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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 23, 2017 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. the cost and countdown to brexit — theresa may sets out her vision for leaving the eu. brussels gives a cautious welcome, and there are key questions ahead of negotiations which will begin again on monday. last night, the uk's credit rating was cut over concerns about the impact of brexit and the health of public finances. good morning, it's saturday 23rd september. also ahead, puerto rico faces the aftermath of hurricane maria — tens of thousands are urged to evacuate as a major dam threatens to burst. pep talk from a prince — harryjoins in the preparations for the third invictus games for wounded service personnel ahead of the opening ceremony in toronto. in sport, one of the big rivalries, but it has recently been one—sided, can rangers get the better of celtic in the lunchtime showdown?
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and can lumberjack skills help create a new world champion? we will look at how hughie fury is preparing for tonight's big fight. and helen has the weather. good morning, it may be grey and damp first good morning, it may be grey and dampfirst thing, good morning, it may be grey and damp first thing, but a brightening picture with a lot of dry weather on offer, all the details for the weekend if you canjoin me in around 15 minutes. good morning, first our main story. european leaders have given a guarded welcome to theresa may's brexit proposals which she hopes will pave the way for future negotiations. brexit secretary david davis will begin fresh talks with eu leaders on monday. the prime minister wants to secure a two—year transition period which means we won't technically break away from the eu until 2021. susana mendonca, our political
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correspondent, is in our london newsroom. this was billed as a major moment in the brexit process, we had those talks starting again on monday, the big question is, what difference did theresa may's speech—maker? the biggest thing is the realisation that the government will commit to this idea of a transitional deal. over the summer, we had various people in the cabinet talking about whether we needed a transitional deal — theresa may set out that we will need that, and she is going for a two year deal as an option, certainly moving things forward , option, certainly moving things forward, and the point of the speech was twofold, really, to try to get her party onside, but to try and break the deadlock that we have seen in the negotiations with the eu, so she will be hoping that the different tone that she used, the warmer tone, i suppose the approach to moving forward that something that will go down well with eu
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leaders, but so far they have said they want to see more meat on the bone, more clarity about what britain really wants. and in terms of her own party, there are certainly backbenchers who are unhappy with the idea of us remaining effectively part of the eu for another two years. thank you for that. and in a few minutes we'll speak to the editor of brexit central, a website promoting a positive vision of the uk after it exits the eu. the ratings agency moody's has downgraded britain's long—term credit rating. it says it made the decision because of the economic uncertainty caused by the brexit negotiations and the likelihood that the public finances would become weaker. let's get more detail now from our business correspondent, joe lynam, who is in our london newsroom. morning, joe. we are going to be aa2, not at the bottom of the list but not at the top of the pile either. yes, above the canadians, americans and the germans, pretty
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much alongside the french, but below us much alongside the french, but below us of the japanese and the italians, who have astronomical levels of public borrowing to repay. that is why moody's, this credit agency, has downgraded the uk, because it believes that the uk will probably have to pay, will have to borrow more, will cut back on spending, perhaps tax more, that the public finances will not be better as a result of brexit — in the opinion of this think tank, moody's, which sits in new york. these agencies have a track record, before the financial crisis, getting things very wrong, and they lost a lot of credibility vibrating junk assets with the top rating. they have got their ship backin rating. they have got their ship back in order, but some people regard them as a very decent benchmark as to what the markets might think about the health or otherwise of the economy, and it may affect the borrowing costs that britain might have to pay. the
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government said, we are not complacent about the challenges ahead, but we are optimistic about our bright future. joe, we have also heard that there was criticism of the ratings agency, and downing street said that the ratings were outdated. yeah, i think they were alluding to the fact that the public sector finance borrowing figures we re sector finance borrowing figures were the most healthy for a decade when published this week, and that britain was appearing to get its house in order in terms of borrowing. having said that, britain still has a huge national debt, and it still has a budget deficit, the national overdraft figure, higher than most countries in that g7 list. job, thanks very much for explaining that, you deceive. tens of thousands of people in puerto rico have been ordered to immediately evacuate an area because a dam is threatening to burst. parts of the 90—year—old barrier have been broken by the weight of water after days of heavy rain following hurricane maria as andrew plant reports.
