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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 24, 2017 10:00pm-11:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: angela merkel has won a fourth term as chancellor of germany but her party's share of the vote has fallen sharply. now she needs coalition partners. translation: we now have a mandate to assume responsibility, and we're going to do that calmly, and hold talks with our partners. the hard—right afd movement had a successful night, entering the federal parliament for the first time in more than half a century. jeremy corbyn resists calls from labour members to remain in the eu single market after brexit, saying it could make it harder to protect british workers and invest in industry. the important priority is to ensure that we have a tariff free trade access to the european market. half of all our trade is with europe. i would also say that we need to look very carefully at the terms of any trade relationship. american football stars kneel
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during their national anthem, protesting against racism in the us. donald trump says they're unpatriotic. and an exhilirating 53—ball century from moeen ali inspires england's cricketers to a comfortable win over west indies in the third one—day international in bristol. good evening and welcome to bbc news. exit polls in germany suggest angela merkel‘s party will once again be the largest in parliament after nationwide elections. that means she looks set for a fourth term as chancellor. her christian democrats came out ahead of the second—placed social democratic party,
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but with a significantly reduced level of support. perhaps the shock of the day was the success of alternative for germany, now on course to become the first far—right movement to enter the bundestag, since the second world war. our berlin correspondent jenny hill is in the german capital for us tonight. angela merkel knew she'd win this election, but it's not the victory she'd hoped for. exit polls suggest support for her party is now lower than it's ever been under her leadership. a verdict perhaps on her decision to open germany's doors to hundreds of thousands of refugees. translation: let's not beat about the bush. of course we'd hoped for a better result, but let's not forget we've just had a very challenging four years. that's why i'm happy to say we achieved the strategic goal of our campaign. we are the strongest party. for mrs merkel, a well—trodden path. arriving to vote
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with her husband today. not so much a victory march, just the quiet confidence of a woman who's done 12 years in the job. even so, they still checked her id. just in case. mrs merkel casts herself as a symbol of stability, security in a shifting world. for many a vote for angela merkel is a vote for the status quo. her campaign has focused on herfamiliarity, her experience, and yet, it seems, that alone is no longer enough. because this is today's real success story. afd, anti—islam, anti—immigrant, anti—euro, is now part of the german establishment. what is the political norm elsewhere in europe was unthinkable here. not any more. it's a huge success.
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it will change the political system in germany and it gives back the voice to the opposition, which has not taken place in the german parliament in recent years. it's a profound shift in post—war german politics. today, running together in berlin, but in the heart of this country there is division. discontent. translation: they were like the nazis under hitler. i was born in 1939. i am a war child. i grew up in the ruins and now we get this again. they are criminals. i have always voted cdu and i want angela merkel again. translation: it's difficult, there aren't many alternatives to angela merkel. translation: she doesn't do much on her own initiative. she reacts a lot to what others do and that's a kind of stagnation. angela merkel must now find a coalition partner.
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don't expect afd to be included. that the party is in parliament at all horrifies the political mainstream. exhausted, bruised, at the end of a long campaign. angela merkel‘s conservatives may be the winners, but this doesn't feel much like victory. jenny hill, bbc news, berlin. the performance of the right—wing, anti—islam party afd led to dozens of protesters gathered outside their headquarters in berlin. a little earlier, our correspondent damien mcguinnesss gave us this update on those protests. so behind me you can see a row a police. see a row of police. there are quite a few. it goes all the way down street. it goes all the way down the street. there are hundreds of demonstrators, mostly young people. lots of signs, anti—afd signs. now, these demonstrators are calling the afd neo—nazis. they said that this party is a right—wing extremist party. they are here because the afd has just been celebrating what it sees as an electoral victory.
