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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 23, 2017 8:00am-9:00am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. the cost and countdown to brexit — theresa may sets out her vision for leaving the eu. brussels gives a cautious welcome, and there are key questions ahead of negotiations which will begin again on monday. last night, the uk's credit rating was cut over concerns about the impact of brexit and the health of public finances. good morning, it's saturday 23rd september. also ahead, puerto rico faces the aftermath of hurricane maria — tens of thousands are urged to evacuate
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as a major dam threatens to burst. as the minicab service uber says it plans to appeal against a decision to strip it of its licence to operate in london, we'll speak to one of the company's top executives. buysin buys in sport, one of the big rivalries, but it has recently been one—sided, can rangers get the better celtic in lunchtime showdown? and cana better celtic in lunchtime showdown? and can a bit of lumberjack skills help create a new world champion, we will look at how hughie fury is preparing for tonight's big fight. and helen has the weather. and helen has the weather. a little bit grey and damp first thing, but for many a brightening picture with a lot of dry weather on offer, but all the details for the weekend in around 15 minutes. good morning, first our main story. european leaders have given a guarded welcome to theresa may's brexit proposals which she hopes will pave the way for future negotiations.
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brexit secretary david davis will begin fresh talks with eu leaders on monday. the prime minister wants to secure a two—year transition period which means we won't technically break away from the eu until 2021 gavin lee is in brussels, but first let's speak to our political correspondent susana mendonca. susana, how was mrs may's speech received by her own party and her opponents? yes, i think what she did achieve is she managed to get the cabinet, which has been pretty split on this issue, singing from the same hymn sheet. so for example, boris johnson, whojust a sheet. so for example, boris johnson, who just a few days ago wrote that britain should not contribute financially to the eu budget in order to remain a part of the single market, well, you know, yesterday he was basically saying this was a good speech. we also add
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philip hammond, one of the more, softer brexit approach ministers in the cabinet, saying that this was an excellent speech. within the cabinet, we have got them basically agreeing with one another at this stage. in terms of the party more widely, a more difficult picture, it went down well with the remainers, people like anna soubry, but then you have got pro—brexit mps who are really unhappy that for another two yea rs really unhappy that for another two years britain would be accepting free movement of people and pay money to the eu. many thanks. our europe correspondent gavin lee is in brussels. brussels has given a cautious welcome to this speech? i think so. bearing in welcome to this speech? ithink so. bearing in mind welcome to this speech? i think so. bearing in mind that the objective was to try to break the deadlock, so this was going to florence to do it, something about legacy. i think may has reasons to be cheerful, firstly because for the man who was guiding these talks, who has got the mandate to do it, michel
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barnier, he has said that this is constructive, it moves it forward. the language she has used for the past three rounds has been, you know, largely saying that this is not quite right, we want to see a breakthrough. there is a list of things that he said which still has not been mentioned — for instance, the irish border issue, but the idea of the transitional period does give some clarity. emmanuel macron said the same thing, still areas to work on. look at estonia on thursday, when all the leaders will be meeting foran when all the leaders will be meeting for an informal summit, when theresa may will meet the others and we may get a more considered response. gavin lee, susana mendonca, thank you very much. the ratings agency moody's has downgraded britain's long—term credit rating. it says it made the decision because of the economic uncertainty caused by the brexit negotiations and the likelihood that the public finances would become weaker. downing street said the firm's assessments were outdated. tens of thousands of people in puerto rico have been ordered to immediately evacuate an area because a dam is threatening to burst.
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parts of the 90—year—old barrier have been broken by the weight of water after days of heavy rain following hurricane maria as andrew plant reports. after days of heavy rainfall, severe damage to this dam has sent torrents of water searching downstream, causing flash flooding four miles down river. 70,000 people in several populated areas told to evacuate from here, but information from puerto rico has been unreliable, and it is unclear how many people are still in danger here. it is already being called the worst storm for 100 yea rs. many roads underwater, with cars submerged. those who stayed in their homes are sheltering on the upper floors from the deluge and damage down below. does you have food and water? be priority is water, food, blankets. there is great damage all
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around the whole island. the puerto rico governor said that damage to the electricity grid was so severe that it could take engineers many months to fully restore power to the island. andrew plant, bbc news. it's the last day of campaigning before the german general election tomorrow, with chancellor angela merkel and her main rival, martin schulz, making their last—ditch appeals for votes. in what is now a familiar picture across europe, both mrs merkel and the social democratic leader, martin schulz, are urging voters to shun the anti—islam, anti—immigrant rhetoric of right—wing candidates that have gained support in the run up to the polls. 0ur correspondent damien mcguinness is in berlin for us this morning. damian, how significant is this election? well, if the polls are correct, chancellor angela merkel will remain germany's next chancellor. it is com pletely germany's next chancellor. it is completely up in the what sort of
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government she will lead, though, because that depends on the numbers, because that depends on the numbers, because you have to form a coalition. but the big story is what happens to this new anti—migrant af tea party. it is set to enter the german parliament for the first time. —— afd. it is seen as very controversial, because some of its leaders have links, or are accused of having linked to neo—nazi groups, and some of its leaders have expressed what critics say is openly racist, anti—migrant, anti—muslim comments. the big question is whether this party will get into double figures, and if so the impact on german politics will be big. having said that, they won't get into government because no other party in germany will work with them ina party in germany will work with them in a coalition. a wonderful backdrop behind you, of course, the rooftops of berlin behind you. in relation to brexit, obviously, the german public