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after days of heavy rainfall, severe damage to this dam has sent torrents of water searching downstream, causing flash flooding four miles down river. 70,000 people in several populated areas told to evacuate from here, but information from puerto rico has been unreliable, and it's unclear how many people are still in danger here. is everybody ok in that house? it is already being called the worst storm for a hundred years, many roads underwater, with cars submerged, and those who stayed in their homes sheltering on the upper floors from the deluge and damage down below. do you have food and water? the priority is water, food, blankets. there is great damage all around the whole island. puerto rico's governor said that damage to the electricity grid was so severe that it could take engineers many months to fully restore power to the island. andrew plant, bbc news. the two main party leaders in
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germany will make a final appeal to voters before the elections on sunday. chancellor merkel‘s party has a clear lead in the polls, but both she and her main rival are urging voters to shun anti—islamic rhetoric of right—wing candidates who have gained support in the run—up to the polls. a part of the m3 in hampshire has been closed due to an ongoing police incident. a few details that we are receiving, we know that junctions 9—11 are shut. it has been described as a hazardous area, a response unit has been onside alongside emergency services. motorists are being asked to seek alternative routes as delays are likely. south—central ambulance says it is currently supporting hampshire
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police and hampshire fire and rescue service at the incident, and it's hazardous area response team, along with a tactical commander, are at the scene. we will bring you more details as we get them. many of the big travel insurance firms will not reimburse ryanair passengers who lost money on hotel bookings or other expenses when the airline cancelled their flights, the bbc has learned. the low—cost airline is grounding more than 2,000 flights over the next six weeks, because of the number of pilots taking holidays. china has tightened sanctions on north korea, announcing an end to imports of textiles and a gradual halt to the export of oil products. textiles were one of the last remaining exports for north korea, bringing in $700 million year. the move is in line with sanctions approved the night and nation security council, and it will impact more than 100,000 to work in factories. —— the united nations security council. the opening ceremony for the third invictus games which was founded
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by prince harry for wounded servicemen and women takes place later today. toronto plays host to the event where 550 athletes from 17 different nations will compete in events including athletics, sitting volleyball and cycling. our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. final words of encouragement from the prince who founded the invictus games. teams from 17 countries have converged on toronto for the sporting competition which opens tonight. this year, more than 550 military personnel will take part in 12 different sports. all have had injury or sickness to overcome. it brings people together that can then associate with each other and learn from each other and help themselves, better people. that interaction is really important. to me, it's a way to get out and about again, to represent my country again. as an aussie, it is a way to get out and have fun. injust three years, the invictus games have become a global sporting event, and there is little doubt that that is down to the star power of prince harry and his determination to make them a success.
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toronto also happens to be where prince harry's actress girlfriend, meghan markle, lives and works, leading to much speculation the couple may make their public appearance together. that question remains unanswered. what is clear is that the next seven days will be filled with examples of the power of sport with examples of the power of sport as a tool to aid recovery. sarah campbell, bbc news, toronto. let's return to our main story and theresa may's brexit speech in florence which dominates the front pages. lots of questions about how to come to the numbers, how much we will be contributing jeering this transition period. this is the front page of the times, you will be familiar with the times, you will be familiar with the fact that there were no numbers in the speech, but she did make
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commitments. the times i've done a bit of adding up and come up with a figure of a0 billion, they say that will be the overall brexit bill. —— the times have done a bit of adding up. there is a negotiation process still ongoing, of course. the daily mail has the figure of £20 billion going to brussels, and accepting and checked immigration from the eu during this period. —— unchecked immigration. and on the telegraph, brexit delayed until 2021, they say in practical ways we will still be pa rt in practical ways we will still be part of the eu until that date. so let's get reaction from jonathan isaby, editor of let's get reaction from jonathan isa by, editor of brexit let's get reaction from jonathan isaby, editor of brexit central, a website that aims to promote a positive vision of the uk after it exit is the eu. what did you make of what theresa may said and the reaction? she provided a lot of clarity, and in many cases it was restating what
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you said in the lancaster house speech back injanuary. we are leaving the european union in two yea rs, leaving the european union in two years, article 50 has been triggered, that is a fact, that we will be leaving at thatjuncture, but what she also did was set a positive and optimistic tone in terms of britain's future as a sovereign nation, but also a conciliatory tone towards the european union, making clear that we wa nt to european union, making clear that we want to part an amicable terms, not least because we want very different things. jean—claude juncker‘s speech, the state of the european union address last week, two weeks ago now, made clear that he wants to ta ke ago now, made clear that he wants to take the eu in an integrationist direction, getting all the countries tojoin the euro, more pooling sovereignty. we simply do not want that, and that is why we voted to leave. we said we want different things, we wish you well, let's part amicably, and that is what the speech was about. that is the easy bit — speech was about. that is the easy bit - the speech was about. that is the easy bit — the tone is the easy bit, and negotiations are different. when
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davis davis sits down on monday, what has changed? the question will remain from his eu counterparts, how much are you going to pagelj remain from his eu counterparts, how much are you going to page i think the very important developments in the very important developments in the speech yesterday was her saying that britain would want to honour commitments made during the period of membership. now, you have talked about various figures being bandied around on the front pages, and what this all refers to is the fact that the eu budget cycle runs for a seven—year period, andy carroll cycle started in 201a and will end in 2020. -- cycle started in 201a and will end in 2020. —— and the current cycle. decisions were made in 2013 about that period, based on the eu being a contributor. theresa may clearly wa nted contributor. theresa may clearly wanted to say, we will continue to pay what you expected us to pay until the end of 2020, but of course what she didn't say was a number, quite rightly — this is something that has to be negotiated, and an important aspect of that is to