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as you know, they have scored, according to the latest exit polls, more than 13%. they have gone from not being in parliament at all, to becoming the third largest party in parliament. that gives them a lot of seats. that is why these people are angry, because they feel this is a right—wing populist party with views against muslims, against migrants, against minorities of all sorts. and they are not happy about it. i think this protest just goes to show how controversial this party is, this new party, that was only founded a few years ago. it started out as an anti—europe party and, during the migration crisis, when germany saw more than 1.5 million migrants and refugees coming to this country, it morphed into an anti—migrant party. and that is where it sees its success. now, we are going to have to see what the other parties do about it, because this has rocked the german establishment and no other german party leader in the other parties wants to work with this party, because it is seen as so toxic. but still, we have to face it,
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it looks like more than 13% of the population voted for them. so that is the debate that germany is going to have to have now. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has resisted calls from some in the party to pledge to keep britain in the european single market after brexit. with their annual conference beginning in brighton today, 30 labour mps were among those who signed a letter suggesting workers would suffer if market access was restricted. but mr corbyn told the bbc that staying in could hamper a future labour government's ability to protect jobs. there will be no brexit vote during the conference. here's our political correspondent eleanor garnier. you can take your party's conference out of westminster, bring it to the beach—front in brighton, but brexit will follow you everywhere. ok, here we go... he doesn't mind. he's got a spring in his step after a better—than—expected election result. jeremy corbyn is no longer fighting for his leadership,
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but pitching himself as a prime minister in waiting. we need at least two terms of a labour government to start to address issues of poverty and justice and inequality in britain and to build the houses that we need in this country. jeremy corbyn‘s certainly safe in hisjob, but he's dealing with division in his party over brexit. he argues leaving the single market will make it much easier to protect british workers and industry. we need to look very carefully at the terms of any trade relationship, because at the moment we are part of the single market, obviously. that has within it restrictions on state aid and state spending. that has pressures on it through the european union to privatise rail, for example, and other services. i think we have to be quite careful about the powers we need as national governments. but more than a0 senior labour figures are pushing the leader to commit to staying in the single market after the uk leaves the eu. if you want frictionless trade and you want to put jobs first,
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the only way in my view you can do that is by staying permanently a member of the single market. jeremy corbyn‘s position and his policies in the party are now almost unchallenged, but you don't need to come far at this conference to see where division does actually lie. on the crucial issue of brexit. i support corbyn. i support momentum. i want a socialist programme in this country, but you need money for that, and if we leave the single market and the customs union we'll be an impoverished country and we won't have money to maintain things as they are. jeremy corbyn as prime minister would be great, but parties come and go and we need to be in the eu. that's the most important thing. no doubt there's high spirits among party members, but even withjeremy corbyn‘s now tight grip on labour, the biggest issue of the day — the uk's journey out of the eu — will ensure there will be plenty of disagreements too.
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eleanor garnier, bbc news, brighton. well, speaking to us a little earlier, vicki young, our chief political correspondent, said that there is now a clear split within the parliamentary labour party on the issue of brexit. we had 30 of them signing this open letter calling for the party to adopt a policy of staying in the single market even after any kind of transition period. that is not labour party policy at the moment and relief through the gauntlet down to the leadership. listening to jeremy corbyn this morning, maybe it shouldn't be surprising. throughout his career he has been pretty eurosceptic. he will not go as far as saying we should stay in the single market, raising some of the problems he does have with it. this has caused fury among some labour mps. the reaction
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tonight on twitter and fringe meetings and some of them saying exactly that, that this is the biggest issue facing the country. heidi alexander says she is gobsmacked and that they are a laughing stock for not discussing it. chuka umunna says they should not that the debate but lead it and ben bradshaw says it undermines the claim that they are listening to members. in the last couple of minutes there has been an indication from labour sources that there may be something tomorrow. we know kia starmer, the shadow brexit secretary, will make a speech tomorrow. there seems to be a suggestion that could be broader and might bea suggestion that could be broader and might be a vote of some kind. i don't think it will be about many labour mps want about the single market in particular. this is a conundrum not just for the market in particular. this is a conundrum notjust for the tory party, we know they have had their issues with europe over the years and have seen a lot of it over the summer, that labour clearly has an issue as well. the headlines on bbc news: exit polls in germany show angela merkel has been re—elected chancellor for a fourth term. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, resists calls from within his own party to commit to keeping britain
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in the european single market and customs union indefinitely after brexit. nfl players kneel during the american anthem at wembley in defiance of president donald trump. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh ferris. moeen ali scored the second—fastest century in england one—day history to help them take a 2—0 lead in the series against west indies. at one stage, the all rounder took 61 runs from just 14 deliveries as he reached his tonne offjust 53 balls. eventually finishing on 102 as england scored 369 for nine in their 50 overs. chris gayle did his best to chase it down, but fell just six runs short of his own century. then liam plunkett‘s maiden five wicket haul sealed a 124 run victory in bristol. it was a good time to come into
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baton play myself in. i had a bit of a licence to clear the small ropes. did you get that feeling once you hit the ropes a couple of times that the crowd were behind you and you could hit every ball for six? yes, they bowled a lot in that area. it was just one of those days, everything seemed to go for six. brighton won the battle of the promoted sides in the premier league today, beating newcastle 1—0 in front of a record crowd at the amex. the only goal came six minutes into the second half when tomar hemed hooked in his first of the season. newcastle had started the weekend in fourth, but slip down to ninth after their first defeat in four matches, while brighton are up to 13th. sheffield united are up to fourth in the championship after holding off a sheffield wednesday fightback to win the steel city derby for the first time in eight years.
