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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 24, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and christian fraser. a show of force, us bombers fly close to north korea in another escalation over its nuclear programme. pyongyang's foreign minister said president trump made it inevitable that north korean missiles will hit the united states. good morning. it's sunday, 24th september. also ahead, voters in europe's most powerful nation go to the polls with angela merkel expected to win a fourth term. six people are injured after being sprayed with acid near an east london shopping centre. a 15—year—old is arrested. spectacle and celebration as prince harry opens the invictus games in toronto.
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the presence of his actress girlfriend meghan markle captures attention. in sport, manchester city smash five goals. you keep a good look out for the words ending in... we will be celebrating 60 years since the bbc first started making programmesjust since the bbc first started making programmes just for schools. and helen has the weather. good morning. mixed fortunes weather wise today. some changes on yesterday particularly in the west where we have got rain. it might be heavy in scotland. so i'll keep you updated on that. i hope you canjoin me for more details in 15 minutes. north korea has warned the united states it would take pre—emptive military action if there was any sign of an american attack on its territory. the comment came after us bombers and fighter jets flew the comment came after us bombers and fighterjets flew over the comment came after us bombers and fighter jets flew over waters close to north korea's east coast. pyongyang's foreign minister
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repeated kim jong—un's accusation that president trump was, "mentally deranged". danny savage is in seoul. good morning. what's the p feeling there then as —— what's the feeling as the war of words escalates and we are seeing military action not action, but military devices being deployed? we have had various developments overnight. you have what is very much a military mission by the americans in the last 15 hours or so flying the bi bombers and f15 fighter jets up hours or so flying the bi bombers and f15fighterjets up the north korean peninsula further north in this region than thief been in history. we have seen the planes in the air before over south korea for photo opportunities, but this wasn't a photo opportunity. this is what the americans describe as a demonstration of united states resolve and it did take place after careful discussion between south korea and the united states. the
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north korean foreign minister was talking at the united nations, remember donald trump said that kim jong—un was on a suicide mission earlier this week? north korea's foreign minister says that donald trump is on a suicide mission at the moment and that he's mentally deranged and full of megla mania and donald trump tweeted in the last few moments if he echoes the thought of little rocket man, that's who he calls the korean leader, they won't be around for much longer. not getting any better in this developing crisis. the war of words at least is continuing. danny, thank you very much for that. the labour party conference begins today in brighton wherejeremy corbyn is facing renewed calls to keep the uk in the single market. 0ur political correspondent he eleanor garnierjoins us
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0ur political correspondent he eleanor garnier joins us from brighton. jeremy corbyn asked delegates at conference to debate in a comrade and respectful way. does that suggest for the optimism there are divisions about which way they are divisions about which way they are going to go on brexit?” are divisions about which way they are going to go on brexit? i think that's one of the areas where there could be division, but if you think back to this time last year, jeremy corbyn had just survived another bitter leadership contest. yesterday, he arrived in brighton to cha nts yesterday, he arrived in brighton to chants of, "oh jeremy yesterday, he arrived in brighton to chants of, "0hjeremy corbyn." i think he is getting used to the sound of adulation. this is the first chance the party had a chance to get together en masse since the jeremy corbyn's when labour did better than expected, gaining 30 mps. even though labour didn't do well enough to get into government, there will be lots of celebrating and despite that, that doesn't mean there will be divisions lurking behind the scenes, some in the party are behind the scenes, some in the party a re really behind the scenes, some in the party are really pushing the party, pushing the leadership to adopt as
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official policy staying in the single market, staying in the customs union. so whilst there will be lots of people in high spirits, the conference won't be devoid of disagreement. 0k, eleanor, thank you very much. in around five minutes time we will be speaking to the shadow home secretary, diane abbott. germany goes to the polls today for the country's general election. angela merkel is expected to win a fourth term in office. 0pinion polls suggest the nationalist anti—immigrant suggest the nationalist anti—immigra nt alternative for germany party will become the first far—right movement to enter parliament since the second world war. damien mcguinness. this is the woman who looks selt to lead germany for another four years. angela merkel is seen as a stable force in a very unstable world. economic growth here is up and unemployment is down. so, mainstream voters here look at the rest of the world with the uncertainties of brexit and trump and think that germany might just be better sticking with the leader they know they can rely on.
