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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 21, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. today at 5pm: theresa may is likely to propose a transitional arrangement between the uk and the eu of up to two years after brexit, the bbc understands. long meeting, ministers? she briefed senior ministers on the eve of one of her most important speeches since the general election — when she will try to break the deadlock in negotiations. it's expected that the uk could be willing to pay into the union during the transitional period. giving billions of pounds to the eu after we come out, it's not really what i think, it's not really what the cabinet thinks, what are the british public going to say to that? florence is quite the backdrop for a speech of this importance. the europeans are keen to hear the detail, but will it shifted the impasse in the negotiation? we'll have the latest brexit developments, and we're asking prominent figures from business what they want to hear from theresa may tomorrow. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm:
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rescuers work to free children trapped under a collapsed school — a 12—year—old girl is among those thought to be alive the debris in mexico city. these are the latest pictures as a rescue involving members of the army and hundreds of volunteers continues. ryanair says more flights may have to be cancelled — as the boss admits there's been a significant management failure at the airline. and calls for the fa to answer questions over its sacking of mark sampson, as england women's football coach. our main story at five: on the eve of one of the prime minister's most important speeches since the general
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election, theresa may has given the cabinet details of her address in italy, which she hopes will break the deadlock in the brexit talks. sources have told the bbc, that the prime minister's florence speech tomorrow is likely to propose a transitional arrangement between the uk and the eu of up to two years after brexit. it is expected that the uk would be willing to pay into the union during that period in an offer described as being ‘open and generous‘. and after the marathon two and a half hour cabinet meeting, there was a show of unity among her colleagues. as yet there is no official confirmation of any of the speech. our political correspondent iain watson reports. open and generous — as the prime minister arrived at downing street to share the contents of her speech with the cabinet, one minister told the bbc that was exactly the kind of offer theresa may was prepared to make to the eu. it sounded like a strong hint she was willing to cough up
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cash in future to move the brexit process forward. but do all her colleagues agree? is the prime minister going to make an open and generous offer to the eu? good morning. morning. is the prime minister going to make an open and generous offer? morning, morning. they were remaining tight—lipped. it is perhaps easy to understand why. this picture from the un suggested borisjohnson was doing some back—seat driving, pointing out the direction of policy. he's already set out his stall, ruling out long—term financial commitments to the eu. is boris helpful, mr hunt? his cabinet colleagues didn't exactly give him a ringing endorsement. borisjohnson might have felt a little shutout from the brexit process but after his intervention, he certainly cannot be ignored now. nonetheless i think it's important not to overstate the divisions around the cabinet table, at least in the short term. there seems to be agreement there should be a transition period after we formally leave the european union in 2019, and that we should continue to make
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contributions to the eu budget during that time. it's also been suggested to keep what are usually our eastern european allies on side, the prime minister could reassure them they won't have to fork out extra cash to cover any funding gap when we leave. some close observers of negotiations in brussels say the eu want to hear a specific offer of cash. any number is a good starting point. we are spending too much time on an issue we shouldn't be spending time on so we need to get on with it and that's important to make progress with other stuff. here, some of the most ardent leave campaigners say the the minister can make an open and generous offer, but on citizens rights rather than hard cash. the prime minister said actually we haven't reached agreement but actually we will say today eu citizens can stay here whatever, then that would be an open and generous offer which i can support but giving billions of pounds to the eu after we come out, what will the british public
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say to that? the chancellor and foreign secretary don't always see eye to eye, both will be flanking the prime minister in florence tomorrow and she will be hoping this show of unity can be maintained. in a moment, we can talk to my colleague christian fraser who is in florence where the prime minister will make that speech tomorrow. first though, let's get the latest on the day's developments from our political correspondent chris mason. you've been trying to keep up with all the day ‘s developments. it's very striking, some of what we hearing. my first observation would be, why would a pmqs to go to florence in mid—september to give a speech? this evening giving you the mildest p. what's striking this evening, one, the length of that cabinet meeting. they usually last a little over an hour, it gives you a
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sense of how much there was to talk about. each minister was given a copy of the draft at the beginning of the meeting, a chance to read it, then theresa may went round the table asking for contributions from her top team. when you look back through the history books in terms of the length of that meeting in context, i managed to find two references to cabinet meetings of a similar length. one in 1992, the other in 2003. the first 1992 shortly after the uk had crashed out of the european exchange—rate mechanism, and indeed thousand three when gordon brown was making the to tony blair's cabinet thatjoining the euro was not the best option. you will notice the common theme. on the specifics we have learnt about content, the specifics we have learnt about co nte nt, we the specifics we have learnt about content, we understand the prime minister will talk about the desire for a transitional period. that is a topic where the cabinet is united. the idea being that it could be around two years long, we understand, and that the uk will make, and we herded then report, a
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"open and generous" offer around money. that has been a sticking point with brussels till now. that could amount to around about £10 billion per year. the idea being that would not leave any individual eu member state out of pocket as a result of the uk leaving the european union, and therefore potentially leaving a gap in its budget if it does not make this kind of offer. but, the expectation from another source is that that kind of deal would be based on continued access to a single market along the lines that the uk has now. also membership of some sort of customs union, perhaps not the existing one, which presents the uk from going on striking trade deals around the world, or any eu striking trade deals around the world, orany eu member, but some sort of customs union which comes close to the arrangement at the moment. all of that just about the transitional period, then there is the bigger question raut the longer term picture. thank you for now, chris mason in the rain. let's go to chris mason in the rain. let's go to chris frazier in the sun in
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florence. in all seriousness though, actually, why florence? such a beautiful city. the perfect backdrop for such an important speech. everywhere you go you spot the history and the links which go all the way back to medieval times, between florence and the uk. back then in the 13th century, the bankers in the city with the painful treasurers and tax collectors were so treasurers and tax collectors were so rich they lent money to the english kings. there is an u nfortu nate english kings. there is an unfortunate that note in history. the english kings did not want to pay back their loans. spot the theme? fast forward to today, and theme? fast forward to today, and the europeans want to know whether they are going to get their money back. the principalfocus tomorrow. what is theresa may going to commit suing terms of transition period, what sort of money will they get in the short term and will britain commit to the money at o is for things like pensions and that's? interestingly, michel barnier was in italy as well today, he's in rome.
