e—cigarettes in its annual campaign for the first time. it says they can be one of the most successful means of quitting. that isa summary successful means of quitting. that is a summary of the latest news, more at half past ten. you are getting in touch about the
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cycling story all morning, whether there should be a change in the law to make it death by dangerous cycling as we have by driving. 0ne text saying i walked two rescue dogs and have cyclists coming up behind me breaking at the last minute, it terrifies the dogs, the majority of cyclists do not give way. margaret has said it should be made mandatory that cyclists take responsibility for their behaviour and this includes wearing clothing which is clearly visible to other road users. get in touch on this story and all the other stories we are talking about. if you do text you will be charged the standard network rate. lets over and talk to the sport. martin glenn has defended the sacking of mark sampson, sports mr trea cy sacking of mark sampson, sports mr treacy crouch has called a mess. it follows evidence of inappropriate
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and unacceptable behaviour and he had been at the centre of allegations of bullying and racism. we can talk to richard conway, this may be a confusing timeline for some people, tell us exactly how and why this came about? the timeline is crucial. mark sampson was appointed as head coach to the england women's tea m as head coach to the england women's team in december 20 13. a few weeks after that, into 2014, the fa received allegations regarding his time at bristol academy. safeguarding investigation was ordered, that took almost a year to report back. by this time they are in too early 2015. an independent panel of three people were convened, they made a judgment and assessment that the fa say cleared mark sampson to continue working and said he did not pose a safeguarding risk. it was later in 2015, october 2015 that martin glenn the chief executive who
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had come into office during this time was made aware of the existence of the report. he says his mistake was to take it on face value that it was to take it on face value that it was confidential and he could not read the contents. it wasn't until last wednesday that martin glenn says he went back to the report having been informed by two anonymous people that perhaps he should take a look at this. he did, convened a board meeting and that board meeting decided mark sampson's contract should be dismissed because of the contents of this report. nothing illegal, but conduct at bristol academy this report contained the fa believed was unbecoming of an england head coach and he had to leave. i actually feel very positive with the way we have dealt with eni aluko's concerns and mark sampson, previously might have tried to bury the issue but we have come out front and self disclosed, we have ta ken
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come out front and self disclosed, we have taken eni aluko's concerns very seriously was not one investigation but two and the moment we saw the bigger picture with respect to mark we dealt with it. many people will now be asking how he was able to continue in the role. some of those questions relating to martin glenn, the lack of curiosity perhaps about a very senior member of fa staff with safeguarding allegations against him, martin glenn. the report was confidential. there will be questions asked about the nature of the bureaucratic processes within the fa, about why the chief executive did not look further into this and why as well it took until last wednesday for him to look at this, the claim that two people came forward. i put it to martin glenn yesterday that this was perhaps very convenient timing given the enquiries into eni aluko but he
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denied that and said it was separate issues the fa had to be seen to be doing the right thing. thank you richard conway, that's all the sport for now. rescuers in mexico city, with the help of hundreds of volunteers, have been working into the night through thunderstorms and downpours in a search for survivors of tuesday's devastating quake, which has killed more than 230 people. now the country's foreign minister, luis videgaray caso, has appealed for international help saying mexico urgently needs highly specialised equipment and crews with expertise to aid the desperate search efforts. perhaps the most agonising search was at a junior school where 21 children, aged between seven and 13, were killed when the building collapsed. at least 30 children are still missing. but one small ray of hope amongst the devastation: search and rescue teams said they had made contact with a young girl inside the rubble of the school. translation: the girl told us her name, did she tell you this? yes,
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she told me that, when she told us her name she told us there were two other kids and other bodies but at this point we don't know if they are dead or alive. we are able to hear three different people. we know there are the three bodies but nothing else in that room. the school was one of 16 in mexico city to suffer serious damage in the 7.1 magnitude quake which toppled dozens of buildings there. the epicentre was 80 miles southeast of the capital. it was the second earthquake to hit the country in a matter of weeks, and came on the 30th anniversary of the violent earthquake in 1985 that killed more than 5,000 people. earlier i spoke to some people directly affected by the disaster, including a gentleman who was right by the school which collapsed, but first we'll hear from a man from california who grandad was any hospital bed when the earthquake struck. she had no time to react
