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tv   Dateline London  BBC News  September 24, 2017 11:30am-12:01pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news with me, ben brown. the headlines: the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, resists calls from within his own party to commit to keeping britain in the european single market and customs union indefinitely after brexit. the important priority is to assure we have a tariff free access with the single market. half of our trade is with europe. i would also say we need to look very carefully at the terms of any trade relationship. people in germany are voting in a general election which is expected to give angela merkel a fourth term as chancellor. donald trump faces a growing backlash from us sports stars after his criticism of players who've been protesting over race relations. six people have been injured in a suspected acid attack in a shopping centre in east london. more now on the increasing tensions
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between north korea and the united states. president trump has warned north korea's leaders might not be around much longer. that follows a speech at the united nations in which north korea's foreign minister called him mentally derange. earlier, us warplanes flow close to north korea's coach in what the pentagon said was a demonstration of america's military options. our correspondent danny savage is monitoring developments from the south korean capital seoul. he told me earlier that the government there want an easing of tensions between north korea and the united states. what we have been waiting for is the official response from the united nations which we have just heard, of north korea accusing donald trump of being the one on the suicide missions. speaking of missions, overnight last night, i think it is quite significant that the american
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air force flew further north than they ever had in this region, into they ever had in this region, into the airspace of north korea, with a couple of bombers and fighters as well. that was a military mission andi well. that was a military mission and i think that is significant because in the past we have seen b—i bs and f—i fighters pictured over south korea, as a show of force in daylight as a photo opportunity to get the point across. last night they went further north to have a look around. again, it raises the sta kes, look around. again, it raises the stakes, what if north korea launched some interceptors and there was some kind of confrontation in the skies between the two air forces? what would happen then, what would be the scenario? but the thoughts here from the south korean government is they wa nt the south korean government is they want some breathing space, and they wa nt wantan want an easing of tensions. the only
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ways the tensions will be used is if the two main players, donald trump and kim jong the two main players, donald trump and kimjong un and back of the two main players, donald trump and kim jong un and back of the rhetoric. the stand-off has been going on for years but what is new is how personal some of the abuse is, talking about donald trump being mentally derange, for example? yes, for yea rs mentally derange, for example? yes, for years the north koreans have been very noisy with their rhetoric and the criticism of the united states and in flaming feelings at home in north korea of america being their greatest enemy and the great satan, if you like. what we now have is what is different now is donald trump has risen to the bait. past us presidents have never used this sort of language. he has used diplomatic channels and not risen to the criticism or fired verbally back. donald trump is and it is not really helping many people would say. him doing this is pushing the temperature up on this whole episode andi temperature up on this whole episode and i think many people are just wishing that he would stop tweeting all these strong words, stop using
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such strong words and perhaps take a step back and go back to the diplomatic channels and people talking behind the scenes and trying to get things a bit more calm. danny savage, our correspondent in seoul, the south korean capital. six men have been injured in a suspected acid attack in east london. police were called to a shopping centre near westfield in stratford last night, following reports a group of men were spraying a noxious substance. a 15 year—old—boy has been arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm. simon clemison has the details. last night's attack was in stratford in east london, but it is now one among many. police say during an argument between two groups at the stratford shopping centre, what they call a noxious substance was thrown. medics arrived and the injured were treated at the scene. a witness said one man run into a nearby restaurant toilet to try to wash acid from his face. six people were hurt with three having to be taken to hospital. no one is believed to be in a life threatening condition, but it has left some of those living here shaken. i think it's scary and disgusting