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he was quoting machiavelli, the italian philosopher coming saying where the willingness is great, the difficulties cannot be great. urging the brits to get on the net. interesting from the speech he gave, theresa may saying we can arrange a bespoke deal, we don't want be a brute, the norway route nor the canadian deal. he's really saying we can't have the benefits of the norwegian model and the constraints of the canadian model, pick a path but at least choose one. who is actually going to be the audience? with this end that? —— who is this aimed at? there will be a lot of focus at the prime minister tomorrow, why she has in what she will say. i was speaking earlier in the week to the vice president of the week to the vice president of the european commission, who said we are all ears. realistically, look at the german election and brexit does not even feature. they are not focused on brexit. it's not the be all end all in europe. the germans
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wa nt to all end all in europe. the germans want to talk about further integration and the future of the 27 countries that are left. france as labour reforms, the dutch are still trying to form a government, the italians want a dog about immigration and the migrants poring through their ports. even in europe, the bulgarians want closer integration. at the same time they doa integration. at the same time they do a lot of business with britain, and they do want a solution. they wa nt and they do want a solution. they want a smooth transition, it's in no 1's interest to get the new deal option. thank you for now. and we'll be carrying theresa may's speech tomorrow live on the bbc news channel when it happens, and christian fraser will be back for a special edition of beyond 100 days tonight at 7 o'clock. we can now speak to the labour mp and chairman of the exiting the eu parliamentary committee, hilary benn.
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he joins us from leeds this evening. we are getting something of a sphere, it would seem. what do you make of what we've heard so far?|j think the prime minister has to do three things tomorrow. first, she has to make a proposal on the money to break the logjam, otherwise the negotiations cannot progress to the really important questions of trade and access for our service industries. secondly, she has to be absolutely clear that the british government is going to seek a transitional arrangement, which will involve remaining in a customs union and a single market which is the position keir starmer set out on behalf the shadow cabinet in august. she needs to adopt the proposal, and thirdly, because europe will be watching the speech very carefully, she has got to try to persuade those we are negotiating with them that
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the government has a clear plan and crucially, that every single member of the cabinet is behind it. we have seenin of the cabinet is behind it. we have seen in the last few days nothing but division and confusion. that is not in the national interest when we are engaged in such important negotiations. doesn't the fact that we are getting something of a steer on this suggests that, to your last point, certainly there is a clear plan? it would appear we are absolutely going to hear about a transitional arrangement. that presumably makes you happy? it's been obvious for a long time that it would not be possible in the time thatis would not be possible in the time that is available, negotiations have two went by october of next year, to negotiate a final agreement on trade and market access. it has taken the government 15 months since the referendum, six months since article 50 was triggered, if the prime minister does announce this tomorrow it will have taken a long time to get to the point where lots of other people have been saying, for ages, we need to arrive at. on doing this
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relationship and putting back together a new relationship after we have left is a very, very convex process. you need to have the time to do that. if the government is now going to give up, saying no deal is better than a bad deal, ifor one would welcome that, because clashing with no deal would be a disasterfor the british economy which is why we need transitional arrangements. the british economy which is why we need transitional arrangementsm terms of any sums that might be paid during the transitional period, whatever that it ends up being, you will know that there will be people following the speech tomorrow who think, wait a following the speech tomorrow who think, waita minute, i following the speech tomorrow who think, wait a minute, ivoted following the speech tomorrow who think, wait a minute, i voted for this country to get out of the eu, why on earth are we still paying them? some people are still going to be very unhappy, aren't they, abolition? some might, but we do have obligations. the crucial question will be guests. if payments are to be made, and that would be sensible during this transition, maybe two years, then the important thing is that those payments come