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and the germany government have been consumed by the election there, but we will know by monday who is in charge again, and whether that whoever is chancellor in germany will be so important to the brexit negotiations. has there been any reaction to theresa may's speech? the only official reaction so far has been that, actually, the commissioner is the one that negotiates, but the press is divided. some of the press say this is simply cherry—pick in, some of the press say it is a conciliatory step towards the eu, but one german mep has been much more forthright, and he has accused theresa may of being egotistical, nationalistic, and said it is simply more cherry picking from britain towards the eu. so some german politicians are not happy at all. many of the big travel insurance firms will not reimburse ryanair passengers who lost money on hotel bookings or other expenses when the airline cancelled their flights, the bbc has learned. the low—cost airline is grounding more than 2,000 flights
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over the next six weeks, because of the number of pilots taking holidays. the opening ceremony for the third invictus games which was founded by prince harry for wounded servicemen and women takes place later today. toronto plays host to the event where 550 athletes from 17 different nations will compete in events including athletics, sitting volleyball and cycling. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. final words of encouragement from the prince who founded the invictus games. teams from 17 countries have converged on toronto for the sporting competition which opens tonight. this year, over 550 military personnel will take part in 12 different sports. all have had injury or sickness to overcome. it brings people together that can then associate with each other and learn from each other and help themselves, better people. that interaction is really important. two metres away at to get out and about again,
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injust three years, the invictus games have become a global sporting event and there is little doubt that that is down to the star power of prince harry and his determination to make them a success. toronto also happens to be where prince harry's actress girlfriend lives and works, leading to much speculation the couple may make their public appearance together. that question remains unanswered. what is clear is that the next seven days will be filled with examples of the power of sport with examples of the power of sport as a tool to aid recovery. and good luck to all those competing in the opening ceremony taking place today. the mother of missing airman corrie mckeague has asked the public tojoin her in retracing her son's last—known steps a year on from his disappearance. we'll speak to nicola
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in a moment, but first, let's look at the events leading up to the point when he vanished. 0n 23rd september 2016, corrie went on a night out in bury st edmunds with friends from the raf. just after 1:20 on 24th september, cctv footage shows corrie walking alone before falling asleep in a shop doorway. at 3:25, he appears briefly on cctv before disappearing into an area known as the horseshoe. he isn't seen again. two weeks later, it's revealed that his mobile phone had been tracked moving 12 miles out of town just hours after he was last seen. the movements match those of a bin lorry travelling to a landfill site. police search the landfill site but on the 21st ofjuly, after more than four months, the search is finally called off — with corrie still missing. nicola, thank you for joining us this morning. this will be taking place tomorrow,
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this re—creation, following the last known steps, corrie's last known movements, take us through what will be happening. on sunday, myself, my sons, my brother, we are going to go down to the area in the recent edmunds, where corrie started his night out a year ago. —— in bury st edmunds. anybody wants to come to meet as 412 o'clock, to be able to say thank you, but also to be able to walk people around in little groups and be able to show them exactly what happened that night, we know where the cameras are, where he was, you know, everything that went on. my hope is that once they have been around, ending at the horseshoe, it might start focusing
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people's attention on different things, because they have physical ease seen at themselves. and the police will be present, so if they have got any information, they will be able to speak to police immediately. part of this is clearly very practical, you are searching for something that make some progress in the investigation, but people will be aware, i mean, i can imagine your emotions must be very mixed tomorrow, because deeply personalfor mixed tomorrow, because deeply personal for you, mixed tomorrow, because deeply personalfor you, being mixed tomorrow, because deeply personalforyou, being in mixed tomorrow, because deeply personalfor you, being in that place knowing what happened one year ago. it is, but i think this is how myself and my sons have found the easiest way to cope with it, by doing something practical. we can't just sit and do nothing, then we will just be just sit and do nothing, then we willjust be sitting talking about it all day, and that is torture. we will do something practical, something that will help the investigation. it might get new
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information in, but it will focus people on the facts of what we know. a lot of people will be listening to this and be interested in the timeline — just remind people of those last cctv images, that is the last time that he was seen, that corrie was seen, but there is... the trail does go slightly beyond that, albeit unsatisfactorily. corrie has been on a night out, he walks... he is asked to leave the nightclub he is asked to leave the nightclub he is incoming he gets some food from a ta keaway is incoming he gets some food from a takeaway shop, he has a sleep for nearly two hours, he wakes up and walks into the back of a loading bay, and there are industrial bins, and it is the back of shops in the town centre. that is at 3:25, that is the last time he is seen, walking in there. after that, the only piece of evidence that we have is corrie's phone is tracked following a bin
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lorry that is picked up in that area, a0 minutes after corrie walks in there. it doesn't show that he was in the bin, but it does show that his phone has either gone in the lorry or in the back of the bin with the rubbish. it does only go as far as barton mills, and a lorry does continue a run further on than that, but that may be because his phone has been damaged and stopped working, but that is the last ping, if you like, that the police have been able to get from the cell towers. it is the most awful circumstances, the hope presumably is, given the sequence you have described, that somebody somewhere will have seen something, that they may not have realised yet, even though there has been so much publicity, they may not yet realise it is significant. i am hoping so, but more importantly than that, i
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know that corrie's phone has gone with the bin, but we don't know that he has. if corrie had gone with the bin, what the police are saying is that they would have found him in cell 22 — they have not. in my mind, that means all options are still open, so is there somebody else involved? has somebody given him a lift just to involved? has somebody given him a liftjust to be nice and then something has gone wrong after that? it is never too late to come forward. anybody that thinks they may have seen corrie, possible sightings, please come forward and tell us. i know some people have, but i am starting to see a bit of a pattern in some of the sightings we have talked about, so anybody else, if you have seen something, even if you are not sure, please get in touch with the police. thank you for your time this morning, nicola, the mother of the missing servicemen, and just to clarify, nicola mentioned cell 22, that is the
