Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 24, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

8:00 am
i am literally six inches away from them. join us for that if you can and don't forget, if you want to see our adventures on the road, you can follow us on social media but in the meantime, from all of us here, it's goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and christian fraser. a show of force, us bombers fly close to north korea in another escalation of tensions over its nuclear programme. the war of words continues as pyongyang's foreign minister says president trump has now made it ‘inevitable' that north korean missiles will hit the us. good morning it's sunday the 24th of september. voters in europe's most powerful nation go to the polls — with german chancellor angela merkel expected to win a fourth term. six people are injured
8:01 am
after being sprayed with acid near an east london shopping centre a 15—year old is arrested. spectacle and celebration as prince harry opens the invictus games in toronto. the presence of his actress girlfriend meghan markle also captures attention. good morning. in sport, manchester city smash five past crystal palace, as all of the favourites taste victory in the premier league. hidden in plain sight. we have the story of ambled reproductions which turned out to be a priceless masterpiece. and talking of masterpieces, here's the weather. mixed fortunes weather—wise. some changes yesterday. light and heavy, i'll keep you updated on that. join me in15 i'll keep you updated on that. join me in 15 minutes. north korea has warned the united states it would take pre—emptive military action if there was any sign of an american attack on its territory.
8:02 am
the comment came after us bombers and fighter jets flew over waters close to north korea's east coast. pyongyang's foreign minister also repeated kim jong—un‘s accusation that president trump was ‘mentally deranged'. pyongyang, the capital of north korea, a place where tens of thousands of north koreans gathered to show support for their leader. and their anger at america's leader donald trump. who is trump to talk about the collapse of our government. we are resolved to set up government. we are resolved to set up defences by military force if war brea ks up defences by military force if war breaks out. america, in turn, has demonstrated its strength, the us air force plane bombers and fighter jets over the waters east of north korea. the closest they've thrown to the country this century, says the pentagon, which shows how seriously america are taking north korea's reckless behaviour, as they have
8:03 am
called it. frequently antagonistic words and missile tests have made many uneasy. but there has been no sign of north korea being willing to placate all please any escalating tension. their foreign minister pulled no punches in a speech at the un saying donald trump was mentally deranged and on a suicide mission. the absurd reality is that a person like trump, a mentally deranged person can use fraud and schemes and has his hand on the nuclear button. he is the greatest that to international peace. donald trump has said north korea would pay dearly for its hostile behaviour. america, he said, would totally destroy the country if it was ever forced to defend itself. the labour party conference begins today in brighton, where jeremy corbyn is facing renewed calls to commit labour to keeping the uk in the single market and customs union after brexit. yesterday the labour leader told delegates they're "in a moment
8:04 am
of great change" and must "prepare to form a government". our political correspondent eleanor garnierjoins us now from brighton. will mr corbyn be able to unite his party? we have just had we havejust had diane we have just had diane abbott on the programme and she says she can't remember a conference as united? i think that is probably quite true. this time last yearjeremy corbyn had just survived another bitter leadership contest, there were questions about how long he could stay on as leader, and who should succeed him. yesterday he arrived to hear his name being chanted by lots of people waiting for him. he is going to have to get used to the adulation. this is the first time the party has got together en masse since the general election when he did much better than anybody expected. he gained an extra 30 mps. there will be a lot of celebration
8:05 am
over the next few days, even though they didn't get into government. despite bad, division is lurking behind—the—scenes, not least on brexit and the balance of power between party members and the parliamentary parties. spirits are high, that the converse is not divide of disagreement. germany goes to the polls today for the country's general election. the chancellor, angela merkel, is expected to win a fourth term in office. 0pinion polls also suggest the nationalist, anti—immigrant "alternative for germany" party will become the first far—right movement to enter parliament since the second world war. our correspondent, damien mcguinness, reports from berlin. this is the woman who looks set to lead germany for another four years. anglo—american is seen as a stable force an unstable world. economic growth is at and unemployment is
8:06 am
down —— angela merkel. people look at the uncertainties and think germany may be better sticking with the leader they know they can rely on. but what we don't know is what sort of government angela merkel will be leading. she'll have to form a coalition, and all of her potential partners have a very different policy. that means coalition talks could get rocky. what is clear is that the new anti—migrant anp party looks set to enter the parliament for the first time. but it won't end up in government. the afd is accused of being nationalistic and even racist. so no other party will work with them. germany is the most powerful country in europe, and that the continent facing huge challenges. resolving the refugee crisis and reforming the eurozone. the government that losing here after the election will have a direct impact on the whole of
8:07 am
europe, including britain. —— moves in here. six men have been injured in a suspected acid attack in east london. police were called to a shopping centre near westfield in stratford last night, following reports a group of men were spraying a noxious substance. a 15 year—old—boy has been arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm. simon clemison has the details. last night's attack was in east london. it is now one among many. police say an argument outside the shopping centre led to a noxious substance being thrown. the injured we re substance being thrown. the injured were treated at the scene. witnesses say one man ran into a restaurant toilet to wash acid from his face. six people were hurt, three were taken to hospital. no one is believed to be in a life—threatening condition, but some of those living here she can. i think it's scary and disgusting. it's horrible that people do this. it's horrible that people do this. it's horrible.