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the blades got off to a terrific start with john fleck‘s free—kick after three minutes and then leon clarke making it 2—0 after quarter of an hour. gary hooper gave the hosts a chance when he scored just before the break. 0wls sub lucasjoao levelled with a composed finish, but mark duffy thundered home before clarke added his second. 11—2 it finished at hillsborough. aberdeen avenged their midweek league cup defeat to motherwell with a 1—0 win against the same opponents in the scottish premiership. andrew considine's scrambled goal secured all three points at fir park. the dons are back up to second in the table and two points behind leaders celtic. defending champions manchester city began their wsl season with a comprehensive win over yeovil town ladies. there were four different scorers in their 4—0 victory. but that wasn't the biggest win of the day. chelsea thrashed bristol city 6—0, with drew spence scoring their opener against the promoted team. maren mjelde also got a couple.
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there were also wins for arsenal and sunderland. england and saracens number eight billy vunipola will miss england's autumn internationals after being ruled out for four months with a knee injury. he limped off in sarries' win over sale yesterday and underwent surgery today. he will miss the tests against argentina, australia and samoa in november, and the first few rounds of his club sides european cup defence. side's european cup defence. there were a couple of games taking place in the premiership today. 0lly woodburn scored two tries as champions exeter claimed a 31—17 bonus point victory over wasps. while northampton made it three successive premiership wins as they eased to a a0 points to 25 victory at london irish. saints had a bonus point wrapped up before the break with mike hayward going over for their fourth try before half time. peter sagan won his third world title in a row in a dramatic finish in the men's road race at the world championships in norway.
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the slovakian sprinter had barely featured among the lead riders throughout the 166 mile race in bergen. he was in 80th place approaching the final climb up salmon hill, but timed his ride to perfection. sagan beat norwegian alexander kristoff byjust a quarter of a wheel to become the first man to win three consecutive world crowns. britain's ben swift finished fifth. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. a reminder that we'll have a full paper review at the later time of 11:30 this evening, but ahead of that, let's take a first look at some of tomorrow morning's front pages. the metro says theresa may is struggling to keep a lid on tensions in her own party over brexit negotiations. the paper says she has a fight on her hands to stay in number ten. the i leads with a story that david davies is ready to mount his bid to become pm if theresa may
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is forced out. the daily telegraph claims borisjohnson is forced out. the daily telegraph claims boris johnson is simple—minded on brexit and also looks at angler merkel‘s record equalling fourth term in power in the general election as the far right returns to the german parliament for the first time since the 60s. a more detailed look at those stories at 11:30pm. donald trump has been denounced by leading figures in the sports world in a controversy over the us national anthem. he says the american football league should fire players who refuse to stand during the national anthem. in a tweet, the president withdrew a white house invitation to a star player of america's basketball champions because he voiced concern at being in the white house with mr trump. now one of america's greatest basketball stars, lebron james, has joined in the criticism of mr
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trump. this guy that we've put in charge has tried to divide us once again. we all know how much sports brings us together, how much passion it has, how much we love and care, and you know, the friendships and everything that it creates, and for him to try to use this platform to divide us even more is not something i can stand for, and is not something i can be quiet about. and last night stevie wonder became the latest high profile figure to defy the president over the "take a knee" protest. tonight, i'm taking a knee for america. the singer was helped down by his son as he kneeled during his performance at the global citizen festival in new york city. an nfl match is currently under way at wembley this afternoon,
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and before the game started a number of players knelt during the national anthem. these fans gave us their thoughts on the protests. anyone who wants to take a knee, take a knee, but at the same time you've got to respect the troops, so... respect the national anthem, respect the flag, respect the country. but you know what, freedom of speech is an important thing. as an american, i don't think it is disrespectful to the country. it'sjust that they don't share the same opinion with the president, i guess, and they've got different opinions, and they don't stand for this national anthem at that particular point. it's not criminal. it's their right, and i think it's symbolic of... it's very similar to what martin luther king did, a peaceful protest of things that are going wrong. 0ur washington correspondent david willis has been following the story. what we are seeing already today here in the united states is a vivid
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display of player power, some of the most highly paid athletes in the world uniformly taking some sort of protest action in defiance of president trump's remarks. we have seen players kneeling, we've seen them locking arms, we've seen some raising their fists in defiance of his comments, and one team, the pittsburgh steelers, actually decided not to take the field at all for the playing of the national anthem as part of their protest. so it's quite possible this will spread to other professional sports here. the interesting element to all this is that instead of dividing and ruling, as it were, the team owners have come out in support of the players in many cases, and these are people who put up large sums of money in an attempt to get president trump elected. a man has been rescued afterfalling
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about 50 feet down a disused mineshaft in west cornwall. the walker, in his mid 50s, was brought to safety on a stretcher following a six—hour long, multi—agency rescue operation on a coast path at porth nanven. he was airlifted to hospital with a suspected broken hip and hypothermia. a man has been stabbed on his way to a mosque in greater manchester. he was attacked this evening inhale close to the altering and tail must association. greater manchester police said two men were arrested and the incident is being treated as and the incident is being treated as a hate crime. police are urging any witnesses to come forward. the man is recovering in hospital. prince harry has opened this year's invictus games for disabled and wounded military personnel, in toronto.