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technical name for the specific area for the landfill site where, as you heard, the phone traces, the bin lorry could have led to, just to explain that. that event will be taking place tomorrow, on sunday. let's talk to helen about the weather. ? good morning. this is a recent picture from hampshire, there is some cloud around, but i have been mentioning we have a weak weather front across southern and western areas this morning, but essentially dry today for the most part. tomorrow we will have rain, mostly in the west. this southerly wind is drifting northwards across the uk, so drifting northwards across the uk, so it will feel warmer by day and by night. we have a weak weather front around, and this is that these guys are looking across the west midlands just recently, and it will take a few hours for that to clear and
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reveal some sunshine. as i say, and improving picture for most of us, we have a weak weather front, massive area of low pressure, but as it meets the high pressure, it is weakening all the time, very little rain left on them. for northern scotland, the central belt, brighter weather in north—eastern scotland, quite warm today. a decent start across northern england, but across wales all that low cloud, some drizzle, hill fog, and indeed for northern ireland, and that stretches across parts of the midlands into east anglia, but actually dry and bright weather to the south of it. that will chip northwards as we go through the day, and as i say, these arejust through the day, and as i say, these are just spots of rain ensures all for the most part, brightening up in northern ireland. —— spots of rain 01’ northern ireland. —— spots of rain or drizzle for the most part. 18-20dc or drizzle for the most part. 18—20dc potentially, even warmer tomorrow. and that means tonight
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should be relatively mild, not as warm as the nightjust gone, because we have got clearing skies, but with that strengthening wind, western coastal gales will be a feature, holding temperatures up for the most part, but tomorrow, sunday, we see a bit more rain, but particularly for scotla nd bit more rain, but particularly for scotland and the rest of western england and wales, pulses of rain running along this area, but coming into that high pressure, things are still quite stagnant, and at this time of year, nights getting longer than days, fog will become more of an issue through the morning hours. sunday doesn't look too bad for the most part, central and eastern parts of england and wales, but further west picking up rain. a sandwich of weather, weather in western areas, but northern ireland should brighten up but northern ireland should brighten up as well. we got to 2a yesterday, we are going for 23 today, but it will be warmer tomorrow, warmer than it should be for this time of year,
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pretty nice in eastern areas if you have got outdoor plans. iam i am always observant, that is why i noticed the temperatures! the ride—hailing app firm uber has been told that from the end of this month it can't operate in london. the service has transformed the way millions of people use taxis, by allowing them to book and pay by smartphone. but the body which regulates transport in london says it will not renew the compa ny‘s licence because of "public safety and security implications". fred jones from uber uk joins us now from our london newsroom. thank you forjoining us one brea kfast, thank you forjoining us one breakfast, can you tell us your reaction to this board at tfl? well, i think, you reaction to this board at tfl? well, ithink, you know, there reaction to this board at tfl? well, i think, you know, there are 3.5 million londoners who use the service, and over a0,000 licensed divers who rely on the app to earn a
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living. we have seen that they are astounded by this decision by the mayor and transport for london. a petition started yesterday afternoon has already received over a00,000 signatures, and i think people realise that this decision by the mayor and transport for london is because they have caved to pressure from a small number of individuals and groups that want to protect the status quo and reduce consumer choice and competition from london. well, actually, tfl says you have not met certain requirements, security requirements, safety requirements. you have not investigated serious allegations of sexual assault. you have not abided by the rules. so, you know, safety is integral to our app and service. all the drivers that use the app are fully licensed by transport for london, they have all been through the same enhanced background checks that black cab drivers have. and we ta ke safety that black cab drivers have. and we take safety very seriously. 0ver that black cab drivers have. and we take safety very seriously. over the yea rs take safety very seriously. over the years that we have been in london,
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we have pioneered new features using oui’ we have pioneered new features using our technology to enhance safety. for example, every trip is gps track, so you can always track friends and loved ones. but although your drivers have abided by the background checks that black taxi drivers go by, they have not abided by the regulations that tfl has specified, that is why your contract is not being renewed. so, you know, we are a very large operator in london, we have been operating in london, we have been operating in london forfive london, we have been operating in london for five and a half years and are regulated by transport for london. during that period, tfl have regularly audited us, you know, they have carried out the largest audit in their history, and we have passed with flying colours. the last time they audited us to check that we we re they audited us to check that we were playing by the rules, they found no errors in our processes. your drivers have not abided by the checks that tfl says they need to abide by, you have not abided by the
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rules. this was one of the strange things about the transport for london notice yesterday, they are the ones who do all the checks and licences for drivers. they are the ones who decide weather an individual is fit and proper to transport members of the public around the capital, and then once a driver is licensed by tfl, they can sign up and use the uber app, and then we do our own checks to make sure we comply with the rules set out by tfl and report on incidents as necessary. i'm sorry, i'm not clear — tfl says your drivers have not done the background checks that they stipulate are necessary in order to operate in london. you are saying you have, is tfl lying? so this is a source of confusion with the notice they put out yesterday. all drivers have a background check done by the disclosure and barring service, and it is the responsibility and the role of the regulator, so tfl in this case, to