8:08 am
lam it's horrible. i am concerned, i live here, i work here. i'm here most of the time. iam here. i'm here most of the time. i am concerned. there had been a suggestion that the attacks were random, but officers say that the incident was confined to a few groups. a 15—year—old is being held on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm. people were hurt in a suspected gas explosion at a guest house in blackpool.a man and an elderly woman who were trapped in the blast and had to be airlifted to hospital. residents living nearby were evacuated but have now been allowed to return home. hundreds of hgv drivers in the uk have been caught using devices, which disguise how many hours they've been working for. figures seen by "radio 5live investigates", from the driver and vehicle standards agency, reveal tachograph tampering has gone up by 21% over the last three years. the programme's presenter, adrian goldberg, joins us now. hejoins us later on. prince harry has opened this year's
8:09 am
invictus games for sick and wounded service personnel in toronto, canada. his girlfriend, actress megan markle, was also at the ceremony — making her first appearance at an official engagement attended by the prince. sarah campbell has more from toronto: more than 550 competitors from 17 nations, cheered on by friends and family. the games were prince harry's idea, this is the third such event which aims to use sport to help the process of recovery. as its teams filed in, prince harry watched from the vip area next to the first lady and spotted a couple of rows down and around 18 seats across, his girlfriend meghan markle, the actress and campaigner who has been dating harry for a little over a year. ms markle lives and works in the city and so it would have perhaps seemed odd if she hadn't turned up. kensington palace refused to comment on her appearance adding that half of toronto is here anyway and that
8:10 am
maybe true, but this still has to be seen as a significant public acknowledgement of the seriousness of their relationship. of course, the ceremony was about the games and the competitors who have gone through so much to get this far. there was a lot of respect here for what prince harry has created and his passion for the games is clear. some of you have overcome emotional challenges that until very recent years would have seen you written off and ignored. and now, you are here. 0n the world stage, flags on your chests representing your countries again. the united kingdom! over the next eight days, across 12 sports, these men and women will inspire others in what promises to be the biggest invictus games yet. know someone who knows what it feels
8:11 am
like to take part, we have the former royal engineer. tell as at how it feels. what is the atmosphere like? it looks fantastic? it's almost indescribable. it was a privilege to be part of the first games in london where we all thought it was probably going to be a slightly hyped sports day. shining the light on us. but to have the backing of prince harry, to be able to have the facilities of the 0lympic to have the facilities of the olympic stadium in london was amazing. a good turnout from the public. he support across the world was extraordinary. two years later, to be there again, representing my country again in orlando, it took it to that next level. yeah. you are a captain, you were
8:12 am
recovered in the royal engineers so we should give you your full title. kiwi sportsmen than? i was very keen ona high kiwi sportsmen than? i was very keen on a high level of fitness, i used to compete in triathlon before joining the army. i try to continue that, but commitments stop that for quite a few years. cani quite a few years. can ijust quite a few years. can i just get quite a few years. can ijust get my hands on a medal? you said shining a light on us, the invicta schemes, tell as white light needed to be shone? what happened?” was involved in a blast in afghanistan in 2012. a roadside bomb detonated under my vehicle. i thought i was ok and finished the task, but when i got into camp and was sent to the local centre they found that i'd fractured my back and when i was sent back to the uk,
8:13 am
might wife realised that there was quite a lot more that was different than what had left a few months ago. mental health? no, it was all physical, but not visible. i couldn't remember conversations we'd had. many months before i couldn't hear properly. i was struggling with my speech, balance, and then, through further investigation they realised that i'd suffered a brain injury and hearing loss. also, later on, much later on i went to spinal rehabilitation and they found ace tear in my spinal—cord. how are you now? and managing. trying to achieve as much as i can. sport has been a huge part of that. support from help for heroes and the opportunity to participate in events like the invicta schemes, that has transformed my life. this is one of
8:14 am
your medals. 0ne transformed my life. this is one of your medals. one of four! so this was 0rlando? your four events were? cycling, the time trial and road race, andi cycling, the time trial and road race, and i managed to defend those. for those who don't know, because when prince harry takes the stage, he says, i am invictus. what does that mean? unconquerable. there are lots of people who've come back and going through difficult times, what does this mean to them? a great deal. it's the opportunity to win cigar and represent your country. that's something we are passionate about —— once again represent your country. that's why you join the military in the first place. your career is abruptly ended by whatever reason, and it's then affects your
8:15 am