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off the total which in the end, the british government and the 27 countries of the european union agree is what is owed. it's a way of finding a route through the current logjam which means the negotiations are held up. if you can't move on to phase two, which deals with hugely important questions for business and jobs in this country, our trading relationships, customs and borders, services industry, 80% of the british economy is based on services, 1 millionjobs in financial services, notjust services, 1 millionjobs in financial services, not just in london the hearing needs in other parts of the country— that is why we need to avoid a cliff edge, when we leave the institutions at the end of march 20 15. leave the institutions at the end of march 2015. then, to move on to the negotiation of a deal, we hope that will govern our relationship going forward. there is a lot still to be done. it's up to the prime minister tomorrow to make it clear that if the government does have a plan, it
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is exacting labours proposals that we need these transitional arrangements and makes an offer that allows the european council do say we can move on. currently we are stuck. if we are stuck then we cannot move forward. by the end of tomorrow, we now mop “— cannot move forward. by the end of tomorrow, we now mop —— we might not be. they have just heard enough to give them a reassurance we might need. that time to start planning, then they have a clearer sense of what the uk is aiming for? businesses would undoubtedly welcome a clear statement that there will be transitional arrangements. the businesses i talk to them say, that's fine, but i need to know absolutely for sure that they will happen. it's one thing for the uk government to propose it, it's another for the 27 to agree. secondly, they say, we need to know exactly what those arrangements are going to consist of. we know there are businesses who are currently planning against the worst possible outcome, no deal, and we do not want businesses to take decisions that
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may be bad for the british economy, because they do not know what's going to happen after march 2019. it's a first step to say we will seek transitional arrangements, what is then essential is that it is made clear to british businesses as quickly as possible but those arrangements are going to be put in place for sure. and what they will consist of. british business is saying we need that certainty very clearly, which is why you have to break the logjam, because if you don't do that, you can't get that assurance that our companies and services are looking for. thank you very much for now. chair of the exiting the eu parliamentary committee. after half past, i will be talking to one prominent businessmen and asking what he wants to hear from theresa may tomorrow. that is coming up in the next little while. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: theresa may is likely to propose a transitional arrangement between the uk and the eu of up to two years
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after brexit, the bbc understands. rescuers work to free children trapped under a collapsed school — following the earthquake in mexico city. ryanair says more flights may have to be cancelled — as the boss admits there's been a significant management failure at the airline. in sport, was he ever suitable? questions now raised over what was known about mark sampson's background before he was appointed. head coach of the england women's football team. chelsea have agreed to sell diego costa to his former club, atletico madrid, if personal terms and a medical confirmed. he will be free to move come the new year. brian cookson has lost the election to stay on as world cycling ‘s governing body president to the frenchman, davidoff party. more at half—past. rescuers in mexico city are trying
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to reach a number of people they believe are still alive under the rubble of a school which collapsed during tuesday's earthquake. a senior official has told the bbc a young girl is sheltering under a table in the debris — and that crews have managed to pass food and water to her. the government has appealed to other countries to provide specialist teams and equipment to help search for survivors. rajini vaidya nathan reports from mexico city. after the horror of the earthquake, there is hope. these young children were pulled alive from the rubble of a primary school in the south of mexico city. rescuers searched overnight for others who may still be trapped. at least 20 children were killed here. it was on tuesday lunchtime that the powerful earthquake struck mexico. as buildings collapsed, people ran for cover.
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across mexico city, the search for survivors is continuing. as you can see, people are going in to try and help with the efforts. this six—storey office block, which you see in the distance, is the focus of their work. antonio and dolores‘ son, juan, worked on the fourth floor as an accountant. he called his parents every day. they last spoke hours before the quake hit. for the past day they have watched as rescuers picked through the rubble, but there‘s still no sign ofjuan. translation: we still believe he will make it out alive. "i would dig him out myself if i could", antonio tells me. relief workers have beenjoined by hundreds of volunteers. many have turned up with their own tools to do their bit. we‘re building kits with first aid things like alcohol and band aids, and these things, and that kind of stuff, so they can bring these things to the people that need it.