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but what we don't know is what sort of government angela merkel will end up of government angela merkel will end up leading. she will have to form a coalition and all of her potential partners have very different policies. that means coalition talks could get rocky. what is clear, is that the new anti—migrant afd party looks set to enter the parliament for the first time. but it won't end up for the first time. but it won't end up in government. the afd is accused of being nationalistic and sometimes even racist. so no other party will work with them. germany is the most powerful country in europe and that's a continent facing huge challenges from solving the refugee crisis to reforming the eurozone. so the government that moves in here after the election will have a direct impact on the whole of europe including britain. six men have been injured in a suspected acid attack in east london. police were called to a
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shopping centre near westfield in stratford last night following reports that a group of men were spraying a noxious substance. a boy has been arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm. simon clemison has the details. last night's attack was in stratford in east london, but it is one among many. police say during an argument between two groups at the stratford shopping centre what they call a noxious substance was thrown. medics arrived and the injured were treated at the scene. a witness said one man run intoa at the scene. a witness said one man run into a nearby restaurant toilet to try to wash acid from his face. six people were hurt with three having to be taken to hospital. no one is believed to be in a life threatening condition, but it has left some of those living here shaken. i think it's scary and disgusting and it's horrible that people can't wack and be safe anymore. now that happened i'm concerned because i live here, i work here, i'm here most ft time. so i'm a bit concerned. there had been
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an initial suggestion that the attacks were random, but officers say the incident was confined to the two groups. the teenager arrested is 15 and is being held on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm. an investigation is under way after four people were hurt in a suspected gas explosion at a guesthouse in blackpool. a man and woman who were trapped in the blast and had to be airlifted to hospital. residents living nearby were evacuated, but have been allowed to return home. prince harry has opened this year's invictus games for sick and wounded service personnel. his girlfriend, meghan markle, was also at the ceremony. sarah campbell has more from toronto. more than 550 competitors from 17 nations, cheered on by friends and family. the games we re on by friends and family. the games were prince harry's idea, this is the third such event which aims to
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use sport to help the process of recovery. as its teams filed in, prince harry watched from the vip area next to the first lady and spotted a couple of rows down and around 18 seats across, his girlfriend meghan markle, the actress and campaigner who has been dating harry for a little over a year. ms markle lives and works in the city and so it would have perhaps seemed odd if she hadn't turned up. kensington palace refused to comment on her appearance adding that half of toronto is here anyway and that maybe true, but this still has to be seen as a significant public acknowledgement of the seriousness of their relationship. of course, the ceremony was about the games and the competitors who have gone through so much to get this far. there was a lot of respect here for what prince harry has created and his passion for the games is clear. some of you have overcome emotional challenges that until very recent yea rs challenges that until very recent years would challenges that until very recent yea rs would have challenges that until very recent years would have seen you written
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off and ignored. and now, you are here. on the world stage, flags on your chests representing your countries again. 0ver countries again. over the next eight days, across 12 sports, these men and women will inspire others in what promises to be the biggest invictus games yet. hats off to prince harry. it is a great event that. and all the contenders as well, the competitors. we will be talking to another one after 8 amt. jeremy corbyn is facing renewed calls from members of his own party to commit labour to remaining in the single market post brexit. so as the labour party conference gets under way in brighton, we can get the thoughts of one of his closest allies, the shadow home secretary, diane abbott, thank you very much forjoining us diane abbott on bbc breakfast, good morning. good morning. so, let's start, we saw some pictures yesterday, coverage of jeremy start, we saw some pictures yesterday, coverage ofjeremy corbyn
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talking to grass—roots members, cheers ofjeremy corbyn's name, he is very popular amongst those attending the rally. can you tell us how united the party is itself. we have been reporting on some friction between main members. actually, this is one of the most positive and united labour conference i can remember and i have been to a few. we've got 7,000 delegates all together. tens of thousands of visitors and on the back of a general election which up ended expectation, there is an enormous amount of unity. we have seen an open letter from 30 figures in, senior figures, open letter from 30 figures in, seniorfigures, an open letter from 30 figures in, senior figures, an open open letter from 30 figures in, seniorfigures, an open letter written by them to keep britain in the single market, urging jeremy corbyn to keep britain in the single market after brexit. is that possible? the labour party
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leadership is committed to respecting the result of the referendum and we've also said that we wa nt referendum and we've also said that we want a transitional period after the end of the article 50 period in which we will stay in the customs union and the single market. at the very least it gives some security to business and workers. however, if we come out of the single market, freedom movement falls. say that again — if you come out of the single market... when we come out of the single market freedom of movement will fall. will fall, but to be part of the single market, you have to commit — the eu made clear it wants a commitment to freedom of movement. it is not one or the other. no, i'm not saying it's one or the other. i'm saying this — that we're committed to a transitional period when we will stay in the