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check and licensed divers. uber and other private hire operators, we don't do that. 0nce other private hire operators, we don't do that. once a driver has been licensed by tfl, and they have granted them a licence because they have done all the paperwork, done all the tests, then they can sign up to the app. why don't you do the checks that tfl once? so tfl, they are the ones that do the checks, and they require the medicals, the background checks. private eye operators do not do any checks themselves. —— private hire operators. we make sure that they have the correct paperwork, but we do not do it ourselves. what is happening with uber? when we introduced this interview, we said this is a company that has shaken up the way people order taxis, you can orderfrom your phone, and as the way people order taxis, you can order from your phone, and as you have mentioned, you have many customers. a french court has find you, milan has banned one of your services, you have withdrawn from denmark after a law was passed, hungary block internet access to
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dispatchers, describing it as an illegal dispatcher service, a german court has restricted your usage there. do you think you are above these regulations? you seem to be clashing with regulations, rather than working with them. absolutely not, and it is worth saying that as well as those incidents you highlighted, we are operating in over 600 cities globally, and i think the decision yesterday shows that london, farfrom being open and welcoming of innovation, you know, is actually closed, and the decision made by the mayor and tfl, i think, reflects the extreme pressure they are underfrom reflects the extreme pressure they are under from a reflects the extreme pressure they are underfrom a small group reflects the extreme pressure they are under from a small group that wa nts to are under from a small group that wants to restrict consumer choice and competition on our streets. there is an allegation as well that you have not investigated incidence of sexual assault, you have employed a driver, you continue to employ a driver abdi was accused of sexual assault, according to the metropolitan police. how can you say
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you are a responsible company, mindful of safety of your passengers, thousands of passengers, when incidents like this, drivers like this operate under your name? first of all, let's acknowledge this was a terrible incident, and we got it wrong, and we apologise to eve ryo ne it wrong, and we apologise to everyone involved unreservedly around that. you know, the incident happened because of a mistake that we made, when the riderfirst reported in two us, we just didn't realise how seriously the rider took the incident. that was a mistake, and obviously we are making steps to address that immediately. we have a very good working relationship with the metropolitan police, we have a dedicated team that works with them, and this is one of the topics of very current ongoing discussions with them, where they are helping us figure out how we can make our processes eve n figure out how we can make our processes even better, so very rare incidents like this don't happen again. fred jones from uber uk,
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thank you for talking to us on brea kfast. thank you for talking to us on breakfast. time now for a look at the papers. rob mcloughlin is with us, having a look through the inside, where are you going to start, theresa may is all over the front pages?|j you going to start, theresa may is all over the front pages? i tried desperately to avoid mentioning florence, a beautiful city, we would all like to be there, and didn't all those lobby correspondents love going there yesterday to hear something they could have heard in sa lfo rd ! something they could have heard in salford! to be fair, though, i don't know what point you're making, but the room it was done in two and have been anywhere, it could have been a sports all insulted, yes. —— a sports all insulted, yes. —— a sports hall in salford, yes. if you look over, i have been focusing on the right—wing press, looking at the telegraph, the sun, the daily mail,
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and she is getting a reasonable reception in terms of the editorials. for example, the daily mail says, yes, concessions from mrs may but also hope for britain. the sun is saying it is over to eu. the telegraph last week sparked a of the unease with the borisjohnson, the very long borisjohnson article, but they are actually saying today that a lot of what mrs may announced yesterday, the extension, going forward to 2021, of course, in terms of the transition, in terms of the money, they say a lot of that is unpalatable, but their headline is brexit is delayed, but we will fight on. they say as long as she delivers what they regard as a flexible, bold deal, they may think the british people will buy this. and a lot of the papers today are making the point that she has done enough to keep the consensus within cabinet,
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to get through the conservative party conference in manchester, she has done enough for that, and for party unity for the moment. but the real test comes when the real negotiations start coming through over the next few months. there have been questions about her leadership as well, which leads nicely into the next article — angela merkel, and a look at what has become a quite familiar tale in europe, the rise of the extreme left and the extreme right, and now it has influenced her. you touched on this a few moments ago, of course, because there is a possibility that afd, which has been described as a neo—nazi party, could, according to the polls, could actually deliver something like 60 mps in the bundestag after this election. now, thatis bundestag after this election. now, that is not enough to get anywhere near controlling power, nobody will go into coalition with them, and of course we will be wrangling over who
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will rule. most of the punters and the pollsters are saying that angela merkel will get back in, but of course she has got to form a coalition, probably with up to two parties, if the polls are correct. what makes the political story so compelling in a wider sense is because of the history of germany, the notion of a far right political organisation having some kind of presence — it is different from elsewhere, isn't it? yes, and if you read this article, it is quite frightening, because some of the leaders have spoken about the fact that germany should be very proud of what their soldiers did during both world wars. and that, of course, is raising tension. there are possibilities here, increased by a bundestag committee which has come out and said that what mrs merkel did in terms of allowing millions of asylu m did in terms of allowing millions of asylum seekers into germany should have gone to a vote in parliament, rather than being an executive
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decision. so it puts on the defensive, it does mean that certain traditional supporters of her party are likely to vote for this party as well in protest, but as we know, and you said earlier, all of these things are unpredictable because people both macro for things that they think are a protest vote and they think are a protest vote and they end up becoming president of they end up becoming president of the united states of america! we will be talking about the joys of being on strictly come dancing. see you ina being on strictly come dancing. see you in a bit. the headlines coming up you in a bit. the headlines coming up in you in a bit. the headlines coming upina you in a bit. the headlines coming up in a few minutes time. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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helen will bring you the weather in around ten minutes time. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. european leaders have given a guarded welcome to theresa may's brexit proposals which she hopes will pave the way for future negotiations. the prime minister wants to secure a two—year transition period which means we won't technically break away from the eu until 2021. brexit secretary, david davis will begin fresh talks with eu leaders on monday. the ratings agency, moody's, has downgraded britain's long—term credit rating. it says it made the decision because of the economic uncertainty caused by the brexit negotiations and the likelihood that the public finances would become weaker. downing street said the firm's assessments were "outdated". parts of the m3 motorway has been
