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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 25, 2017 6:00am-8:29am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. labour's divisions over brexit are laid bare as it avoids voting on membership of the single market at its annual conference. the party will claim today it's ready to take charge of brexit negotiations but some of its mps say the lack of a vote on contentious aspects of the party's policy is absurd. good morning, it's monday the 25th of september. victory for angela merkel in germany's elections, but she's punished at the polls as her support falls to its lowest level and the far right makes unprecedented gains. american football stars at wembley defy president trump by kneeling during their national anthem.
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they say they're protesting against racism in the us and he says they're unpatriotic. good morning. we bought more than £500 million worth ofjune last year, that's doubled in the last six yea rs, year, that's doubled in the last six years, so year, that's doubled in the last six years, so i've come to a distillery in london to find out why its booming ——jim. in sport, the rain stays away in bristol. fifa have held talks with the home nations in time for matches in november to have poppies. and carol has the weather. rain in central uk this morning, some of it heavy. in the west, although we have fog in northern ireland, that will lift and western areas today generally seeing sunshine. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today as it looks to calm growing anger over the issues that will be voted on at the party conference.
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the shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer will give a speech on the issue, but there will be no vote on contentious issues like staying in the single market. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. labour say they're the grown—ups when it comes to brexit, they claim they don't squabble like the government. but as the policy develops, it shows signs of growing pains. transport policy commission report, can i see all those in favour? last night delegates decided which topics to debate at the conference this week. brexit was not amongst them. there won't be a vote on an issue some delegates were keen to discuss, long—term membership of the eu single market beyond brexit. with the task of keeping all voters happy, the party leadership was always wary of doing so. pro—eu mps are blaming momentum,
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the campaign group supportive ofjeremy corbyn of blocking the issue. i think a lot of people are angry, frustrated, puzzled by the fact we will not be debating the big issue of the day, the existential threat of hard brexit to life in britain. we'll carry on fighting and i'm confident that labour will be asked to do what is in the best interests of the country. even some supporters of jeremy corbyn are not best pleased. to be not discussing the brexit wrong. to defuse the row, labour's been drawing up a plan for brexit and members will vote. but it won't commit to the long—term single market. the party leadership will keep its options open. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in brighton this
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morning, disagreements about brexit hang over the conference, but labour will be hoping to throw light on some of their other policies issues today? delegates the sided they didn't want a formal debate on brexit. they chose do have big discussions on the nhs and social care, public sector pay and the grenfell tower. there's one idea the shadow chancellor will be announcing today on credit cards. he will tell conference labour plans to limit the amount of interest credit card companies can charge people. he'll say a new labour government will bring in a cap and 3 million people are trapped by their debt because they pay more in interest and credit card charges and they've borrowed. labour will say that the credit card companies can't charge people more than twice the debt on their original credit card
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bill. i think this feels a bit like a victory parade if you like for jeremy corbyn, and notjust a normal conference. there's a lot of high spirits here and that doesn't mean with brexit hanging over everything it's going to be an easy ride for jeremy corbyn. he's not going to be able to avoid those difficult conversations. after 7am we will speak to the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell. the fourth round of brexit talks between british and eu negotiators begins in brussels today. it will be the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech in florence last week, which aimed to restore momentum to the process. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government, following yesterday's election which saw millions of voters defect to the far—right. she was re—elected for a fourth term but on a reduced share of the vote, as the nationalist afd party won its first parliamentary seats since the second world war. our berlin correspondent, jenny hill, has more. butjust to warn you, her report does contain flash photography.