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single market and in the customs union, but that is not an indefinite transitional period. theresa may has adopted our idea and she is talking about two years. we're talking about about two years. we're talking about a fixed transitional period when we stay in the single market and the customs union. and theresa may, recently in a speech on friday, in florence, made clear that's the two year period. so does labour back theresa may's commitment to that two year transition period? theresa may is backing us. we were the first ones to talk about a transitional period... theresa may is in charge of the government, so... but we were the first ones to make that suggestion. she has now adopted our suggestion. she has now adopted our suggestion and we are content with the two year period that she has suggested. what's going to come out of the labour party conference this weekend? what will people or potential voters hear, do you think that will switch their vote to labour? they will hear a message of
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hope. they will hear a positive message. they won't hear the kind of infighting that they're hearing from boris and philip hammond and the rest and they will see that we are ready to fight and to win a general election whenever it comes. will they see unity with the likes of sadiq khan on stage? yes. i mean, i'm a london mp. sidique is my mayor. i think he has done extremely well. i'm glad he's speaking and you'll find that conference will give him an incredible reception. can we talk about the so—called mcdonald agreement or, in terms of trying to lessen the percentage needed of the vote to get grass root members up on stage at conference. it sounds as ifjeremy corbyn wants the voices of grass—roots members heard more than senior members of the labour party. well, you know
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we've got the biggest labour party we've got the biggest labour party we've had for years and we're all keen that grass—roots members should be involved more. we don't want a labour party that's a top down labour party that's a top down labour party. we want a labour party which involves and harnesses the enthusiasm of our members and remember, without all the new members and without all that enthusiasm, we wouldn't have won the seats we did in the last general election. yet people have voted for the mps, not the grass—roots members. so as the labour party conference when you say people are going to hear about a government, a labour party that is ready to go into government, it's not getting to hear from the ones that we elected. you know, one of the things that helped us in the general election was our manifesto. i've never known a labour manifesto that popular with the general public. so what we're
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looking at is not individuals. we're looking at is not individuals. we're looking at is not individuals. we're looking at the party. we're looking at the manifesto. we're looking at our values and that is what i believe will take us to victory at the next general election. why does the next general election. why does the leader of a political party, jeremy corbyn, need to ask delegates to debate in a comradery and respectful way, what does that mean? we always encourage comradery debate. isn't it an assumption that would happen anyway? you know if scwer ramie wasn't asking people to debate in a comradily way. you would be saying why isn't he saying that? he's saying that because he wants to remind journalists as much as anybody else, he believes it not in personal attacks, but in open
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debates. journalists aren't getting up debates. journalists aren't getting up on stage and talking though, are they? we're talking about the conference. the conference is the parliament of the movement. this is going to be one of our biggest conferences going to be one of our biggest c0 nfe re nces eve r. going to be one of our biggest conferences ever. there is lots of important subjects to debate and jeremy is right to remind people of what he has always said of the importance of debate which are not about personalities, are about the issues and are comradily. diane abbott, thank you for your time this morning. let's get some weather from helen. it's a lovely day in salford. helen. it's a lovely day in salford. helen is here with the weather. she is going to tell us about it. good morning. this is suffolk this morning. it is a very promising start and some of us will keep that sunshine and it will feel warm again, but we have some rain on the scene now and that's already with us across the western side of the
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country. so that will edge its way eastwards today and tonight. it is quite warm rain, even with all the cloud. we have got a southerly wind as opposed to the northerly we had last weekend, but we have a problem coming with fog. in september, the night is getting longer and we find we have a few fog problems. this was yesterday. worcester seeing the highest temperature at 21 celsius, but you can see around the moray firth, t temperatures are four or five degrees above what they should be. there will be limited sunshine because of this weather front here advancing. probably in the north—west of england, not seeing that rain until later on in the day. that southerly wind coming across the welsh mountains, but you can see for scotland and for the western side of wales and for the eastern side of wales and for the eastern side of wales and for the eastern side of northern ireland it looks grim at times. cloudy, drizzly with rain pepping up later in the day. it looks heavy for scotland. even in more highly populated areas parts of the central lowlands could have 20
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mill meet, of rain today. it is close across antrim and down and across northern ireland at times. the fine start will deteriorate the weather. the sunshine diminishes. probably eastern scotland and shetland may stay dry. through this evening and overnight the rain as i mentioned edges eastwards, but it peps up. we see heavier rain across central and southern england. dries up central and southern england. dries upfor central and southern england. dries up for northern ireland and later in the night, possibly, wales and the south—west. so although mild for the most part, it will turn chilly out in ruralareas, most part, it will turn chilly out in rural areas, but more than the risk of a grass frost is the risk of widespread and dense fog tomorrow morning in northern ireland and possibly as well wales as the south—west as if the rain and cloud clears away. that could be troublesome for travellers tomorrow morning in northern ireland. low sun angle and the sun taking a while for
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it to clear. it is still warm. i7 angle and the sun taking a while for it to clear. it is still warm. 17 to i9 celsius. but it does look more autumnal as the week goes on. we will stick to the sunny theme. we will stick to the sunny themem might be hard to do that. the andrew marr show is on at 9am. what's coming up, andrew? it is glorious here in brighton i have to say. the sun is shining on the labour party. i'm going to bejoined byjeremy corbyn, the labour leader, and talking about brexit, david davis, our chief negotiator, plus nick clegg who is mounting a campaign with labour mps to try and keep britain inside the eu. lots to talk about at 9am from brighton. andrew, thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 7.20am. it's time for a look at the newspapers.