well—being, you feel that loss of, archery and belonging. then, having that opportunity to come together, supported by all your peers,. your flag on your chest again. yes. how important is it that prince harry is pa rt important is it that prince harry is part of the games? it was his brainchild and he continues his support. there is your little one. yes, my daughter. how important is prince harry to these games? without himi prince harry to these games? without him i don't think they would have achieved the exposure that they warranted. then the continued support is something that we all feel very proud to have. also, with his personal link to the military having served himself he can relate to it, and he uses that platform to
8:16 am
make change for good. that's something we all want to endorse. we are very proud of you. it's great to see the medals. well done. 5:35pm, the opening ceremony highlights will be on bbc one. shall we find out what's happening with the weather? it was a glorious morning this morning, how is it looking? it's not looking too bad. the best of the weather will be today. i thought we'd have a look at what we are looking at. this time of year we start to see the day is getting shorter. that happens, theoretically, on the equinox. as you can see for yourself, the time is just before seven and just after seven, they are not equal. just a few days later, we see it happening
8:17 am
in practice. tomorrow, as you can see, the days are equal length. 12 hours. that's to do with when the sun rises. the scent can illuminate the horizon before it starts to rise. that is the equinox. as for today, we have had some beautiful sunshine this morning. southerly winds, and sunshine. it will feel warmer than it should for the time of year. but, already, we've got a weather front moving in. of year. but, already, we've got a weatherfront moving in. some rain, but ahead of that, this is how it looks across staffordshire. i think the staffordshire, along with wales and the south—west, cloud will look significant for the afternoon. for scotland, you see the heaviest rain. we will look at that in more detail. that's quite far east. it looks like
8:18 am
significant rain not just for the highlands of scotland, but the central lowlands and north—east. it might be an east west split across northern ireland. the rain in the east. despite a fine start in england and wales the rain is flirting with cornwall and pembrokeshire. it will make its way across the midlands. ahead of that we hang on to the sunshine. it may well be warmer. 0vernight it perks up, as you can well be warmer. 0vernight it perks up, as you can see some amounts well be warmer. 0vernight it perks up, as you can see some amounts of rain. ten or 20 millimetres on a few places. mild with hill fog. when it clears we have proper low—level fog, dense fog. that becomes an issue for rush—hour travellers. it could also see some patches across wales. it looks like a different complexion tomorrow. we've seen the sunshine
8:19 am
today, dreary and damp. the west, once we've cleared the fog, could see some decent sunshine. it is slightly fresher. bad is the pattern for a couple of days. towards the end of the week it looks like we'll see some autumnal lows rolling in off the atlantic. fairly quiet conditions for many today, but the rain is certainly worth watching out for. thank you. that equinox stuff is fascinating. equinox, ithink thank you. that equinox stuff is fascinating. equinox, i think what happens in reality. almost a century ago a happens in reality. almost a century agoa group happens in reality. almost a century ago a group of working—class people set up an art club in london's industrially is done. from shops to slums they captured their everyday life in paint. much of the group's ardron hasn't been seen in decades.
8:20 am
we've been rediscovering it and putting it on show. —— group's art work hasn't been seen in decades. an east london canal, an unlikely subject for a painting. the artist is equally unlikely, he was a clerk for a shopping firm. this was painted by a window cleaner. this eerie street scene, by and errand boy. this was the work of a printer. the man who painted this was unemployed, a basket painter painted this window. they were known as the east london group. today these painters of the shabby east end are largely forgotten. this exhibition aims to revive their reputation, a band of artists who saw the extraordinary in the everyday. there
8:21 am
are views and images which most of us are views and images which most of us wouldn't choose to paint, they saw beauty and what they knew. they painted in and around the local area. their work ended up in the west end at the most prestigious gallery at the time. today the east london they painted as unrecognisable. this railway bridge is still there, but the traffic is modern. 0ne artist painted these houses across the road from where she worked. they are still there, but onlyjust. the group's work is a record of a largely vanished world. there are exceptions, like this one, but they have long since been destroyed. albert toobin has exhibited... albert toobin has exhibited... albert was a wartime fireman. in peace time he was a window cleaner and member of the group. he was also
8:22 am
and member of the group. he was also a firebrand socialist. an exhibition devoted to his work opens later this week. the curator says the east london group deliberately chose unfashionable subject. why would you paint shabbiness? places people say they want to get out of? because they are slums. it's perverse , out of? because they are slums. it's perverse, and for that sake it interests me and it's wonderful. albert's daughter recalled the man who was forever sketching. but much of his work, especially that from the 30s and 40s has vanished. when he died there was some stored in a shared. and i'm afraid my mum decided she wanted to clear it out. and so, it got thrown away. many more paintings have disappeared, around 700 were exhibited in the
8:23 am