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and it's horrible that people can't walk and be safe anymore. now that happened i'm concerned because i live here, i work here, i'm here most of the time. so i'm a bit concerned. there had been an initial suggestion that the attacks were random, but officers say the incident was confined to the two groups. the teenager arrested is 15 and is being held on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm. we are going to be back at the labour party conference in brighton very soon. we are expecting a speech from diane abbott the shadow home secretary in the next few minutes. we will be bringing that live. it will be interesting to see what she has to say about immigration, free movement of people, also police
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budgets and the controversial prevent anti—terror strategy. that is the scene at the labour party conference. it is running a little late at the moment but we will be back there when diane abbott takes to the stage. in the meantime, let's bring some other stories. almost a century ago, a group of working—class people began an art clu b working—class people began an art club in london's east end. they ca ptu red club in london's east end. they captured their lives in paint. despite their early success, much of the artwork has not been seen by the public for decades but as nick higham has found out, it is now being rediscovered and put on show. an east london canal, an unlikely scene for a painting. the artist is equally unlikely, he was a clerk for a shipping firm. this was painted by a shipping firm. this was painted by a window cleaner. this is read
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street scene by an errand boy. this was the work of a printer. the man who painted this was unemployed and a basket maker painted this view from his back window. they were known as the east london grip. today, these working—class painters of london's shabby, industrial east end i largely forgotten. this exhibition at southampton city art gallery aims to revive their reputation, a band of artists who saw the extraordinary in every day. there are views and images that most artists might not choose to paint, but because they saw beauty in what they knew, that is what they painted. they painted around the mile end and bow road generally but their work ended up on sale in the west end, it is in virtually the most prestigious gallery of the time. today, the east london they painted is unrecognisable. this
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railway bridge is still there but the traffic is modern. grace moss croft painted these houses across the road from the shop where she worked. they are still there, but only just. the painting worked. they are still there, but onlyjust. the painting show a world which has largely vanished. the scenes they painted have long since been destroyed by wartime bombing or post—war redevelopment. albert turpin was a wartime auxiliary fireman. in peace time he was a window cleaner and another member of the group, as well as a firebrand socialist and post—war mayor of bethnal green. an exhibition devoted to his work opens later this week. the curator says the east london group deliberately chose unfashionable subjects. why would you paint shabbiness, why would you paint places people deliberately wa nted paint places people deliberately wanted to get out of because they are slums?
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it is perverse but also very interesting and wonderful. turpin's daughter recalls a man who was forever sketching. but much of his work, especially that from the 1930s and 40s has vanished. when he died, there was some stored in a shed in there was some stored in a shed in the factory where he worked in bethnal green. i am afraid, like lots of people do, my mum decided she wanted to clear it out, and so they got thrown away. but many more east london group paintings have disappeared. more than 700 were exhibited in the 1930s. today, just over 100 are known. the rest, perhaps on walls and in attics up and down the country await rediscovery. now, he is arguably the nation's favourite bear, but aa milne created winnie the pooh forjust one boy, christopher robinson. the story will
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be shown in a film, the time when the inspiration, a real—life black bear from canada could the inspiration, a real—life black bearfrom canada could be seen and even fed. i would like it if you could read a book to me. millions of fans worldwide may not know that the winnie the pooh books only came about by chance. the little boy loved bears said his father created the stories. the world fell in love with them. in the 1920s, as everyone took stock of the first world war, the tale of winnie and his companions did a lot to heal wounds. he was a very respected writer of punch magazine and he was respected in the world end. winnie the pooh overtook his life. alan milne
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suffered trauma in the trenches that he and his son found solace at london zoo and that is where they met the real winnie, and extremely tame black bear, pictured here with the young christopher robin.|j tame black bear, pictured here with the young christopher robin. i will have to go for the little one, it has to be piglet. i think the timeless stories appeal to both children and adults. they are beautiful and simple and quite profound in that very simplistic way. it was also a safe place. that is what it became for alan and also for christopher robin. it was a very damaged and traumatising time. the world has not got any better in the meantime. i still think this is a safe place and that is a beautiful thing. back in the 1920s, christopher robin became something ofa christopher robin became something of a celebrity. almost a century later, he and his companions are