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it's a good atmosphere because people want to help. all the mexican people here, all american people, english people, british people, a lot of people want to help and i think that it's good that a lot of people are here to help. at times the crowd was asked to be silent so rescuers could call out to any survivors still stuck in the debris. more than 20 people have already been rescued from this building, but as time passes the chance of people being reunited with their loved ones is becoming ever slimmer. our correspondent rajini vaidyanathan is in mexico city. there has been so much focus on the school in particular, do people still think they might be able to find someone there? people are not
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giving up hope for certain, it‘s almost two days since that earthquake struck, which happened on tuesday lunchtime. across mexico city, the rescue efforts are still very much intensifying. let‘s start with that primary school which is at the other end of town from where i am. the rescue efforts are continuing, one thing that has been a challenge for people working at the school is the risk that the building may collapse even further. earlier today, they had to scale back some of the relief work at the school, for fear that the back some of the relief work at the school, forfear that the building would collapse. there is still an intense effort going on there, they have to be cautious because of that risk. i am have to be cautious because of that risk. iam here have to be cautious because of that risk. i am here at the office block i referenced in my report. as you can see behind me, there are numbers of the mexican military, mexican police, and also dozens of family members, people who worked in the building, waiting to hear news. in
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the last half an hour or so we heard that the efforts here are focused on the fourth floor, where they understand that a group of ten people huddled together. they hope, still alive. they are now trying to access the fourth floor so they can get to them. we are hearing that they received a whatsapp message yesterday from a member of that group. they have been sniffer dogs also arriving, as i mentioned in my reports. dozens of volunteers, also going in, risking their lives, many just volunteers, not professionals from the police and rescue services, just people who want to help in the wa ke just people who want to help in the wake of this tragedy. trying to get to the fourth floor of a building thatis to the fourth floor of a building that is concertino in some parts, that is concertino in some parts, thatis that is concertino in some parts, that is so delicate. i suppose that‘s just one example of why the authorities say they need help from outside? exactly. the mexican authorities have called for
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international assistance, in particular they want help when it comes to pacific rescue equipment. heavy lifting equipment, i presume thatis heavy lifting equipment, i presume that is to move those huge slabs of concrete you can see over my shoulder. we have to be careful about how they move them, of course, because there is the risk the buildings could collapse. one thing i saw yesterday, dozens of volu nteers i saw yesterday, dozens of volunteers going into the building with huge pieces of wood. i did wonder at first why they had them, i was told that is because they are going in to try and place those strategically so they can properly building up. that way it will not collapse. that‘s why the government wa nts collapse. that‘s why the government wants this specific equipment, because it is a very precarious job they have to do. they are where there could be as many as dozens of people trapped in this building and another buildings, a school, across mexico city, in order to be careful, every m ove mexico city, in order to be careful, every move they make could cost lives. thanks for now. ryanair‘s chief executive
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michael o‘leary has admitted a significant management failure at the airline — and says more flights may have to be cancelled. a group of ryanair pilots has rejected an offer of a bonus of up to 12,000 pounds each to work extra shifts and help reduce the number of cancellations. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. even the boss of ryanair now calls it a significant management failure. it‘s certainly more than a little turbulence. the budget airline has had to cancel about 50 flights a day until the end of october because it doesn‘t have enough pilots available to fly them. at today‘s annual general meeting in dublin, chief executive michael o‘leary had some explaining to do. do you feel under pressure? no, we‘re having a very good year. the company says it is planning to force some pilots to divert part of their annual leave until next year and says it doesn‘t need their consent but there are signs pilots themselves are taking advantage of the situation.
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ryanair has offered its pilots a cash bonus of up to £12,000 if they agree to work extra days, but in a letter seen by the bbc pilots representatives from bases across the europe say they reject that proposal. they say it‘s simply inadequate and is meeting with great resistance from their members. they say what they really want is ryanair to come up with new contracts for them with different working conditions. they say that might be enough to stop pilots from looking for greener pastures or in other words moving to different airlines. ryanair‘s business model relies on keeping its costs down. analysts say it can ill afford major concessions to its workforce. ryanair pilots are regarded as well—paid but equally worked very hard. although the company will make some modest changes to make sure they keep pilots and attract new ones from competitors. there won‘t be room for any fundamental change. ryanair said today the crisis has already cost £22 million. the question now is how quickly it can resolve the situation and how
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much long—term damage has been done to its reputation. a sixth arrest has been made by police investigating last week‘s we arejust going we are just going to head stateside now because president trump has started speaking in the last few moments, he is in new york. we think you may be talking a bit more about north korea. let‘s listen. you may be talking a bit more about north korea. let's listen. foreign banks will face a clear choice, do business with the us or facilitate trade with the lawless regime in north korea. they will not have so much trade. this new order provides us much trade. this new order provides us with powerful new tools, but i wa nt to us with powerful new tools, but i want to be clear. the order targets only one country, and that country is north korea. the regime can no longer count on others to facilitate its trade, and banking activities.