30s, and today just around 700 were exhibited in the 30s, and todayjust over 100 survive. most, on walls around the country, away to discovery. i wonder how many more of those are around. the gallery runs untiljanuary. it's in mayfairat the gallery runs untiljanuary. it's in mayfair at southampton city art gallery. and the work of albert is on display until the 29th of september in both gallery. it's time to look at the papers. lemn sissay is here to tell us what's caught his eye. it's so easy, sometimes, if you see someone on it's so easy, sometimes, if you see someone on the street and they seem distressed, it can sometimes feel awkward interfering. it is seen as
8:24 am
interfering rather than just offering help. the simplest questions make a difference, can't they. this is an exclusive in the sunday mirror. i love this headline. a couple of younger boys, 15 years old, walking home from school. they walked across a bridge, saw a man, they actually got out of their cameras to film it because they thought he was doing some sort of prank. they had no idea he was distressed. they tried to convince him to come off the bridge, and actually held onto him, held onto his waist and one of him deliver them held his jumper. he was determined to jump? them held his jumper. he was determined tojump?‘ samaritan's report reveals that men
8:25 am
are three more times likely to end their lives, it's the biggest killer of men under the age of a0. the local police have said they are going to get a bravery award. they brought in some other people to help, later on, they called the police. and the young boys were distressed because people walked past. there were some people who didn't help. frank goodness these boys did. yes, and as the dark nights come closer, depression affects a lot of young males, they can end up committing suicide it's important we ask those questions. connected to that, we've been talking about the invictus games all morning. there's prince harry with the first lady. he says we have to stop this pill pushing culture we haven't found other ways to deal with mental illness. prince harry
8:26 am
has done an incredible amount of work with the consciousness of mental illness and depression in all of us. but, he... he doesn't say that he thinks too many pills being giving out to stop depression in this country. but he says that there's not one syllable bollards to solve this. he does say as well. i... ifit solve this. he does say as well. i... if it works, it works. —— silver bullet to solve this. if they are helping them, in it does seem that it's worth it. we have heard from two former soldiers about how healing this is. team spirit, things like that. there are other things we can do. you can have your cake and
8:27 am
eat it! you can't take your pills for depression and do sport, i think he has said that, prince harry has said that they resent this magic bullet. it's tricky, when you are talking about medication. i think it's best to leave that to the doctors, but he's doing incredible work. you will do me foster care system. —— were dimly foster system. white paper is this from? this is from the sunday telegraph. how is that supposed to work? this is a statement put out from a british association for adoption and fostering. the head of the group,
8:28 am
john simmonds, which represents foster carers is writing to the department for education calling for a review of whether there is enough training of parents on how to spot somebody who is being cultivated as a terrorist. this goes back to parsons green, he was obviously in foster ca re. parsons green, he was obviously in foster care. like foster carers don't have enough to do! this will be the criticism, wanted?m don't have enough to do! this will be the criticism, wanted? if you can't spot, as a foster parent, this behaviour, which is resulting in terrorist activity, then there is a bit of a problem. whether you've had training or not, fostering is an incredible thing to do. and adoption is one of the greatest things that a human being can do for somebody else. i think this is one pressure to many. good to have you. thank you
8:29 am
for joining to many. good to have you. thank you forjoining us. the headlines are coming up. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and christian fraser. coming up before 9am, helen will have the weather. but, first, a summary of morning's main news. north korea has warned the united states it would take pre—emptive military action if there was any sign of an american attack on its territory. the comment came after us bombers and fighter jets flew over waters close to north korea's east coast. pyongyang's foreign minister also repeated kim jong—un's accusation that president trump was ‘mentally deranged' the labour party conference begins today in brighton, where jeremy corbyn is facing renewed calls to commit labour to keeping the uk in the single market and customs union after brexit. more than a0 senior labour figures — including 30 mps — have signed an open letter, saying the party must offer a clear alternative to what they call the tories' destructive brexit. in the last half hour the shadow home secretary diane abbott told us the party was as united as ever.
8:30 am
this is one of the most positive and united labour conferences i can remember. i've been to a few. we've 7,000 delegates and tens of thousands of visitors. 0n the back of a general election result which upended expectations and showed our manifesto was extremely popular, there's an enormous amount of unity. germany goes to the polls today for a general election that looks set to see the chancellor, angela merkel, secure a fourth term in office. however, her win could be overshadowed by the nationalist alternative for germany party. 0pinion polls suggest it could become the first far—right movement since the second world war to enter parliament. six men have been injured in a suspected acid attack in east london. police were called to a shopping centre close to westfield in stratford last night, following reports a group of men were spraying a noxious substance. a 15 year old boy has been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm.
