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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 21, 2017 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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welcome to beyond 100 days. in an outpouring of grief, mexicans have flooded the streets of their capital to dig through the rubble of the earthquake. among the many victims, it's the children of a primary school who have the world's attention. it's now more than two days since the quake struck, and rescu e rs days since the quake struck, and rescuers are increasingly frantic. they do believe some children may still be alive. rescuers say they will continue to day and night until every last child is accounted for. it feels like right now, everyone in this nation is awaiting two. president trump slaps new sanctions on north korea, but what are the chances these will work where cou ntless chances these will work where countless others have failed? also on the programme: i'm in florence where the british prime minister will set out her key brexit strategy tomorrow. but why this city? we will
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find out. it understood mrs mabel propose a two—year transitional deal post brexit, but how much is not going to cost uk taxpayer? and the elephant in the room. what is the latest cover of time magazine telling us about the future of the democrats? welcome, i'm catty quay in washington. christian fraser is in florence, italy. but we start in mexico city, where more than 48 hours after a massive earthquake, rescue workers still hope to find survivors under the rubble. they got 50 people out alive yesterday. scenes are all on volunteering tirelessly to help the effort are remarkable. —— scenes of ordinary people volunteering. they have been trying to get you iiz—year—old girl friday now, and the nation is transfixed by her fate. ——112—year—old girl.
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volu nteers volunteers hang on to moments of hope, but in all the confusion, none really know what the ambulances carrying away. any sign of life in the rubble, the call goes out for doctors and soldiers. the focal point now is the school where children and teachers remain trapped. there has been an extremely tense rescue operation unfolding at this primary school, an excruciating wait for parents. the rescuers say they will continue through day and night until every last child is accounted for. it feels like right now everyone in this nation is waiting for that moment as well. for a time, we were given access to the school yard with rescue workers. right beside the collapsed 3—storey building. there was a dramatic moment when it was announced that
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all moment when it was announced that a ll efforts moment when it was announced that all efforts were now to be focused ona all efforts were now to be focused on a 13—year—old girl they had made contact with. one of the teachers from the school who had been waiting four hours was called forward and escorted into what remains of the collapsed building. a friendly, familiar voice for the trapped girl to hear. through the night, rescuers work that the site, tunnelling through debris and using specialist rescue cameras to locate those buried. though the schoolgirl remains trapped, it appears someone was rescued, but his condition is unknown. much of the news of the past 2a hours has been bad. it's believed one teacher was the last whose body was recovered. at the school and rescue operations elsewhere, it's hard to use heavy machinery because of the risk of causing further collapse. the work is so delicate, says this man, head of one rescue brigade. we have to do everything by hand or chisel, with hama or cancel if you don't, you
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could cause something very serious. those rescue attempts go on far beyond mexico city. in this state, close to the epicentre of the earthquake, buildings and cars were flattened. fewer high—rise structures, the area escaped the of offers —— the loss of life suffered in the capital. there are questions why all, withstand earthquakes better when this country is so printed them, particularly schools. justin mexico city we have more than 9000 schools. this is the only one that has serious damages. many are giving thanks that more schools were not affected. but that is little comfort for the parents who have suffered and to continue to suffer here. you are standing in front of a
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building where some 20 people have already been rescued. what is the situation at the moment? the defence minister is actually speaking to journalists now, there's a big scrum. i'm trying to work out what exactly he is saying. hopefully in the course of the discussion we will get some information about what he is saying to people. in the meantime, i have spent the day here. the overwhelming hope is that they will find people alive. appere, yesterday, by the time we left in the early hours of the morning they had actually rescued for people from this building. that is why many people are still holding out hope that their loved ones will be found alive. there are dozens of people, family members who have travelled from neighbouring cities, many that i have spent time talking to, who camped out here, waiting, staring at
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this massive concrete and twisted metal. they believe that their loved ones are still there somewhere. i should say, a couple of hours ago we we re should say, a couple of hours ago we were told that they were focusing their efforts on the fourth floor of their efforts on the fourth floor of the building. they believe a group of ten people were huddled together, they received a whatsapp message yesterday from them. there were focusing their efforts on the fourth floor to see whether or not they we re floor to see whether or not they were able to rescue them. i'm looking at the notes i've been passed about the defence minister who has just bacon. passed about the defence minister who hasjust bacon. he has told journalists here that they estimate that 70 people are still in the building. 70 people were in the building. 70 people were in the building. they have confirmed they have rescued 28. i'm guessing they are still thinking that the remainder could still be there. alive. so far, they say they are not