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onceit struck. she had no time to react once it hit, she was thrown from one side of the wall to the other side of the wall in a matter of seconds and if it wasn't for two guys there she would have inaudible . there was not like a minute before where you are aware it was going to be an earthquake. that happened and my grandpa was in the hospital bed, it turns out that the roof came down and actually ended up taking the nurse with the roof and my grandpa, someone was able to bring him out in a wheelchair but they were telling us a wheelchair but they were telling us there was a lot of chaos and nobody knew what was going on. we are suffering from watching all the images, we cannot believe that inside this building that is almost completely collapsed there are still some children inside. well, we are all concerned, even though of course
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these are not kids we even know but, well, we are just concerned about our people and it's really sad to see this situation going on. matthew cochrane is from the red cross. they have teams on the ground in mexico. he joins us now from switzerland. give us a sense of how difficult thisjob is? give us a sense of how difficult this job is? you give us a sense of how difficult thisjob is? you have highly trained teams but the challenges you are facing? the images we are seeing underscore how complex this is. it's a similar complexity to any earthquake, you are trying to find a balance between speed, you need to get people quickly but also you need to move carefully, you do not want to move carefully, you do not want to triggerfurther to move carefully, you do not want to trigger further collapse. it can be quite painstaking work removing pieces of rubble piece by piece, particularly when you know or suspect survivors, there are
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survivors nearby. this is still an active search and rescue effort, hundreds of volunteers on the ground, search and rescue teams from mexico and overseas who are working on this and hoping very much to be finding survivors over the coming hours and days. many of those who have followed this will have seen people holding hands aloft to get eve ryo ne people holding hands aloft to get everyone to be silent so they can listen out for survivors, if your tea m listen out for survivors, if your team is here are those noises do they have the equipment at the moment to get people out? we know mexico has been asking for that equipment. it depends on a case—by—case, situations where it's only going to be possible to remove rubble by hand, very gently and carefully so to avoid triggering another collapse. in other situations where equipment is needed, the equivalent might be with some teams and not others and i think that is why the government has asked for support and white
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countries are sending support. you mentioned in the package this is the second earthquake in the country to respond, which is quite huge, mexico knows what it's doing to respond to a disaster but it is stretched to the maximum. the window you have two pull people alive? there is talk of a window being 48—72 hours and every hour which passes, every day which passes the window shuts. it's a search and rescue operation until there is no hope and we know from other disasters, you will remember some of the incredibly moving stories from haiti, days after that earthquake, survivors being pulled from the rubble. it's a live search and rescue operation. teams are working around the clock, through the night with whatever resources they have, often with their bare hands and they are hopeful of
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finding people live and we are hopeful they can do that as well. talking to guests in earlier from the epicentre of the quake and also in mexico city and they say there was real concern is more buildings may fall, people are sleeping on the streets in some cases, how difficult is it for teams to work when there is it for teams to work when there isa is it for teams to work when there is a challenge there could be more collapsing around them ? is a challenge there could be more collapsing around them? incredibly difficult. i am collapsing around them? incredibly difficult. iam not collapsing around them? incredibly difficult. i am not there with them. i have not had those conversations. but you can imagine the stress, the conditions people are working under. but it also speaks to another aspect of this, at the moment the focus is search and rescue but there will be considerable need for support for people who have lost their homes, peoples whose homes are now in buildings which are perhaps no longer safe and we are going to up to see in the coming days attention turned to that as well, turning to the survivors who might be homeless for months if not longer if their
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homes were destroyed. matthew, thank you for talking to us. an inquest into the death of moors murderer ian brady is about to begin. the 79—year—old serial killer died in a secure hospital on merseyside in may. in 1966, ian brady and his partner myra hindley were jailed for life for the killings of 12—year—old john kilbride, 10—year—old lesley ann downey and 17—year—old edward evans. they went on to admit the murders of 16—year—old pauline reade, and 12—year—old keith bennett — who you can see far left — the only victim whose remains have never been found. myra hindley died injail in 2002. we can speak to kate sweeting at bootle town hall in merseyside now. what are we expecting to hear today?