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lemn sissay is here. good morning. we will talk to you in a moment. we will whiz through the front pages and see what is happening. the front page of the observer is taking a look at an open letter that's been signed by more than 30 mps calling onjeremy corbyn to commit to a full and permanent membership of the eu single market and customs union so the party can offer a clear alternative to the tories over brexit? tim shipman has a new book coming out and they are serialising it the sunday time. apparently philip hammond said to borisjohnson after the election, i will back you for lead are. it talks about the plot among the big four, amber rudd, borisjohnson, philip plot among the big four, amber rudd, boris johnson, philip hammond plot among the big four, amber rudd, borisjohnson, philip hammond and david davis. the front page of the sunday telegraph takes a look at a
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picture there of prince harry meeting melania trump. this is at the invictus games, the opening in toronto. they begin today. we will have coverage of that opening ceremony at 5.35pm on bbc one. chancellor versus boris, well that didn't last long, did it? it was a love—in on friday in florence. it is the teams behind them that are rowing. this story i'm interested in. are you picking up on the front page of the sunday times? 0h, in. are you picking up on the front page of the sunday times? oh, you wa nt to page of the sunday times? oh, you want to go there first. just as the labour party conference is going on, it would be great if our ruling party is united and as you just said, revealed plots by cabinet's big four to seize may's crown, the extra gilljit of theresa may's crown was laid bare last night. as it was revealed four of her senior
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ministers had made plans to replace her after the general election. it is kind of madness. we want them to be united. but are you surprised? this is talking about straight after the general election which was a shock. we saw theresa may emotional when she was giving her speech after the general election because it was a shock result for the conservative party. so are you so surprised that that would have happened straight after? right now, iwould like that would have happened straight after? right now, i would like them not to be in this situation, just as brexit is happening, we need, i'm a regular guy, you know... we need to be united. aren't these guysjust the figure heads for the movements within the party. if you read the story, it is people briefing about what philip hammond said and about what philip hammond said and about what boris johnson what philip hammond said and about what borisjohnson said and each is trying to undermine the other. rebel leaders claim last night that up to 50 conservative mps now want may to resign more than the 48 who would be needed to force a vote of no confidence in her leadership. all i'm saying is i would just like them
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to be united at this particular time. to come out and snuff it out and say enough. yes. christian, i know you like this story and think it may brew into something more. lemn, do you want to explain. trump slams sports stars over the national anthem. trump says wouldn't you love to see one of the nfl owners when somebody disrespects our flag to get that son of a — off the field right now. he's fired. so we have the presenter of the apprentice becoming president, using the catchphrase from this, the programme to get out a sports star who has a democratic
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right not to... basically there was some nfl players who took the knees, they were kneeling down. this is when the national anthem was playing in protest over the black lives matter campaign. president trump said this was disrespectful and they should be fired for it showing disrespect to the country and to the national anthem. it is the first amendment. this is why i'm interested in the story, most of the mba interested in the story, most of the m ba and nfl players are black. most of the owners of the clubs are white and what he is saying in the tweets last night, is look, you should be thank your lucky stars you're getting such money. do as you're told. in other words these guys have the power to take it all away and after sha rl lots the power to take it all away and after sharl lots vil that shows a really divisive message within the united states. that's why it could start to escalate. to offer the other side is that a black and white
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thing? you know, this is after he threaten to totally destroy north korea and he launches a blistering attack on the leadership of iran. 0ne attack on the leadership of iran. one gets the feeling of being in, with an unsafe person. general kelly had a handle on this president and goes and tweets at the weekend, when they take a day off, apparently that's when the tweets start coming! a quick mention, we will see you in an hour. we spoke to the head of, ber uk about the losing of the licence in london. that's the general manager. he appeals to tfl and the city's mayor sadiq khan saying we would like to know what we can sit down to work together to get this right. he is panicking. what happens in london with, her could
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affect newcastle, manchester and brighton and the rest of the country. it is an important story for us to follow. lemn, plesh your having you with us. we will talk to you again in an hour. we will have more of your thoughts. we are on the bbc news channel until 9am, coming up bbc news channel until 9am, coming up on breakfast, what time is it? it's alphabet fun time. join in with this song. no, it's not, it's 7.27am we will look back at 60 years of bbc schools programming. the rare occasions you were allowed to watch television when you were in the classroom how we used to live. we head to the greek islands to find out how one is planning to power its industry with the sun and the wind. we will bejoined industry with the sun and the wind. we will be joined by a four time gold medallist to find out how the invictus games transformed his life.
