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tv   Our World  BBC News  September 23, 2017 4:30am-5:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines. european leaders have welcomed an attempt by the british prime minister to breathe fresh life into the brexit negotiations. president emmanuel macron of france and the eu's chief brexit negotiator praised the tone of theresa may's speech. but they both said that more clarity was needed. us officials say intense rain and flash floods have caused a dam to fail in puerto rico, causing an extremely dangerous situation. tens of thousands of people are being evacuated. hurricane maria brought torrential rain, swelling rivers to record levels, and knocking out power to the whole island. the ride—hailing app uber has lost its license to operate in the british capital. london's transport authorities questioned the firm's approach to driver background checks and the reporting criminal offences. let's take a moment to see what's making the headlines on the front pages of some of the morning's papers. and surprise, surprise — brexit dominates.
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we start with the guardian, which shows theresa may making her speech in florence. as we've been reporting — she's called for a two year transitional period after britain leaves the european union. the prime minister also crops up on the front of the daily telegraph. the paper reports on some unhappiness from the eurosceptic wing of the conservative party — who are unhappy that the uk will — as they see it — still be bound to brussels. the daily mail says mrs may is walking a tightrope — trying to placate the two wings of her warring party. but the prime minister believes her country's future can be bright outside the eu. the independent calls it a brexit reality check — pointing out that the uk will have to accept free movement of people until at least 2021, and the country will have no say
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in how eu regulations are decided. and the daily mirror goes its own way — reporting on the court appearance of ahmed hassan — the teenager accused of carrying out the parsons green tube bombing. it's alleged he bought the components to make the bomb online. now on bbc news — it's time for our world. this week we take a look at the ongoing humanitarian crisis in yemen. and i should warn you this programme contains images that some viewers may find upsetting. yemen. a world's worst humanitarian disaster. —— the world's. as the richest countries in the arab world relentlessly battled the region's poorest, the west is accused of complicity. if something is not done soon, literally hundreds of thousands of children will die. the hunger, death and disease rampant here are not accidents of nature.
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this crisis is a direct consequence of the way the war is being fought. and now, they're's a deadly new threat. cholera. —— there's. —— there's. at this general hospital in the city, it is a chaotic place at the best of times. these are the worst of times, however. in the eye of the storm, this doctor is ready. i met
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him here last year when the hospital was overwhelmed with patients from the villagers, who were dying of starvation. today, it is worse than ever. and now, patients infected with deadly cholera are turning up here. this doctor takes me to wear the new arrivals are treated, well away from the main hospital. what price, a childhood in yemen? what price, a childhood in yemen? what price, a child's life? i was born here. after leaving, i returned home every year to visit my family. in march 2015, a ten nation coalition led by saudi arabia and
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backed by the us and uk started warming yemen. they came to reinstate the government who were pushed out by the houthis, who received support from iran. i have covered fighting, bombing and starvation —— bombing. i have covered fighting, bombing and starvation —— the suffering of ordinary people is a direct consequence of the way this war is being fought. both sides are using control of food and fuel as a weapon. the latest result is the biggest outbreak of cholera ever reported. 500,000 people have been affected and millions more are at risk. i am affected and millions more are at risk. iam heading up affected and millions more are at risk. i am heading up to the highlands to see for myself whether this outbreak started. this is what cholera dolls to a man —— does.
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this is what cholera dolls to a man —— and this is what cholera does to a child. he looks newborn, but is 17 months old. she has caught cholera for the second time —— she. she has caught cholera for the second time —— her mother walked for a day to get her baby to this clinic. now, she can't afford transport. this nurse tells me it is cases like
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this that shows authorities are failing to deal with the problem at the source by correlating the water, and finding out whether —— where the bacteria is spreading from. the nurse tells me of a village where one of the latest outbreaks started, so that is where i am going. 0n the way, i come across this scene. they say water is life,
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but in yemen, it can also mean death. cholera, waterborne bacteria, spreads through public supplies such as wells and reservoirs, contaminated with faeces. it has killed 20 people in the settlement i am going to now. this man and his sister have been
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showing cholera symptoms for 2h hours. this is the same well they drink from. it is still contaminated with cholera. the people here have no alternative source. it is a potential death sentence for the whole community. i have come back to the general hospital. to the familiar scenes of exhaustion and despair. all these people have spent all the money they have to get this far. now the electricity is of, so all the machines are off, all the incubators are off, all the oxygen
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has stopped. this happens all the time. this morning, i meet this boy and his family. he isjust three yea rs old and his family. he isjust three years old and lives around the corner. his dad works in the local factory. he has severe malnutrition. 24
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2a hours later, he has deteriorated badly. suddenly, a bed is found. it may be his best chance for survival. desperately malnourished, he lies between life and death. yemen's hunger is the result of food shortages and soaring prices. i am
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heading into the port for some a nswe i’s. heading into the port for some answers. it is the most important harbour in rebel territory. 20 million people's food supplies are supposed to come through here, but 110w supposed to come through here, but now it is barely operating. bombing and a blockade imposed by the saudi coalition has impeded the access of food, fuel and eight. the saudis justify this by saying that iran are smuggling weapons to their allies. the manager is a the political man, very powerful. he denies the smuggling allegations —— aid. the rebels have been profiteering from the blockade, and scoring political points by playing the victim. the un says both sides in yemen's war should do more to put civilians first. we are trying to work with all parties involved to engage both sides, and to some degree they both help and to some