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many companies are working with us to increase economic and diplomatic pressure on north korea. i continued to call on all those responsible nations to enforce and implement un sanctions and impose their own measures like the ones i am announcing today. i must tell you that this is a complete denuclearisation of north korea that we seek. cannot have this as a world body any longer. in just a few minutes, prime minister rb, president moon and i are going to discuss what more we can do working together. we have had a close relationship, i think our nations have become closer because of this. i know it‘s going to be a great meeting. an alliance with south korea and japan has never been stronger than it has been today. we share a commitment to creating a world where strong and independent
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nations on the left people, respect the sovereignty, respect the sovereignty also of other nations, and promote peace. thank you very much and i would like to ask... to start off, for president moon to say a few words, please. translation: recently we have seen provocation from north korea. the japanese people must have gone through a huge shock, i believe the concerns through a huge shock, i believe the concerns the japanese people may have because of this provocation, so i would like to express that i feel compassion for the japanese people in this regard. the three leaders have met at the 620 summit injuly in germany. they issued a joint
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statement, through this statement we also set a foundation for close coordination between our three countries based on which, we are co—operating closely with the entire community. —— the international community. —— the international community. the un, the general assembly, the three leaders have come together. we have all made speeches at the general assembly, we met with leaders of the major countries and we are able to enhance understanding about the sanctions. we also want to urge the international community about this situation. this is an outcome that the three countries have made. president trump just talked about the executive order, through which the executive order, through which the us is going to be implementing sanctions, a major announcement made
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by china to take action on the... let‘s leave that for now, but we will come back. could be more interesting comments to come, that is south korea‘s president moon, and president trump partly talking about sanctions on north korea and in particular dealing firmly with anyone who wants to trade with north korea. that is something we have heard from president trump before. you will remember his extremely strong language to the un general assembly earlier in the week about the situation in north korea. that‘s one reason we are interested in this conference particularly. may well be more to emerge after questions, in particular. we will keep an eye and see what other comments president trump makes about the situation in north korea. just while we were listening to
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those comments, we have some news from scotland yard. a 21—year—old man arrested in connection with the parsons green attack in west london has been released from custody with no further action. this is all in light of the device that partially exploded at parsons green station in west london, recently, 30 people injured. quite a few arrests but we arejust injured. quite a few arrests but we are just hearing from scotland yard that —year—old man who, according to the press association is believed to be farooq, has been released from custody with no further action. any more details and we will bring them to you. a busy afternoon, let‘s catch up with the weather. western areas of the uk have been brightening recently, but the weapon
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has also been deteriorating out towards the east. fekir cloud of london overnight were clear with clearing skies, the odd fog patch with clear weather, it will be a chilly night. temperatures down to 7—10d in the towns and cities, cold in the countryside. certainly a chill on friday. the exception is northern ireland by the wind picks up, outbreaks of rain moving in, turning heavyin outbreaks of rain moving in, turning heavy in the morning before spreading to scotland and western england and wales. the rain turning wiretap and patchy through the afternoon, never really reaches the midlands. 19 in london, sunshine later in northern ireland. reasonable weather this weekend, sunny spells, reasonable temperatures and a band of rain coming through on western areas on sunday. saturday is the better of
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the two days this weekend. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines. theresa may is likely to propose a transitional arrangement between the uk and the eu of up to two years after brexit, the bbc understands. rescue workers in mexico city are still trying to reach survivors trapped under the rubble of a school which collapsed during tuesday‘s earthquake. one is a 12—year—old girl who‘s thought to have taken shelter under a table. ryanair‘s chief executive, michael o‘leary, is planning to make pilots delay taking a week of their annual leave , after the airline was forced to cancel 50 flights a day for the next six weeks. we will hear that brexit shortly but
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here is the sports news. the story that has still got the football world talking about who, what and when. it‘s notjust mark sampson, former head of the england football team, —— weren‘t troubled him, but also how his bosses have handled his sacking. the fa called it inappropriate and excessive behaviour first female players it inappropriate and excessive behaviourfirst female players in it inappropriate and excessive behaviour first female players in a previous role. there has been a call forair previous role. there has been a call for air investigation into the culture of the fa. a few weeks later, a safeguarding complaint was made against sampson regarding his time at bristol. the issue was investigated and reported
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in march do 15. later that year, sampson was concluded to continued working in football. having been urged to re—examine the details last week, years later, the fa terminated his contract. people will look at what's happening, not just his contract. people will look at what's happening, notjust the story about sampson, the issue about sam alla rdyce last about sampson, the issue about sam allardyce last year, the concerns about child abuse in football, allegations that are now being investigated. there is a theme developing that there were people within the beauvue new, warnings given coy concerns expressed, but no action was taken. it was only when theissue action was taken. it was only when the issue exploded, when people spoke out publicly, that a decision was taken to act on it. why within foot ball was taken to act on it. why within football in the country, are the these wrong decisions made, warnings not heeded, it is seen to keep it under wraps until it is too late.
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chelsea are agreeing to sign diego costa to his former club atletico madrid. he said he wanted to leave did not materialise, who said he would not play. personal terms and a medical need to be confirmed. the president of cycling‘s world governing body, brian cookson, has left his role with his head held high, he says. despite losing the election to the presidency. the new president has vowed to get rid of the corruption that has left the uci with what he says is a disastrous reputation. more from my correspondent. brian cookson swept into power four years ago, correspondent. brian cookson swept into powerfour years ago, promising to rescue it from doping scandals.