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the competitors will take part in 12 sports over eight days. his girlfriend, the actress megan markle, was at the opening his girlfriend, the actress meghan markle, was at the opening ceremony, making her first appearance at an official engagement attended by the prince. sarah campbell is in toronto for us this evening. more than 550 competitors from 17 nations, cheered on by friends and family. the games were prince harry's idea. this is the third such event which aims to use sport to help the process of recovery. as the teams filed in, prince harry watched from the vip area next to the first lady and spotted, a couple of rows down and around 18 seats across, his girlfriend meghan markle, the actress and campaigner who has been dating harry for a little over a year. ms markle lives and works in the city and so it would have perhaps seemed odd if she hadn't turned up. kensington palace have refused to comment on her appearance adding that half of toronto is here anyway and that maybe true, but this still has to be seen as a significant public acknowledgement of the seriousness of their relationship. of course, this ceremony was about the games and the competitors who have gone
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through so much to get this far. there was a lot of respect here for what prince harry has created and his passion for the games is clear. some of you have overcome emotional challenges that until very recent years would have seen you written off and ignored. and now, you are here on the world stage, flags on your chests representing your countries again. over the next eight days, across 12 sports, these men and women will inspire others in what promises to be the biggest invictus games yet. almost a century ago, a group of working class people began an art club in london's industrial east end. from shops to slums, they captured their everyday lives in paint. despite their early success though, much of the east london group's artwork hasn't been seen by the public for decades. but, as nick higham has been
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finding out, it's now being rediscovered and put on show. an east london canal, an unlikely scene for a brilliant painting. the artist is equally unlikely, he was a clerk for a shipping firm. this was painted by a window cleaner. this eerie street scene by an errand boy. this was the work of a printer. the man who painted this was unemployed, and a basket maker painted this view from his back window. they were known as the east london group. today, these working—class painters of london's shabby, industrial east end are largely forgotten. this exhibition at southampton city art gallery aims to revive their reputation, a band of artists who saw the extraordinary in every day. there are views and images that most
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artists might not choose to paint, but because they saw beauty in what they knew, that is what they painted. they painted in and around the mile end and bow road and bow generally but their work ended up on sale in the west end, at virtually the most prestigious gallery of the time. today, the east london they painted is unrecognisable. this railway bridge in the bow road is still there but the traffic is modern. grace 0scroft painted these houses across the road from the shop where she worked. they are still there, but onlyjust. the group's work is a record of a world which has largely vanished. most of the places they painted, with a handful of exceptions, have long since been destroyed by wartime bombing or post—war redevelopment. albert turpin was a wartime auxiliary fireman. in peace time he was a window cleaner and another member of the group, as well as a firebrand
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socialist and post—war mmyor of bethnal green. and post—war mayor of bethnal green. an exhibition devoted to his work opens later this week. the curator says the east london group deliberately chose unfashionable subjects. why would you paint shabbiness, why would you paint the places people say they wanted to get out of because they are slums? it is perverse but also very interesting and wonderful. turpin‘s daughterjoan recalls a man who was forever sketching — fellow councillors, his family, the streets around him. but much of his work, especially that from the 1930s and ‘aos has vanished. when he died, there were some stored in a shed in the flats where we lived in bethnal green. i am afraid, like lots of people do, my mum decided she wanted to clear it out, and so they got thrown away. but many more east london group paintings have disappeared. more than 700 were exhibited in the 1930s. today, just over 100 are known.