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we are expecting to hear more detail about the final days of ian brady. he died aged 79 in may at a psychiatric hospital in merseyside. he had been there for more than 30 yea rs. he had been there for more than 30 years. he had been fighting to be moved to a hospital in scotland where he might be allowed to die. he had been an hunger strike since 1999 on and off. he was being force—fed right up until his final days. we know that he died from heart failure, amongst other complications, but we will hear from two doctors today to give us more details about exactly what those complications were. we are also likely to find out what has or will be done with ian brady's body. that is not yet known and is likely to be revealed in the inquest. the coroner christopher sumner had said he will not allow ian brady's ashes to be
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scattered on saddleworth moor in greater manchester, which is where four of the five victims are buried. that is something the victims are very keen not to happen. so what will happen to him is likely to be revealed today. his remains may already have been disposed of. myra hindley died in prison in 2002. her remains were scattered in a secret unmarked location by a prison officer. we will find out if that may be similar treatment for ian brady's remains. kate sweeting, thank you for speaking to us. time and again we hear about people with mental health issues, who die while in police custody. and more often than not the investigations into their deaths find that mistakes were made in how they were treated — and that their deaths were avoidable. now the body responsible
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for those investigations is calling for change. james herbert died in custody when he was 25. using his experience, they've identified common mistakes which they want police to learn from, so that some of these deaths can be prevented. james's father tony herbert is here now — as is rachel cerfontyne, the deputy chair of the ipcc. let's talk about the day when james died. he had come in to police co nsta ntly a nd died. he had come in to police constantly and on the day he died he was running into the road and behaving erratically. he was restrained and ta ken behaving erratically. he was restrained and taken into custody in a cage in a back of a police van for a cage in a back of a police van for a journey of around 45 minutes and then carried into the cells? yes. he was carried into the cells. after he arrived at yeovil he was still not
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recognised as a medical emergency. he was unresponsive. he was making grunting noises but nothing much else. he was carried into the cells by five police officers. they stripped him naked, they had already taken out the mattress from the cell, and left him naked face down in the cell. they shut the door and they expected james, i think, to spring back to life. i think they felt he had been feigning being unconscious. he did not. at that stage they put him into the recovery position and finally called an ambulance, but sadly by the time the ambulance, but sadly by the time the ambulance arrived, he had already stopped breathing. rachel, so many things that sound like they went wrong. why does this consistently seem to be a problem?” wrong. why does this consistently seem to be a problem? i think the challenge for police officers is they are dealing with incidents which can be very difficult. they go
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to incidents sometimes not understanding the circumstances they are going into. i think fundamentally what we are saying todayis fundamentally what we are saying today is it is about mindset. when the police are dealing with someone who might have mental health difficulties, you look at them and approach them and come to that situation with the view of them as a patient, rather than as a potential criminal. if you come with a patient mindset, you ask, how can i keep this person safe and anyone around them safe? how can i reduce the potential for harm, rather than how cani potential for harm, rather than how can i take them into custody? can it be difficult to identify if someone has mental health issues or if they have been using alcohol or drugs?” think it is. the police may find themselves dealing with someone who has all of those things or any combination. we are saying if someone is behaving in a way which may be strange or acting oddly,
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start with the assumption that it might be some of those things, treat them asa might be some of those things, treat them as a patient and only change that behaviour if you find something else out. if you start with that approach, i think a lot of harm could be reduced. do you think, tony, that clearly things should have been differently done, but do you think police officers are able to cope currently? do you think there should always be a medical person in a police station there at all times to identify when your son came in that this was a medical emergency which clearly was missed? i guess that james stenson emergency which clearly was missed? i guess thatjames stenson and emergency which clearly was missed? i guess that james stenson and was recognised as a mental health case early on but the fact of the medical emergency being missed, at yeovil it would have been helpful if there had been a medical person there. i think it would also have been more helpful, had the police officers that restrained him in the first place, had the kind of training
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which is to be able to recognise the difference between somebody, as you have just pointed out, difference between somebody, as you havejust pointed out, with mental health issues, and somebody who hasn't. i think there are a number of clues in james' hasn't. i think there are a number of clues injames' case which suggest he was suffering with mental health issues. but that is about resources , health issues. but that is about resources, to a degree, medical resources , resources, to a degree, medical resources, but mostly it is about culture and training and that is the issue. is it about empathy? yes. if you see some another patient you naturally bring empathy, care and respect in trying to look after someone and that is why the message is important. training guidelines and protocols are really important. when you are dealing with an incident, key messages help. think another important message we're trying to get across with six missed chancesis trying to get across with six missed chances is the use of force and
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restraint. police officers may think thatis restraint. police officers may think that is the safest way but often it escalate the situation. for someone who is suffering, to restrain them, it can be so frightening for them and it can escalate and make the situation dangerous. are you saying that police should never restrain someone? no, i am not. i have to be realistic. there may be some situations which are so potentially dangerous for the patient or people around them that they have to use it. i around them that they have to use it. lam around them that they have to use it. i am not around them that they have to use it. lam not being around them that they have to use it. i am not being unrealistic. what lam it. i am not being unrealistic. what i am saying is last resort, and if you have to use it, use it minimally. explain what restraint is. there are different levels of restraint. injames' is. there are different levels of restraint. in james' case is. there are different levels of restraint. injames' case we are talking about handcuffs and leg restraints. police will use escalating levels and that is what happened in james' case. escalating levels and that is what happened injames' case. restraint is the use of force, it is stopping somebody doing something by using force and that force has to be legal