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it would seem from today‘s election, a whopping margin of defeat for brian cookson, 37—8 votes, delegates gathered at the uci election and we re gathered at the uci election and were unimpressed by his efforts. he may well have been affected by the negative headlines are running british cycling, allegations of a culture of bullying in the organisation. when he was in charge in 1997-2013. that might organisation. when he was in charge in 1997—2013. that might have swayed some people against him doing the vote. we have a new president, the third french man to lead the uci. he said ina third french man to lead the uci. he said in a speech before the election, that he vowed he would get rid of corruption. mission accomplished for one of the best boxers in the world, who says he leaves the sport top of the mountain. the american light heavyweight world championships grey champion is regarded as one of the
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best, having won all 32 of the fights, including against carl froch. at 33 years old, ward says his body cannot cope any more with the rigours of the sport. the cricketers could not win the fight today against the rain sobhi odi between england and west indies were abandoned. keep up—to—date with those stories including the cricket wash—out at trent bridge on the bbc sport website. they will try again on sunday, i think there will be better weather. we will have a weather forecast to that end just before 6pm. we will return our attentions to brexit. there was a long cabinet meeting this morning in advance of theresa may balls big speech tomorrow in florence. ministers are understood to have
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discussed the possibility of a so—called ‘transition deal‘ , and the prospect of continued payments to the eu , after britain leaves the bloc. we will now talk about what business might want. tim martin from wetherspoon says in the next few minutes but for now... chris morris from bbc‘s reality check team joins me now. chris a number of options being considered here — let‘s go through these different models that people are referring to. we hear we will start with canada. this week, the most ambitious trade deal the eu as ever implemented comes in force to canada. testing on flags. i‘m good on that one. force to canada. testing on flags. i'm good on that one. it get rid somewhat most tariffs on goods and liberalise services, and meet our red lines, we wouldn‘t have to be
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pa rt red lines, we wouldn‘t have to be part of the european court of justice, we would have control on immigration, and pursue our own free—trade deals but it does fall considerably short of being part of the single market and appears from the single market and appears from the soundings from downing street that the cabinet and the parameters to have ruled that out as a way forward. that is the one that took a long time to organise. seven years. we are not looking at canada them. i‘m looking down for this one, e e a minor. —— eea minus. i‘m looking down for this one, e e a minor. -- eea minus. the other flags belong to the other countries in the eea, iceland, norway and lichtenstein. they are part of the single market but not in the eu. so potentially, there could be some attractions for us there. but when you are in the eea, you have to accept freedom of movement so it eea
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minus will be in the single market and not freedom of movement, other countries would say they would not give us that. that is ruled out as well. we could negotiate other countries would say, we allow freedom of movement, if you don‘t, you don‘t, you can‘t have full access to the market you required. can‘t have one without the other. what is the potential switzer land option chris rushworth they are a bit more like us, the other awkward squad. the swiss looked at the eea model and said we don‘t like that. they painstaking negotiated a series of bilateral deals, you could say that sounds like a bespoke deal and a deep and special partnership with is what we understand the government one. again, the swiss or more closely tied to freedom of movement, they had a referendum to limit freedom of movement and were told by the eu is the element that referendum, your access to the single market is limited. so there are problems with all of these potential ways forward. the trouble
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with what we‘re learning at the moment is we don‘t know what we do want. we know we want a special deep partnership, the problem is stating it altogether, so everyone in the cabinet can agree to it and the other countries around the eu are willing to do it. you are about to talk to tim and the thing for the business is the clock is ticking. thank you, chris myers. tim martin is the founder of the pub chain wetherspoons and was a prominent backer of brexit. welcome, good to see you. i went to stew on flags, but where are you on all of this? —— i would test you on flags. as a businessman with a successful train, thinks this would work for me once we are out of the eu? anything will work with wto
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rules boast the best thing for uk to go for. that is relationships with america, china and so on, and works for them. it‘s the basis for the eu trade with these countries. the eu has not done a trade deal with a big economy, only trade deals with small economies because of the difficulty they have in incrementing their things for 27—28 nation. i am the press what i have heard about a two—year transition period and paying money to the eu. we have been told that the government say there is no need for legal basis for payments, and the two—year transition deal, 2021, five years after the referendum, hilary benn says staying within the single market and the customs union. i think five years is quite a long time. anything goes wrong of the economy before them, all the remainer ‘s will say this is because
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of brexit. it is a partial step to not leaving the eu. that is how i see it. that's interesting. i'm interested that you as a businessman are not interested that you as a businessman a re not interested interested that you as a businessman are not interested in a transitional deal because you are deal because you appreciate are not interested in a transitional deal because you appreciate are plenty who run their own business that so this is what we need because how can i plan? how can i produce the book and think about the next financial year and after that without certainty? 9096 of businesses in the uk do not trade with the eu at all. so it is interesting to lay on what basis... how can they plan if they have jitters, if they are nervous about what‘s happening, they must run a business strategy surely? we trade, we buy, and number one electors copy from an italian coffee company. with the biggest selling in the world. it‘s up to the u k to put
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a tariff on the covey but they don‘t have to. when we leave, we can take no —— we can say there are no tariffs on copy or ciderfrom —— we can say there are no tariffs on copy or cider from sweden. but you don‘t know how much that will cost. that's entirely up to the government because there are no ta riffs government because there are no tariffs after brexit until the uk government says so, it can unilaterally get rid of tariff. most people don‘t understand that theresa may can say in two years, no tariffs. and there will be no ta riffs tariffs. and there will be no tariffs whatsoever on any incoming goods. most people don‘t quite get that but that‘s the truth. goods. most people don‘t quite get that but that's the truth. 0k, and what would you like to hear from theresa may timea around the whole question of immigration. if you are running a pub chain and more besides, you employ an awful lot of people on european country. theresa may does not have to decide
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immigration tomorrow, it‘s an complicated issue. there are lots of countries from outside the eu, usa, new zealand, singapore, with higher you would immigration than uk. i believe immigration provided it is controlled. we don‘t have to pull a rabbit out of a hat tomorrow on immigration. interesting. as we will talk again want to know what is exactly in the streets. tim martin, good to see you, thank you. an inquest into the death of the moors murderer ian brady has been reopened. brady, who along with myra hindley tortured and killed five children, died at ashworth hospital in may at the age of 79. an earlier inquest heard he died from obstructive pulmonary disease. our correspondent kate sweeting was at the hearing in bootle. ian brady and myra hindley‘s crimes are infamous and he is still attracting media attention even after his death. at the inquest today, coroner christopher sumner said brady died from natural causes. he had heart failure linked to chronic lung disease.