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pulling anyone out from the rubble dead. so there are still holding out hope they can rescue more people alive. now we are talking about 48 hours since the earthquake struck, this happened tuesday lunchtime in mexico. thank you. those scenesjust extraordinary during the course of today, question, all those people trying to help. meanwhile that other natural disaster in the caribbean, president trump says hurricane maria has totally obliterated the us island of puerto rico and destroyed its electrical grid. we know that three and a half million people there are without power after the island was hit on wednesday. the island was hit on wednesday. the island ‘s governor says it takes months to restore the electricity supply completely. the authorities are warning of more flash floods. the hurricane also brought rain and high winds to the dominican republic. those scenes we are seeing
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from the dominican republic, puerto rico, mexico city, these people have just been so hammered in the course of the last week. there is that heartening since at least in mexico of people trying to help each other after that awful earthquake. let's move now to global politics. there has been a war of words this week between the us and north korea. today was no different. in the last hour, donald trump announced new sanctions against pyongyang to try to pressure it to give up its nuclear weapons programme. to pressure it to give up its nuclear weapons programmem to pressure it to give up its nuclear weapons programme. in his maiden speech at the un, donald trump described north korea's leader kim jong—un as rocket man, trump described north korea's leader kimjong—un as rocket man, and britain to totally destroy the country sanctions fail. in response, north korea's foreign minister likens donald trump to a barking dog. the president has been meeting with the south korean and japanese cou nterpa rts with the south korean and japanese counterparts today, here's a little of what he had to say. a new executive order will cut of sources
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of revenue that fund north korea's efforts. to develop the deadliest weapons known to humankind. the order enhances the treasury department '5 authorities to target any individual or entity that conducts significant trade in goods, services or technology with north korea. i services or technology with north korea. lam services or technology with north korea. i am very proud to tell you that, as you may have just heard moments ago, china. their central bank has told of their other banks, that's a massive banking system, to immediately stop doing business with north korea. donald trump in new york. joining me now is our north korea editor. we have had a raft of sanctions against north korea. these ones are targeting businesses and blacklisting people that do business with north korea, shipping and trade networks. do you think they have any more chance of working in the previous ones have failed? sanctions
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are an effective tool if everyone agrees to them. whether they be state actors or corporations. the problem in the past as they have been too many people, too many actors who thought there was money to be made, i canjack up my prices because the goods they want are going to become even more scarce now because of a sanctions regime. but you will still find people willing to trade. it looks like they're getting more of the world community in position now. the un security council has agreed resolutions, you have the chinese banking system, a p pa re ntly have the chinese banking system, apparently saying they should do no trade. in america and announcing sanctions, and the eu. this is conventional politics. the gap between the rhetoric and the reality is shopping. the rhetoric is rocket the reality is that we destroy north
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korea. that's because everybody knows any military action against north korea has the potential to result in massive loss of life. we had angular merkel this week saying listen, i think a military solution is unacceptable. that was the word she used. what you cannot have from the us president is him saying, you are right, there's nothing we can do militarily. he has to have that threaten his back pocket. able play well, that language, with his base in the us. ultimately there is that weapon. but there is no simple military solution. so, for all the rhetoric, the reality is, you are doing things by an old—fashioned means of trying to turn a screw, just trying to increase the pressure on pyongyang and see if it will have any effect. let's see if that actually works this time around. any effect. let's see if that actually works this time aroundlj was actually works this time around.”
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was thinking, there has been a lot said about his speech on tuesday, lot said about the bombast that he used, but i get the impression looking at the pictures today as he comes up looking at the pictures today as he comes up against these world leaders that they have learnt a lesson that they have two soothes the ego of donald trump and a much more attention to what he does the multi—actually says. attention to what he does the multi-actually says. that's the key point. people know, and funnily enough, after donald trump gave his speech, most notably the swedish foreign minister came on your programme to talk about it as being the wrong speech at the wrong time. there were many others at the un strikingly, saying to me, that was not as bad as we thought it could be. there was strong language against individual so—called rogue states, whether it be iran or north korea. but previous us presidents have done it. maybe not such an unorthodox way, but respect for the institution was there. i don't know whether that was because they thought it was a great speech by donald trump or whether their expectations were in a place that
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donald trump exceeded them. john, good to see you. let me tell you about why i'm here in florence. the prime minister will be making a speech, and there cannot be many better backdrops than this. it is a beautiful city steeped in history, it reminds you of all the medieval links that go right back. the relationships the uk has happened this country well before the single market. so what is she going to say? she is expected to propose a transitional deal with the eu of up to two years according to one cabinet source. the prime minister is also set to make what is set to be an open and generous offer to the eu. i suspect you're there because you had a word with number ten and told them he wanted the speech did ta ke told them he wanted the speech did take place in florence, let's be honest! it's a beautiful city, new love it, in many ways the epitome of europe. an interesting speech then