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and proportionate. ithink force and that force has to be legal and proportionate. i think police do have to use force on occasions. we would all want them to when it is appropriate. what i am saying this in terms of people with mental health difficulties, that use of force can be dangerous. it can be fatal. we are saying try and use other techniques like containment or talking to people. and if you have to use it, recognise that you are quite possibly creating a medical emergency and then treat it as a medical emergency. get urgent medical emergency. get urgent medical help. i think i agree with all of that. i think it is that point which is now accepted, really by police forces who understand the situation, that a person who is in mental health crisis, who is restrained, is a medical emergency. you do not need any other residents, other than they have mental health issues and they are in restraint. do
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you think this will change police forces attitudes? i hope so. i think it isa forces attitudes? i hope so. i think it is a really good piece of work by the independent police complaints commission, which i think is an achievement, because it is really trying to shape the future and keep people safe in the future, rather than looking historically at something which went wrong. it will depend on how seriously it is taken by the police, how seriously it is taken by by the police, how seriously it is ta ken by police by the police, how seriously it is taken by police leaders, and a recognition that perhaps police officers need a little more in their armoury. 0ne officers need a little more in their armoury. one thing i would say which is really encouraging is a couple of weeks ago i addressed a conference, which was policing and mental health, and i told them about what happened to james, and i told them about six missed chances which is coming, and the result was extremely positive and supportive. maybe this is the time change. if that happens,
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what a legacy we have given my poor son. thank you both for coming in to talk to us. avon and somerset police who dealt with james say misconduct proceedings are now at an end and one officer has been cleared of allegations. they added, all too often the police service has been the last resort for people in mental health crisis. when all our files and the events leading up to james' tragic death is a clear example of this. this report is a call for action for police services nationwide and i would like to reassure our communities that we have made fundamental and wide reaching changes covering all the recommendations made. 0ur reporter is in southwark and can
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bring us up to date with developments into the parsons green bomb. six men are being held by police under section 41 of the terrorism act. powers allow them to hold all of the men, including one who is believed to be 21—year—old syrian refugee until today. a further man who we believe to be an 18—year—old iraqi refugee can be held until saturday. police have arrested three further men in south wales, in newport, 25—year—old man on tuesday and early on wednesday morning and a 48—year—old man. police have confirmed they have arrested a sixth person, a 17—year—old boy who they arrested in thornton heath in london and they say they are also conducting a search at a house in that area. that ta kes search at a house in that area. that takes the total to six properties which have been searched by police. we know one property, a chicken shop in hounslow, is no longer being
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searched. none of the people arrested so far have been charged with any crime. it could be several more days before we hear any news about charges. we may not get any information at all. there may not be any charges. in manchester there we re any charges. in manchester there were 20 people arrested and they we re were 20 people arrested and they were all subsequently released without charge. police have described this as an active and fast moving investigation which is still very much ongoing. thank you for that, matthew. lots of people getting in touch this morning about this government proposal about whether they should introduce a new law looking at whether they should look at cycling and whether there should be a death by dangerous cycling lore. richard says i regularly have pedestrians walking into the street without looking and then swearing at me when i ring my bell. i also see cyclists who jump off pavements into the road without checking for ongoing traffic. brian says i am frequently walk along a country lane which is part of the
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national cycle route and i regularly have to leap out of the way from cyclists who do not have a bell. jonathan says it is sad to hear about the unfair negativity about cyclists this morning. is this pic on cyclists de? it is not, you are fine. another person says ic —— i see drivers eating and using their mobile phone at the wheel and they regularly come out in front of me. keep those views coming. still to come: new data shows the highest success rate on record for people quitting smoking. we'll speak to current and past smokers about kicking the habit. and the consumer group which? is advising people to stop buying fridges and freezers without fully fireproof backs, a campaign which has also been made by the london fire brigade. with the news here's annita in the bbc newsroom. mexico has asked other countries to provide specialist teams and equipment to help search
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for survivors after the earthquake on tuesday. at least 230 people are known to have died. in mexico city, emergency workers are still trying to reach a number of people buried under the rubble of a primary school. a group of ryanair pilots has rejected a cash bonus to work extra shifts to help reduce cancellations in the coming weeks. the airline was forced to cancel 2000 flights over the next six weeks because of mistakes on holiday rotas. pilots' unions are now asking for new contracts and better working conditions. detectives investigating last week's terror attack on a london underground train at parsons green tube station have arrested a sixth person. a 17 year—old boy was detained in thornton heath, in south london, just after midnight. the five other people in custody are all men, aged between 18 and 48. theresa may is chairing a meeting of
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her cabinet to discuss a major speech on brexit she will deliver in italy tomorrow, she has insisted the government is working together to get the best deal for britain despite borisjohnson setting out his own vision for brexit in a recent newspaper article. that's a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o'clock. here's some sport now with hugh. the fa chief executive martin glenn has defended their decision to sack the england women's head coach mark sampson. in 2015 the fa decided he was not a safeguarding threat but he was not a safeguarding threat but he was dismissed yesterday for what the fa called inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour with female players in a previous role. he is still free to coach. marcus rashford scored twice for manchester united last night as the holders reached the fourth round of the week up with the fourth round of the week up with the 4-1 the fourth round of the week up with the 4—1 win the fourth round of the week up with the 4—1win over championship side burton albion. also wins for
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chelsea, arsenal and manchester city, you can see the full draw for the last 16 on the bbc sport website and act. and chris froome says he has no regrets about a bronze medal in the time trial at the road world championship in norway. that's all the sports now. more of us are giving up smoking than ever before and a lot of it is down to the popularity of vaping. new figures from university college london show that one in five people who try to give up are now managing to quit — which is a higher rate than at any other time in the last ten years. significantly, the figure covers all types of smokers — regardless of their background, job, sex, age or where people live. joining us now is david jack taylor. at his worst he smoked 60 cigarettes a day and has tried to quit more than 20 times. suzanne young — who stopped smoking four years ago. george laing — who has smoked for six years and so far can't kick the habit. and — louise ross — the stop smoking service managerfor leicester.