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we have been speaking to inspiring people whose lives have been changed by the invictus games. this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc 0ne. we will be staying on breakfast on the bbc news channel. stay with us on the bbc news channel. stay with us for that. but for viewers on bbc 0ne, goodbye for now. is hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and christian fraser. and is christian fraser. coming up before 8am, helen will have a weather update. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. north korea has warned the united states it would take pre—emptive military action if there was any sign of an american attack on its territory. the comment came after us bombers and fighter jets flew over waters close to north korea's east coast. pyongyang's foreign minister also repeated kim jong—un's accusation that president trump was ‘mentally deranged' the labour party conference begins today in brighton, where jeremy corbyn is facing renewed calls to commit labour to keeping the uk in the single market and customs union after brexit. more than 40 senior labour figures — including 30 mps — have signed an open letter, saying the party must offer a clear alternative to what they call
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the tories' destructive brexit. in the last half hour the shadow home secretary diane abbott said: this is one of the most positive and united labour conferences i can remember. i've been to a few. we've 7,000 delegates and tens of thousands visitors. 0n the back of a general election result which upended expectations and showed our ma nifesto upended expectations and showed our manifesto was extremely popular, there's an enormous amount of unity. germany goes to the polls today for a general election that looks set to see the chancellor, angela merkel, secure a fourth term in office. however, her win could be overshadowed by the nationalist, alternative for germany party. 0pinion polls suggest it could become the first far—right movement since the second world war to enter parliament. six men have been injured in a suspected acid attack in east london.
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police were called to a shopping centre close to westfield in stratford last night, following reports a group of men were spraying a noxious substance. a 15 year old boy has been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm. the founder of the invictus games, prince harry, has opened this year's event in toronto, canada. over the next eight days, more than 500 sick and wounded service personnel from 17 nations will compete across 12 sports. harry's girlfriend, actress meghan markle, was also at the ceremony — making her first appearance at an official engagement attended by the prince. bbc one will have opening ceremony highlights at 5.35pm. as photobombs go, you could say this one is roaring success. donna martin managed to snap this selfie with marty the tiger, during a visit to the highland wildlife park at kincraig. hugh andi
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hugh and i know what this picture is. he's not got his paw on her head. there was a pane of glass between them. which isn't obvious! well, i thought it was obvious. definitely not camera shy, marty is one of two endangered amur tigers housed there. and as you can see he even put a paw up to the protective glass as donna took the photo. amur tigers are listed as endangered and it's believed only around 450 remain in the wild. i thought he was chewing her ear! she wouldn't be smiling if that was happening. crazy people had those as pets 40 years ago. that is mad. people had those in their houses. mike tyson had one. saw a video of him playing around with one the other day. shall we talk ( crystal palace? not a good day for them yesterday.
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we don't have to talk about it. give us we don't have to talk about it. give usa we don't have to talk about it. give us a goal is all we're thinking. no—one's cheering. they aren't. premier league leaders manchester city continued their free—scoring form yesterday, running riot against crystal palace in a 5—0 win. palace, meanwhile are now the first team in english football league history to lose their opening six games without scoring a goal. city are being chased by manchester united, chelsea, liverpool and spurs who all won yesterday. ben croucher rounds up the best of the action. if you're on the hunt for a premier league goal, a map for manchester is a good guide. city can't stop scoring after six at watt #230red last weekend, just the five this time against crystal palace who just can't score. the 5—0 thrashing takes city top on goal difference. as easy as it gets for the blue half of manchester, the red half, playing a black, found life tougher at southampton. when united need goals
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these days they give the ball to lukaku and these days they give the ball to lu ka ku and let these days they give the ball to lukaku and let him do the rest. the only place united have dropped points this season was at stoke. caution for champions chelsea. that was propelled against the potteries' wind where costa's move away from the club was agreed. his replacement ensured he'd barely be missed. alvaro morata in a 4—0 win. everton trail to struggling bournemouth. the toffees coming unstucken? not if niasse could help it. he equalised and went one better. commentator: was it over the line? it is now. no doubt about it. niasse has turned this game on its head. totally different world after winning. i think you have always some key moments during the season. today was really a big win. that
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will give everybody a boost. but what we need at the time. neighbours liverpool won by the old goal in five at leicester. masters of the seat piece. coutinho showing how it should be done. jamie vardy house it shouldn't! and where one england striker struggled, another continues to flourish. harry kane found the net twice as 10—man tottenham won 3-2 at net twice as 10—man tottenham won 3—2 at west ham. confirmation of yesterday's results. elsewhere, watford continued their fine start to the season with a 2—1 win at swansea whilst burnley and huddersfield played out a goalless draw. celtic extended their unbeaten run in the scottish premiership to 57 games after a 2—0 win over rangers in the old firm derby. they stay 5 points clear at the top of the table thanks to two second half strikes. tom rogic powered in celtic‘s opener before leigh griffiths marked his 100th league appearance celtic appearance with his 67th goal. elsewhere, kilmarnock and aberdeen drew i—all,
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hibs won away at ross county, patrick and hearts drew i—all.... and a 2—1 win over hamilton saw stjohnstone move up to second place. hughie fury — cousin of tyson fury — has failed in his bid to take the wbo heavyweight title from new zealand'sjoseph parker. a points decision saw parker come out on top at manchester arena. the venue was hosting a sporting event for the first time since reopening after the terror attack in may. in rugby union's premiership, leicester tigers have their second win, thanks to a chaotic 31—28 victory at harlequins. it was a rollercoaster six—try game at the twickenham stoop. leicester had lost both of their opening matches, but the tigers are now building some momentum thanks to back—to—back victories. elsewhere, newcastle narrowly beat bath 33 points to 32. and billy vunipola will have an anxious wait to find out whether he'll be able make england's autumn internationals, after he injured his knee during saracens win over sale.