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it was a disastrous night for angola muckle. a brave face, though, for the cameras and for the party faithful —— angela merkel. mrs merkel‘s won the election for them but it's not the victory they hoped for. support for her conservatives is lower than it's ever been under her leadership. a verdict perhaps on her leadership. a verdict perhaps on her decision to open in germany's doors toi million refugees. translation: let's not beat around the bush. of course we'd hoped for a better result, but let's not forget we've just had a very challenging for years, that's why i'm happy to say we achieve the strategic goal of oui’ say we achieve the strategic goal of ourcampaign, we say we achieve the strategic goal of oui’ campaign, we are say we achieve the strategic goal of our campaign, we are the strongest party. because this was the real success party. because this was the real success story. anti— islam, anti—immigrant, anti— euro, afp, the
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far right, is now part of the german establishment. —— afd. translation: we will hunt them down. we will hunt mrs merkel down and we will take back our country and our people. this election will go down in the history books. mrs merkel‘s worst result and victory for the far right. what is the political norm in other european countries was unthinkable in post—war germany. not any more. jenny hill, bbc news, berlin. more on that later in the programme as well. president trump has refused to back down in an his ongoing public row with some of his country's most famous sportspeople, claiming they should be sacked for kneeling during the national anthem. a number of american football players took part in the protest against racism in the us ahead of yesterday's nfl game at wembley, as simon clemison reports. god save our gracious queen... these
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players stand for national anthems. but not their own. the protest known as taking a knee began last year when one player refused to rise for the star spangled banner over what he said was the oppression of black people in the us. but it now spread. yesterday's game at wembley began the biggest demonstration at matches yet. we were told to take a knee, we believe what's right, it's bringing awareness to the issue going on right now in america. in a non—violent way. we did it together asa team. non—violent way. we did it together as a team. it's just a way of doing that. donald trump says american footballers who refuse to stand should be fired. he says the country has to be respected and he believes most people agree with him. we have a great country, we have
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great people representing our country, especially our soldiers, oui’ country, especially our soldiers, our first country, especially our soldiers, ourfirst responders, country, especially our soldiers, our first responders, and they should be treated with respect and when you get on your knee and you don't respect the american flag or the anthem, that's not being treated with respect. he may be used to a collision course but in american football, that could prove quite painful. simon clemison, bbc news. an imam is recovering in hospital after being stabbed as he walked to a mosque in hale in greater manchester last night. doctor nasa kurdy, who works as a surgeon, suffered a stab wound to the back of his neck. two men have been arrested and police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. the united states has expanded its controversial travel ban to include north korea, venezuela and chad, but sudan has been removed. it means that for the first time restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to co—operate with washington. team uk has struck gold on the first full day of competition
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at the invictus games, an event for sick and injured servicemen and women. it's really been gathering popularity in the last few years. prince harry was among the spectators in toronto as lamin manneh won the men's if6 shotput. lindsay chapman also raced ahead to take gold in the women's it5100m. it's given me a goal and a purpose once again. i've got something to get out of bed for and i feel better about myself. i've got fitter. met loads of people. brilliant people. all the other teammates are wonderful, some very special friends already that hopefully i keep for life. so, yeah. you can watch highlights of today's invictus games action from 7:30pm on bbc one. we are talking about poppies, a lot of the home nations defied fifa's
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rules about whether or not they could wear poppies to play, especially england against scotland on armistice day last year. fifa said it's a political symbol, the p°ppy, said it's a political symbol, the p°ppyv y°u said it's a political symbol, the poppy, you can't wear said it's a political symbol, the p°ppy, you can't wear a said it's a political symbol, the poppy, you can't wear a political symbol on the football field but there's been a huge debate over the last 11 months and it looks like fifa world cup lacks the rolls. the p°ppy fifa world cup lacks the rolls. the mm is fifa world cup lacks the rolls. the poppy is going to become less of a political symbol and more of an act of remembrance for a national event —— relax the rules —— fifa world cup lacks the rules. it's how i have —— fifa will relax the rules. fifa is expected to lift the ban on football teams wearing a poppy after talks with the four home nations‘ football associations in time for november's matches. that could mean england could wear the poppy when they face germany in a friendly the evening before armistice day. moeen ali's century sets up a big one day win for england against west indies. the all rounder smashed