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david i have to ask, how did you get anything else done if you are smoking 60 a day? that was more the lines of when i was going out drinking and clubbing. they were sold in clubs and pubs all over the place so it was easy to go out with 20 in your pocket, you would get to them in no time and then there is a machine you can just go to and buy another 20 and before you know it another 20 and before you know it another and it was easily done. so how did you break the cycle? this time aroundi how did you break the cycle? this time around i went under the —— vape. i went on one of those this time and made an effort to significantly reduce the amount of nicotine that was in that vape and
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what became apparent was i was more addicted to the habit than the nicotine. what about you suzanne, you were successful. yes, i decided to give up because the lifestyle i wanted to lead was not conducive to smoking, i was finding myself going to yoga classes, going for runs, going to meditate, coming out of the class and having a cigarette and it wasjust wrong. so i:e., the timing could not have been better for me, i decided to give up injuly, august and then the campaign came along, so i contacted my local doctor and got the stoptober pack and i was determined. is that all it is, determination? i think to a certain
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extent but it depends who you are with, what your situation is. i am 24, a lot of my friends smoke, i've found when i stopped for four weeks the reason i started again was every timel the reason i started again was every time i went out everyone else was smoking so before you know it's someone offers you a cigarette and ucs. determination is a key part but i think it also depends which situation you are in. if you're going out clubbing, drinking, before you know it you have had ten cigarettes, you have been smoking night. louise, it's interesting that the vaping has had such a huge impact, do we definitely know it is safe ? impact, do we definitely know it is safe? yes, everything in life has some risk but we know in comparison with smoking vaping is 95% less harmful than smoking because it's the smoking cigarettes in combustible cigarettes which does the damage, the tar and carbon
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monoxide. with the pain you do not have that and it makes a difference and it has transformed what we can offer to people in the stop smoking services. it gives a really helpful extra ingredient which might make it a success. i have spoken to some people about this, what about those pictures you get an cigarette packages which are pretty gruesome and the fact you can only buy packs of 20 rather than ten so social smokers won't spend £12, £13 on a of 20? it can range from £8 to £12, i'm not sure these pictures make a difference, they did not for me. changing the colour on the packet would not have deterred me, hiding them would not have made a difference. i was one of those kids that if i was told not to it made me wa nt that if i was told not to it made me want to. nothing would have put me
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off doing it, i have got asthma and even that did not put me off, even when my mum was going crazy. i think the best thing we have done, the best thing in this country was the smoking ban even though i did nothing but moan about it at the time. it was the best thing because on those nights out all the sudden un from 60 to 20 at least so it was a start. it makes you more conscious of how it smells, especially since i have been off for a few months, the smell of them. you used to never be able to tell the difference when you work dawa in the pub because everybody stunk. then makes a difference now, somebody comes in and you can smell it. but i don't think the packaging makes difference to be honest. suzanne, speak to george about how much better you
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feel? you would like to stop wouldn't you ? feel? you would like to stop wouldn't you? yes, especially for stoptober. when i was where georges, if, ironically, someone was telling me don't do this... you an encouraging him. but i would not have appreciated it because i agree, regardless of how they change the packets, nothing could have stopped me, it was down to me so my advice would be really want to do it. because then regardless of what changes are being made to the packets and she was telling you what to do you'lljust do you want to do. what difference does it make when you wake up in the morning, i'll lived with a smoker, the hacking cough in the morning... it is not ideal. does that go quickly? it does
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in all honesty, it's gross when you wa ke in all honesty, it's gross when you wake up. you are coughing up your guts, it's not pretty. if you smoke in the house your clothes stink, everything stinks, nothing gets rid of the smell. my other half banned me smoking in the house a while ago. he would go mental if you went to work stinking of smoke which i totally understand. george, talk to louise. one of the main reasons i wa nt louise. one of the main reasons i want to stop is i am a keen athlete andl want to stop is i am a keen athlete and i have read recently when i go on longer runs i can physically feel the effect. the tightness in the wheezing. that's something, that is my main reason for wanting to stop. it is important you find out what motivates you. it might not be money, it will be for other people, but if it's the intention to become