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it was only his second match back after shoulder surgery that saw him miss the british and irish lions tour to new zealand. there was drama in yesterday's pro14 — cardiff snatched their first win of the campaign, thanks to a last—minute try against connacht in galway. elsewhere, scarlets beat edinburgh 28—8. england's paul casey boosted his hopes of winning the fedex cup and a 7.4million pound bonus by moving into the lead in the season—ending tour championship in atlanta. casey shot a five—under—par to move to 12 under going in to today's final round — two shots ahead of americans kevin kisner and xander chauffeur—lee. if he wins the tournament, casey could take the fedex title depending on where higher—ranked players finish. you may have heard over the last year — a number of nfl players have been refusing to stand for the national anthem. this is in protest at perceived racial injustice and police brutality in the united states.
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well the situation has escalated to involve the president. donald trump says he is withdrawing a white house invitation to the nba basketball champions golden state warriors, after their star player steph curry suggest he wouldn't attend. it's tradition in american sport for championship winners to be invited to meet the president. on twitter, trump wrote "going to the white house stephen curry is hesitating, therefore invitation is withdrawn!" this has provoked much response on social media including one of the most famous american sports people of all time, basketball star lebron james calling president trump "a bum" and saying "going to white house was a great honor until you showed up." there are fixtures in the nfl today — including one at wembley — so we'll be watching out for reaction there. all kicking off, isn't it? could be a real problem. let's take a trip down memory lane now. back to school and a time when the class gathered around the big tv, wheeled out
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from its special cupboard. hugh, do you rememberthat? when i saw that, it was a flashback from the past. that little magic pencil where the light used to trace the words. unbelievable. did you not have it i don't remember it at all. i thought he was going to go, no, i wasn't born. we'll get the voice behind wordy in a short while. that magic pencil taught us how to write and we learnt how to count through song. well today marks 60 years of schools tv from the bbc. in a moment we'll speak to one of the actors who starred in the programmes and one the people behind the modern day equivalent. but first, this might bring back some memories. the first of this afternoon's programmes for schools and colleges, words and pictures follows in one minute. music do an
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doane do an e and carry on. come back round and now it's done. watch. right, word watchers, you keep a good lookout for all the words ending in ight. you may have in thessed i'm wearing a belt. it's the bo the half of an old sam brown. # row, row, row your boat # row, row, row your boat # gently down the stream # gently down the stream # merrilly, merrilly, merrilly # merrilly, merrilly, merrilly # life is butt a dream. # we're joined now by charles collingwood — who was the voice of ‘wordy‘ in look and read and the executive producer of bbc teach, andrew tomlinson. welcome to you both. charles, how
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long did you do that voice for? was wordy. well over 20 years. how did the voice come about? i'd been doing an awful lot of schools television anyway, since the late sixties. i was part of the unit. they said, can you think of a voice for wordy? you know, i was fairly silly. ijust thought up a sort of silly voice like this. they thought, that will do. for the next 20 years i made a fortune. hello, my name's word gentlemen, ha, ha. i'm still sane. it's worked very well having been in the archers 40 years means i've been mostly employed as an actor. this is taking me back. that voice. extraordinary. i remember sitting in my primary school. we were saying, the television would be wheeled out.