8:31 am
hundreds of hgv drivers in the uk have been caught using devices, which disguise how many hours they've been working for. figures seen by "radio 5live investigates", from the driver and vehicle standards agency, reveal tachograph tampering has gone up by 21% over the last three years. the programme's presenter, adrian goldberg, joins us now. can you tell us more about what you investigation has revealed? why should we care? very important because a tired driver is a dangerous driver. the taco graph, amongst other things, measures how long a trucker has been in the cab. if they're driving beyond their legitimate working hours they could be dangerous. we've figures suggesting almost a50 thatchering devices of one sort or another were found in trucks in the last year with hundreds more suspected. not only dangerous because you've potentially tired drivers but also many of these devices affect the
8:32 am
breaks, steering and speedo of the trucks. what confuses me about this, surely the bosses of these drivers are aware when they give them their jobs how long these jobs take. who's to blame here? the drivers who neat to blame here? the drivers who neat to meet targets or the bosses who are setting impossible targets? possibly a bit of both. truckers doing a bit of extra work on the side or trying to earn a bonus. you do have companies implicated encouraging their drivers to break the rules. you can hear more on 5live investigates at 11am today. the founder of the invictus games, prince harry, has opened this year's event in toronto, canada. over the next eight days, more than 500 sick and wounded service personnel from 17 nations will compete across 12 sports. harry's girlfriend, actress meghan markle, was also at the ceremony — making her first appearance at an official engagement attended by the prince. bbc one has invictus opening ceremony highlights and action
8:33 am
at 5.35pm. we've been talking to inspirational people who've been at the games. morning hugh, people say the atmosphere at these things stunning. it is gaining more and more popularity. it's been growing and growing, this eventin it's been growing and growing, this event in toro ntole it's been growing and growing, this event in torontole biggest yet. thousands of athletes. the in the football yesterday. u nless football yesterday. unless you support manchester city? i don't. premier league leaders manchester city continued their free—scoring form yesterday, running riot against crystal palace in a 5—0 win. palace, meanwhile are now the first team in english football league history to lose their opening six games without scoring a goal. city are being chased by manchester united, chelsea, liverpool and spurs who all won yesterday. ben croucher rounds up the best of the action.
8:34 am
if you're on the hunt for a premier league goal, a map for manchester is a good guide. cityjust can't stop scoring. after six at watford last weekend, just the five this time against crystal palace who themselves just can't score. the 5—0 thrashing takes city top on goal difference. as easy as it gets for the blue half of manchester, the red half, playing in black, found life tougher at southampton. but when united need goals these days they give the ball to lukaku and let him do the rest. 1—0 it finished. the only place united have dropped points this season was at stoke. caution for champions chelsea. that caution was propelled against the potteries' wind in a week where costa's move away from the club was agreed. his replacement ensured he'd barely be missed. alvaro morata with a hat—trick in a a—0 win. everton's millions haven't bought the same success, three straight defeats and soon trailing to struggling bournemouth. the toffees coming unstuck again?
8:35 am
not if niasse could help it. sent from the bench he equalised and then went one better. commentator: was it over the line? it is now. no doubt about it. niasse has turned this game on its head. totally different world after winning. i think you have always some key moments during the season. today was really a big win. that will give everybody a boost. but what we need at the time. neighbours liverpool won by the old goal in five at leicester. masters of the set—piece. coutinho showing how it should be done. jamie vardy how it shouldn't! and where one england striker struggled, another continues to flourish. harry kane found the net twice as ten—man tottenham won 3—2 at west ham. celtic extended their unbeaten run
8:36 am
in the scottish premiership to 57 games after a 2—0 win over rangers in the old firm derby. a 2—1win over hamilton saw stjohnstone move up to second place on goals scored, at least until lunchtime when aberdeen take on motherwell. saints came from behind with murray davidson securing the winner. elsewhere, kilmarnock and aberdeen drew 1—1, hibs won away at ross county, patrick and hearts drew 1—all.... hughie fury — cousin of tyson fury — has failed in his bid to take the wbo heavyweight title from new zealand'sjoseph parker. a points decision saw parker come out on top at manchester arena. the venue was hosting a sporting event for the first time since reopening after the terror attack in may. new castle narrowly beat them 30—2.