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closed in both directions. it's an ongoing police incident. we have very few details, but junctions ongoing police incident. we have very few details, butjunctions nine to 11 are shut and what is described asa to 11 are shut and what is described as a ‘hazardous area response‘ unit is on site alongside emergency services. motorists are being asked to seek alternatives routes. that‘s problems on the m3. we will try and get more details for you as soon as we can. in other news. tens of thousands of people in puerto rico have been ordered to immediately evacuate an area because a dam is threatening to burst. parts of the 90—year—old barrier have been broken by the weight of water after days of heavy rain following hurricane maria. it‘s being reported this morning that iran has test—fired a medium—range missile days after the country was condemned by president trump for its ballistic programme. it was unveiled publicly at a military parade in teheran yesterday and is said to have a range of 2,000 kilometres. the iranian president, has defended his country‘s right
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to a missile programme for defensive purposes. the two main party leaders in germany will make their final appeals to voters today before sunday‘s elections. chancellor angela merkel‘s centrist party has a clear lead in the polls. in what is now a familiar picture across europe, both mrs merkel and the social democratic leader, martin schulz, are urging voters to shun the anti—islam, anti—immigrant rhetoric of right—wing candidates that have gained support in the run up that have gained support in the run up to the polls. many of the big travel insurance firms will not reimburse ryanair travel insurance firms will not reimburse rya nair passengers travel insurance firms will not reimburse ryanair passengers who lost money on hotel bookings or other expenses when the airline cancelled their flights, the other expenses when the airline cancelled theirflights, the bbc other expenses when the airline cancelled their flights, the bbc has learned. the low—cost airline is grounding more than two—thousands flights over the next six weeks, because of the number of pilots taking holidays. more than 550 wounded servicemen and women from 17 different nations are set to compete in the third invictus games following tonight‘s opening ceremony in toronto. in just three years the sporting tournament, which was founded by prince harry, has become a global success and over the next eight days athletes will compete in 12 different sports
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from athletics to wheelchair basketball. it has an impact on people way beyond the games themselves. yes, it also has a sporting impact. david hanson found in pictures success which led the paralympic success when he won a bronze medal in the 200 metres. when we spoke to them, it was about how it changed their attitudes to life after being so severely wounded, having something to then be competitive again and be pa rt to then be competitive again and be part of a team again. it's inspired so many in its wake. i want to take you back to 1998. dan is here. the year of my birth! laughter boyzone were number
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one with all i need. we were still watching vhs‘s. gareth barry made his debut for aston villa. he‘s about to make history this weekend. 0n about to make history this weekend. on monday he beats ryan giggs' premier league record. he is level with him at the moment. he's had an amazing career. he's 633 premier league appearances he's going to make on monday. this week we sent phil neville to have a chat with him. he came up with this idea himself. phil neville is an 509 premier league appearances. they decided to have a quiz. this is part of the interview. we‘re going to do a little bit of a quiz. here‘s number 572, do you remember that one? laughter. i don‘t know that one, by the way.
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you‘ll not know many of them! appearance number one. sheffield wednesday, still the most nervous i‘ve ever been running out on the pitch. appearance number 33. did i score a goal? steve stones crossed it, and i got on the back post. appearance number 150. a straight red card for swearing at an official. swearing at an official?! i think so, yeah. gareth barry. it's not like four minutes of a quiz, they talk about his career as well. and phil said he didn't really say, do you memberthis, do you remember that one, he say, do you memberthis, do you rememberthat one, he remembered say, do you memberthis, do you remember that one, he remembered the significant ones. did you ask him what he eats for breakfast? he honestly hasn‘t changed. he‘s defied youth. the way he prepares for games has completely changed. he does yoga on the back of ryan giggs' success. he really takes care of his body. he's never been a footballer who will run at 200 mph but he covers ground. he can manage a game, to
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play at his pace which has always been one of his great talents. there's no reason he can't go on to play another three or four years. what‘s on football focus? play another three or four years. what's on football focus? mark sampson this week, gareth barry, jeff marx, steven davis, peter crouch and we've got predictions for mark strong of hollywood fame. at midday with trevor sinclair, mark lawrence. five-hour show? other are any doodles on your piece of paper? i'm quite embarrassed by this. i had my first mince pie of the year—to—date. my first mince pie of the year-to-date. no! this is the bag i bought it in. i couldn't find a piece of paper. it's still september! it's never too early for a mint spy! they aren'tjust for christmas. we are going to talk about scotland as well. but before that, it‘s one
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of sports great rivalries — two sides of glasgow, meeting for the first time this season in the scottish premiership. it‘s been a bit one—sided, recently — in fact celtic have lost just once, in their previous 58 league matches. for the new faces who haven‘t experienced the rivalry before, the managers have been trying to get their messages across. there‘s a noise and an intensity to this game that a lot of the players would never have felt before. so that‘s the first. you know, you go into a game thinking of about ten things before any normal game, you go into this game and you‘re thinking about 15 or 20. so it it‘s a great experience, but of course it‘s being able to regulate that pressure that comes along with it. the women‘s super league has kicked off — and it began with a 2—0 victory for liverpool against everton in the merseyside derby. after a scramble in the box, the first goal came from natasha harding, tucking the ball away. and then with just seconds remaining, niamh charles made sure of the victory. it‘s the first time the women‘s season, has coincided with the men‘s.