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remember the eu has considerable assets, and since we have been a member of the european union and indeed the ec before that, there are assets upon which we would also be able to lay claim, and that would be needed to be taken into account. you are not a politician, you are not in those negotiations, so you put a number on it for us. i am not going to put a number on it, because it is a very complicated process, but in terms of the contribution that we would be expected to make in 2019 and 2020, that comes to about, i think, £18 billion, £9 billion in each of those years in terms of net contribution. but there are assets to be taken into account as well. it isa to be taken into account as well. it is a complicated process. the europhiles have been telling people like me for years that the amount of influence the eu has over british law and british life is minimal, and that it was hyperbole for people like me to say that the eu is involved in every area of british
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life, but what we are seeing right now, in terms of the negotiation thatis now, in terms of the negotiation that is having to go on, is that we are going to have to unpick four decades of integration, which indeed have got into every single area of national life, and it actually vindicates those of us who have been saying that for a long time. vindicates those of us who have been saying that for a long timem vindicates those of us who have been saying that for a long time. it is not about point—scoring, it is about practical issues, so that transition period — who is in charge? practical issues, so that transition period - who is in charge? well, it was not news that there will be a transitional period... no, my question... we can all talk around the issues, i am trying to find out what you think. in that transition period, in legal terms, who is in charge? an agreement will have to be made. what do you think? it is going to bea made. what do you think? it is going to be a bit ofa made. what do you think? it is going to be a bit of a limbo period, where it will be a halfway house between full uk sovereignty and the position that we're in at the moment. what is important is that she said the
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transition will be time limited. there are some who had been hoping that a transition can last for ever and ever and we will never actually leave. theresa may was absolutely clear that transition has to be time limited, and she put a number on it of around two years. thank you very much for your time, jonathan isaby, editor of brexit central, thank you. let's find out what is happening with the weather, it is autumnal, to say the least, a mixed stage, sunshine and showers, temperatures waving around as well. any idea what this is a picture of? it looks like a load of ufos! these are lenticular clouds coming off the highlands of scotland, but. today here, as you say, a real makes this weekend. —— beautiful start
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today here, as you say, a real mix this weekend. at the moment, things are relatively warm, a cool start across northern scotland, and that is why we have got big holes in the cloud here, a lot of cloud for northern ireland, moving across england and wales, but underneath the cloud, in northern england, where you saw breaks in the cloud, patchy fog over the hills, a rather atmospheric view of harrogate in north yorkshire, hopefully lifting and breaking as the wind picks up. this weekend doesn't look too bad, particularly today, the drier day of the weekend for most of us. courtesy of this area of low pressure, weak weather fronts will weaken all the time, very little rain left on them, just some cloud, really. but with the proximity of that low pressure, the proximity of that low pressure, the winds will strengthen, so that will happen for northern ireland, western fringes of scotland through the course of the day. cloud will
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drift northwards as well, so this afternoon was in the cloud for northern ireland, the central lowla nds northern ireland, the central lowlands of scotland as well, but on the whole more glad for northern england, even though a higher base it should be quite bright. for parts of wales, southern and western england, quite a bit of cloud, lifting to bring brightness, warmth in the sunshine, temperatures above average because of the southerly winds, which is to say they will be quite brisk across the western side of the country. they will temper the feel across northern ireland, despite brighton is coming through. very little change through the night, the weather works further eastwards, so not a particularly cold night for most of us, just cooler than the night just cold night for most of us, just cooler than the nightjust gone in eastern areas. the main change for tomorrow is we will have some rain, notjumpy rain, but across the western side of the uk. for many in the west and later in the east, it is largely dry. when germany goes to the polls tomorrow it is expected that
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angela merkel will be re—elected. tomorrow it is expected that but there has been a unprecedented political shift with support for the nationalist party afd — thanks to a campaign which has focussed on immigration. if as expected, they enter parliament, it will be the first far—right party to take seats since the second world war. here's our berlin correspondentjenny hill. dance music plays. angela merkel knows she'll most likely win this election. her campaign, a stage managed display of strength, security, stability. german voters like it, but then for german voters, there's not much choice. the mainstream parties here share the centre ground. translation: mrs merkel is a bit too soft. she seems easily influenced. i can't decide who to vote for. translation: i like angela merkel a lot. she has very good policies, and i particularly like her refugee policy. translation: the big parties are already in power,
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and it didn't do that much good. i don't want to support them with my vote. and mrs merkel‘s campaign team can't entirely drown out the voice of the right. the nationalist afd is likely to enter parliament, the first far—right party to win seats since the second world war. "new germans", this poster says, "we make them ourselves." "burqas? we like our bikinis." afd‘s anti—islam, anti—immigrant rhetoric is luring voters from the mainstream parties. like this teacher, who worries that german traditions, german values, are being lost. translation: in a way, afd is already sitting at the table of government. it's the most influential party in germany, because it breathes down the neck of the mainstream parties. you can see the concrete results of that in germany's new asylum laws.