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—— an interesting choice then for a speech about breaking with europe. can mrs may say enough then to break the deadlock on negotiations? well the deadlock on negotiations? well the italian primers are from 2009 at 22011 the italian primers are from 2009 at 2201! has been speaking to the bbc. let's hear what he had to say. —— the italian prime minister. there is a misconception in the public opinion in the uk that the song to be put up is a fine for having to be decided to divorce. —— be some. it's a penalty, a punishment — not at all. i think the eu will be considerably worse without the uk. not only because it will be smaller, because there will be some gap in the budget, but if you want my view, largely because a voice which has always been the strongest and the loudest in terms of proposing opening up globalisation, markets
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and competition will no longer be there. that will be a loss also to there. that will be a loss also to the eu. i am far from there. that will be a loss also to the eu. lam farfrom happy about this departure. but the money is not all. it is simply the mechanical consequence of the uk, applying with the obligations that, like other member states, it has taken for the future. those the thoughts of mario monti. here with me now is a professor and director of the robert schuman centre for advanced studies at the european university institute here in florence. we have heard a bit of the detail today from downing street as to what might be happening, where it has not been confirmed but we suspect she will make an offer of a financial settle m e nt make an offer of a financial settlement through a two—year transition period. that's important, it's the first time we have there will a transition. it's the first time the uk has said it will ask perret transition. that does not mean it will get much of course it
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will, and my assumption is the other states would be happy to have that period. the question is under what conditions they will offer that transition, and in my view there is only one offer on the table and that is the uk withdraws from all european institutions from the decision—making of the eu but had to ta ke decision—making of the eu but had to take everything for the two years. in other words, ecj, free movement, all of the three movements, and continue to pay into the budget. on march 2019 we leave the eu. that i presume would mean that even though we are a member of the customs union, we can start negotiating trade deals with the rest of the world ? trade deals with the rest of the world? that would have to annoyance all have a good edge again. —— that would have to happen or we will still have the cliff edge. you only also begin to negotiate the actual detail of the trade agreement and our economic arrangement when you area third our economic arrangement when you are a third country. eva hofstadter has been an island over the last two days, looking to a solution over
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what is a very tricky issue. —— diet at the hofstadter. even the language is sensitive. he says there should be no border between the north and south on the border should be somewhere in the irish sea.” south on the border should be somewhere in the irish sea. i think the irish border will prove very intractable. if the uk leads the customs union and the single market there will have to be border checks because there will be two regimes on the island. i think one should not underestimate how difficult the irish question will remain, and how committed eu 27 are that the irish question is dealt with. do you think what she says it tomorrow will be enough to shift the impact in this first phase of the negotiation? that depends on what she says. from the eu perspective they want movement on three things, money, the irish question and citizens rights. good
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to talk to you. i'm sure there will be lots to say over the next 24 hours. the prime minister that we expect to make the speech tomorrow afternoon. what do the italians make up afternoon. what do the italians make up the fact that the prime minister has chosen florence and not say, rome, to give the speech and? it's not really it should in the italian press. people are scratching their heads and saying, why did she pick florence? the simple answer is that she has an election in germany, she cannot go there, industrial action in france, the dutch do not have a government. it's important to say they are not entirely fixated on brexit in europe. we think they might be but they are not, they have other priorities. the germans want to talk about the future of the 27 other countries, italians want to talk about immigration, countries in east wa nt talk about immigration, countries in east want to talk about integration between the danube and the black sea countries. they all have other things on their plate. albeit that
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brexit is crucially important. they will listen politely tomorrow and they will hope she has something that can move this negotiation forward. that was something i had this summer in europe as well, brexit no longer the main headline in many countries. let's look at spain where there are protests outside the high court in barcelona which is deciding whether to release 15 officials arrested on suspicion of helping to prepare for catalonia's independence referendum. the spanish prime minister has urged separatists to abandon their plans for the boat which was scheduled for the 1st of october. police investigating an attack on london underground train last week have arrested a teenage boy. he is the sixth person to be held in connection with the incident in which a home—made bomb partially detonated, injuring 30 people. the 17—year—old was detained at a property in south london which is now being searched. as we said earlier, the prime minister is travelling to florence but she cannot escape the rifts in her cabinet. back home, overthat cannot escape the rifts in her cabinet. back home, over that brexit strategy, to key cabinet members
