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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 22, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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today at 5, we're in florence, where theresa may has delivered her speech aimed at breaking the deadlock in brexit talks. the prime minister called for a two—year transitional period arrangement to allow for a lordly exit. —— and orderly exit. so during the implementation period, access to one another‘s markets should continue on current terms and britain should also continue to take part in existing security measures. and i know businesses in particular would welcome the certainty this would provide. watched by members of the cabinet, she said britain would pay its "fair share" to the eu during that period. the uk will honour commitments we have made during the period of our membership. as the prime minister left florence labour said the plans were a product of cabinet infighting. this speech seemed to me the product of internal
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negotiations of the tory party rather than negotiations with pe you. we'll have more from florence in a moment. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the taxi app uber loses its licence to operate in london — it could put thousands of drivers‘ jobs at risk. an 18—year—old man is charged with attempted murder after the bomb attack on a tube train. you cannot be serious! rivalry between two tennis greats is the plot of a new blockbuster. we'll get mark kermode's thoughts on borg versus mcenroe — and the rest of the cinema releases — in the film review. i'm christian fraser in florence, where, in what has been
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billed as a major speech, theresa may has set out her vision of britain's relationship with the eu after brexit. the prime minister talked about brexit as an "exciting time" for the uk — "full of promise". she told the audience that the eu had, as she put it, "never felt to us like an integral part of our national story" in the way it does to so many elsewhere in europe. lets look at the detail in the speech. theresa may called for a two—year transition period when existing market access and free movement arrangements will apply. on trade, the prime minister said the uk would not seek single market membership or a canada—style free—trade deal — but that a "creative solution" was needed and she didn't think it was necessary to impose any new tariffs. mrs may said the registration of eu nationals would be a building block for a new immigration system. she said britain would honour its financial commitments during the remainder of the current budget — so no country would have
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to "pay more or receive less". on security, the prime minister said she wanted to establish a new uk—eu agreement which would provide a framework for human rights, security issues and criminaljustice. and she said a strong dispute resolution mechanism was needed to help when disagreements arise between the eu and uk laws — but that this should not be overseen by the european court ofjustice. our political correspondent jonathan blake has more of the detail. this speech was billed as a possible game changer. theresa may in florence to jump start the process of negotiating britain's future outside the u. early on an admission the uk had neverfelt comfortable outside the u. early on an admission the uk had never felt comfortable as pa rt the uk had never felt comfortable as part of the european union. throughout its membership the united kingdom has never totally felt at home being in the european union. and perhaps because of our history
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and geography, the european union never felt to us like an integral pa rt never felt to us like an integral part of our national story. in the way it does to so many elsewhere in europe. look into the prime minister was clear what she did not want. one way of approaching this question is to put forward a stark and unimaginative choice between two models, either something based on european economic area membership or a traditional free european economic area membership or a traditionalfree trade european economic area membership or a traditional free trade agreements such as that the eu negotiated with canada. i don't believe either option would be best for the uk or the european union. there was little detail on how trade agreement might work. before that can be agreed there are sticking points to overcome, firstly the rights of eu citizens living in the uk.” overcome, firstly the rights of eu citizens living in the uk. i want to incorporate our agreement into uk law and make sure the uk courts can refer directly to it. and when there
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is uncertainty around underlying eu law i want the uk courts to be able to ta ke law i want the uk courts to be able to take into account the judgments of the european court ofjustice with a view to ensuring consistent interpretation. the uk is due to leave in march 2019 but time is tight and the prime minister confirm she wants in effect an extension of membership. a period of implementation would be in our mutual interest and that is why i propose they should be such a period after the uk leaves the eu. clearly people, businesses and public services should only have to plan for one set of changes in the relationship between the uk and eu. the uk's relationship with the eu would continue she said on the current terms, in other words little will change for five years beyond the referendum. brussels called the speech a step forward. the process to leave is making slow progress.