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the rest, perhaps on walls or in attics up and down the country still await rediscovery. check the loft! time for a look at the weather forecast. it's been another mild day, temperatures a little higher even than they were yesterday. we have had a fair bit of cloud across western parts, rain bearing cloud, in the weather fronts here, but across central and eastern england we've had some sunshine and the skies have brightened at times in northern ireland. but even if you didn't have the sunshine, temperatures were still on the mild side, and where the sun came out, and number of spots got up to around 22 degrees, about four celsius above normal for the time of year, so it has been a pretty warm late september day. 0vernight tonight, a band of rain will continue to push
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east across scotland, england and wales. the rain will probably be patchy at times, and across the western side of the british isles as we get clearer skies working in particularly to northern ireland we will get dense patches of fog forming here, and perhaps some murky conditions spreading into wales and south—west england as well. here is the chart for monday. this weather front will hit high pressure across scandinavia and europe at the moment so the front will weaken and tend to stop pushing back west as we go through the course of monday. so the rain already lighting patchy through the morning with this strip angela merkel has won a fourth term as chancellor of germany, but term as chancellor of germany, now has to deal wi threat but now has to deal with a new threat from the far right. her party's popularity has fallen sharply. translation: let's not beat about the bush, of course we'd hoped for a better result. but let's not forget, we've just had a very challenging four years. we've just had a very there were protests tonight outside the headquarters of the far right afd movement,
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after their success, finishing third in the elections. after their success, so what's shocked so many here in berlin are the echoes of the past, a party which they view here as having nazi sympathies, extreme nationalist and extreme right—wing back in the bundesstadt. and extreme right—wing so what do the results mean for germany, and the european union? we'll be live in berlin. also tonight: american football stars kneel during their national anthem, protesting against racism in the us. during their national anthem, donald trump says they're unpatriotic. jeremy corbyn feels the heat over brexit, but resists calls from some labour mps to stay in the single market. united to stay in the single market. kingdom! and prince harry opens this year's invictus games for injured servicemen and women in toronto. invictus games for injured good evening.
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the german chancellor angela merkel, is on course for a fourth term in office after parliamentary elections, but says she wants to understand the reasons why so many people, voted for a far right party, which came in third. the alternative for germany movement, which opposed mrs merkel‘s decision to allow more than a million refugees and migrants into the country, is the first far right party to win seats in the german parliament, since the end of the second world war. parliament, since the end mrs merkel‘s took 32% of the vote, nearly 10% down on the last election, and she says the afd poses a "big new challenge". and she says the afd poses 0ur berlin correspondent jenny hill is in the german capital for us tonight. jenny hill is in the german yes,
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jenny hill is in the german good evening. this elec will yes, good evening. this election will go down in the history books for two reasons. mrs merkel may have won, but this is her worst ever election result. and secondly, afd, the far right, is now going to take seats in the german parliament. for this country's post—war political system it has been an unprecedented evening. it's been a disastrous night for angela merkel, a brave face, though, for the cameras, and for the party faithful. for the cameras, mrs merkel‘s won the election for them, but it's not the victory they'd hoped for. for them, but it's not support for her conservatives is lower than it's ever been under her leadership, a verdict perhaps on her decision to open germany's doors to a million refugees. translation: let's not beat about the bush. of course, we'd hoped for a better result, but let's not forget, we've just had a very
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challenging four years. we've just had a very that's why i'm happy to say we achieved the strategic goal of our campaign. we are the strongest party. mrs merkel casts herself as a symbol of stability, security in a shifting world. as a symbol of stability, for many, a vote for angela merkel is a vote for the status quo. her campaign has focused on herfamiliarity, her experience, and yet, it seems, that alone is no longer enough. and yet, it seems, that alone because this is today's real success story, anti—islam, anti—immigrant, anti—euro, afd, the far right, is now part of the german establishment. afd, the far right, is now part translation: we will hunt them down. afd, the far right, is now part we'll hunt mrs merkel down, and we'll take back our country and our people. and we'll take back our it's a profound shift
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in post—war german politics. today, running together in berlin, but in the heart of this country, there's division, discontent. but in the heart of this country, translation: they're like the nazis under hitler. i was born in 1939. i'm a warchild. i grew up in the ruins, and now we get this again. they are criminals. and now we get this again. translation: it's difficult. and now we get this again. there aren't many alternatives to angela merkel. translation: she doesn't do much on her own initiative, she reacts a lot to what others do, and that's a kind of stagnation. angela merkel must now find coalition partners, wingback voters, persuade her country, perhaps some in her party, she's the right woman for the job. perhaps some in her party, exhausted, bruised, the end of a long campaign. mrs merkel‘s conservatives may be the winners, but it doesn't feel much like victory. jenny hill, bbc news, berlin. there have been protests
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on the streets outside the headquarters in berlin, of the alternative for germany party, with some left wing demonstrators calling them "nazis". the party founded just four years ago, takes a hardline view on immigration and islam. ago, takes a hardline view 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticas, takes a closer look at the afd and its policies. grammaticas, takes a closer look chanting: nazis out! nazis out, the chant. but the afd is in. and so left—wing protesters took to berlin's streets within minutes tonight. took to berlin's streets the afd has won more seats and influence than anyone imagined. so there is shock in a country still shamed by its nazi history. i'm pretty shocked. im really, really angry. like, it's complete sadness and rage. like, it's both in my heart right now. what is it about what the afd stands for that you most dislike? one of the highest guise