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with very different approaches to the negotiations, borisjohnson philip hammond, made a show of unity this morning after a marathon two on the cabinet meeting. make no mistake, those splits are real and they are intense. the foreign secretary and chancellor are at the heart of the two opposing sides. i wa nt to heart of the two opposing sides. i want to show you some illustrations in the british press of late. something that is really showing you how it's being depicted. on the left, the spectator. boris and philip hammond the chancellor, swords raised, theresa may somewhere in the middle. same with the political website on the right. david davis and theresa may, not really sticking their colours to either. let's find out what we might get a flavour of tomorrow. our system political editor is with me. i think it is your debut on 100 days. good to have you. you have been digging around on what we are likely to get. let's talk about money. this is a bone of
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contention within the cabinet. the big question is, will theresa may name a figure and say to eu leaders, re st name a figure and say to eu leaders, rest assured, i will give you extra billion. the answer is, no. what she will do is give them a nod and a wink. she will say i will make sure you do not lose out, that your budget does not lose all the uk cash during the transitional phase. in other words, no country need panic that they believe had to pay more or lose out. she will not actually spell out a figure, but we will be able to speculate what that means. if that continues, that would mean we'd be paying around 10 billion a year. the question then is, is that figure good enough? the initial smoke signs are, well, probably not. they are looking at taking on board eu pension liabilities, loan arrangements, ongoing projects, but it is an initial offer. the hope is,
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by making that sort of nod and wink offer, it will be enough to break the logjam of negotiations. boris said earlier they are like singing birds ina said earlier they are like singing birds in a nest. i thought they were more like ledger lindberg is trying to shove each other out of the nest. —— more like ledger birds. basically, that has been parked. there is no agreement about the future arrangement we have with the eu, whether we go for some sort of very loose arrangement like canada or very loose arrangement like canada ora very loose arrangement like canada or a much closer arrangement like switzerland. there is no agreement. it is too sensitive a subject to get into. the argument so far has focused on the transitional deal. if you think you will be argy—bargy and aggro we have had over the transitional deal, this is just aggro we have had over the transitional deal, this isjust an initial offer. that gives you the idea of the huge himalayan heights that have to be scaled. we are just talking an initial offer an
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transition. that has provoked a huge cabinet row. she says it will be a bespoke deal. it will not be norway or switzerland, single market modified, it will be more free. it will not be free like canada, she said it would be somewhere in the middle. michel barnier who has been speaking in rome today says no, you get one or the other. but in a way she can't say anything else. if she says it will be like canada, then all the remainers will be up in arms. if you says it will be like switzerland, then all the brexiteers. .. switzerland, then all the brexiteers... its all things to everyone. everyone can think it's the sort of bespoke deal they want without having to actors say what sort of deal we will get. looking at the new twitter feed, sort of deal we will get. looking at the new twitterfeed, it's sort of deal we will get. looking at the new twitter feed, it's called westminster bubble, ollie hawkins, a researcher in the westminster researcher in the westminster research library. what he's doing is pulling the keywords from your tweets, the westminster correspondent, and putting them in a word bubble. look at this. you will see the keywords are brexit, boris,
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may. i look back over a few days, thought this was a good idea, but i look back and see brexit is there every single day. so is boris johnson, so is theresa may. we have become the most boring people in the world. we took brexit during the day, we go home until brexit to our wives, we get up in the morning, still talking brexit! it's killing me,| still talking brexit! it's killing me, ican still talking brexit! it's killing me, i can tell you. the tragedy is there's no end in sight. we have the transitional period, there were still talking brexit, then the final deal. basically the rest of my life is brexit, i have become the world's biggest aboard. i will consult you tonight, i will buy you a gelato. look at our word bubble from the 100 days team. look what comes up time and time again... yeah, you guessed it! kathie kay. look where i am on the screen! yeah, right. not to be outdone, i've come up with my own word bubble. we are colonising here
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at the washington bureau summits on paper, but look what mine says! christian, florence, paris, ola, wine here. food. and jealous! christian, florence, paris, ola, wine here. food. andjealous! i think that's referring to me. it's been a hellish year, but i am a professional, i go where the story is! laughter jealous and professional, i go where the story is! laughterjealous and wine. those are my two words of the day. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming upfor coming up for b was on bbc news and bbc world news, we have more from florence where the british prime minister will reveal her brexit strategy. why this city in particular? we will find out. and the democrats done? the outlook is not good if the times will cover is anything to go by. all still to come on beyond 100 days. another september days
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seems to have offered contrasting fortu nes seems to have offered contrasting fortunes on the weather front, because of a weather front. get ahead of it in the east, first thing, some blue sky to be had. a bit further towards the west, lunchtime the afternoon and there's a lot of cloud, quite a bit of rain as well. there is the weather front. where you were in relation to that particular beach amid all the difference. once it had moved through after a dank start to the day across the west, a glorious afternoon in prospect. notjust in tintagel, quite widely to northern ireland. through the rest of the evening and overnight, that weather front moving off into the north sea. the skies begin to clear and the temperatures as a consequence begin to tumble away. particularly in the countryside, there could be a touch of frost about proceedings across parts of scotland. here we are off