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0ur assistant political editor, norman smith has been watching the speech and is with me now. through the summer there was a lot of talk that the soft brexiteers we re of talk that the soft brexiteers were getting the upper hand and philip hammond had steered the prime minister towards a soft brexit. i did not detect in this speech she has shifted an awful lot from the lancaster house speech. has shifted an awful lot from the lancaster house speechlj has shifted an awful lot from the lancaster house speech. i think that is true and in a way that is what mrs may always said was going to be the guts of this speech, she described it as an update on lancaster house and building on lancaster house and building on lancaster house and why that matters is if you want to unlock these talks, clearly something has to give. there has to be some sort of movement because currently clearly lancaster house has not provided the space to move to the next phase of talks. what that meant i think was that we had got as expected the transitional phase, the two—year
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period, yes we got an offer of money during that two—year period, but not a specific figure, but on what is, alongside money, the key sticking point, namely eu nationals, i don't think we really moved much at all beyond a plea in effect to trust us, we will guarantee your rights and this suggestion that british courts will take account of the rulings of the european court ofjustice. as i understand it they will not have too, but they can. obviously it is a highly technical legal issue but it sounds to me as if that probably is not going to be enough to meet the sort of concerns of eu negotiators who to date have been adamant it must be the european court of justice that rules over the rights of eu citizens. that key sticking point seems to me to remain. that
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will be discussed on monday, the fourth round of talks will begin in earnest. we have had some comment from michel barnier, the european commission negotiator who said it was positive in tone but now he needed to see concrete details. does it shift us past the logjam in negotiations? it depends what sort of mood the eu negotiators are in. if they were listening to the tone of mrs may's speech, which was warm, conciliatory, she went out of her way to stress our common european heritage and how we will remain close to europe and europe had an exciting future. if they listen to that and feel reassured, perhaps they can cut her some slack and we can move to the second phase. if, as has been the situation so far, when they adopt a legal, constrained approach to the detailed remit they
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have been given, then i suspect they will feel there is not enough yet on eu nationals to allow them to move ahead, but it depends to an extent on how they respond and also it depends on whether eu leaders, and mrs may went out of her way to appeal to them to say you need to show leadership, in other words, appeal to them to say you need to show leadership, in otherwords, get hold of michel barnier and tell him we wa nt hold of michel barnier and tell him we want to trade deal, let's move on. if they are listening and put the squeeze on mr barnier, potentially that too could be another mechanism for unlocking the deadlock. and we might see some movement after the german election with angela merkel‘s focus perhaps a little bit shifted back to brexit. as you would expect when it comes to brexit, views were diverging. we had comment from the labour leader jeremy corbyn. she said mrs may have been too slow to act. 15 months on
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since the referendum and we get to a situation where the prime minister faces the reality that she will have to look for a transition period. she has had 15 months to think about that and she goes to florence, and we did not get a chance to see florence in the background, to tell us florence in the background, to tell us what we know. it was part of our amendment to the withdrawal billed to look for a transition period. it is going to happen. there has to be a transition period to protectjobs. 0ur point through this process has been a brexit that damages employment and jobs is dangerous for everybody in this country. that is oui’ everybody in this country. that is our basic approach to this. i don't think it is possible to put a figure on it. clearly there are obligations that must be met and the eu have obligations to make to this country, but this speech seemed to me the product of the internal negotiations of the tory party rather than
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negotiations with the eu. she seemed to slap down boris and david davies during the speech. transition has got to happen is the idea ofjeremy corbyn. not everybody agrees, least of all nigel farage. we have the debate, it was called a referendum. we have a clear 70% of oui’ referendum. we have a clear 70% of our population that simply want the government to get on with it and what we have done today is we kicked it into the long grass for at least another two years. it's a good day for westminster, it's a good day for the political class. it's a good day for goldman sachs, but it's two fingers up to 17.4 million people who voted for brexit. let's get some more from the conservative backbench mp and remain campaigner. anna soubry. let me pick up campaigner. anna soubry. let me pick up that point i picked up with
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norman, if you are in the remain u will be dismayed by what theresa may said, that we are definitely leaving the single market and customs union, we wa nt the single market and customs union, we want to be a free trading nation. i think we need to move on, which includes moving on in the language that we use. we are going to be leaving the eu in march 2019, and the welcome news today is we will have a transition period for two yea rs, have a transition period for two years, probably longer, until such time as we get a final arrangement and in that period, they will enjoy the benefits of the single market and customs union because the prime minister has put the interests of the economy and jobs at the heart of brexit. she should do as she has done. that is what today is all about. i am done. that is what today is all about. iam not done. that is what today is all about. i am not interested in reruns of the referendum, i am looking forward , of the referendum, i am looking forward, and most people in nottingham and my constituency want us nottingham and my constituency want us to get on with it and get the best deal possible in this