8:37 am
and billy vunipola will have an anxious wait to find out whether he'll be able make england's autumn internationals, after he injured his knee during saracens win over sale. it was only his second match back after shoulder surgery that saw him miss the british and irish lions tour to new zealand. there was drama in yesterday's pro1a — cardiff snatched their first win of the campaign, thanks to a last—minute try against connacht in galway. elsewhere, scarlets beat edinburgh 28—8. wigan warriors outside chance of defending their superleague title is officially over, after defeat in their final game of season. they were comprehensively beaten 32—0 by wakefield, shipping five tries in the process. meanwhile, widnes secured their place in superleague next year with a 12—10 victory over catalans dragons. england's paul casey boosted his hopes of winning the fedex cup and a £7.amillion
8:38 am
bonus by moving into the lead in the season—ending tour championship in atlanta. casey shot a five—under—par to move to 12 under going in to today's final round — two shots ahead of americans kevin kisner and xander chauffeur—lee. if he wins the tournament, casey could take the fedex title depending on where higher—ranked players finish. that is all the sport for today. not quite. a story you've been covering. we're taking a closer look at it. nfl story. us president donald trump is facing growing condemnation from the sports world after his criticism of nfl players. on friday, he said the national football league should fire players who protest during the us anthem. there's been a backlash from a number of high—profile players, including basketball star lebron james who openly criticised the president. this guy that we've put in charge
8:39 am
has tried to divide us once again. 0bviously, has tried to divide us once again. obviously, we all know what happened with char lots very and the divide that caused. —— charlottesvill architis. it's hit home more for me because he's using sports as the platform to try to divide us. we all know how much sport brings us together. how much passion it has. how much we love and care. the friendships and everything that it creates. for him to try to use this platform to divide us even more is not something i can stand for. it is not something i can stand for. it is not something i can stand for. it is not something i can be quiet about. lebronjames not something i can be quiet about. lebron james one of not something i can be quiet about. lebronjames one of the biggest sports stars in the us. donald trumps comments follow a string of protests over race relations, started by nfl player, colin kaepernick last year. avenues a9ers quarterback which involved a number of players refusing to stand for the national
8:40 am
them. an nfl commissioner roger good all said divisive comments show a lack of respect. the players association said the president's cross add line. support seemingly united that the president has got to hopelessly wrong? yeah. i think that's a huge development. the nfl, particularly the owners, have been pretty quiet on this issue that's been rumbling on this issue that's been rumbling on for 12 months. i think they'd rather stay out of it. they had a year last year where their own ratings were declining. there are certain segments of society believe thatis certain segments of society believe that is because of protests. they've been really quiet on it. all donald trump seems to have done is move the narrative such that they've felt the need to speak out in support of their players. that is a hugely significant step in there, one that could move the needle on the whole
8:41 am
debate. last night, the oak land athletics, in major league baseball kneeled. there's a game in wembley. if they start taking the knee in that game and others in the united states, this will become a really big issue? i think it will be one of the most significant days in recent nfl history. we've 28 of 32 teams playing today. what we saw last year is that initial sport and then —— support and then the story moved on to where it wasn't so much in the public eye. it is firmly in the public eye. it is firmly in the public eye. it is firmly in the public eye today. the press haven't yet had the chance to speak to nfl players since the comments. a lot of nfl players came 0'0ut on social media saying they would be protesting today. one of elements, there's been an example of a low—key white player who's nield. i think what this story needs in terms to
8:42 am
pushit what this story needs in terms to push it on is maybe do we see a really preeminent white player do it? there's a seattle seahawks player michael bennett who called for that a couple of weeks ago. it will be fascinating to see if that happens and equally fascinating to see what players say after the game when the media get the chance to speak to them. if you look on social media, the hashtag take a knee, has gone viral. white stars too encourage to take a knee today. all started because stefan curry who place for the golden state warriors said he didn't feel comfortable going to the white house because of black lives matter protests and police injustice against minorities. 0nce police injustice against minorities. once he was uninvited by the president he gave this response. the way he takes his opportunity to bash these people, these athletes and almost try to threaten them in a
8:43 am
certain way with theirjob security, is crazy. at the end of the day, i commend and applaud everybody that's spoken up. it's what we're supposed to it. supposed to continue this conversation and hopefully promote change. everybody‘s doing it in their own way. i wasjust saying earlier, one of the slightly uncomfortable issues about this is all the nfl and nba players are black, all the owners of these clu bs, m ost black, all the owners of these clubs, most of them, are white. the president is saying you should thank your lucky stars you're getting paid. it is quite per nicks what he's insin waiting there? it is. one of the big elements to this storyline is capper nick who started this was an nfl quarterback about five seconds from winning the super bowl for the san francisco a9ers. i
8:44 am