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fitter and maintain your fitness you have two really keep that in mind. and the local stop smoking services have got a lot of good advice, lots of good hints and tips to help you quit but we say to people if you have not thought about vaping give ita have not thought about vaping give it a try. have not thought about vaping give itatry.a have not thought about vaping give it a try. a lot of my friends have moved on to vaping and i've done some research but it's hard to believe online what is true and what is not. there is a lot of misinformation. so it is more beneficial to vaping than the smoking? yes, you don't have the smoke but you have the nicotine and what users tell us is that it has transformed their ability to go without cigarettes. 0ne transformed their ability to go without cigarettes. one of them said to us recently i was waiting for the ha rd pa rt to to us recently i was waiting for the hard part to start. they describe it asa hard part to start. they describe it as a transformation, a revelation, because it makes it so much easier. they like the clouds which come with
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vaping. it doesn't suit everybody but the good thing about going to a stop smoking service before stoptober is you can get a combination which suits you. it is tailor made to the individual. it might be that vaping with the patch as well, a low—level light patch like you use can be just right. as well, a low—level light patch like you use can be just rightm would be better if you just stopped altogether because we don't know the long—term effects of vaping, it's not been around long enough so it would be better if you didn't at all. easier said than done! i know that! we have had nicotine replacement therapy for many years and we know it's a well— known way of stopping yourself relapsing. that's the key, people can go for a certain amount of time without smoking and then something happens, they have a crisis and the first thing they do,
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especially if they have friends like yours, you take a cigarette and they vaping can be the thing which stops you lighting again. thank you for coming in, good luck. lots of you still getting in touch with us about cycling, we will be talking about this ina cycling, we will be talking about this in a little while, the idea the government is looking at whether there should be dangerous cycling a law brought in much the same as dangerous driving, mark saying i do not condone but you do not know how dangerous pedestrians are when they cross lights before the green man. fiona saying i think it's time a compulsory test and insurance needed, i have witnessed shocking behaviour on both sides, if proficiency tests were involved it would be clear cyclists have an understanding of the safety and the highway code. the consumer group which? says we
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should stop buying fridge freezers with a plastic back as it makes them a fire risk. today's warning is likely to be taken seriously because of course the grenfell tower fire was started by a hotpoint fridge freezer even though it's not been confirmed whether it had a plastic back or not. joining us now is pete moorey, head of campaigns from consumer group which?. thanks for coming to talk to us. first of all what should we be looking for on the back of our fridge? it is non-flame retardant plastic back fridges, freezers and fridge freezers. these backings, we are concerned, on the basis of the london fire brigade evidence can spread a fire. they do not start it but they can spread it. that is why we are seeing two manufacturers stop making these. we can see the difference on screen. i cannot get
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around the back of my fridge and i am sure lots of people would be able to some so should they be worried? the messages do not panic. these type of fires are rare. we want to give people the information when they are going to buy a new fridge freezer. you can get all that information on the which? website. we have looked at the 500 most popular fridges, freezers and fridge freezers and about 200 or so have got this non—flame retardant plastic backing so we want to give that information to ensure people by the safest possible product for them and theirfamily. safest possible product for them and their family. why is the onus on the consumer, why their family. why is the onus on the consumer, why are their family. why is the onus on the consumer, why are they not being withdrawn? manufacturers not making them is the key. that's our main message this morning two manufacturers, we want them to do the right thing, stop making these fridges and freezers that have this
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plastic backing. we also want them to make sure they have a new, tougher standard for these fridge freezers. the standard we have in place at the moment is inadequate, it allowing a lot of these appliances to go into peoples homes and they are presenting a fire risks or manufacturers must make that change but also consumers need be aware about fire safety and make sure they are doing everything they can and we have lots of advice on the website. thank you for coming to talk to us about that. cyclists who ride dangerously could face far tougher penalties if new road laws are introduced. the government is consulting on whether to bring in new laws which would be similar to the ones drivers currently face. it follows the death of kim briggs who was killed as she crossed the road in central london. her husband has welcomed the news. this is not in any way anti—cycling. kim's case was special that they could bring a man slaughter charge but that is very unusual. had they not been able to do that, we would
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have been left with just a victorian law. it seems to me there israeli yawning gap in the legislation that needs to be filled. it took 18 months to come to court and what i wa nt months to come to court and what i want is for the police and the cps, because this probably will happen again, to have a law, a coherent law, to be able to reach for in the future. the transport minister jessye norman told the bbc that the consultation will look at... the first stage will go to the charlie alliston case and whether there is a remedy for a crime of bodily harm or death inflicted by a cyclist. the second stage is a much wider consultation review which looks at the way the roads are used by cyclists, pedestrians and motorists because there are hundreds of cyclists injured and nearly 100 cyclists injured and nearly 100 cyclists killed every year. we want