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transition period —— and this transition period —— and this transition period —— and this transition period will be welcomed widely. when you talk to businesses in nottingham, does it allow them, the transition period, allow them to start spending money on their plans for the coming years? it really does help them because it gives them certainty. the cbi has given a cautious welcome. we still need more detail and still be to make sure the eu is going to accept this. it is great we have got ourselves into a better position. we need to work out as see whether or not the eu will agree. from the negotiating point of view this is the right step and in the right direction. i think it will give british business what they have cried out for, which is some sort of certainty, idea, as to where we are going as a nation and what the government policy is, so now we know what the government aims to secure in this transitional period and i think that will be welcomed by
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british business. it is being welcomed, they need more flesh on the bones, they want the extra certainty because they want the ee you to accept that. we need to get that progress and sorted out. and we will leave in 2019, and then we need to get the difficult negotiations of a final settlement. this is a difficult process. people were told it would be easy. they are not stupid. they realise how difficult thisjob is. i think theresa may has made it clear she has a grasp on things, knows what you want to achieve and she will get on and do it. interesting you say we have certainty of where we are going because a lot of the comment today has been there was very little on what the end destination is. she talks about the bespoke deal but michel barnier, he said you cannot have a little bit of the norway deal and a little bit of the callow deal,
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you have to choose one or the other. it seems in some way theresa may is trying to fudge the issue.|j it seems in some way theresa may is trying to fudge the issue. i think she wants the very best. of course it will be difficult. many of us have made the case for staying in the single market and customs union as part of the transition. that argument has been accepted, but the final deal, we don't know how long it will take to secure it. it took at least five, seven years, to secure the deal with canada. we are not in their situation because we have complete similarity in terms of rules and regulations, so it should be easier, but these things take time because they are fiendishly complex. what is important is putting everything back on the table, getting into proper negotiations, getting the transition out of the way and sorted, getting into proper negotiations, which are
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more responsible. i am sure the eu will be heartened to see this sensible, responsible approach to these difficult negotiations. thank you for being with us. so how will mrs may's proposals be greeted by eu leaders? chris morris, from the bbc‘s reality check team, has been looking at whether the offer will be enough to break the stalemate, over the financial settlement. this speech comes a few days before the fourth round of negotiations and over the summer, one thing has become clear, the biggest problem in those negotiations is money. even though they say you should never reveal your cards too early, there has been a lot of talk about what the prime minister would offer to break the deadlock and the key issue is this, transition. what would a transition period looked like immediately after the uk leads the eu in 2019? the prime minister has suggested a transition period under current eu rules and regulations. it
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would give the uk more time to set up would give the uk more time to set up among would give the uk more time to set up among other things new customs and immigration systems. she suggested it would last two years. that implies the government would make roughly the same net payments into the eu budget is now, a bit more than £9 billion per year, after you've taken more than £9 billion per year, after you've ta ken account more than £9 billion per year, after you've taken account of the british re bate you've taken account of the british rebate and money the eu spends in the uk. it could buy goodwill. the long—term budget in the eu runs his seven—year cycles in the current lasts until the end of 2020. a two—year transition could take care of the net amount of around £18 billion. the uk has already said it will pay. there will be no immediate hole in the budget for others to fill. it makes money one of the better cards in the uk hand because the eu relies on british cash a least for couple of years after brexit, but do not think that would be that. the rest of the eu would not accept it as a final settlement
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because they do not see paying to maintain the current role in the single market during transition as the same thing as settling past debts. there are plenty of bills the eu says the uk has to deal with. there is the uk share of money formally committed but not yet paid, like a credit card, and at current exchange rates, the outstanding bill is more than £210 billion, which makes the uk share more than 25 billion. there is the uk share of the eu pension pot. british civil serva nts the eu pension pot. british civil servants have been working for eu is situations for more than a0 years, another £8 billion the rest of europe expects the uk to cover. even though mrs may has made what might be seen as a generous offer to get talks moving, it will not be the end of the story. it really is touch and go whether enough progress would have been made before an eu summit knocked over to allow negotiations