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people are tired of hearing the same old things. in this country, with its wartime history, few expected the right to do so well, let alone enter parliament. there are those who say this election is boring, the campaigning lacklustre, and the result is predictable. but something really significant is happening here. the 2017 general election marks an unprecedented shift, both in the tone and in the substance, of post—war german politics. what is a political norm in other european countries was unthinkable here. not any more. jenny hill, bbc news, schwerin. you are watching breakfast from bbc
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news, time for a look at the papers. rob mcloughlin is back to tell us what has caught his eye. you are taking a look at uber, we would talking to uber uk earlier on, and this is a story that has caught your eye, because it has revolutionised, many say, the taxi industry, the mini card industry. it will be a very big issue, for people who have not caught up with the story, transport for london has said that they are ready to take the licence away from uber in london, because they have not conformed with a number of things — they have not been reporting properly on the fitness of drivers in terms of health, in terms of criminal records, criminal incidents not being reported, these are allegations that tfl have said. apparently, according to the article in the times, within a few hours of this being announced, something like 335,000 people had signed a petition saying uber must stay. it is
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growing, iam saying uber must stay. it is growing, i am sure. and what that article is saying is that this is really a lobby by the black cab drivers in london, and this is putting pressure on the mayor of london, who is supposed to be one step removed from this, but he is the chair of tfl as well. so it is gone to raise a number of issues. but can i give you some startling figures? i know you like figures, charlie! a0,000 uber drivers in london, couldn't name them all. 10,000 in the uk. they are operating in a0 cities, and the global revenue is1.29 in a0 cities, and the global revenue is 1.29 billion. it is interesting, from the interview earlier, uber wa nt to from the interview earlier, uber want to turn this into an argument about people being against change. luddites. yes, but in many ways there are more simple principles at sta ke, there are more simple principles at stake, which is that you entrust tfl, in this case, we could be talking about restaurants or something — there are rules, and if you do not adhere to the rules, you do not get to do the thing you want
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to do. but they want to turn the art event into something else. —— the argument into something else. and as you said earlier, you know, uber has such a reputation for so long, and over the last year, because of issues in america, they have been dragged into a lot of unsavoury and questionable headlines, so there are some big issues. the article is also saying, and it is over a lot of the papers, it is making the point that in other cities, cardiff, edinburgh, liverpool, york, making the point that those cities may look closely at what happens in london, but a poor cod of black cab drivers would be very series, is that really practical in london? —— a boycott of black cab drivers. we will take a com pletely black cab drivers. we will take a completely different tack, this is brian connolly, who is in strictly
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come dancing this year, and he is talking about the effect it has had on him so far. that two page spread is in the daily mirror, and he refers to himself at the last variety artist in the united kingdom, ken dodd might have a view on that! it is an interesting article, because he is saying that this is going to help him through some of the issues he has had. he had to pull out of i'm a celebrity is, suffering from malnutrition and other issues. he points out that his brother is the floor manager on strictly come dancing, so you may have met him, and naga. yeah, he is funny. he said to him, you realise what this programme could do for me? is brother said, don't worry, you are not going to win it anyway! what is really interesting is that this is really interesting is that this is the biggest show on the bbc, the biggest show on bbc one since great
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british bake off, and the papers today are just full of stories. this is out of the daily express, ruth's tea rs is out of the daily express, ruth's tears for dad, molly is on the front page of another magazine, i am sure she would have been bruce's favourite! but what is clever about this is the publicity machine around strictly come dancing is fascinating, because if you go through today is papers, there is a different contestant featured, it is an amazing machine. certainly is! do you think you could cope with... i dealt no, what is a lot of children for most people? two! i was one of four, i had three brothers. one of 20! yes, this radford family, the one in the middle is rg. he was born to the mother, who has had 20
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children over the last 28 years. this family is based in morecambe. there are 19 in the pictures, because one of the pregnancy sadly endedin because one of the pregnancy sadly ended in a stillbirth, but they still count that baby amongst the family and still remember them. 20 children in 28 years to children in 28 years? family and still remember them. 20 children in 28 years? yes, channel a have been following them for a documentary, ten of the children are at school, the oldest is 28, and the youngest is little archie. my mum calls me by my sister's name, like she mixes them up, but you could so easily mix them up. you would have to have badgers, like dame edna did on her chat show. why is everyone called darling on television? thank
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you, lovely! we are on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, then clinton purnell takes up for saturday kitchen, which is firing up the ovens even as we speak, morning to you! morning, lovelies! darling! our special guest today is chris ramsay, and you are going to face food heaven and food health. yes. food heaven is full at stake, food hell is macro for a strange reason, you will have to tune in to find out. —— mackerel. you will have to tune in to find out. -- mackerel. iam you will have to tune in to find out. -- mackerel. i am going to bake some celeriac with wheat berry pudding. we are expecting great things from you this morning! and cani things from you this morning! and can i compliment you on yourjumper?