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0na six the television would be wheeled out. on a six foot high trolly. charles would come... i wouldn't. that's not you? what happened there. the first series they did in bristol, one of the stage managers went in it. he was fine in the morning. went off to the club and had rather a good lunch. in the afternoon, scop wordy was massively overanimated. but in the evening he was slummed. they got a wonderful little actuary called katie who was very small. she could p0p katie who was very small. she could pop inside this rather smelly costu me pop inside this rather smelly costu m e year pop inside this rather smelly costume year after year. here he is. there we are. there's poor old katie listening to me. we wore cannes. i had a microphone too. headset, microphones. yeah. itold had a microphone too. headset, microphones. yeah. i told her what to do. marvellous. andrew, it's changed. that's a little bit of understatement. it has. but teachers still want bbc in schools? there's a
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huge demand for bbc content in schools. we still do one thing done all those years back, use some of the bbc's top presenters, talent and act tors front some of fees films we make. e—ceptionly, everything's john ryan line now. that's happened gradually but particularly in the la st gradually but particularly in the last year. in terms of how long the programmes are now? much shorter. two or three minutes. the idea is to get the class talking. to get the teachers introducing the ideas to the children. we have about seven—and—a—half 8,000 clips available that date back ten years or so. available that date back ten years or so. this is the point. back then, when i was a nipper, you didn't get a lot of children's television. you sat up and paid attention. now, they're deluged by content online, youtube. my children have i phones, ta blets. youtube. my children have i phones, tablets. it is a conscious decision to keep it as short as possible? to
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get that conversation going in the classroom and hit those key points the teacher needs to teach. we make sure they're as curriculum—based as possible. they're not dry. we use cutting edge animation, drama, factual techniques used right across tv. we make sure they're used in the school's films as well to try to keep the imagination going and keep the children focussed on what they're watching. look and read was 20 minutes. quite an assault for three minutes. the subject matter's changing in some ways. you'll look at issues like mental health. before, those subjects weren't touched upon as such? they weren't but not touched opinion anywhere the the only thing i worry about. i get nostalgic when i hear wordy. do they lose that because they're being
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spoken to by older children? no, the audience has become more sophisticated. everything's online. the kind of animation techniques we're using are the things they see when gaming or on the children's cartoon channels. they stick in their minds but it is a different approach to wordy. wordy had a massive following which we didn't real eyes at the time. i was at the ideal home exhibition with my wife. we were doing an archers thing and we had another slot at 2.15. this same journalist interviewed us. instead of being parents, we had 300 children. we were dieing a death in front of these children. i stopped it and front of these children. i stopped itand said, front of these children. i stopped it and said, anybody here watch look and read. i said, it and said, anybody here watch look and read. isaid, hello, word watchers. we can't resist. thank you so much. charles, i am going to
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indulge helen. would you throw to helen in wordy‘s voice. indulge helen. would you throw to helen in wordy's voice. helen, what's the weather today, ha, ha. 0h, what's the weather today, ha, ha. oh, my goodness me! the weather is stunning as here in suffolk this morning. some beautiful weather watcher pictures. continue to send them in. cloudier skies will invade from the west through today, tonight and tomorrow. still quite warm. we're bathed in a southerly wind at the moment. but, with the light winds this week, we'll potentially have some fog problems. a september problem with the change in season. taking you back to yesterday's temperatures. lovely and warm across many parts. a little bit down today in scotland. temperatures stipe above the average. we might see higher temperature—wise across the eastern side. still feeling quite warm here. reason for the
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change is the advance of our weather front. it will turn out to be quite heavy rain we think come this afternoon across scotland. just patchy rain really across the west initially. for england and wales this evening and overnight the rain peps up. a more detailed look ever scotland. across the north. here we could have that heaviest rain across the grampians and highlands. not exclusively here. the low lands. antrim and down quite wet. further west drier and brighter. lovely weather to start the day in salford and north wales. clouds coming in here and across the midlands. the south—west of england. hanging on to plenty of sunshine. more than yesterday. here, it will feel quite warm, 20—22 celsius. here's that heavy rain coming in through the night. a soaking for some of the gardens in southern areas overnight. certainly quite mild. hill fog as
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well with that rainband. it's fog of a different nature. the low level fog that could cause real problems for northern ireland tomorrow morning. possibly parts of wales and south—west if that weather front‘s moved away. a rather dreary look to our weather for many tomorrow. 0nce the fog clears in the west, it is here we'll see the best of the sunshine in contrast to today's further east. quite a mixed bag. if you do have plans, stay tuned. nice to see the rain's serving us all. all sides of the country. thanks, helen. we'll be back with the headlines at 8am. first, it's time for the travel show with carmen roberts. this week on the show, we pay a flying visit to the greek islands, where one of them is planning to run its entire tourism industry on the wind and sun alone. plus, we are in santiago to taste the delights of chilean wine. we will start with the rose, and then we will serve some red wine as well.
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and i come face—to—face with one of my japanese food nightmares. it is chewier than a lot of sashimi i'm used to. first up this week, we are heading to the small greek island of tilos. for decades it has been a fairly low—key destination, and a firm favourite with tourists looking for a more laid—back alternative to the busier islands. but now it is looking to make its mark by becoming the first one to generate its own electricity, using just the power of the wind and the sun. we sent guy fenton to find out how the plans are going. i've just been on a two—hour ferry
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ride from rhodes to arrive here at the island of tilos. compared to rhodes, it's much smaller and less developed, but it seems to be just as hot. pull this down and it will inflate. my pull this down and it will inflate. my life jacket. all that's left is i get on. this is the first time i've flown on a boat plane. it will be a great way to see tilos. tiny bit nervous. mostly excited. orchestral music.