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to move on to consider the outlines ofa to move on to consider the outlines of a future trade deal. at the moment, it looks unlikely. touching go. theresa may will have to do more than this speech, certainly in the european council meetings in 0ctober. we told you about the reaction in the uk. what about the rest of europe? 0ur correspondent is in brussels. you looked at the early reaction, what did they make of it? the key person is michel barnier, the eu chief negotiator, who has reacted and put out a statement that sums up what we are now hearing, which is welcoming what they see as a more constructive tone from the uk, saying they'd see a new willingness to ta ke saying they'd see a new willingness to take things forward. but, saying they need more detail. what he says thatis they need more detail. what he says that is on money, welcoming the uk is saying it has commitments and will honour those but says we want
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to see if that all commitments on citizens, the they are steps forward but it means that what is put on the table here next week when uk negotiators turn up, and on ireland, he says it does not clarify how the uk intends to honour its obligations, not happy with what he heard on that issue. positives, but more detail needed. mep sven giegold is the spokesperson for the green party in germany and a prominent voice within the european and german left. hejoins me now from hanover. what did you make of this speech? i agree there was a better tone and thatis agree there was a better tone and that is a positive tone. when it comes to the suggestions, i have to say it is a step towards reality because saying we need a transition period of about two years during which there are continuing financial
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commitments towards the eu budget as well as the four freedoms, including open migration between the eu member states and the rules to apply, that isa states and the rules to apply, that is a positive step forward. you say if you are remaining part of the single market and perhaps the customs union, maybe not a member of those, you are bound by the same rules, we would have to accept freedom of movement, a stipulation for the transition? that is what theresa may has basically offered andi theresa may has basically offered and i would recognise this as a clear step forward. 0n the other hand, i would clear step forward. 0n the other hand, iwould make clear step forward. 0n the other hand, i would make two big buts. when it comes to the option for the future, one has to say she has basically demanded a new special treaty outside of the eu and many in europe will feel britain always
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wa nted europe will feel britain always wanted a special deal inside of the european union and may now ask for a special deal outside of the eu because she is saying she wants to have very strong open access to the common market, without having the obligations with it. the two options is either there is restrained access, like in trade deals with canada and others, or you have the norwegian, swiss and other solutions, which offer strong access to the common market, but then you have again to honour all the obligations that go with it, common rules, decisions, they have to be accepted so that there is fair competition. and she basically asked for a third way, as if there were two, markets in europe, but there is only one and i think that is a demand from my perspective is not
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british because all other european countries have very different deals and she is not asking for the british principle of same rights, same obligations. thank you. you can hearin same obligations. thank you. you can hear in that tone that in the view of the germans it is a binary choice between the norway or canada model, irrespective of the fact that today she said we could have a bespoke deal where we could have a little bit of both. that of course will feature as part of the negotiation. let's bring in the conservative mp suella fernandes, who campaigned for britain to leave the eu. she's in our westminster studio. reacting to that, you hear in the tone of that german that really it has to be one or the other and that is not the weight theresa may wants to go. what the reality is is britain is starting from a different point to other comparative examples, not really helpful therefore to say we will pick an option off the
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shelf. that is what the prime minister made clear, that we are not going to adopt european economic area model or canadian model, we will have a british model that takes account of our particular trading arrangements with the eu and our strength in our economy and the wishes of the british people as expressed in the referendum. did you think we got enough detail to move it forward? it seemed we got a little bit on the cash and a little bit on the transition, but precious little apart from optimism on what the final destination is.|j little apart from optimism on what the final destination is. i think we did. theresa may set out a bold—macro, dynamic and realistic vision michel barnier said her speech was a step forward. i think that is the minimalist way of expressing her speech which set out detail on eu citizens, progress made in relation
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to northern ireland. she reassured us we to northern ireland. she reassured us we have a strictly time—limited implementation period. i think she's set out the positive prospects for a new relationship with the eu about which i am optimistic. she did say when pressed after the speech that the no deal option is still better than the bad deal option. do you think so? i do. than the bad deal option. do you think so? ido. i than the bad deal option. do you think so? i do. i believe that firmly and i think britain is in a strong position where we are a net contributor. i think we always have to be ready to take on a deal option ifa to be ready to take on a deal option if a bad deal is presented. it is a two—way negotiation and if at the end of the hard work put in a deal is presented that isn't favourable to bring's interests, we have to be ready to walk away without a deal and will be ok without a deal. we area and will be ok without a deal. we are a valued trading partner of the