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still captivating audiences. let's ta ke still captivating audiences. let's take you back to the labour party conference in london. we are waiting for diane abbott to make a speech shortly. this is the scene there. delegates have been coming up to the podium one by one to make their points. 0verall, as we have been hearing from our assistant political editor norman smith in brighton, it is a significant conference forjeremy corbyn but he is resisting pressure from some labour mps to is resisting pressure from some labourmps to commit is resisting pressure from some labour mps to commit labour to keeping the uk in the eu single market and the customs union after brexit. it is said in the papers that around 30 senior mps in the party have written an open letter, calling for labour to do whatever it ta kes to calling for labour to do whatever it takes to keep britain in the single market and indeed the customs union. we will hear from diane abbott, expected to talk about the extent to which there can still be free
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movement of people after brexit and immigration, and also to talk about police budgets and perhaps the government's prevent anti—terror strategy as well. diane abbott is a lwa ys strategy as well. diane abbott is always a controversial figure. strategy as well. diane abbott is always a controversialfigure. we will listen to her speech at the labour conference in the next few minutes. it has all been a bit delayed as norman smith can tell us as he is there now. things are not running entirely to schedule, norman? no, they always get delayed. but i think a lot of the focus of this conference will inevitably be on the single market issue, brexit, whether mr corbyn does give ground on the issue. he has already accepted staying in a phase. now he is under pressure to commit
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permanently. 0ne is under pressure to commit permanently. one of those putting pressure on him is the mp ben bradshaw. why do you want to do that? for economic reasons. the economic impact will be so disastrous for public services, for the financial situation as a country, that it is the only sensible thing. with the tories now in chaos, having moved into our position which has moved itself back in august, i think delegates and labour party members will expect clear red water between us and the conservatives on the single biggest issue facing the country. let me put you whatjeremy corbyn said on the andrew marr show, he said i will not be able to put money into the steel industry, there is a problem with privatisation, i could renationalise the railways, if we stay in the single market, i could not pursue my agenda? that is not true. germany has a wonderfully state—owned
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railway system. there is no reason why staying in the single market should not allow us to pursue that programme. i was very encouraged by what jeremy programme. i was very encouraged by whatjeremy said programme. i was very encouraged by what jeremy said when he programme. i was very encouraged by whatjeremy said when he said he would listen to labour party members and vote as the overwhelming majority of whom want britain to stay in the single market, they want us stay in the single market, they want us to rescue britain from this disastrous conservative hard brexit and the chaos that the government is about to plunge it into. len mccluskey, a key ally ofjeremy corbyn, he said if we stay in the single market, that is basically almost putting two fingers up to all those people who voted to leave the eu, because you stay in the single market, that is staying in the eu. identical re—with that. len is making the same mistake that theresa may makes when she seems that people we re may makes when she seems that people were voting to leave the single market. they were voting to leave the european union, albeit sold on a completely false premise, but there is no reason why we should not be able to stay in the single market and implement it in a different way than we do now which i think would
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meet some of the concerns of the public about how free movement operates. what will happen at this conference? we know there are a0 motions which have been put down from constituency saying we want to have a debate about brexit and the single market, many saying stay in the single market. is there a realistic possibility that by the end of this conference, labour party policy could be continued membership of the single market?|j policy could be continued membership of the single market? i hope so and within a matter of weeks and months. it is the only place we could sensibly be if we want to save the economy, and austerity and pursue the sort of vision for britain that jeremy corbyn says he wants. what do you say to the mps often those representing traditional labour seats when there was a big brexit vote and people very concerned about immigration and freedom of movement, they are concerned we have to stay in the single market that still stick with freedom of movement? only