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he had been a heavy smoker for much of his life. he died in may aged 79 at ashworth psychiatric hospital where he had been for more than 30 years and he had been on intermittent hunger strike, as he called it, refusing food on and off and had been force—fed through nasal feeding tubes during his time there. the inquest heard today that he was not emaciated and had been accepting snacks and meals at times from various carers. brady died without revealing where he buried 12—year—old keith bennett, a secret he seems to have taken with him to the grave. for the families of other victims, this is an ordeal which will never be over. it's hard to put words to it, really, how i felt when he did die. we are still affected by everything until we die. it still carries on in our family. i have to carry on living without a brother all these years.
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it was hoped that today‘s inquest would reveal what had been done with brady‘s remains but the coroner said that is down to his executor who is his laywer, who is not commenting at the time. the coroner did say his ashes must not be scattered saddleworth moor where most of his victims are buried. myra hindley died in 2002 and her remains were cremated. her ashes were scattered in an unknown location by a prison officer. but we may never know what has happened to brady‘s remains. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: theresa may is likely to propose a transitional arrangement between the uk and the eu of up to two years after brexit, the bbc understands. rescuers work to free children trapped under a collapsed school — a 12—year—old girl is among those thought to be alive beneath the debris. ryanair says more flights may have to be cancelled — as the boss admits there‘s been a significant management failure at the airline.
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more now on ryanair — and it‘s chief executive michael o‘leary has admitted a significant management failure at the airline. that is the phrase he used. a number of ryanair pilots have rejected an offer of a bonus of up to 12,000 pounds each to work extra shifts and reduce cancellations. james atkinson was a captain for ryanair between 2006 and 2014. he says he‘s not surprised by the cancelled fights , and says their pilots are under a lot of pressure. a lot of pressure. they have their schedules changed quite a lot. they often are overworked, frankly. one sent me his roster today, he has 45 hours and 15 minutes of flying in one week. if you do 45 minute and 15 minutes of flying in one week, that really means you‘re at work
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about 60 or 70 hours. that‘s a bit much. in europe, what i see in comparison to the states, things are quite bad because ryanair has had quite an effect on the industry hunt has dragged down conditions for everyone. other airlines emulate rya nair. our business editor — simonjack — is here with me now. we are hearing from michael o‘leary because it is the firm‘s agm. what more did we learn from that? he was apologetic to passengers, 3—4000 people affected. he was contrite with the shareholders saying there was a management failure and we messed up. but he wasn‘t conciliatory with the pilots who are at the heart of this, he said they area bit at the heart of this, he said they are a bit precious, he rejected any notion they were overworked, he said
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maybe we get the pay level a bit low so he says we will hire another 125. he insists there is not a pilot shortage, who says they have the mother of all rotor crises and did not plan it well. 95% of passengers will be rebooked or we funded but clearly a lot of people angry. hundreds of thousands of passengers affected. the numbers and this has huge, on the face of it from the outside it looks disastrous but actually, in business terms, what are people saying to you? how do they think this will play out for they think this will play out for the airline? i spoke to some big shareholders and said how serious and issue is this, they said and airlines have lots of cock ups like dba crisis and an airline dragging offa dba crisis and an airline dragging off a passenger. but there was no lawyer —— lasting damage, he michael
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o‘leary said self grey himself that my planes full of people who will not fly again. the passengers do not give a flying fig in many cases. william g stuart, best known for presenting the game show 15 to one, has died, he presented it for 15 yea rs has died, he presented it for 15 years and was also a successful director working and bless this house and love thy neighbour. he died after a short illness. consumers are being advised to stop buying fridges and freezers
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with flammable plastic backs, which could create a fire risk. according to research by the consumer group which — nearly half the products on the market have flammable backs — which are unlikely to be the direct cause of a fire but could help flames to spread. the industry has insisted that all fridges and freezers sold in the uk adhere to legal safety requirements three years after prince harry founded the invictus games, the uk‘s biggest team yet is on its way to toronto in canada to compete in this year‘s event. the athletes will be joining more than 500 men and women from 17 nations — who‘ve served in the military and have been wounded in action. our correspondent tim muffett has been to meet members of the team. invictus, a latin word meaning "unconquered". at heathrow airport this morning, the 90—strong uk team heading to the invictus games in toronto were in bullish mood. it gives you that purpose, it gives you that goal. it gives you something that‘s been missing for so long. something that gets you up in the morning. this