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eu and it would be an act of self harmed by the eu not to work with us co—operatively in whatever format that takes. ok. thank you. joining me is professor brigid laffan — director of the robert schuman centre for advanced studies at the european university institute. we talked a lot back cash in transition, i know you have a big focus on ireland because you come from over there. let's talk about ireland with sinn fein saying it does nothing to protect the good friday agreement and that they have had no detailfor irish friday agreement and that they have had no detail for irish citizens. absolutely, all she did was reiterate the position of the irish government, the british government and eu but the eu and irish government asked the uk, you want to leave, what will you do about the border? 0n ireland, nothing. leave, what will you do about the border? 0n ireland, nothingm leave, what will you do about the border? on ireland, nothing. it is almost as if we have glossed over it
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and perhaps it is one of the trickiest issues, going to the issue of peace in ireland? without a unique status, special status for northern ireland that makes it a special region between the uk and the eu, there will be trouble in ireland and anyone in the other ireland and anyone in the other ireland who thinks they should take this lightly are fooling themselves. the problem of course for the dup, if you have no border between north and south, you have more europe, more ireland and the connections with the uk start to disappear, which is what they are worried about. if you look at the electoral map of northern ireland, there is a strong green belt from county derry to south armagh and the unionist majority in northern ireland is shrinking. if i work the dup i would be solidly in favour of eu
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membership because that would have protected their future in the uk. without this for northern ireland there will be a constitutional moment over the next 20, 30 years. thank you very much for being with us thank you very much for being with us in florence. it has been spectacular today, a hot day in florence, and it looks beautiful in the sunshine. let's find out what the sunshine. let's find out what the weather has in store for the weekend. we got to 19 in london so not too bad a day. let's look at what hurricane maria is up to. 125 mph winds in the centre and these islands a little bit away from the centre but being buffeted with hurricane force winds which could cause damage. the system then moves out harmlessly into the atlantic. in the uk, 19 degrees and sunshine in london but not everywhere. we have had a band of rain working is woods
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which will continue to move eastwards overnight. cloudy in england and wales. light rain and drizzle. a mild night. in scotland, with clear skies, in the countryside, temperatures down to low single figures. saturday starts ona low single figures. saturday starts on a cloudy note with spots of rain. the cloud breaks up with sunny spells coming through and we should all see sunshine at some point. not all see sunshine at some point. not a bad start to the weekend. hello, good evening. you are watching bbc news. we will be talking a little bit more about theresa may's speech in this half hour. for now, some of the other main stories. the taxi app uber will not have its licence renewed by transport for london. it says the firm is not fit and proper to operate, and that uber‘s approach and conduct has implications for public
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safety and security. about 3.5 million passengers, and a0,000 drivers, use the service in the capital. uber says it will appeal against the decision. matthew thompson reports. it's five years since uber first launched its app in london, and in that time it's made its fair share of both enemies and friends, but today transport for london announced that it would not be renewing uber‘s licence to operate in the city at the end of this month. in a statement, they said the company was not fit and proper to hold a licence and had demonstrated a lack of corporate responsibility. tfl's concerns relate to four main areas — uber‘s approach to the reporting of serious criminal offences such as sexual assaults by its drivers, for which it's been criticised by the metropolitan police, the way the company performs background checks on its drivers, and the way it obtains medical certificates, and finally there are concerns about uber‘s use of a controversial piece of software known as greyball which critics have argued has allowed uber to avoid law
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enforcement and sting operations on its drivers. it's not an anti—minicab decision, it's an anti—not—playing—by—the—rules decision. tfl have got a really important role to perform in making sure those that operate private hire vehicles do it safely and securely. uber says its immediate concerns are for its 3.5 million customers in london and its thousands of drivers. i think this decision shows that by trying to ban uber in london they are caving in to the pressure exerted by a small minority that want to restrict consumer choice and competition. you know, this decision, if it holds true, will mean that over a0,000 licensed drivers will be out of work. uber also denies all of the allegations made in tfl's announcement and says it will immediately appeal the decision. crucially, the company will retain the right to operate during the appeals process, which could take many months, so serial users of the app shouldn't fret about their morning commute just yet. matthew thompson, bbc news.