i don't think anyone believes he's not in the nfl because he's not talented enough. quarterbacks are really difficult to find. the fact he hasn't been signed by a team, the pervading wisdom is that is because of this protest. what's interesting overnight, we've seen a love the nfl tea m overnight, we've seen a love the nfl team owners come out and criticise president trump and address these comments. why i think today's so significant, if you're an nfl player who's not secure on the rostrum, i've seen what happened to colin, maybe i don't want to stan stand up for this, i have a family to feed, i need to keep myjob, you may not have protested. with what most or a vast majority of nfl owners have said, ithink vast majority of nfl owners have said, i think players will feel enabled to protest more. i think the next few hours will be really fascinating in this story. we'll keep our eye on the nfl games this afternoon. strong position for a
8:45 am
president to preach that you have a right to carry a gun but you don't have an opportunity to kneel, if you wa nt have an opportunity to kneel, if you want to, fora have an opportunity to kneel, if you want to, for a protest. whatever your thoughts on after nearly a00 years, a lost masterpiece worth tens of millions of pounds has been found hidden in plain sight — hanging in a historic country house in glasgow. it had been thought the painting was a copy of work by the baroque artist, sir peter paul rubens. but an extensive restoration project for bbc four‘s britain's lost masterpieces series has revealed it to be an original. the art restorer, simon gillespie, undertook that painstaking work and hejoins us now. your right good morning. good morning. it was painstaking. that was going to be my first question. reading about the technicalities of how you actually age or determine the age of a piece of art, how did you do that and how long did it
8:46 am
take? it took a long time and a lot of investigation as well. i have a very good team behind me who are all scientists. they can take little bits of paint and look at them under mike scopes and see the deliver layers. to determine what is real and not real. like rings of wood? that's one part. the rings from a tree. it is like dating wood. you look at the end of the grain of the planks this thing is painted on. it is like looking at a fingerprint. some years would have been very dry. three dry years in a row, three wet yea rs three dry years in a row, three wet years ina three dry years in a row, three wet years in a row. therefore you'd have fat rings, thin rings. we've got a database going fat rings, thin rings. we've got a data base going back fat rings, thin rings. we've got a database going back 3,000 years which shows all of those rings. you canjust which shows all of those rings. you can just run your information from that plank you have in front of you along that likes a ruler until it sudden matches where it comes from. from what date it comes from. you can see the wood will come from
8:47 am
different parts of europe. different parts of the world. the man in that portrait is the duke of buckingham. what was news to me, he was it says here, the lover to james i in england? which is probably the reason he rose like a shooting star ina very reason he rose like a shooting star in a very short time from really nobody to dancing in front of the king showing his legs and doing incredibly well after that within four or five years i incredibly well after that within four orfive years i became incredibly well after that within four or five years i became a incredibly well after that within four orfive years i became a duke. and into the peerage. 0ne four orfive years i became a duke. and into the peerage. one of the most powerful men in the world. and into the peerage. one of the most powerful men in the worldm caused a lot of controversy in court as well. the king referred to him as his husband? oh, yeah. there are some wonderful sweet letters between the two of them. he, the duke, was quite a manipulative politician. because he became the chief cup bearer within six months of meeting the king, that gave him the position of being able to speak president
8:48 am
king which not a lot of people did. that led with lots of people coming to him to say well, would you like to him to say well, would you like to talk to the king about this and that, took all the bribes that went with it. became very wealthy. this isa with it. became very wealthy. this is a clip from the programme. talking about some of the restoration process. the one area of the picture not working is the junction between his hair and the background. i'm guessing that's to do with the overpaint which is cloaking the whole of this background? i'm pretty confident we should be able to get it. we've some very nice parts of original grey. yes. that's the only thing that ales holding us back. if you can fix that, we're really motoring. we are the first people to really appreciate this for centuries. a very proving privilege to see this. how does a man who was working for the catholic church and painting these baroque images for the catholic church which were very different to that kind of portrait
8:49 am
painting, how does he come to be in britain painting that?” painting, how does he come to be in britain painting that? i think this was painted when the duke of buckingham was travelling on the continent. rubens did come to england. he must have known about him and how he was rising through the ranges. and vice versa. the duke would have wanted to know anyone who was influential. rubens was also an international diplomat in spain and england. knew all the right people. he was half a generation older than him. watching the painting, it looking quite dirty, i would be petrified to try to touch it. the thought of cleaning a painting. how long does it take? i've learnt to control the shake on my hand. indeed. it takes a lot of investigation, as i said. we go through the process of looking from simple things, ultra violet light to see what is added later on.
8:50 am
normally, you can see later overpaint. we go through infrared light. we can see drawings underneath the painting. then you can see through x—ray damage and changes in the painting. there were changes in the painting. there were changes on this painting which made it look like an argle painting from an artist which hadn't been just copied from another one. there is a copy of this thought to be the original one but this is now superseded that. the other has been demoted. i'm going to get into trouble trouble. what was it worth when it wasn't a rubens and what is it now? i'd put a value of about £8 million on it. i'm so pleased you we re million on it. i'm so pleased you were so careful when you were cleaning it. simon, fascinating talking to you. thank you for joining us. britain's lost masterpieces will be on bbc four on wednesday, at 9pm. we're going to sigh goodbye to you.