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to make sure we have a much wider and better understanding of how the interests and needs of these users can be brought together so the roads can be brought together so the roads can be brought together so the roads can be better used by everyone. so do we need new laws to tackle irresponsible cyclists? with me now is duncan dollimore, he's the road safety and legal campaigns officer for cycling uk. on her bike in central london is the writer and cyclist, nell frizzell, who is still cycling whilst seven months pregnant. and we have a member of the all—party cycling grip who was recently knocked off his bike himself. nell, icannot recently knocked off his bike himself. nell, i cannot believe you are still cycling while seven months pregnant. you are responsible for your safety. cyclists have a huge amount to lose
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in this situation. we are vulnerable, road users, just as eve ryo ne vulnerable, road users, just as everyone else. when mr briggs talks about there being a yawning gap, i think there is a lot to be said for better education of taxi drivers, bus drivers and lorry drivers. cyclists, when they go onto the pavement, they are putting pedestrians at risk. 0ften pavement, they are putting pedestrians at risk. often i think young women like me do that because we do not feel safe on the roads next to other road users. i was reading in the guardian that of the 400 collisions with pedestrians that resulted in pedestrian death a year, on average two involved cyclists. 0f course two is too many and we do need better education and signage and better shared space, particularly in cities, big cities like london, manchester and leeds. we'll is the need an evidence —based approach to this. i think the problem is to do with the modern risks of road use which are iphones,
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roadworks, hgvs coming through towns in the middle of the day. that is something i would welcome an investigation into. you have raised that point, the danger of motorists on their phone and nearly crashing into cyclists, but you also see cyclists going along with headphones in which terrify me or on their phones while cycling, say fabian hambuechen, there is a mutual responsibility here, isn't there? -- hamilton. yes, we all need to be much more aware of what is going on around us. the number of times i cycling london and the streams walk in front of you, staring at their phone texting, oblivious of what is going on around them. we need common sense here. we also need cyclists to be the highway code. we have all seen fellow cyclists on the road who
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do not be the highway code. but in the endl do not be the highway code. but in the end i think kim is right and jesse norman norman's response is correct. this was an appalling tragedy. we should not react to that one appalling tragedy by being draconian on all cyclists. cycling isa draconian on all cyclists. cycling is a public good, more of us need to do it and we need to use common sense. we are talking about common sense, fabian hamilton was talking about that, but do we need a new law? if there is a review, there needs to be a review of all road traffic legislation. this review is on the back of a hard case and sometimes hard cases make for bad laws. the government promised to review road traffic legislation three years ago. since then 1300
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pedestrians and 400 cyclists will have died. that review has not started in a proper and meaningful fashion. but on the back of a high profile case we will have an urgent review. do we need to review legislation? the answer is yes. but we need to look at the whole remit of the legislation. does there need to be a dangerous cycling law? our position is clear that dangerous driving and careless driving cases are not working. it is too subjective. what might seem careless to me might be dangerous to you orjust an accident to somebody else. the whole lot needs to be reviewed. what we should not do isjust needs to be reviewed. what we should not do is just tag on two new offences to a legislative system which is not working at the moment. we have had this e—mailfrom colin. iam 73, i we have had this e—mailfrom colin. i am 73, i live in woking. my walk into town a stressful because of cyclists riding on the footpath without any concern for the safety
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and well—being of pedestrians. how would you respond to that?” and well—being of pedestrians. how would you respond to that? i would say, cyclists going on the footpath is regrettable and i don't agree with it but i can empathise with people who don't feel safe on the roads. young women and older people are roads. young women and older people a re often roads. young women and older people are often told that the pavement is safer. you say that but i will tell you something. as a mum who walks her kids to school every morning when i am not here, my daughters often when i am not here, my daughters ofte n get when i am not here, my daughters often get run over by cyclists going to the local college. most mornings i say, could you go on the road, there are little children, be careful, and often they can be quite rude. there is a real disconnect between pedestrians, cyclists and car users and everyone thinks they have a priority. there is an arrogance and rudeness among eve ryo ne arrogance and rudeness among everyone in that situation. i have been on all sides of it. i would say asa been on all sides of it. i would say as a cyclist, if you are on the road or on the pavement, you are at great