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an 18—year—old man has appeared in court charged with attempted murder over the parsons green tube terror attack. 30 people were injured in last friday's attack, which left one woman with serious burns. earlier, our correspondent adina campbell sent this report. well, this afternoon 18—year—old ahmed hassan has appeared here at westminster magistrates‘ court charged with attempted murder following the terrorist attack in parsons green in south—west london last week. in court, he confirmed his name and address, which is in sunbury, in surrey. the 18—year—old was arrested in dover last week, a day after the attack. this afternoon, police have now confirmed that he has been arrested and charged with attempted murder, relating to rail passengers on the district line tube train last friday morning. he has also been charged with maliciously using an explosive
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device to endanger life or cause serious harm to property. in court earlier we also heard that the device was made of hundreds of grams of tatp, a powerful explosive. the prosecutor, lee ingham, also said that it was the crown's case that he intended to kill innocent people because of his warped political views. the 18—year—old has now been remanded in custody. he is due to appear at the old bailey on the 13th of october. there's been a further heightening of the rhetoric between north korea and the united states with the two leaders questioning each other‘s sanity. kimjong—un mocked donald trump as a mentally deranged gangster, and threatened to test a nuclear bomb over the pacific ocean. donald trump responded by tweeting that kim was a madman who didn't mind starving or killing his people, and would be "tested like never before." the head of the national police
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chiefs council, sara thornton, has warned that pressures on policing are "not sustainable" within existing budgets. the npcc coordinates the police response in the uk to terrorism — and represents forces in england and wales. ms thornton claimed the counter—terrorism policing budget was set to be cut by more than 7% in the next three years. a man and a woman have been charged with murder after a badly burned body was found in a back garden in south london. the pair were arrested last night and appeared at wimbledon magistrates court this morning and will appear at the old bailey next tuesday. the detective in charge of the investigation said the police were doing everything they could to identify the deceased. let's return now to our main story — prime minister theresa may has been outlining the uk's position
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on brexit in a speech in florence. in a moment i'll be speaking to two business leaders about their reaction to the speech — but first let's hear the prime minister explaining her plans for a transitional period clearly, people, businesses and public services should only have to plan for one set of changes in the relationship between the uk and the eu. so, during implementation period, access to one another‘s markets should continue on current terms and britain should also continue to take part in existing security measures. i know businesses in particular would welcome the certainty this would provide. it will take time to put in place the new immigration system required to retake control of the uk's borders. so, during the implimentation period, people will continue to be able to come and live and work in the uk, but there will be a registration system, an essential preparation for the new regime.
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as of today, these considerations point to an implimentation period of around two years. let's discuss what was said in florence. with me is lord bilimoria, the founder and chairman of cobra beer, and a cross—bench peer who supported the remain campaign. and in nottingham is christopher nieper, managing director of david nieper, a women's fashion manufacturer based in derbyshire, he backed the leave campaign. a warm welcome to both of you. i'm going to go to our guest and nottingham first of all. what did you make of it? is this what you voted for? good afternoon. to be honest, i felt this afternoon's speech was very forlorn complement to the eu, very good at reassuring our intention to have a deep and special partnership. but it was very thin on detail. what we were all
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waiting for is her vision for a trade deal. we didn't see anything from that. i'm afraid i was a little bit disappointed this afternoon. she was quite clear on what we are not having in terms of the canadian model would not work so well for us, those sort of illustrations. as someone who runs a big business, i know you have factories in many european countries, what sort of detail are you needing to ensure your business continues to be successful? the faxes has been delayed is really stalling for another two years. that doesn't help us. “— another two years. that doesn't help us. —— the fact it has been delayed. it has become more uncertain, rather than more certain. i think business is very quick to adapt. in business, we work to a delivery date. if we need to have something ready by a certain date, we can be ready. if that date is the end of march 2019, we can be ready. we could easily be ready for them. why can't the government back to work for a
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delivery date in the same way? lord bilimoria, your thoughts?” delivery date in the same way? lord bilimoria, your thoughts? i can't believe after the way this speech has been built up like no other speech i can remember, and you get a completely disappointing speech, full of platitudes. she has said nothing of substance in this speech at all. people were expecting specifics and they are not there. there are a couple of indications that we are not going for canada, we're not going for the european economic area, but the reality is, asa economic area, but the reality is, as a business, as a manufacturer here with myjoint venture partners in the uk, in belgium where we manufacture, we sell into almost every european union country, to us asa every european union country, to us as a business we want access to the best talent that comes from the eu. so, the best bear free movement of people benefits us. we want access to the single market. it is 50% of out to the single market. it is 50% of our trade as a country at our doorstep. there's no point comparing