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hull fc will play leeds rhinos in the super league semifinals after they beat castleford tigers a8—16 last night. hull led by 22 points at the break, against a much—changed castleford, who gave a full debut to former bank worker tuoyo egodo, and he scored three tries. but there was little doubt about the result, once hull fc‘s jake connor scored his own hattrick. leeds beat huddersfield in the evening‘s other match. worcester stay rock bottom of rugby union‘s premiership, but at least they picked up a bonus point in losing at gloucester. yes, gloucesterfound it easy to break down the worcester defence, especially billy twelvetrees, who scored the third of their tries. but worcester did narrow the gap, late on, and went down fighting, 2a—19. ulster scored eight tries as they swept past dragons in pro1a, finishing 52—25 at the kingspan stadium. they have a three point lead at the top of conference b over leinster, who lost at south african side cheetahs. there were also wins for glasgow, against munster
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and treviso over 0spreys. lizzie deignan is hoping to become the world road race champion later today, just four weeks after having her appendix out. she won the title two years ago, but was bed—ridden for 13 days, ahead of the world championships in norway and lost 2kg of muscle weight. it‘s quite bizarre to be in such form, fine form, i was really going quite well, to wake up the next day in a hospital bed, and think "right, that‘s it, it‘s over". and ijust had this small bit of hope that i could make it here, and it wasn‘t something that i was ready to give up on. we should emphasise what an achievement this is. that took your breath away. it's four weeks since she had her appendix out. i have had my appendix out and it sets you back. i certainly didn‘t win the... what‘s the championship? back. i certainly didn‘t win the... what's the championship? the world road race. four weeks after i had
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what's the championship? the world road race. four weeks after! had my appendix out i didn‘t win that. road race. four weeks after! had my appendix out i didn't win that. it's probably easierfor appendix out i didn't win that. it's probably easier for an athlete to come back because they are very fit. iam in my come back because they are very fit. i am in my own way! you'd win the up the stairs to bed race! laughter very well done to her, it‘s an amazing achievement. we've got another champion potentially to look forward to. next to someone else, who‘s battled illness and injury, and who says they sacrificed all their whole teenage years — so no going out with friends, no girlfriend, so that he could focus on becoming world champion. what‘s more, hughie fury, cousin of former world champion tyson fury, has battled against illness and injury, all leading up to tonight, when his dream could finally come true. as alex gulrajani reports, he‘s gone into the wilderness to enhance his training. this is not your normal training camp. but for hughie fury and his father, peter, it is ideal. training up here gives
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you inspiration. when you are stuck in a gym 2a/7 looking at the walls, it is like being in a prison cell. it is stimulation, it is nature, we are training how it should be done. it is hard. it is old school training but it is training i believe in. and it works. two years ago he helped his nephew, tyson, shock the boxing world, while hughie is unbeaten in his fledging click career, which began over a decade ago. as a kid i was on trains all over the place by myself. i‘ve had it tough but i‘ve had the right guidance as well. he is a very relaxed individual. he takes things in his stride. he steps into the ring to fulfil his dreams. i have been through what it
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takes to be a champion. the training, training the tyson went through. i went there. it is my turn now. away from prying eyes it is here in the lakes district where they have been preparing for the latest world title fight. it has somewhat slipped under the radar. no uk tv broadcasters have taken it. instead it will be streamed live online. in a broadcasting first, youtube will stream the fight pay—per—view. that is something that excites both hughie fury and his opponent. i feel things keep training all the time it is greater than to try this new thing. i'm looking forward to seeing how he goes. seeing if it attracts a lot of attention and if people tune in. a new dawn for sports broadcasting and, maybe, a new champion for british boxing. no—one has ever seen the real hughie. you will see that in september. i know i will be world champion no matter what, i am just taking one step at a time and so filling my dream. if he is lucky enough to become a world champion, he will be worthy because boxing will appreciate him. and they will want to see him in with the best. anthonyjoshua included. but for now, he‘s set
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on becoming a world champion. he is to have this skin condition that took away 30% of his fitness. he‘s come through all that. the fighters tonight. thank you. —— the fighters tonight. thank you. —— the fight is tonight. a woman who borrowed £a2,500 from her bank 20 years ago in order to fix her windows has had to pay back more than £600,000, after she sold her house to pay for her care. the 9a—year—old former nurse had taken out a mortgage in 1998, which gave the bank the right to a share in the rising value of her home. paul lewis from radio four‘s money box is in our london newsroom to tell us more. good morning. this sounds so
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frightening, what happened? good morning. this sounds so frightening, what happened ?m good morning. this sounds so frightening, what happened? it is an extraordinary example but there are thousands of these loans that were given out in the late 905. june is a former nur5e, 9a year5 given out in the late 905. june is a former nur5e, 9a years old. she had to sell her home to go into care. she had borrowed a2,500 pounds. she couldn‘t really afford to pay for a loan. the deal 5he couldn‘t really afford to pay for a loan. the deal she did with barclay5 wa5 loan. the deal she did with barclay5 was instead of paying intere5t 5he 5imply gave them a share in whatever the house fetched when she sold it eventually. becau5e the house fetched when she sold it eventually. because it‘s been so long and because the house is on the outskirts of london, the value of the house ro5e outskirts of london, the value of the house rose to over £900,000, so ba rclay5 took the house rose to over £900,000, so barclay5 took its share which is £6a0,000 for a £a2,500 loan. nearly