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seven mps rebelled against the labourmp when we seven mps rebelled against the labour mp when we had a vote on this, far fewer rebels earlier in the year of article 50 in the single market. i think the labour party is extremely united around our current position. i think labour members and the public would not understand if we didn't have a debate here at our democratic conference where members are supposed to have a voice on the single biggest issue facing our country. i think we have to have that debate and i think we have to be ina that debate and i think we have to be in a place where the british public and labour members and supporters want us to be. when your colleague chuka umunna put down a motion in the house of commons to save sisley this, stay in the single market, not only did jeremy corbyn say don't do that, he sacked some of his frontbenchers. that suggests me mr corbyn is not in a place to move on this. i could say since then jeremy himself has moved his position. to be honest, i did not think he would. i'm delighted jeremy
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and the leadership have moved its position where i was a few months ago. i think we need to move further for the sake of ourjobs, for the sake of labour standards, for the sake of labour standards, for the sake of labour standards, for the sake of our economy and basically the tory government is in total chaos over brexit. it is really doing damage to this country. if we are a party of government we have to have a responsible position the british people can support. if you were to win the argument and labour would back the single market, are you suggesting labour should become the pro—eu party? suggesting labour should become the pro-eu party? we are already more pro—eu than the conservatives? there are many other governments and countries in europe who want to reform the way free movement works. you are seeing the development of an inner core you are seeing the development of an innercore in you are seeing the development of an inner core in the european union and an out—of—court which i think we would be perfectly comfortable being pa rt would be perfectly comfortable being part of. we have had this referendum at the wrong time, taking us out in at the wrong time, taking us out in a chaotic way which is destroying
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our economy, destroying i°b5 a chaotic way which is destroying our economy, destroying jobs and it is the labour party's responsibility to stop that and find a way that the public can come behind, the labour party ca n public can come behind, the labour party can come behind, and we can rescue britain from the disaster of the conservative's hard brexit. to go down this road you have to defeat the government. at the moment you do not have the numbers. if the labour party mr corbyn put down a motion saying to stay in the single market, you will never get conservative mps to back mr corbyn. how'd you unlock the arithmetic on this? that is an issue for them. a good number of conservative mps want to stay in the single market. ithink conservative mps want to stay in the single market. i think the government will back down on some of the amendments in this bill. i think we will have victories over the government but more critical of that is the inability of the cabinet, not just the government, but this conservative cabinet to agree a position on brexit. how on earth are
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our european partners going to be able to negotiate on this with so little time when our own cabinet is at war with itself? it isjust impossible. what is your end destination? we know the government have left it open in terms of a bespoke deal but what is your end destination? your thoughts, we go back to where we were or nick clegg was suggesting this morning, some sort of outer circle, associate membership? that is happening anyway. if you listen to the debates going on all around europe, there is a logic to the inner core of euro countries becoming much more integrated in terms of their economies and economic policies and an outer core of non—euro countries which britain in normal times would be part of, forming an out—of—court both with free trade, the single market, the customs union operating and with a say. that would be the ideal situation. it would be much more sensible to work our way towards that, rather than leave,
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that, ratherthan leave, do that, rather than leave, do all the damage which it is already doing to our economy and then in the future come back in again? i put it to you that that is the worst of all worlds? if we are in the outer circle we have no say, we do not have a seat at the table and we have to keep paying them, we are dragged along with no control of our destiny and we cannot strike trade deals that we would be liberated to do if we left? i don't suggest that. you suggest sweden and the eastern european countries who would never join the euro, would somehow be second—class members. i did believe they would find that acceptable. we would not find that acceptable as well. we would have mutual respect and we would be part of the decision—making process, or we just would not be in the euro. i think thatis would not be in the euro. i think that is a vision most of the british
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public would buy up to. your stance on europe has for a long time been known, isn't the problem on shifting jeremy corbyn on this, as soon as you articulate the idea, it is seen almost as an attack onjeremy corbyn, and doesn't it have to be mr corbyn's own supporters, the young energetic supporters he has galvanised, they are the ones who will have to change his mind, and not with respect people like you? and i think people are. it is not just me, we have the labour campaign for the single market which is across the spectrum of the labour party. trade unions on left and right, businesses, ordinary party members and the vast majority of labour party voters support us. if this is an area where jeremy is serious about listening to labour vote rs serious about listening to labour voters we do need to move in the interest, notjust in the labour party but any interests of britain. a brief one if i may, come at the election, will be labour party ma nifesto election, will be labour party manifesto contain a commitment to