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personal risk. i would not cycle on the pavement, particularly now when pregnant, because someone on their phone or with their headphones on could knock you off if they turned round. it is dangerous to cycle on the pavement as well as stupid and am thinking towards your other road users. it is not a great idea. but i can understand the intimidation when their eye huge lorries or buses or taxes on the road pushing you out, what are you meant to do? fabian, respond to this. this is an e—mail from lynne, she says cyclists should pay road tax and this should pay for better and more cycle lanes and also better and more cycle lanes and also be assured the insured? i'm not convinced of the idea of a road tax because the bureaucratic indications are huge. we want to encourage more people to cycle because it is good for their help and it is good for the environment. i'm sorry, if we
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start introducing a motor vehicle type system we willjust discourage people. let's look at the dutch model. the dutch i think have got it right. their legislation follows their commitment and the investment they have made into cycling infrastructure which means thousands of people and 50% ofjourneys are carried out by bicycle. 0k, it is a flat country than ours but there is a lot we could emulate and make it a lot safer for pedestrians, motorists and above all, cyclists. i think we need to show more respect for each other on road use, be less aggressive and common—sense and the highway code should be the standards we follow. duncan, how do we change those attitudes? how'd we get cyclists not being annoyed by motorists and motorists not being annoyed by cyclists ? motorists not being annoyed by cyclists? i have to say the media have contributed to this because it a lwa ys have contributed to this because it always comes down to a cyclist versus always comes down to a cyclist versus motorists debate. we have
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tried to e—mail that. the person who e—mailed said what about road tax paid for cyclists? we have not had roads paid for by road tax since 1936, it comes out of your income taxes. so there are lots of spurious debates. often when you see lanes for cyclists they are next to pedestrians and there is a line down the middle and periodically there will be a sign of a person walking or the sign of a bike but it can be confusing if you are walking along to know which side you should go in and that can be dangerous? we have been campaigning for national standards for years and we still do not have them. there is no national standard and that is a crucial thing which would make things clearer. you are right, sometimes some of these signs are unclear and that needs to be something the government takes the lead on in terms of designing standards and setting them forward so we have clearer guidance in
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relation to segregated and shared infrastructure. fabian? itotally agree on that. the all—party parliamentary cycling group of which lam treasurer, has done a recent enquiry this summer into justice treasurer, has done a recent enquiry this summer intojustice for cycling. we took a lot of evidence from cycling groups as well as other road users. i think there is absolutely no doubt. we need much clearer guidance from the department for transport, much clearer guidelines for everybody in terms of road use. if we start having an insurance system and a road fund licence system, whatever you want to call it, i think that would just discourage cycling. clearer guidance from government would be very helpful. maybe we will get this after the review. thank you all for speaking to us. ijust want to read this e—mailfrom speaking to us. ijust want to read this e—mail from anthony. the speaking to us. ijust want to read this e—mailfrom anthony. the point thatis this e—mailfrom anthony. the point that is being missed is cyclists are not subject to any offence under the
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road traffic act, therefore they cannot be prosecuted for speeding or incorrectly entering military roads. i have personally suffered the same as the poor lady who was killed, in my case, being knocked off my feet ona my case, being knocked off my feet on a pavement by a cyclist raising his mate. this is nojoke. thank you for all your comments. bbc newsroom live is next. have a great day. good morning. we have had some heavy rain moving its weight used woods across western parts of the uk so farand it is across western parts of the uk so far and it is not great in shropshire —— some heavy rain moving its waitlist with. the rain is moving across western parts. ahead of the rain across east anglia and the south—east of england, it should
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remain dry into the evening. the temperature is still 1920 degrees. elsewhere, a should feel fresher this afternoon, despite the sunshine coming through. this evening, with clear skies overnight, it will turned chilly than it has done in previous nights. during friday, for many of us it is dry and bright once again, but we will see more rain spreading into scotland, eastern england, wales and the south west of england. goodbye. when a this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. rescue workers in mexico city work around the clock to free children trapped in the rubble of a collapsed primary school. mexico requests specialist teams and equipment from other countries to help in the search was by this. the cabinet meets in downing street, ahead of a major speech in brexit to be delivered by the prime minister in italy tomorrow. puerto rico
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cut—off without power, after the island was battered by hurricane maria. reports of catastrophic flooding. police investigating the bomb attack on a tube train arrest a sixth person in south london. also, the fa under fire for its handling of allegations surrounding mark sampson. the england

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