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it looks fantastic! what are you cooking? i am cooking a crab lasagne, simple, homely dish with spinach, tomatoes, finished with a gruyere sauce, served with cucumber and red pepper relish.|j gruyere sauce, served with cucumber and red pepper relish. i have skipped breakfast deliberately! and jack buxton is our wine expert. some sunny southern hemisphere wines. and you guys at home gunboat macro for heaven or hell by going to the website. —— can vote for heaven or hell. see you at ten! the headlines are coming up, we'll see you shortly. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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helen will bring you the weather in around ten minutes time. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. european leaders have given a guarded welcome to theresa may's brexit proposals which she hopes will pave the way for future negotiations. the prime minister wants to secure a two—year transition period which means we won't technically break away from the eu until 2021. brexit secretary, david davis will begin fresh talks with eu leaders on monday. the ratings agency moody's has downgraded britain's long—term credit rating. it says it made the decision because of the economic uncertainty caused by the brexit negotiations and the likelihood that the public finances would become weaker. downing street said the firm's assessments were "outdated". part of the m3 motorway in hampshire has been closed in both directions due to an ongoing police incident. we have very few details, butjunctions nine to 11 are shut
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and what is described as a hazardous area response unit is on site alongside emergency services. motorists are being asked to seek alternative routes. the ambulance service telling us there are no reported casualties but they are supporting police and fire rescue teams at the scene. motorists being warned there are long delays with the m3 motorway shut. if you're travelling you're being advised to check details before you leave. tens of thousands of people in puerto rico have been ordered to immediately evacuate an area because a dam is threatening to burst. parts of the 90—year—old barrier have been broken by the weight of water after days of heavy rain following hurricane maria. it's being reported this morning that iran has test—fired a medium—range missile days after the country was condemned by president trump for its ballistic programme. it was unveiled publicly at a military parade in teheran yesterday and is said to have a range of 2,000km. the iranian president, has defended his country's right to a missile programme for defensive purposes. the two main party leaders
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in germany will make their final appeals to voters today before sunday's elections. chancellor angela merkel‘s centrist party has a clear lead in the polls. in what is now a familiar picture across europe, both mrs merkel and the social democratic leader, martin schulz, are urging voters to shun the anti—islam, anti—immigrant rhetoric of right—wing candidates that have gained support in the run up to the polls. many of the big travel insurance firms will not reimburse ryanair passengers who lost money on hotel bookings or other expenses when the airline cancelled their flights, the bbc has learned. the low—cost airline is grounding more than 2,000 flights over the next six weeks, because of the number of pilots taking holidays. more than 550 wounded servicemen and women from 17 different nations are set to compete in the third invictus games following tonight's opening ceremony in toronto. in just three years the sporting tournament, which was founded by prince harry, has become a global success and over the next eight days athletes will compete in 12 different sports
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from athletics to wheelchair basketball. it's an amazing event. we've all met some of them this week. it is terrific. some great sports as well. wheelchair rugby obviously is the one that springs to mind. it can promote athletes to paralympic success. the likes of dave hansen who found his sporting talent after what happened to him in afghanistan at the invictus games and then became a paralympic bronze medallist in rio. it can be a springboard. rangers got beaten last season against celtic. it's a new season, it's a new day. you get another chance. but before that, it's one of sports great rivalries — two sides of glasgow meeting for the first time this season in the scottish premiership.
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it's been a bit one—sided recently — in fact celtic have lostjust once in their previous 58 league matches. for the new faces who haven't experienced the rivalry before, the managers have been trying to get their messages across. there's a noise and an intensity to this game that a lot of the players would never have felt before. so that's the first. you know, you go into a game thinking of about ten things before any normal game, you go into this game and you're thinking about 15 or 20. so it's a great experience, but of course it's being able to regulate that pressure that comes along with it. the women's super league has kicked off — and it began with a 2—0 victory for liverpool against everton in the merseyside derby. after a scramble in the box, the first goal came from natasha harding tucking the ball away. and then with just seconds remaining, niamh charles made sure of the victory. it's the first time the women's season has coincided with the men's. hull fc will play leeds rhinos, in the super league semifinals
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after they beat castleford tigers a8—16 last night. hull led by 22 points at the break, against a much—changed castleford, who gave a full debut, to former bank worker, tuoyo egodo, and he scored three tries. but there was little doubt about the result, once hull fc‘s jake connor scored his own hattrick. leeds beat huddersfield in the evening's other match. worcester stay rock bottom of rugby union's premiership, but at least they picked up a bonus point in losing at gloucester. billy twelvetrees here finding space to break through the worcester defence, scoring the third of their tries. but worcester did narrow the gap late on, but eventually lost out 2a—19. ulster scored eight tries, as they easily beat the dragons, in the pro1a 52—25 at the kingspan stadium. they have a three point lead at the top of conference b over leinster, who lost at south african side cheetahs. there were also wins for glasgow against munster
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and treviso over ospreys. lizzie deignan is hoping to become the world road race champion later today, just four weeks after having her appendix out. she won the title two years ago, but was bed—ridden for 13 days, ahead of the world championships in norway and lost 2kg of muscle weight. it's quite bizarre to be in such form, fine form, i was really going quite well, to wake up the next day in a hospital bed, and think "right, that's it, it's over". and ijust had this small bit of hope that i could make it here, and it wasn't something that i was ready to give up on. what an amazing comeback, just four weeks after having her appendix out. hughie fury, cousin of tyson fury
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hopes to realise his dreams tonight. he's gone into the wilderness to enhance his training. this is not your normal training camp. but for hughie fury and his father, peter, it is ideal. training up here gives you inspiration. when you are stuck in a gym 2a/7 looking at the walls, it is like being in a prison cell. it is stimulation, it is nature, we are training how it should be done. it is hard. it is old school training but it is training i believe in. and it works. two years ago he helped his nephew, tyson, shock the boxing world, while hughie is unbeaten in his fledging click career, which began over a decade ago. as a kid i was on trains by myself. i've had it tough but i've had the right guidance as well. he is a very relaxed individual.