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and running on friday. we pretty much do it all over again with another set of weather fronts stumbling their way in towards northern and western parts of the british isles, generally speaking, the further east you are, the drier and finer your day will be. none too shabby across the south—west. the cloud fills in, you are robbed of sunshine but used should stay dry until later. best of the sunshine do east anglia and the south—east, temperatures nicely into the teens. maybe a patchy up across the northwest, into the west of scotland. northern ireland pops into something a bit brighter behind that. here we are for the weekend, sunny spells, quite warm in southern and eastern areas, but there will be some rain in the west come sunday. saturday sees the remnants of the old weather front lurking with intent through the heart of england and wales. perhaps a bit of rain getting up towards the cumbrian fells as well. for the south,
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perhaps some dry and finer conditions to be had. some bits and pieces of sunshine across scotland, they're the first signs of frontal of rain gradually pushing its way through to northern ireland on the western side of scotland. as we get on the sunday, notice the isobars across the northern half of the british isles. the wind is going to bea british isles. the wind is going to be a factor here. again, generally speaking, the further south east and the drier day will be. this is beyond 100 days, at washington and florence. the top story, the race against time in mexico city, to find the children trapped beneath the rubble following juicy‘s earthquake, donald trump announces new sanctions dealing with north korea, but are they going to work? and coming up, the demise of the democrats, according to time magazine, can be recovered from a period they would rather forget. and what history tells us about
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britain's connection to florence. since we launched this programme, donald trump and the republican party have certainly given us a lot to talk about. but what about the party in exile? the democrats. it is clear what they are up against, but what are they actually for? this week's time magazine says that the party is in its worst sheep since 1929. can anything see them? we are joined by the author of the article. thank you. it seems to be the sort of split in the democratic party. ones going hard left. and the rest that have said we have got to be economic moderates. it is unclear. the energy is on the left. it is a
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sprint. and they are trying to drag eve ryo ne sprint. and they are trying to drag everyone that they can with them. still about a quarter hailing from the midwest. it is a problem, you can smell saltwater from where they hail from! those values do can smell saltwater from where they hailfrom! those values do not necessarily translate to places like nebraska. the congress gets the start in 2020 in iowa. you have to recognise what goes voters want to hear. you paint a portrait of the democratic party in pretty dire straits. state legislators, they have lost a lot of local congressmen. you have got hillary clinton, coming out with that book. 300,000 copies selling in the opening week. that suggests that the democrats are energised? certainly but toby move that to democratic victory is another thing altogether.
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she is not the president. you have to figure out how to get the numbers, but get them in the ranking districts, the correct states. it is not enough to do well at their play, you have got to do well at ohio. not enough to do well at their play, you have got to do well at ohiom it possible for the democrats to appeal to minorities and the communities, i am appeal to minorities and the communities, iam notjust appeal to minorities and the communities, i am notjust talking about race, games, also white middle class voters perhaps more socially conservative? certainly trying to say that. one of the people that i spent some time with, a congressman from ohio. he has got ambitions for 2020. he said you have got to realise it is notjust the people in his district but they have got reason to be. part of this country have economically stagnated, not making any more money than they were
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during bill clinton's time. angry and want answers. it is difficult to keep a straight face, but how does this look from florence?” keep a straight face, but how does this look from florence? i think people in florence are probably looking at donald trump in much the same way as the other europeans. fascinated by him. and probably fascinated by what has happened to the democratic party. probably equally puzzled by the fact that this time last week donald trump was attacking the democratic party and then suddenly getting into bed with then suddenly getting into bed with the two senior democrats on the hill. what must the democratic base be thinking? they are trying to figure that out themselves. this week, talking about what they have tried to accomplish with donald trump, and you see this outside of
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chuck's apartment earlier this year. the energy is certainly on the left and they have got no appetite for compromise at this hour. what about the money? it is always crucial in american politics. i have read that they do not have much? that is correct. the republic national committee is overgrazing the democrats two to one. the democrats spent about $360 million running the campaign. setting aside super pact, the money, certainly the democrats spent more than donald trump. money is only determining so far. the democrats are trying to figure out which candidates they want to start going around for the 2020 elections. it is very good to get your