8:51 am
i'll be with you here until 9.00. here's helen with this morning's weather. hurricane maria moving away from the turks and kay cos. up until yesterday, we thought it would steer clear of the american coastline. it will but we think it will come closer to the caroline in as and east coast than we thought. you saw fine weather across the midlands. in cornwall, that was taken a few hours ago. that's because we've this weather front edging its way in. u nfortu nate willy weather front edging its way in. unfortunate willy the sunshine will #2ki78 innish over western side of england and wales and scotland. possibly hanging on around the moray firth. perhaps as much as an inch of rain. the eastern side of northern ireland wet. the low cloud will
8:52 am
shroud the hills of wales and the south—west. not a day for hill walking. it will be poor visibility over the hills. across central and eastern parts and northern england we should hold on to the brightness and sun shy. it will feel warmer. southerly winds after all. the winds fall light overnight. the rain peps up fall light overnight. the rain peps up across central and eastern areas. anywhere could see rain this evening and overnight. for the bulk of us, a mild and murky night. the exception to the rule northern ireland. possibly wales and the south—west. it will turn chilly in the countryside but becoming foggy. at this time of year with less energy in the sunshine fog linking through the rush hour. dense fog possibly in northern ireland and western wales. those areas which see sunshine in the east, different tomorrow, it will be rather grey at times with damp and dreary weather. further
8:53 am
west, where we're seeing cloud and patchy rain, once the fog clears, it will take a time, not feeling as warm, it should be a fairly pleasant day. fog will be annish ewe for the next couple of mornings. we'll keep you updated. the rain this afternoon could be quite heavy and nasty across parts of scotland. if you have plans stay toot. have a good day, goodbye. we'll take a trip down memory lane now. helen, enjoy the rest of your weekend. back to school and a time when the class gathered around that little magic pencil where the light used to trace the words. the first of this afternoon's programmes for schools and colleges, words and pictures, follows in one minute. music
8:54 am
do an "e" and carry on. come back round and now it's done. watch... right, wordwatchers, you keep a good lookout for all the words ending in "ight". you may have noticed i'm wearing a belt. it's the bottom half of an old sam brown. # row, row, row your boat # gently down the stream # merrily, merrily, merrily # life is but a dream.# we're joined now by charles collingwood — who was the voice of ‘wordy‘ in look
8:55 am
and read and the executive producer of bbc teach, andrew tomlinson. welcome to you both. two people from different ends of this story. you can tell by the look of us! you haven't aged a day! charles, tell us how you got involved to become wordy?” charles, tell us how you got involved to become wordy? i i got involved to become wordy? i i got involved because look and read was a new idea. the concept of this little creature bouncing around teaching people how to spell an things like that. they asked me, i was involved in schools television as an actor and presenter. they said, can you think of a funny voice and i did. that stuck. fortunately made me an awful lot of money over 20 years. lot of children with this character, what was wordy telling you? wordy
8:56 am
was following on from the film, the story. we were helping people to sound out they were helping in the spelling of that word. it is quite different what children are being shown in schools now. there's still the demand for it? there are still some things in common. there's a huge demand from teachers and pa rents for huge demand from teachers and parents for this kind of content. but also the tech kneeings used are not that different in some senses. we still like to use really high profile bbc talent like charles here. you haven't filmed me recently. you're too busy with the archers. of course i am. we like to use cutting edge techniques, drama and factual techniques. and it's shorter? why? on average three—and—a—half minutes, three minutes we want to get the teacher and class talking and thinking about
8:57 am
the issues. learning some of the basics in the curriculum and carry the lesson on. we don't want to take the lesson on. we don't want to take the place of the teacher. when things are online and you can find them more easily, it's easy to find three or four minute films than it was in the old days when you waited for your 20—minute was in the old days when you waited for your 20— minute slot to was in the old days when you waited for your 20—minute slot to come into schedules and somebody wheeled in the telly on a trolly and waited for the telly on a trolly and waited for the programme to start. the issues being tackled, charles, you'll remember things, how to pronounce words. how to use words. mental healthish use are being discussed now. other social issues that weren't touched upon. certainly not in look and read. issues at the time we re in look and read. issues at the time were talked about of then but not that. there's a new popular series about children's mental health aimed at primary school children. we use
8:58 am
children who've had those issues, ocd, children who've had those issues, 0cd, depression, to talk about those issues themselves. their voices are on those films. they are an mission but it is modern animation as well. that's worked really well for primary schools and for slightly older children as well. andrew tomlinson, charles collingwood, great voice of scop wordy. fancy saying goodbye for us. goodbye, goodbye. that's all from break foss for this morning. do enjoy your weekend, bye—bye. this is bbc news.
8:59 am
i'm ben brown, the headlines at 9am. the labour party conference opens in brighton later asjeremy corbyn comes under pressure to keep britain in the single market and customs union after brexit. in the single market and customs voting has opened in germany's federal elections, with chancellor angela merkel expected to retain power. donald trump face a growing backlash from us sports stars after his criticism of players who've been protesting over race relations. he is now using sports as the platform to divide us. we all know how much sport brings us together. we all know how much sport brings us together. six people are been injured in a suspected acid attack at a shopping centre in east london. also in the next hour prince harry opens this year's invictus games for wounded service personnel in canada.
9:00 am

14 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on