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what impact does taking part in the invictus games have? because you took part in 2016, didn‘t you? yes, it had a huge impact on me. it basically taught me to believe in myself. it taught me to just focus on what i can do and take as many opportunities as i can. devised by prince harry, the event was first held in london in 2014. a chance for injured, sick and wounded service personnel from across the world to compete at the highest level. let‘s be honest, no one really knew how big 2014‘s games were going to be. we honestly thought it was going to be some soldiers playing a bit of sports, and we had no idea of the magnitude of it. we had no idea it was going to be a sell—out crowd. the second invictus games were held last year in florida. craig winspear picked up a silver medal in the wheelchair basketball. he‘s hoping the uk team can go one better in toronto. definitely a goal this time, yes. craig was injured serving in afghanistan in 2011. my role was to go in search for ieds
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and dispose of them. unfortunately i was badly injured, i lost both my legs. taking part in an event like this, you are not sitting on the coach, you are pushing yourself, driving forwards. you want to do more, notjust in a sporting aspect, in life. with 17 nations taking part, this will be the largest invictus games so far. the sporting action gets under way in toronto on saturday, but for these 90 uk competitors, the journey begins right now. tim muffett, bbc news, at heathrow airport. is fantastic, good luck to everyone in the team. whether prospects in just a mirror butjust a reminder, tomorrow at this time we will have extended coverage of that very important speech from theresa may in florence and we will hear more about brexit tomorrow, the more analysis and coverage from 5pm here tomorrow.
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time for a look at the weather. we start with maria. this is the hurricane that obliterated the power supplies in puerto rico. the mayor of has said —— the mayor of the capital said it could be six—month without electricity, unimaginable. the storm is north of the dominican republic, and it will curve close to the turks and it will curve close to the turks and caicos islands, from there it should spin harmlessly out into the atlantic. the next place i could get la ndfall atlantic. the next place i could get landfall might actually be asked. it would be a hurricane, just the re m na nts of would be a hurricane, just the remnants of maria could be coming our way remnants of maria could be coming ourway in remnants of maria could be coming our way in the first week of october. a lot of uncertainty before we get there. today, slow—moving weather fronts pushing eastwards, the cloud have thickened up because east anglia, the rain has now live in london and will push eastwards,
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through the night. we will be left with clear skies and it will turn chilly. temperatures in towns and cities down to 8—10dc, cooler in the countryside and it could be some fun fog patches. temperatures rising in northern ireland, rain turning heavy doing the rush hour and spreading to scotla nd doing the rush hour and spreading to scotland and western parts of england and wales. it moves into an area of high pressure, killing the rain off and becoming lighter and patchy. it never reaches the middle and east of england, it should be fine and dry, not bad the damage is an sunshine coming out in northern ireland in the afternoon. reasonable this weekend, spoils of sunshine for just about everyone, temperature is not doing badly, rain on sunday across the western side of the country. starting on saturday, a cloudy note to start, a few mist and
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fog patches, some sunshine breaking to the cloud, south—easterly again, the temperatures are reasonable, 19-22 the temperatures are reasonable, 19—22 towards south—east, 18 for belfast glasgow and newcastle, cloudy towards the fast north and west. on sunday, where the front will bring rain with it, across western parts of a modern wales and scotland, rain could be quite heavily, because it isn‘t england it never m oves heavily, because it isn‘t england it never moves in, territories in the low 20s, in northern ireland a mixture of this sorry spells on passing shower. reasonable weather over the next few days, that they probably the better of the next days over the weekend. that is your latest weather.
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the prime minister‘s plan to break the brexit deadlock as she prepares for a major speech tomorrow. it‘s understood the prime minister could offer it as part of a two—year transitional deal with the eu, in return for access to the single market. a show of unity from the foreign secretary and chancellor after a marathon cabinet meeting to discuss the proposals. the race against time in mexico city to find the children trapped beneath the rubble of their school after tuesday‘s earthquake. cancelled flights, but now it‘s ryanair‘s pilots who are being told to change their holiday plans because of a rota crisis. the women who took this epilepsy drug during pregnancy — calls for a public inquiry after thousands of children were left with autism
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and learning difficulties. and the man who‘s spent his life searching for the natural wonders of this world. we speak to sir david attenborough

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