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of the afd, he said the germans had to be proud of what they did in the first and second world war. of what they did in the first and i mean, what did germany do? of what they did in the first they bleep slaughtered jews and homosexuals. this is nothing you can be proud of. jews and homosexuals. so what's shocked so many in berlin are the echoes of the past. a party that they view here as having nazi sympathies. extreme nationalism, extreme right wing back in the bundestag. and the target of their chants, well, it's up there. it is the afd‘s leaders, well, it's up there. because that is where they have been celebrating their election results. they have been celebrating before this election, the afd had no seats in parliament. it was only formed four years ago by academics hostile to the euro and germany supporting bailouts of countries like greece. but the party has morphed, moving further right. this was a campaign advert, hostile to gay rights and to islam. we want bikinis,
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not burqas, it says. and against the euro, too. not burqas, it says. the afd wants to protect germany and german culture. the turning point for the afd was the refugee crisis. hostile to angela merkel‘s decision to welcome 1 million new arrivals to germany, the afd wants refugees turned away. the afd wants on most issues it is opposed to germany's mainstream. there must be a voice that is going against the ever closer union. against the euro rescue policy. there must be a voice for protection of the border and to go against islamisation. of the border all germany's other parties will shun the afd. but germany is entering a new, more divisive era. let's rejoinjenny hill in berlin. she is likely to be confirmed as
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chancellor some point down the line, but how weak and is angela merkel tonight? on the world stage, not significantly, i think. tonight? on the world stage, not significantly, ithink. but domestically, it is going to be tricky for her. germany is almost a lwa ys tricky for her. germany is almost always governed by a coalition. she now has to find partners. don't expect afd to be part of that coalition. it's generally thought that she will ally herself with the green party and the business friendly free democrats. 0n green party and the business friendly free democrats. on that note, don't expect any change in position on brexit from germany. both of those parties are broadly in line with mrs merkel‘s thinking, thatis line with mrs merkel‘s thinking, that is that the eu's integrity must come first, and britain can't be allowed to cherry pick its terms. as to mrs merkel, she does have a tricky for years ahead. parliament is going to contain more parties, far more in the way of opposition. the bundestag, which now prides itself on achieving consensus and compromise, is going to become a far more fractious place. germany
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tonight chose a new, and i think, a difficult direction. ok, jenny. thanks for that. jenny hill live from berlin. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has resisted calls from some in the party, to pledge to keep britain in the european single market, after brexit. britain in the european single with their annual conference beginning in brighton today, 30 labour mps were among those who signed a letter, suggesting workers would suffer, if market access was restricted. but mr corbyn told the bbc that staying in, could hamper a future labour government's ability to protect jobs. there to protect jobs. has there to protectjobs. has been anger at the conference there has been anger at the conference not as no resolutions on brexit were chosen for debate. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. more a victory party than a conference. the song, and thousands upon thousands of members, dedicated
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to him. he's the winner here, even though labour did not win the election. its third conference lucky forjeremy corbyn. at last, safe and secure in seat. the steam is rising, not falling. the movement is stronger than ever. labour is a party of the people, it's a party of activist, it's a party of the community. but many in that community. but many in that community came to brighten, too, to tell him something else. they want labour to change its mind about leaving the eu. even to stop it happening altogether. jeremy corbyn should come out and say, "i was wrong. let's do something about this." no brexit at all is my views. i want to form and anti—brexit bagpipe band. with a foe of the left making an unusual protest.
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and many members and mps want to push the leader to commit to stay in the single market, the huge european free—trade area for good. it's a no. the important thing is to have a european market, half of all our with europe. would also say that we need to look very carefully at the terms of any trade relationship, because at the moment, we are part of the single market, obviously. that has within it restrictions on state aid and state spending. in what has been described as a stitch up, members who wanted debates on tricky brexit issues were out organised and outvoted by momentum, but corbyn backing campaign group. nothing contentious will be discussed. i'm a bit gutted. our
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debate on brexit didn't make it. one senior ally of mr corbyn told me some of his critics use europe as an excuse some of his critics use europe as an excuse to attack him. get some left—wingers are dismayed, too. excuse to attack him. get some left—wingers are dismayed, toolj would like to see how that position was come to. this was the quintessential issue of our generation. to not be discussing the elephant in the room, the issue of brexit, physical market, the freedom of movement, is wrong. and i think it's a mistake and we should discuss it. the labour leader will be surrounded by fans and supporters this week, still delighted by the pa rty‘s progress this week, still delighted by the party's progress in the election. but that won't completely mask the tensions over europe with some mps saying the lack of debate is absurd. adoration from the crowds does not mean, even this week, thatjeremy corbyn can forever avoid awkward conversations. donald trump has become embroiled