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thoughts. i suppose when people look politics from outside the country they looked at the leader, and think thatis they looked at the leader, and think that is the opposition leader. when you look at the united states, you do not know who is leading the democrats. it was hillary clinton, she can clearly sell books. but not the leader. and a lot of democrats would wish that she would keep quiet. that is a problem for the democratic party, in the house of representatives and the senate, the leadership is pretty old, white. not necessarily representative of the future, the republicans have got more young leaders in congress. they have got to come up with somebody. the american elections last four yea rs the american elections last four years and years. we all get tired covering them! the democrats have got to get somebody to lead the party soon because they have also got to start raising money, billions of dollars, to run for the presidency. going to need to do that soon. presidency. going to need to do that soon. collections that do not last
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as long, germany. just three days to go until the german election. it is increasingly clear that the right wing nationalist party has got a chance of winning series ground in the german parliament. if the polls are correct, they could be the first right wing party since the first world war. we can speak to our colleague. he is in berlin. a lot of people would look at the german elections and think it is a foregone conclusion. angela merkel is going to win. but you do not see the huge numbers of people in germany, still undecided? i think that is a reasonable point. we have had some polls suggesting 45% of germans still have got to make up their mind. but the point before that, more speed will simply saying this is going to be a done deal, it is not unreasonable. angela merkel's party has got the 14 point lead in
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the latest polls. even if those undecided voters do a lot of unexpected things, it would be unimaginable that would get changed over and she does not have the biggest party. the other question, what happens to the smaller parties, you alluded to the alternative for germany, along with a left wing party, free market liberals, and a couple of others, including the greens. and how the undecided voters are going to go with those smaller parties could influence the quality and that could then influence the kind of terror that anglo—american could have in power. —— term. kind of terror that anglo—american could have in power. -- term. that is the interesting point, the sdp have been in coalition with the cdu and they have said this time they are not going to go into coalition. you looked at the smaller parties. six parties, probably. the frosting
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that has happened. the coalition going to be complicated. that has happened. the coalition going to be complicatedm that has happened. the coalition going to be complicated. it is certainly going to be complicated. we can simplify this by one. the alternative to germany is just so different to the main parties, that it is no possibility that they are going to end up in a college in. in fa ct, going to end up in a college in. in fact, i interviewed the spokesperson for the adf and he accepted no possibility of government. concentrating on being an opposition. this would be the first right wing nationalist party to be represented in the parliament and it is going to have to take the polls being completely wrong for that not to happen. any party over 5% is going to be represented. the latest polls have them on ten, 11%. it looks likely. it is pretty remarkable. we can talk about those undecided voters. before the
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american election be wondered if it was a secret donald trump vote, people who did not want to admit they were going to vote for donald trump. do you think that is the case in germany? the afd vote? certainly, but we will have to see if that manifests itself. we have seen the afd performing well at state level, in13 of16. afd performing well at state level, in 13 of 16. clearly, afd performing well at state level, in 13 of16. clearly, some people will be voting for afd, and not going to tell the pollsters. one of the things that decides how this goes, who the voters think has a vision for germany. angela merkel is seen as a very safe vision for germany. angela merkel is seen as a very safe pair of hands, but even supporters would admit she has not really set who she sees germany evolving over the next ten, 20 years. the german economy is performing well, but widespread acknowledgement that is not necessarily passing over those
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benefits to everyone in society. one of the most crucial point is to be decided in this election campaign, which party can make the case to those undecided voters, that in the long term they have got the plan to digitise the economy, make the economy greener, share benefits, thatis economy greener, share benefits, that is realistic. and something that is realistic. and something that they can believe in. interesting. you could say that was true for a lot of the opposition, and the western world. thank you. we are florence, washington, berlin. forgive us for the delay. the richest woman in the world, liliane bettencourt, has died at the age of 94. she was the daughter of an industrial chemist, forbes magazine estimated her wealth was nearly 40 billion. she died peacefully at home. france's hard left trade union
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is holding a second day of protest against president macron's labour reforms, negotiating wages, and conditions directly with employees. that limits damages paid to workers forunfair that limits damages paid to workers for unfair dismissal. in france, the far right leader marine le pen has said she will rebuild the national front after her deputy resigned, taking our lives with them. he has been at odds with marine le pen since forming his own faction, the patriots after she was defeated. the canadian opposition mp has apologised after referring to the environment minister as climate barbie. the made the comment on twitter, during an exchange on a report over global warming. the deleted the tweet then apologised for using the world barbie, and said it was not reflective of the role that the minister played. it is 2017. that was canada. this is the
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story about a search for the dragon. we speak to sir david attenborough about the wonders of the natural world. ryanair is planning to make pilots change holidays, already after the cancellation of 2000 flights. the cheese cheese underfire for under fire for thousands of cancelled flights, the boss of ryanair was not feeling very patient today. he is making pilots delay some leave to avoid cutting yet more flights. extra money in it for them. but also evidence that some could co nve rse but also evidence that some could converse down. rya nair but also evidence that some could converse down. ryanair is split into 86 pieces, i won't europe. each of them have representatives but the