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degree they both help and to some degree they both help and to some degree they have issues. the port has been bombed out of action. but the placements, already paid for by the placements, already paid for by the us, have been blocked. we loaded up the us, have been blocked. we loaded up the planes, we brought them in, and the saudis and the allied forces locked us from bringing the cranes m, locked us from bringing the cranes in, so we had to send them back.“ something is not done soon, what do you feel will happen? something is not done soon, what do you feelwill happen? it something is not done soon, what do you feel will happen? it is port is bombed and can made useless, literally hundreds of thousands of children will die and millions of people will die along with them. 9096 of cholera deaths in the worth —— worst cases are of cholera deaths in the worth —— woi’st cases are in of cholera deaths in the worth —— worst cases are in huthi controlled areas. saudi arabia is one of the united states and united kingdom main allies. they have helped carry out the war and block independent enquiries into war crimes. they also
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have military officers in the command centre for saudi strikes. they are the main suppliers of the billions of dollars of advanced weapons that have devastated yemen. bridges, hospitals, factories, schools, weddings and funerals have all been hit a coalition airstrikes. -- hit by. the saudi led blockade of rebel held areas does not just the saudi led blockade of rebel held areas does notjust affect big ships 01’ areas does notjust affect big ships or armed smugglers. 0rdinary people are being targeted directly with military force. these fishermen tell me their boats were attacked by the coalition just days me their boats were attacked by the coalitionjust days ago. this man lost his two sons, his
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brother and a nephew in the attack. 15 people across three extended families are now depend on him for survival. the blockade has had a devastating impact on people's everyday life here. this used to be a profitable farm, but it collapsed when the coastal blockade cut off the export routes. southern poverty caused by the war has destroyed the ability of working you many families to cope. —— yemen families. all of this has taken a terrible
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toll on their baby. starving children are horrifying and horribly common sight across yemen. but this crisis is also ruining people in ways you can't see. the working class and even civil serva nts working class and even civil servants now have no jobs, working class and even civil servants now have nojobs, no incomes, and they are going hungry.
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since the yemen government has moved the central bank from the rebel held capital, millions of state employees, including medics and sanitation workers had not been paid for months. this money supply crisis has throttled the economy of yemen. these men are even selling their aid rations for ready cash. people keep telling me a lack of hard currency is making it impossible for them to weather this disaster. i find is making it impossible for them to weather this disaster. ifind out more about this when a grandmother invites beta home. —— invites me to her home. there are many ways to die in yemen. iam there are many ways to die in yemen. i am suddenly called back to the central hospital by alaa's mother. she tells me only to film the truth about what is happening to yemen ‘s
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children. when i arrive, it is a disaster. alaa has a night in the intensive care unit, fighting for his life. —— has spent the night. here is the body of another yemen child. another statistic in a forgotten war. the child had a name, they all have names. he was called alaa, and he was three years old. he was born into a war and the war claimed him. alaa never raised a weapon in his life, he barely raised a murmur as weapon in his life, he barely raised a murmuras he weapon in his life, he barely raised a murmur as he died. weapon in his life, he barely raised a murmuras he died. he weapon in his life, he barely raised a murmur as he died. he had a family that loves him. he had friends he played with. three days ago, he had a future. and he lost it all. reasonably summery for some
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of us over the weekend. this was the scene on friday afternoon. as we head through the course of the weekend, many of us will have largely dry conditions, particularly on saturday. by sunday there will be rain heading into the west of the uk and temperatures will be on the rise as well. as low pressure sets out towards the north—west with tight isobars here but at the moment high—pressure is dominating the south—east. as we start saturday morning, there will be a little cloud and drizzly rain across southern parts of the country. some low cloud, mist and murk first thing. it should brighten up during the day. if we have a look at saturday morning, nine o'clock, after a chilly start in scotland and northern ireland it should be dry and reasonably bright with a little sunshine into northern england and a little more cloud and drizzle and hill fog across the southern half of england and south wales. waking up to a grey morning here but certainly mild, bear with the weather as it brightens up during the day. a fresh start for northern parts of the country, milder towards the south. through the course of the morning this cloud and drizzly spots of rain willjust ease
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towards the east. for many of us it will brighten, particularly along the south coast later in the day. a little more cloud pushing into northern england and scotland and the breeze picking up across northern ireland. all in all, a decent day with temperatures for most of us around 17 to 19 degrees. it should feel quite pleasant. into saturday evening, most places end the day on a dry note. 0vernight saturday and into sunday you will notice a band of rain working towards the west. that is a weather front and the breeze peaks as well. across much of england and wales you should begin the day on a dry note once again. it will be mild, certainly. through the day on sunday, the weather front tries to move in from the west, bumps into high pressure in the east so it will tend to fizzle out somewhat during the course of the morning. there will be some rain for northern ireland, scotland, perhaps the western fringes of wales and south—west england. later in the day, a chance of a few heavy bursts working in but further east
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across much of england and wales remains dry and bright and pretty warm. 22, 23 degrees in the sunshine. just a little cooler in the north—west. we still have a weather front lingering around on monday but it will fizzle out during the day. the east should stay warm and dry with temperatures 19 or 20 degrees. this is bbc news. i'm duncan golestani. our top stories. trying to breathe new life into brexit talks — european leaders welcome the british prime minister's conciliatory tone, but call for more clarity. puerto rico faces the aftermath of hurricane maria. tens of thousands are urged to evacuate as a major dam threatens to fail. banned from the british capital — uber, the online minicab service used by millions,is stripped of its london licence.
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and lots of applause for angela merkel. but as germany's election draws closer, is a right—wing nationalist party about to go mainstream?
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