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£600,000 they‘ve made, the figures are quite extraordinary. you said this was common, or something the bank5 this was common, or something the banks were allowed to do. it was all above board then. there are other people in this position now, surely, and what protection do they have or advice are they being offered? they have little protection. the5e loan5 we re have little protection. the5e loan5 were sold by the bank of scotland and barclays were sold by the bank of scotland and ba rclay5 and were sold by the bank of scotland and barclays and they are called 5hared appreciation mortgages because of the banks shares in the rising value of the home. about 11,000 were around few years ago. there‘s probably fewer than that now because people are dying. many of the5e because people are dying. many of these people were elderly when they took them out. they are coming to as people died and their heirs di5covered people died and their heirs discovered the debt. they can‘t really do anything. the bank of scotla nd really do anything. the bank of scotland has been adamant it will ta ke scotland has been adamant it will take the money due under the contract. ba rclay5 has take the money due under the contract. barclay5 has a hardship scheme but it only applies to a few people. they‘ve got to be alive and
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it doesn‘t wipe out the debt, it ju5t mix it a bit easier. so there isn‘t that much they can do —— makes ita isn‘t that much they can do —— makes it a bit easier. barclay5 cu5tomers should always make sure they are eligible for the hardship scheme.“ there any way of shifting the5e loa n5 a cross there any way of shifting the5e loa n5 across to there any way of shifting the5e loan5 across to another loan vehicle? if people are concerned because it‘s linked to property, is there anything they can do? neither of the banks is prepared to do anything like that. there is a legal action which is growing, there‘s about 170 people in it at the moment. there has been a legal attempt before through the courts, but that collapsed because people we re but that collapsed because people were running out of money. they didn‘t have as much to fight it as the banks did. they had to do a deal which didn‘t get them very far. they can‘t talk about that any more. there is a new group going through the courts that might help people but it will be a long road. the lawyer concerned is keen that he can
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do something about it. and trying to get more people to join do something about it. and trying to get more people tojoin in. that may be some hope for some people. it‘s in the distance and people likejune who have already sold their house, it‘5 who have already sold their house, it‘s too late i‘m afraid. who have already sold their house, it's too late i'm afraid. thank you for highlighting this issue. much more on money box. can ijust say, the banks say they‘ve done nothing wrong. people had advised and they believe it‘s perfectly proper. more on money box at midday on bbc radio a. here‘s helen with a look at this morning‘s weather. thank you. good morning. a lovely start the day in hampshire, ju5t some fair weather cloud and it‘s starting to brighten up elsewhere in the southern parts. the weekend doesn‘t look too bad for many of us, particularly today when it looks mainly dry. there will be some more rain around tomorrow, particularly in the west. the good news for most of us is it‘s warming up. however it
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i5a of us is it‘s warming up. however it is a bit more grey. that‘5 of us is it‘s warming up. however it is a bit more grey. that‘s because we‘ve got these weak weather front5 mulling around. by week i mean they aren‘t producing much rain, they are ju5t aren‘t producing much rain, they are just giving us quite a bit of cloud. low cloud and some hill fog. the reason they are weak i5 low cloud and some hill fog. the reason they are weak is because as they come in from this huge area of low pressure dominating the north atlantic, they are coming into high pressure which tends to squeeze the cloud and the rain out. for the like5 cloud and the rain out. for the likes of northern scotland this morning, not a likes of northern scotland this morning, nota bad likes of northern scotland this morning, not a bad start. some brightness and 5un5hine acro55 northern england as well. as the cloud migrates northward5, while we see an improving picture from the drizzly conditions in parts of 5outhern drizzly conditions in parts of southern and central england and wale5, we‘ll see the deterioration of bit further north. the winds are picking up so it shouldn‘t be quite so picking up so it shouldn‘t be quite 5o grey picking up so it shouldn‘t be quite so grey and drizzly and dismal. not a lot of rain around, mostly dry and bright. the cloud moving north 5tays fine and dry. brightening up the
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northern ireland after what they rather cloudy start and lots of brightness around the south, feeling warmer. 18—20d in a 5outherly breeze. quite a stiff breeze. not unusual to have gale5 a5 breeze. quite a stiff breeze. not unusual to have gale5 as we are in autumn now. they will tend to move the rain further ea5t through the night. a lot of cloud and rain around in the west, clearly not called here. cooler for central and eastern areas but not cold. we are in this mile there at the moment. tomorrow we‘ve got a sandwich of weather, 5till tomorrow we‘ve got a sandwich of weather, still a lot of dry, fine, warm weather across central part5 weather, still a lot of dry, fine, warm weather across central parts of england and wales. the rain moves up into the afternoon acro55 england and wales. the rain moves up into the afternoon across the 5outh—we5t, wale5 into the afternoon across the 5outh—we5t, wales and scotland. it brightens the northern ireland. warm to the east but there will be more rain around in western areas particularly through the second half of tomorrow. a5 particularly through the second half of tomorrow. as we go into monday we pick up the bid —— the benign
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conditions again. there will be some early morning fog which went clear in time for the rush hour. that‘5 early morning fog which went clear in time for the rush hour. that‘s a heads up for monday morning. the national trust has a record five million paying members — that‘s more than any political party or football club. but, despite the booming membership, the organisation has been criticised for being too powerful and too old —fa5hioned. breakfast‘sjon kay has been speaking to the charity‘s boss to find out what‘s being done to change that view. stourhead in wiltshire. one of the most popular of the national tru5t‘5 500 properties. across england, wales and northern ireland, five million people now pay to be members. it is quite an overwhelming moment... the chairman told me he is amazed to have gained an extra one million members in the last three years.