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very reallyjoin them have representatives but the very really join forces. them have representatives but the very reallyjoin forces. i am told that around half have backed a letter that says the majority of collea g u es letter that says the majority of colleagues rejected your last offer, offering the £12,000 bonus to walk on diesel. this is one of their biggest bases. pilots here, along with others in london, frankfurt and berlin are being offered an extra 10,000 euros if they help out. but i have seen messages on social media suggesting that pilots here, anyway, don't want to take that money because it's not being offered across the whole company. one union that is not allowed to get involved unless the pilots ask them to says it has never known a situation like it. ryanair clearly are throwing money at this problem. i would suggest to them that they need to fundamentally look at their employment model, rather than sticking a plaster on the problem. angry pilots keep telling me
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that this is their big chance to get more secure contracts. if these crews do pull together and take action, it could mean more cancelled flights for passengers. you are watching beyond 100 days. sir david attenborough is famous around the world for programmes, bringing exotic creatures and lands into our homes. at 91, his enthusiasm shows no signs of abating. extraordinary. to mark the publication of his latest book, sir david has given an exclusive interview to the bbc. let me take you back to the mid—1950s... this is the story of a search for a dragon. ...when a young david attenborough
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took his first tentative steps as a natural history programme maker. as he circled us, flicking out his great yellow tongue, savouring the smell of the goat's flesh, he looked almost as though he had walked out of some prehistoric age. gosh, look at that. now here we are, 60 years later at london zoo. in the dragon house, named after the man who has become quite possibly the most respected broadcaster on planet earth. david, the world and television has changed a lot since you first encountered one of those. yes. hugely. yes, when i encountered that, there were two networks in britain only. the bottom of the ferry grated on the white coral sand... i went to bali in 1956. i only saw one other european all the time i was in bali, which was several weeks, a couple of weeks. and we filmed dancing, and it was just marvellous.
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whoops, look at that! i mean that, that was great fun. it was the first time that that had ever been seen on television. yes. and it took us weeks to get there and get that filmed. and of course the world was new. that's an example of it. i mean people... it wasn't the greatest film ever made, but nobody had ever seen a fat thing before. when i filmed that, there were only a third of the people on the planet. what is the effect, in your eyes, of having three times as many people on the planet? well everything is overcrowded. everything is overcrowded. and it's very difficult. the wilderness is under threat. looking at the oceans, and seeing the mother albatross come back after having scoured the antarctic ocean to feed this chick which she had been away from for weeks, and to bring back food. and she opens her beak and the chick begs the food and out comes what? plastic.
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no! that she has found floating on the ocean and has brought back and feeds the chick. that's heartbreaking. heartbreaking, yes. you're 91, so you're not as young as you once were. on a good day, how old do you feel in yourself? about 45 really. yes, i think so, really. and i mean, look, this is luck, isn't it? that is just luck. jack and i set off wildly in pursuit. his luck is our good fortune. there are more programmes to come from this much—loved big beast of the broadcasting jungle. will gompertz, bbc news. we had to show you that, because you can never get enough of sir david attenborough. 91. britain has got a long history in foreign fields, and
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when theresa may makes a speech at florence tomorrow, she is going to remain many feminist injuries it spent treating with britain. and the city of florence is no exception. our italy correspondent reports on britain's long history with the italian city. you come to florence when you need to go back to the beginning, to explain who you are and how you get what you want. one local man had a few ideas about this, it is better to be feared than loved. the renaissance diplomats followed england's rise as a power, and the relationship with his native city. in the early middle ages, florence was rich and england saw the city as a giant cash point. in
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13005, the city as a giant cash point. in 1300s, king edward the told borrowed a huge amount of money, to fund a war with france. the king defaulted. that caused a banking collapse. too late to say sorry? by the 19th century, or was largely forgiven. the english even got there own century, so that they could enjoy florence even after death. this historian and religious hermit tends the graves. i think we have got a very great debt to pay florence and ido very great debt to pay florence and i do not think we are pianists very well. —— paying this. italy has so deeply influenced literature and art. craftsmen and women include this man and his apprentices. if there is a florence spirit that britain has spent centuries trying
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to bottle, it can surely be found on these benches. it is a certain humility, then the shape. un —based with your own dreams. essentially you are constructing something that is already inside you. in florence, the penalties for imperfection have often been brutal. in the middle ages, this square was used for book burning. theresa may could find herself in front of a critical audience. if she is looking for some sort of legitimisation, barking up the wrong tree. if she is looking for some sort of emphasis, on britain's relationship with europe outside of the european union does not going to work. for almost 1000 yea rs, not going to work. for almost 1000 years, england, now the uk, has been