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it with canada, from their point of view the eu is 10% of their trade, for britain it is 50%. we want things to carry on as they are within the european union and the government is trying to give the impression they will get there somehow in this creative manner that the prime minister talks about. well, there is one year left, and michel barnier says you have one year and we have made no progress whatsoever. we rushed in with article 50 and now we are still with the uncertainty, negotiating against 27 countries, all of whom are saying don't do it. either way, 27 countries, all of whom are saying don't do it. eitherway, i 27 countries, all of whom are saying don't do it. either way, i was hosting a delegation of senior indian civil servants in parliament today. i asked them, from indian civil servants in parliament today. iasked them, from india's point of view, do you think britain should remain in the european union? 100% of the hands went up. one of them said, we feel sorry for you as a country. that is what the wilting sub us. as businesses, we are suffering extra this rhetoric referendum. we are where we are, the
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nation voted the way about it. as you run a large business, as you have outlined, what did you need to hear today? the issue of free movement, we know what the nation voted for. you have to make your business work, don't you, to the best of your ability? from our point of view there is still uncertainty. the nation voted to leave, but not on which basis, there is every chance we might remain in the european union. we don't know. the exit fee, there are three things we need to sort out, northern ireland, the movement of existing european citizens here, in the eu, and the exit fee. the prime minister has not touched on that, other than saying if there is a transition period for two years, which we would like, we will keep paying you for that. of course we will, in effect we will have access to the single market, the customs union and be part of the european union. we pay £8 billion each year anyway. we would have to continue paying for two years. the european union is saying, on top of
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that, we want an lexically of up to 100 billion euros. what are you going to offer? there is nothing in the speech to say, we're going to offer this on top of what we are paying a transition period. there is nothing save the —— to say the island border, there is nothing about that or of other citizens.|j don't want to run all of the argument so the referendum. christopher, you made the point that he wanted the referendum, as someone who runs their own business, what do you do in terms of planning for the future? what we need to do is an on ano future? what we need to do is an on a no deal situation, plan on world trade organisation rules. either way, that not really a problem. the tariff which we might face under wto rules is dwarfed by the currency advantage which we have just been given. since the referendum last year, the currency has proved enormously in our favour as an
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exporting nation. ithink enormously in our favour as an exporting nation. i think we should ta ke exporting nation. i think we should take that opportunity. it depends how you view the situation. you can either be pessimistic or you can be optimistic. you can have your glass half empty or half full. i don't see this as a cliff edge. i see this as a springboard. i think what theresa may could have done today is to say, on the 31st of march next year, we will be signing free trade deals with many other countries around the world. we will be out of the customs union. we will take the opportunity. the money we will save, we will invest in britishjobs, british skills, british schools and all of those are very important to us as an employer. gentlemen, i regret to say that we do have to leave it there. you're shaking your head. we have not benefited from the currency reduction at all. it is completely misleading. thank you so much for being with us. there will be more opportunities to debate this, i am
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sure. we willjust pause and catch up sure. we willjust pause and catch up with the latest sports news. huey furey has said he will give the performance of his life tomorrow night. he is unbeaten in his 20 professionalfights, night. he is unbeaten in his 20 professional fights, and he's night. he is unbeaten in his 20 professionalfights, and he's up against the most difficult opponent of his career so far. he is also unbeaten and weighed in heavier as well. ronaldo, messi and neymar are the three men nominated for the best fifa men's player shortlist. ronaldo won the inaugural award last year, which replaced the longstanding world player of the year. that was the ath year the real madrid star won a version of the title. messi has also won a version in four years. his former teammate neymar, who became the world's most expensive footballer when he moved from barcelona to psg for £200 million this summer, has always finished behind the others. chelsea's antonio conte
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is up for the men's coach award after leading them to the premier league title in his first season at stamford bridge. he's up against zinedine zidane, whose real madrid side beat juventus, managed by the category‘s third nominee max allegri. you can find the full list on the bbc sport website. four of this summer's british and irish lions have been left out of the england training squad for camp in oxford this weekend. james haskell is the most experienced player to be excluded along with fellow forwards george kruis and kyle sinckler. centre jonathan joseph also misses out having featured regularly for eddie jones of late. jones has though, brought 18—year—old fly half marcus smith as a surprise inclusion amongst the 33 names. toby roland—jones could miss out on an ashes place with a back injury. he was almost certain to be selected after impressing having made his debut in the test team this summer. his county, middlesex, say he has a stress fracture and will miss the remainder of the domestic season.
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there is more at 6:30pm. now time for the film review. hello, a warm welcome to the film review. to take us through the releases, as ever, mark kermode. what have you been watching? borg vs mcenroe, centre court becomes big drama. kingsman, the golden circle. the secret service story continues. and on body and soul, the secret service story continues. and 0n body and soul, described by its director as a shy love story.

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