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in a row with leading us sports stars, after criticising american football players, who refused to stand during the national anthem. they say they're protesting against racism in america. but the president argues they're being unpatriotic and has called for them to be fired. being unpatriotic and has called the row resurfaced at wembley today, ahead of an american football game, when several players defied mr trump, asjon donnison reports. you might think only a fool would pick a fight with these guys. but president trump is not shy of punching above his weight. today, though, at wembley, by refusing to stand for the star—spangled banner, dozens of players defied him. it came just days after president trump had this to say. wouldn't you love to see one of these nfl owners, when somebody disrespects our flag,
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to say, "get that son of a bitch off the field right now. 0ut, he's fired." fired! 0ut, he's fired." but in today's later games across the us, the defiance spread. games across the us, taking a knee, as it's become known, has been used mainly by african—american players in protest against cases of police brutality towards america's black communities. tonight, i'm taking a knee for america. and last night at a concert in new york, stevie wonder, helped by his son, went out of his way to criticise president trump. went out of his way to criticise and it's notjust american footballers who are clashing with the president. footballers who are clashing steph curry is one of the world's best basketball players. as part of the nba championship team, it's tradition that his golden state warriors should visit the white house. i don't want to go, that's really it. the things that he's said,
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and the things that he hasn't said in the right times that we won't stand for it. but the president was not best pleased. 0n social media, he said going to the white house was a great honour, and that steph curry‘s hesitation meant the invitation was withdrawn. hesitation meant the today, as american football came to the uk, the controversy came with it. football came to the uk, this morning, president trump was up at dawn to take to twitter to urge fans not to turn up at matches if the players continued to disrespect the flag in the country. but here at wembley, for today's nfl match, the fans have clearly ignored him. for today's nfl match, it's not criminal. for today's nfl match, it's their right, and i think it's symbolic of... it's very similar to what martin luther king did. a peaceful protest of things that are going wrong. respect the flag, respect the country, but you know what, freedom of speech is an important thing. once again, donald trump doesn't
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seem to mind who he upsets. by stirring up controversy on issues such as nationalism, patriotism and race, he's playing to his base. and from many of them, he still gets a standing ovation. jon donnison, bbc news. he still gets a standing ovation. police say a man has been stabbed outside a mosque in hale in greater manchester, in what they're calling a ‘hate crime'. the victim, who's in his 60s, was attacked outside the altrincham and hale muslim association, and taken to hospital with a stab wound to the back of his neck. two men have been arrested. a controversial referendum on independence for iraqi kurds, is due to go ahead tomorrow, despite growing international pressure to call it off. despite growing international there are fears that if the kurds, who live in the oil—rich north of the country and make up nearly a fifth of the population, vote to form their own state, then that would mean the end of a unified iraq, causing instability across the middle east. 0ur middle east correspondent 0rla guerin reports. decades
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0rla guerin reports. of struggle have brought the kurds decades of struggle have brought the kurds to this. the last rally before their independence referendum, the outcome not in doubt. but the strong support here is matched by strong opposition almost everywhere else, especially in baghdad. the prime minister, haider al—abadi, warning in a televised address that anyone who plays with iraq will suffer the consequences. translation: taking a unilateral step, which could affect the integrity of iraq and its people, and the whole region, is not accepted. and its people, and the whole the kurdish referendum is against the iraqi constitution. we will not accept the referendum or its results. but even as he spoke, the kurdish leader, masoud barzani, was giving a defiant news conference. the iraqi flag still behind
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him, but not for long. he played down the risks of a new conflict in the middle east. do you accept that whatever your intentions, there is a risk that this referendum will spark violent confrontation? either with iraq, or with your neighbours, or perhaps both? translation: we do not have any intentions. we do not initiate any violence and we don't expect that and we do hope also that the others will not think and initiate that. we will be very patient, because we do believe that violence is not going to add to any solution. because we do believe that violence 0n the contrary, it's going to complicate the situation. but it's plenty complicated already. to complicate the situation. these are turkish tanks near the border of the kurdish region. it is a military exercise, but also a clear message. turkey, which has a kurdish minority
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of its own, says the referendum is a terrible mistake. of its own, says the referendum but the kurds believe the arc of history is bending their way. they say tomorrow's vote is about self—determination and democracy, and whatever the risks, there can be no going back. the risks, there can 0rla guerin, bbc news, northern iraq. moeen ali scored a century, to help england to victory, in the latest one day international against the west indies in bristol. they won by 124 runs, and go 2—0 up in the series. andy swiss reports. and go 2—0 up in the series. even on a dank autumn evening, there was no hiding the star. a dazzling day for moeen ali, and not a bad one for his team—mates. ben stokes and joe root showed the way with blistering half centuries, before moeen sent england's hopes stratospheric. a century of quite brutal brilliance, its last 60 runs
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thrashed injust a0 balls, including eight sixes. the crowd loved it. the west indies rather less so. by the time he completed his hundred in predictable fashion, england were seemingly out of sight. in predictable fashion, the west indies' target, 370. in predictable fashion, while chris gayle was at the crease, anything was still possible. but gayle's bat speed is rarely matched by foot speed. 0n 9a, he dawdled. adil rashid didn't. and by barely a coat of varnish, the west indies's hopes vanished. liam plunkett‘s fifth wicket rounded things off, the winning catch taken by, well, who else? moeen‘s match, and very much england's day. andy swiss, bbc news. and very much england's day. football's governing body fifa is to lift a ban, which prevented players from displaying poppies. last year fifa fined england, scotland, wales and northern ireland for displaying poppies during world cup qualifiers. it ruled poppies were a political symbol.