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looking to florence for trade and culture. once again, it comes in search of inspiration. and james, who has already had two days here, is with me. it is such an incredible place. the history is long. where does this feature? a blip? almost black. not far from here, does this feature? a blip? almost black. not farfrom here, galileo was trying to work what rotated, the sun or earth, whether or not an island that used to borrow money from florencejoins island that used to borrow money from florence joins the customs union, in the span of history it is not very important. when you walk around and say to the locals, this is why we are here. theresa may is going to be here. i'll be complex? it is difficult to find some locals. so many to risk. the italians are
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curious but wonder if they are still going to be able to go to the united kingdom because so many hundreds of thousands of italians, particularly young italians cannot getjobs in this country so they have gone to england. anybody in london will know how many are there. going to be wondering if they can continue to do that. people here will say we have got other things to worry about, other than brexit, but a movement of people in italy like what the british people have done, like that they are taking back control? they are. some right wingers hope in the next election, it could be a similar italian focus. but remember italy was one of the founders of the european project. it had been closely tied together than britain ever was. they have spoken about several positions about what they wa nt several positions about what they want from europe, but no critical head of steam to say that they should follow brexit. thank you very
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much. when i call you the rome correspondent, as a previous incumbent of this, everybody said this is the best, everything after thatis this is the best, everything after that is downhill. true! we are going to move away from florence. a little island of ireland, population of just 180 people, it emerged that one of the euromillions tickets, what almost $600,000 was sold there. the winning ticket came from this woman's post office. it was on monday. nobody has come forward yet. but she told us, even if she knew the person, she cannot see anything about it. not surprisingly she has never known such excitement on the island. if i were no lottery, you will be the first person to know about it. before i hand in my bbc pass. eye will know about it because
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you probably will not be coming to work the next day, i will be talking to an empty chair! of course, it is an important speech tomorrow, you will be covering theresa may's speech. how critical as this in the brexit process? it is critical for her. she has had a difficult week, with the borisjohnson intervention last weekend, the ramifications of that in the cabinet. she has to try to find some way of encouraging europeans to move past this first phase and get the cabinet together. she is between a rock and a hard place. one commentator said today that she is wobbling steadily, along a straight line! she cannot go along that a straight line for much longer, going to have to choose another route. coming up next, outside source. and the latest headlines. i have just outside source. and the latest headlines. i havejust got outside source. and the latest headlines. i have just got one thing
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that i want to show you. my graphic has changed. jealous. bright yellow! in case anybody missed that. i may not even come back before sunday. from all of us, thank you very much. another september day seems to have offered contrasting fortunes on the weather front because of the weather front. get ahead of that in the east, some blue skies to be had, but to the west at lunchtime, mid—afternoon, was a lot of cloud and rain. that is the weather front. and where you were... that made all the difference. once it had moved through, across western parts it was a glorious afternoon in prospect. notjust you, a glorious afternoon in prospect. not just you, but also
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a glorious afternoon in prospect. notjust you, but also northern ireland, west wales, west scotland. over the evening and overnight, the weather front moves to the north sea. skies clear. and temperatures asa sea. skies clear. and temperatures as a consequence, begin to tumble. especially the countryside. possibly touch of frost about proceedings. and on friday, pretty much doing this all over again. weather fronts stumbling towards northern and western parts of the british isles. generally speaking, further east, the better. not shabby across the south west. cloud fills in. but you should stay dry until later. east anglia, pushing the temperatures to the teens. cloud and rain fills in. patchy affair at the north—west of england, northern ireland pops out brighter. and for the weekend, some
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sunny spells, warm at times, for southern and eastern areas but some green in the west. on sunday. saturday has the remnants of the weather front just lurking saturday has the remnants of the weather frontjust lurking with intent, through the heart of england and wales, sandrine as well. for those south, some fine conditions to be had. bits and pieces of sunshine across scotland. some signs of that frontal rain gradually pushing to the western side of scotland as we get on sunday. notice the number of isobars across the northern half of the british isles. the wind is going to bea the british isles. the wind is going to be a factor. and the fob associate will be, —— further south you will be, the drier you will be. it is race against time in mexico city.
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rescuers raced to find the children trapped beneath the rubble of their school after tuesday's earthquake. cancelling their holidays, ryanair tries to get pilots to change their leave to help with the problems with customers' flights. new sanctions against individuals and companies who trade with north korea from donald trump. more devastation in the caribbean. hurricane maria makes a direct hit on puerto rico, knocking out power across the island. the women who took this epilepsy drug during pregnancy call for a public enquiry after thousands of
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