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he takes things in his stride. he steps into the ring to fulfil his dreams. i have been through what it takes to be a champion. the training, training the tyson went through. i went there. it is my turn now. i've been at this job for a very long time. away from prying eyes it is here in the lake district where they have been preparing for the latest world title fight. it has somewhat slipped under the radar. no uk tv broadcasters have taken it. instead it will be streamed live online. in a broadcasting first, youtube will stream the fight pay—per—view. that is something that excites both hughie fury and his opponent. i feel things keep training all the time it is greater than to try this new thing. i'm looking forward to seeing how he goes. seeing if it attracts a lot of attention and if people tune in. a new dawn for sports broadcasting and, maybe, a new champion for british boxing. no—one has ever seen
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the real hughie fury. you will see that in september. i know i will be world champion no matter what, i am just taking one step at a time and so filling my dream. if he is lucky enough to become a world champion, he will be worthy because boxing will appreciate him. and they will want to see him in with the best. anthonyjoshua included. but for now, he's set on becoming a world champion. you can follow the fight tonight. you can follow the fight tonight. you don't need the gym or all that equipment to get fit, just go into the forest and cut some blogs. you can have a cracking log fire at the end of it! for more than 20 years britain enjoyed the top credit rating of aaa from the moodys agency. four years ago that rating was downgraded by one level. now moodys have moved it down another level to aa2. it says it made the decision because of the economic uncertainty caused by the brexit negotiations
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and the likelihood that the public finances would become weaker. margaret doyle is a financial analyst with deloitte uk. good morning. how significant is this? clearly it's not particularly good news for any country when the credit ratings downgraded by one of the agencies, particularly one of the agencies, particularly one of the big three agencies. having said that, it looks like the market response, you know, we had a bit of a selling off in sterling which was muted and i think most people are not expecting there will be a significant increase in the cost of funding the uk's very large public sector debt. in practical terms, the impact is likely to be relatively muted but clearly from the point of view of appearances, not
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particularly welcome. we saw the treasury coming out almost immediately and disputing the view of moody ‘s and saying they believe the view is outdated and fails to reflect, for exa m ple the view is outdated and fails to reflect, for example the optimistic vision for britain put forward by the prime minister in her florence speech yesterday. what do you make of the political hammering that comes of the political hammering that co m es after of the political hammering that comes after this? labour's chief secretary of the treasury have said this is a hammer blow to the economic credibility of the tories. philip hammond used claim it was critical for the to maintain the highest credit ratings. is that fair? whenever you have a decision like this you would expect, as with the united states when they had their first dramatic credit downgrade in 2011, you would expect this to become politically charged. i think what is more important is how the government responds on these two key questions and criticisms that moody's made. firstly about the state of the public sector finances
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and the leeway the government has in terms of continuing austerity, and secondly the question of brexit. we have seen that business has welcomed the prime minister's speech, they've welcomed the announcement the government is seeking. some business lobbies would like that to be longer. i think there's a lot to play for and i think that's something we saw in the prime minister's speech yesterday, that she recognises the importance of having that continuing close partnership and having a deal that works for the uk and for the eu. you know, you've been on the sofa with us, we are always tied the time in these warnings. could you explain semi—differing numbers on the front pages this morning —— so many differing numbers, trying to figure out how much the uk will have to pay towards the eu. is it understandable we are seeing a big variety in numbers? i think part of the reason
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is that we don't know exactly what that transition period would look like. we know the uk government says it wants a transition period. it's unclear what the end destination is. i think depending on the end destination and how valuable they the uk and the eu, the value they put on that end model, that will determine exactly how much the uk considers it to be worthwhile to pgy- considers it to be worthwhile to pay. we've seen there has been a shift in the uk government position. people were talking about the uk not paying anything. now there's an a cce pta nce paying anything. now there's an acceptance the uk needs to honour its obligations. one of the reasons the uk wants to have the discussions about the trade deal in parallel with divorce negotiations is because the uk, how attractive that end state and the partnership is in terms of access to the single market will determine how much the uk is prepared to pay for that access. i
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think the uk would say you can't set the price until you know what you're paying. white thank you. here's helen with a look at this morning's weather. i'm seeing some cloud on the picture there. it's showing us where we had there. it's showing us where we had the cloud and where we don't have the cloud and where we don't have the cloud. that is what will determine your type of day today. for most of us it's dry, an abundance of sunshine in the north. there is a bit of fog around. let me try and transpose that into what the pictures look like. we've got some sunshine across highland scotland. flying saucers which is what they do look like! a bit dank and drizzly here with some low cloud. there's the fog in north yorkshire.