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so why does he think so many people arejoining, especially when household budgets are tight? many people spend time on a couch, time on their screens, we live a fairly sedentary life, many of us and a life that is full of noise and activity. so we visit to a trust property can be a tonic. you get open air, real beauty, not virtual beauty, and you get some peace and quiet. but the last year has not always been peaceful nor quiet for the national trust. it has been accused by some of being too politically correct, and decisions like a controversial land purchase in cumbria have also been attacked. your critics would say you are too diggers in and as an organisation. —— your critics would say you are too big as an organisation.
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you throw your weight around in communities and you have been accused of bullying and arrogance. how do you rea55ure them? we are not a bullying organisation, i can assure you of that. we aim to make sure that we said in the middle of different situations where we have people who are living at our properties we have many farm tenants, many people who interact it is inevitable that with so many interactions occasionally but our goal is to make sure we do the very best thing for the nation and all of the properties that we look after. there is always the of the national trust that it is old members, middle—class, white wealthy people. we may have a disproportionate representation of people who come from one background but we are genuinely trying quite hard to make everybody welcome at a trust property. we are enjoying some mode5t of success in that regard.
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how? it takes time. is there more to be done? there is always more to be done. next month, members will vote on whether to ban trail hunting on national trust land. an issue that has been divisive, sometimes acrimonious. it goes to the heart of what this charity stands for and where it is going. stunning image5 there. it‘s a ritual many hou5ehold5 go through on a daily basis, putting plastic bottles and paper in the correct bins. but the latest figures from the department of environment suggests households in the uk a re recycling le55 than they used to. so how can we become more environmentally 5avvy? alison freeman‘5 at an event in redcar that might have the answer. good morning. good morning, charlie.
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food is a major part of this festival, sustainable food. look at all of this wonderful bi5cuit5, ca ke5, all of this wonderful bi5cuit5, cakes, dried apple5. tell us what the ethos of your farm is. we try not to waste anything, working with nature. we use the apples to press into juice nature. we use the apples to press intojuice and nature. we use the apples to press into juice and then nature. we use the apples to press intojuice and then the pulp nature. we use the apples to press into juice and then the pulp we nature. we use the apples to press intojuice and then the pulp we make intojuice and then the pulp we make into cider vinegar. when that's finished with weep at the pulp in the compost and back onto the farm for the vegetables. no waste? no way stud. yellow the smells are wonderful. the spices coming from this company the harrogate. we've got locally produced dressings and balsamic vinegar. the man behind a lot of this food is simon preston, you are the feed guru of the festival. why are you so passionate about it? it's a great opportunity to showcase the region. the festival of thrift is different. we get a great crowd of people who want to
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get involved and discover food in all different ways. we've got some fun events that let people get stuck into experimentation. tell us some of the highlights for you. we work with lots of volunteers, lots of local businesses to try and make sure that everything we do is sustainable. 0ne sure that everything we do is sustainable. one of the events we are working on today is bistro du van. we find people who want to open pop‘up van. we find people who want to open pop—up restaurants. we prepare them with a pop—up restaurants. we prepare them witha campervan. pop—up restaurants. we prepare them with a camper van. it's a wonderful feeling. it's a great thing. we are also celebrating other communities nearby, with our event the town is the menu. we've created a special menu inspired by the town of
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saltburn. we are moving onto nicky who works for refuse. tell us about what you do is. we are campaigning against food waste. we collect food from supermarkets, shops, food retailers around the north—east. we could community meals, we serve food at schools and we campaign and build—up education around how much food is being wasted and what we can do with it. tell us about this is. four example we collect stuff past its best before date. this is marmalade that has got a november 2015 date on it, it's perfectly fine to eat. we'll be proving that it shouldn't be called food waste, it's perfectly fine to eat. we see the dates and we throw it away, is that the right thing to do? play—macro we‘ve got a culture of worrying about food. we can go back to using
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our senses. we can be a lot more using our common sense and creative with food and not so reliant on dates labels. it causes a huge amount of waste. thank you. the 5mell5 amount of waste. thank you. the smells and the sights and sounds here are wonderful. it‘s making me hungry. it starts at 10am. thank you. look5 hungry. it starts at 10am. thank you. looks like lovely weather. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the cost and countdown to brexit —
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there5a may sets out her vision for leaving the eu. bru55el5 gives a cautious welcome, and there are key questions ahead of negotiations which will begin again on monday. last night, the uk‘5 credit rating was cut over concerns about the impact of brexit and the health of public finances. good morning, it‘5 saturday 23rd september. al5o ahead, puerto rico face5 the aftermath of hurricane maria — tens of thousands are urged to evacuate a5 a major dam threatens to burst. pep talk from a prince — harryjoin5 in the preparations for the third invictu5 games for wounded service personnel

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