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the ban will be lifted before international games in november. prince harry has opened this year's invictus games for disabled and wounded servicemen and women in toronto. the competitors will take part in 12 sports over eight days. his girlfriend, the actress megan markle was at the opening ceremony, making her first appearance at an official engagement, attended by the prince. appearance at an official 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. the competition is already as hot as the sweltering temperatures toronto is currently enjoying. hot as the sweltering temperatures this morning, prince harry took his seat to watch the athletics. and it was a successful startforteam uk, taking gold, and bronze. startforteam uk, paralysed ten years ago in a road traffic accident, lindsay chapman today took the gold in the women's100 metre final. it's given me a goal and a purpose again. and i feel better about myself, i've got fitter, met loads of people, brilliant people. i've got fitter, met loads
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all the other team—mates arejust wonderful. some very special friends already, that hopefully, i keep for life. prince harry has spent the last couple of hours here at the athletic centre talking to competitors, handing out some medals in some of the first medal ceremonies. handing out some medals in some his focus today is purely and simply on those taking part in these games. sir, has toronto put on a good games? fantastic games. last night, the games got off to a spectacular start, all 550 competitors have gone through so much to get this far. they were cheered on by the prince, america's first lady, and canada's prime minister, and seated a few meters away from harry, meghan markle, his girlfriend. toronto is her adopted home, and this was her first appearance at an official royal appearance involving the prince. these games were harry's idea, and there's a deep mutual respect between him and the competitors. and there's a deep mutual respect some of you have overcome emotional challenges, that until very recent years, would have seen you written off and ignored. would have seen you
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and now, you're here, on the world stage, flags on your chests, representing your countries again. over the next week, these men and women, cheered on by theirfriends and family, will all be winners, no matter who crosses the line first. sarah campbell, bbc news, toronto. the line first. that's it. now on bbc1, it's time for the news where you are. the time for the news where you are. final four weeker the final four weekend of september was a tale of two halves. in eastern england, sunshine with warmth courtesy of the south—easterly breeze. beautiful weather watcher pictures sent in with blue sky and sunshine. a lovely september
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afternoon. by contrast, the north—west of scotland a different story. a drab weather theme in argyll and bute. from this weather front, pushing in from the atlantic, will drift eastwards overnight, bringing rain. ahead of it, a south—easterly breeze. it will feel warm and the rain will ease the way, which could lead to problems with some early fog. the jet stream meandering across the atlantic, allowing low pressure to keep this blocking phase and the quiet story continues, meaning the weather front does not make too much of an impact. we could have heavy bursts of rain in scotland, central and southern england for a time but behind it, fog and some of its dense in places
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first thing. broken up perhaps across wales and south—west england. it is worth bearing in mind if you are out early monday morning. tune into your local bbc stations. the fog will clear slowly but at 8am on monday, fog in northern ireland, potentially brighter spells in western scotland and light rain in eastern scotland through the borders towards the pennines. in the west, if we have fog it will lift and brightness will come into wales and south—west england. the weather front could mean a drab start of the day in the south—east of england with rain potentially. as we go through the day, the front weakens. a great story for many, with the odd spot of drizzle. either side, we could see brightness and if that
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happens, we may get more warmth in the south—east. 0n happens, we may get more warmth in the south—east. on tuesday into wednesday, fog could be an issue again. dry weather. by the end of wednesday, we will see rain pushing him from the west and some of that will turn quite heavy. 0vernight on wednesday, wet and windy weather. gales on exposed coasts. some of the rain heavy as it moves east. a lull before the next batch of rain. the reason for the change, the jet strea m reason for the change, the jet stream will start to strengthen, partly because of cold air from canada meeting warm air from caribbean. that will really intensify the jet and trigger those low pressures in the —— hashes in
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the british isles. we close the month of september with an autumnal flavour. this is bbc news. i am martine croxall. the headlines: angela merkel is set for a fourth term as chancellor, but german voters punish her party at the polls. now she needs coalition partners. translation: we now have a mandate to assume responsibility, and we're going to do that calmly, and hold talks with our partners. a major breakthrough for the right wing afd as they enter parliament for the first time in more than half a century. the important priority is to ensure that we have a tariff free access to the european
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