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basically we've got the wind picking up. and we've gotjust a very weak weather front, running into up. and we've gotjust a very weak weatherfront, running into high pressure. there would be much rain or drizzle on it. even though it's cloudy it will be decent enough for getting out and about. apart from across the hills. with the breeze picking up that will be a bit of a feature of the northern ireland in particular. it will lift that cloud. into the afternoon it's a southerly wind. in contrast this weekend at least we've got a warm wind blowing our way. it's a southerly lifting that cloud, pushing it north. the central lowlands should do quite well. northern scotland quite warm with some sunshine. northern ireland will see sunshine appearing at times. it will feel cooler because of that strengthening wind which will continue to strengthen bringing rain to northern ireland, western scotland, western fringes of england and wales. it won't be a cold night,
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and wales. it won't be a cold night, a tad cooler in eastern areas compared with the nightjust gone. not a cold start to the morning for most of us. where we have a cooler start will see the bust of the sunshine tomorrow. central and eastern parts of england flowing quite well. the weather front pepping up quite well. the weather front pepping up through the afternoon, potentially bringing heavy rain through the second half of the afternoon to the evening. by that time it's brightened up and dried up mostly bar the odd shower. in that sunshine, 22—23. that southerly wind isa sunshine, 22—23. that southerly wind is a bit tempered where we've got the rain in the west. watch out for monday morning, potentialfog. the rain in the west. watch out for monday morning, potential fog. we've had a bit already. we are going to be talking about thrift. there is this festival on near redcar today, you said you're quite thrifty. we tried to teach the children the right weight about making do —— the
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right weight about making do —— the right way. you don't want to throw things away. and if we do, to the right places. helen always does the right places. helen always does the right thing! no, no! itry. i'm not so right thing! no, no! itry. i'm not so good with the crafts. i hate throwing food away. keep food past its sell by date. common-sense, exactly. we need this festival to be explained. good morning. good morning. the festival of thrift is starting to get underway. the stores are filled with beautiful produce, things that have been recycled and up things that have been recycled and up cycled. first, the co—founder, designer, wayne hemingway. tell me about the festival of thrift. this is the fifth one and it is a wonderful feeling that there are
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hundreds of fiercely independent makers, designers, small businesses, growers who come here and getting in front of 50,000 people, to see if what they do is any good. it's such a happy, uplifting thing. it's in a place, it's in the tees valley, it's inbred carjust outside and people often think of this place as a post—industrial wasteland. people come from all over the uk and internationally. they see those wonderful beaches. it puts this place in a new light. how many people know that middlesbrough has got the fifth highest number of entrepreneurial start—ups in the uk? or that manchester, liverpool and leeds. it gives hope. just over there is a steelworks. lots of people here were sadly made redundant but they are trying new things. there are two
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ex—steelworkers making amazing curries. it's called thrift but it's about innovation and making do with what you've got. thrift is a really good way to live your life. we don't all have to buy expensive designer goods. it's crass to want a posh yacht but so much media says having money makes you happy. tell these people that. doing things that are interesting, making things from old, it's how i was brought up. it's a great way of living. i'm so proud of what we've achieved here and the fa ct what we've achieved here and the fact it's free. thank you. i'm going to pop over to one of the entrepreneurs who did well last year. you make low—carbon art. entrepreneurs who did well last year. you make low-carbon art. we make creative things. we want to talk about the economic impact of the festival. this time last year we we re the festival. this time last year we were working off a dining room table and we met designers and we've met lots of people all year who said we
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met you at the festival of thift. now locally we have workshops and employed people and have grown massively. the economic impact and growth available through this festival is undeniable. thank you. we are going to go over here. here is ourup we are going to go over here. here is our up cycled room —— up cycled ringmaster. ladies and gentlemen our first piece of music this weekend at the festival of thift! music studio: i'm looking for home—made instruments and i'm not seeing any! you wouldn't throw them away, would
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you? he's you wouldn't throw them away, would you ? he's decorated you wouldn't throw them away, would you? he's decorated his coat with badges. on the sofa with us right now is victoria derbyshire. you spent your life making links between these things. make a link between that and what you've come here to talk about. ican't! what you've come here to talk about. i can't! i can, being practical. i was thinking about the notion of enjoying life for what it is and grabbing the moment. the reason you've come to talk to us is because you've come to talk to us is because you've got a book out relating your... do you like the phrase the battle with cancer? some people really don't like it. i wonder -- understand why people use it. i didn't want to elevate cancer to something even more significant, i wanted to diminish it. i felt for myself that if i compare it to other illnesses i've felt better about it. it's an illness, the nhs will treat
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it and hopefully i'll get through it. regular viewers of the bbc will be familiar with you. for many who haven't come across your story and what you've been dealing with, as a journalist you tackled cancer with a series of video diaries. let's show our viewers what you are doing and why you decided to do it. today i'm having my first session of chemotherapy which is part of my treatment for breast cancer. in case there are any microscopic traces of cancer elsewhere in my body the chemotherapy drugs will kill it. one of the things i'm finding difficult to come to terms with is losing my hair. i would say i've lost about