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that was absolutely insane. a bit of a bumpy takeoff, this thing goes so fast in the water, then itjust took off into the sky. i can't believe this thing actually gets up there. a great way to see tilos. if flying isn't your thing, how about this? probably one of the most relaxing and scenic ways to see tilos is by bike. you might see some wildlife along the way, but right now i'm on my way to check out something that up until now has been a vital link between tilos and the outside world. and this is it. these cables here. they have been connecting tilos to another island called kos around 100km away. traditionally, that is how tilos has been getting its powerfrom kos. from here, the cable travels underwater to kos,
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and up until now it has been a lifeline for tilos. the underwater cable sounds like a good idea, but the oil—generated power is expensive and the line is vulnerable to breakdown. when that happens, the island and its tourists are left without electricity. but thanks to a locally devised initiative, tilos has now set about generating its own electricity in a sustainable and eco—friendly way. we are hope that can we can satisfy the demands of the island and, of course, in some particular hours of the day, we can also provide power to the kos power company. we were not going to pollute.
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secondly, we will win from the power cuts. we have a lot of power cuts. that means not good quality of electricity. so, we will have a better quality. we will save our elect ricks. charging stations for electric cars. nobody here is suggesting this scheme can be replicated across all of the greek islands. the tourist industry here on tilos a low—key but they are setting a real good example. let's hope some of the other islands do follow their lead. japan's food can be jaw dropping
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and most people new to the country make at a beeline for the yakitori joints or sushiyas that you'll find everywhere. i've lived here in tokyo for over three years now and i love japanese food but there are a still some ifind quite intimidating. so with a little help from my translator yoko, i'm taking my taste buds on a trip through this country to try and understand what i'm missing out on. my travels take me a couple of hours' flight south—west of the capital, in fact, to the very tip of japan's biggest island. so this is honshu, the main island, the one with tokyo on it and over this is shiminoseki, the home of one of east asia's most notorious fish. fugu, or pufferfish, is a japanese delicacy, eaten normally raw as sashimi but it's lethally toxic. 0ne wrong bite and you could be killed instantly.
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in fact, the chemicals in the fish are reckoned to be 1200 times more poisonous than cyanide. some have described it as the dining equivalent of russian roulette. how many people die every year from eating fugu? the town has made something of a tourism industry of its relationship with fugu. and it's not hard to find a licensed chef in shiminoseki. so tell me which parts are poisonous. everything here.
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ok, so this is the liver, the eyeballs, this is the heart, gallbladder. ok, so what do you do with all these poisonous parts? so, the chef said it tastes better if you try three slices together. three slices? 0k. more than i wanted to take, but... i got some fugu sauce. it's chewier than a lot of sashimi i'm used to. not bad. the sauce was good, too. i feel very safe here but what i want is a rawer,
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less polished experience and ifind it at the town's unique fugu auction house. what we are about to see here doesn't happen anywhere else in the world. here, they have developed a system of bidding that ensures secrecy. everything happens inside a big, black glove. it's quite interesting, the man with the black bag or shroud around his hand, he's the auctioneer, obviously, from the fish market and all the wholesalers are bidding. but it's said to be shrouded in secrecy so they are doing hand gestures underneath the black cloth so you never really know the real price of the fugu. it's all shrouded in mystery. or it was shrouded in mystery until i asked how it works. i can't even add up that quickly! so, by and large, fugu is nothing to worry about.
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in all the outlets here, the staff are properly trained and licensed, and know what they're doing. and it comes in all shapes and sizes. so, in here, there's the fin of the fugu that has been smoked and soaked inside the sake. ok, let's try the burger now. it's crunchy, there's lettuce, there's mayonnaise, there's bread. it's quite tasty, actually. call me old—fashioned, i definitely prefer my drinks without fish parts. but, if there's one thing i learned on my mission to tackle japan's most daunting dishes, it's that even the scariest are worth a bit of persistence. well, that is it for this week.
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coming up next week... rajan starts his epic voyage down the longest river within the balkans, the sava. he will be exploring the river headfirst in slovenia and travelling along its course to croatia to meet the man whose incredible tale of animal rescue has become internationally famous. incredible sight. three baby stalks. i am literally six inches away from them. join us for that if you can and don't forget, if you want to see our adventures on the road, you can follow us on social media but in the meantime, from all of us here, it's goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and christian fraser. a show of force, us bombers fly close to north korea in another escalation of tensions over its nuclear programme.
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the war of words continues as pyongyang's foreign minister says president trump has now made it ‘inevitable' that north korean missiles will hit the us. good morning it's sunday the 24th of september. voters in europe's most powerful nation go to the polls —
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