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remain in the single market? that is difficult to say, when will the next election be? will it be spring? would it be christmas? things can change very quickly indeed. we need to be ready with a coherent, attractive and clear position to put to the writ issued people. ben bradshaw, that is a interesting view. thank you. mr corbyn dominates his party now in terms of political thinking and organisation, but on brexit, as across the political divide, there are profound divisions in this party about the approach and that seems to be crystallising around the issue of the single market. norman, a brief word about the conservatives, we have so often at the beginning of the labour party conference, we have been talking about blood on the carpet, civil war
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in the labour party, but today, or the headlines and front pages are about civil war in the tory party over europe? guess, and that figure borisjohnson is the figure at the centre of that brum —— brexit turmoil. mrs may has suggested there are more rules and regulations that we have to take during the transitional period. and suggestions in some of the papers that mr johnson is claiming victory for insisting that the transitional period is restricted to two years. tea m period is restricted to two years. team boris are not denying that he does not want britain to take any more rules and regulations from brussels. they are not denying as well but he insisted on a two—year time frame. however, theresa may did not commit to a two—year time frame. when you look at her words she said it should be roughly two years but she
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said it will take as long as is necessary. that is seen by some on the former remain wing of the party that if things get tricky it could ta ke that if things get tricky it could take longer than two years. the two—year idea has been floated but mrs may has not altered it down. it gives a sense of the huge argument crashing around the cabinet with the whole issue of brexit and how britain leads the eu. norman, many thanks, we will be back with you. diane abbott, the shadow home secretary is expected to speak at the labour party conference very soon so we the labour party conference very soon so we will be back with norman soon. soon so we will be back with norman soon. it looks sunny in brighton. let's get a forecast for the whole country with helen willits. hello. we do have southerly winds and more cloud but temperatures will be above average for the most part. temperatures were three to a degrees
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above average yesterday and it will, if anything, be warmer today. we have seen the cloud piling in. the weather front is bringing have seen the cloud piling in. the weatherfront is bringing rain already across the west. we will see it prepping up as we go through the afternoon. we have had some sunshine ahead of it in the midlands. we hang on the sunshine in the midlands and east anglia and scotland. the rain could be really heavy across scotland. it is likely to be 30 or a0 minute meters across the hills. even by the central lowlands we could have 20 million litres of rain, notfar could have 20 million litres of rain, not far short of an inch. some rain, not far short of an inch. some rain is possible for east belfast —— eastern northern ireland. there will
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be more than patchy rain through this evening and overnight. it peps up this evening and overnight. it peps up across this evening and overnight. it peps up across central and southern areas. there could be a soaking for the gardens here. it could be relatively mild. further west, while the towns and cities will stay in double figures, it could be chilly in the countryside. it could be foggy on monday morning. fog a real issue for northern ireland. some dense fog lasting across the rush hour. 0nce dense fog lasting across the rush hour. once the fog patches clear it could be a decent day. there should not be a lot of rain left on the weather front in the afternoon. temperatures are little lower but still above average. so that is the main bulk of the first part of the week, that rain band edging its way eastwards. it will be more autumnal later in the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 12:00pm. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, resists calls from within his own party to commit to keeping britain in the european single market and customs union indefinitely after brexit. the important priority is to ensure we have tariff free trade access to the european union. i would also say that we need to look very closely at the terms of any trade relationship. voting has opened in germany's federal elections, with chancellor angela merkel expected to retain power. donald trump faces a growing backlash from us sports stars after his criticism of players who've been protesting over race relations. and prince harry opens this year's invictus games in toronto.
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