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30-50% of hair. i would say i've lost about 30—50% of my hair. hair. i would say i've lost about 30-50% of my hair. it's ok. i want to say to you right now, if you are going through cancer treatment or if you are about to go through cancer treatment, i'm sending you all my love and strength. have it, you can have it. please, do. and just keep going. victoria, it's brilliant that you've shown and been so open about how
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your treatment went and your recovery into remission. seeing it must be so emotional. but knowing the impact you've had on so many people. i feel a bit pathetic saying i get emotional watching myself cry, but i do. it is a hopeful story because i got through it and i survived. doing those video diaries, you know, it was helpful for me because i thought i can carry on being a workerand because i thought i can carry on being a worker and a journalist, not simplya cancer being a worker and a journalist, not simply a cancer patient. the reaction was overwhelming. millions of people have seen them and told me the video diaries help take the fear away from them. that was massive and unexpected and an illustration that there is a desire for straightforward, honest, factual information about the kind of treatment you can be offered. were you scared about becoming the story? ididn't you scared about becoming the story? i didn't think about it to be
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honest. i knew that i wanted to be open, i wanted to tell our viewers why i wasn't going to be able to present the programme sometimes. i'm an open person anyway. it felt normal and natural. people over the years have shared some really personal stories with me, and i thought i'm going to tell people about mine. we had a rather wonderful mother and daughter an earlier, did you see that? one of the things that occurred to me was you don't quite know what is in you or other people around you, until something like that happens to you. you've been through that process. pa rt you've been through that process. part of this is played up publicly but some of it is a deeply personal thing. you've got young children and one of the moving parts of your story is about how do you tell your children something you know they don't want to hear. we told them the truth. we were very low— key and undramatic. by that stage, we knew
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that my cancer was treatable, albeit by mastectomy, chemo and radiotherapy. i was going to get through it, i was going to live. so actually that was the feeling of euphoria. that's when we felt able to tell our boys who were eight and 11 at the time. they took it and within 24 hours my older son oliver said, are you not angry you've got cancer, because i am. i explained that i wasn't and that these are the stats and the energy i have, i wanted to focus on getting through the treatment rather than wasting it on being angry. you're also very open about the downsides, the physical challenge, losing your hair, having drains and tubes put into your breasts after the operation, and the pain of that. how easy was it for you to be that
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honest? easy. it wasjust documenting, for me this is what happens when you have a mastectomy. that hurt, there's some blood, obviously there are some bruising. but you can also do this and do this and within a few days you can wash hairand drive the and within a few days you can wash hair and drive the car and all that sort of stuff. after i had a mastectomy i was elated because the cancer was out of mastectomy i was elated because the cancer was out of me. mastectomy i was elated because the cancer was out of me. i didn't know how chemo was going to affect me. you get to that point and it's more dispiriting. you are very candid in the book but amongst other things you say that the way you've approached it is your way and it doesn't mean... people react very differently. some people want to deal with it privately. there is no blueprint for the right way. absolutely no blueprint. you do whatever you feel is right for you because every cancer is different.
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every treatment is different, every combination of drugs is different. whatever is right for you, do that. for me it felt right to go to work sometimes because that was good for my mental health. it felt right to pick the kids up from school, it felt right to drink wine sometimes. all of those things i didn't know that you could still do if you wanted to. how are you now? and get. touch wood. i had a checkup a couple of weeks ago and so far so good. does the book feel like... it's a bizarre phrase but closes a chapter? it really does. it's a relief, if that's the right word. i'm proud of it. obviously you have your checkups every six months so it never goes away. having cancer is a watershed, it has been a watershed for me in my life. it's a new normal, if you
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like. the title says it all. lovely to see this morning. the book is called dear cancer, love victoria: a mum's diary of hope. that's all from us for today, i'll be back here on bbc one from 6:00 tomorrow with christian. until then, whatever you are doing today, have a good day. bye— bye! this is bbc news, i'm julian worriker, the headlines at ten: french president emmanuel macron says he must provide more clarity over its negotiating position on brexit. the uk's credit rating has been cut over concerns about public finances and fears brexit could damage the country's economic growth. tens of thousands of people downstream from a failing dam in puerto rico have been told to evacuate in the wake of hurricane maria. hundreds of thousands of people sign a petition calling for a decision to strip cab—hailing app uber of its licence in london to be reversed. also in the next hour, record membership for the national trust. five million people across wales, england and northern ireland now pay to be members of the trust. and coming up in half an hour,
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the travel show heads to the greek islands.

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