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the second fastest one day international 100 in english history as england took a 2—0 lead in the series with two matches still to play. brighton beat newcastle 1—0 in the premier league. tomer hemed scored the only goal of the game between two of last season's promoted teams. a blow for england ahead of the autumn internationals as back row forward billy vunipola is ruled out forfour months. he's undergone surgery after he damaged cartilage in his knee playing for his club side saracens on saturday. another vunipola injury, they are a lwa ys another vunipola injury, they are always injured, those vunipolas. maybe it is where they play on the field! if you're that massive then massive then people can target you! we've already seen carol this morning, she's given us an idea of the weather, didn't sound great, good morning. good morning. some will see sunshine and showers
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but others will see rain. rain in central parts of the uk at the moment is quite heavy but through the day it will ease. the best of the day it will ease. the best of the sunshine will be in the west, especially northern ireland were this morning we have some fog. you can see why we got the rain, courtesy of this weather front, pulses in it, easing through the day. this morning in south—west england and parts of west wales, a bright start with a bit of patchy fog, running into this rain, low cloud associated with that as well but the extremities of eastern england hanging onto brightness first thing. further north we still have this rain, impulses, some is heavy, some isn't but it extends all the way up to the northern isles but go west and we've got some clearer skies. a chillier start to the day and patchy mist and fog but dense fog in northern ireland this morning, a yellow a weather warning out for this, the lowest level warning, but expected to clear
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mostly by 10am. some fog in some of the clearest bells in parts of wales. through the day, here's our wiggling weather front using a touch through the day, brighter skies out to the west, sunshine in the far south—east as well but through the day we will see showers developing, especially in some western areas. not all will catch them, fairly hit and miss, and some will be heavy. 1a in the north to 19 in the south. not feeling particularly special if you're under the cloud and also the rain. as we go through this evening and overnight, again, cloud around, brea ks and overnight, again, cloud around, breaks in the cloud, one or two showers, some patchy mist and fog forming. temperature wise, it's not going to be particularly cold in towns and cities. temperatures staying in double figures. across—the—board we've staying in double figures. across—the—boa rd we've got staying in double figures. across—the—board we've got ten to 14. across—the—board we've got ten to 1a. that's how we start the day tomorrow, any patchy mist and fog forming overnight will tend to lift slowly as we go through the morning.
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brighter skies coming through. still one 01’ brighter skies coming through. still one or two brighter skies coming through. still one 01’ two showers. brighter skies coming through. still one or two showers. for many of us it's not going to be a bad day. for many it will be dry and the. breezy out to the west, windy with exposure and temperature wise, 1a to 21 —— drier and brighter. 21 is above average for this stage in august —— dry and. as we go into wednesday, still a lot of drier and brighter weather around, some sunshine but you can already see what's happening the west. this band of rain and windy conditions coming our way, edging initially to northern ireland. a high of 16 in belfast, further east in the sunshine, feeling pleasant with highs of 21. a bit of a change, more unsettled conditions towards the end of the week. steph is at a gin distillery today. we have sent her out, not drinking
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gin, obviously. a lovely way to start the week! when they told me that last night, i thought that is a good way to start the week. where would you like to begin? with the gin. angela merkel has won the general election but the far right getting lots of the vote. it is also the front page of the telegraph, and they are talking about borisjohnson and philip hammond, his allies accusing him of being simpleminded over brexit. on the front page of the times, angela merkel being eclipsed by the resurgence of the far right. a picture of law atjames burke, the bbc‘s political editor —— laura kuenssberg, who has extra protection because of the threats from online trolls. the daily mail talking about receptionists at gp
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offices, in a controversial scheme to cut the number of appointments. and meghan markle on a lot of the papers, she was at the invictus games, but wasn't sitting with harry. i love the way they have written this. when harry almost met meghan. no chance of a two shot. the front page of the mirror, gloria honeyford, and how mcgee stays in shape. i think she was second. honeyford, and how mcgee stays in shape. i think she was secondlj didn't shape. i think she was second.” didn't follow closely, but i know she did extremely well.” didn't follow closely, but i know she did extremely well. i am aware of the leaderboard, i have a family who are very assessed by it. and a tory mp has great you can't buy a p°ppy tory mp has great you can't buy a poppy wreaths on expenses. tory mp has great you can't buy a poppy wreaths on expensesm
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tory mp has great you can't buy a poppy wreaths on expenses. it must be coming to that time of year, i am talking about poppies as well. the story that fifa are set to relax their rules on whether players can wear poppies. the times, an fa victory in england poppy row. it is all the home nations, as well, so scotland, northern ireland and wales also allowed to wear poppies, many of them fined for doing so last year. and a ban remains on slogans 01’ year. and a ban remains on slogans or images related to individual people or political parties or governing bodies, but when commemorating a significant national 01’ commemorating a significant national or international event, the sensibilities of the opposing team and the general public should be carefully considered, that is fifa's proposed adjustment to the rule, it hasn't yet been ratified, so that is supposed to happen at some point for matches in november. england played germany the day before armistice day
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in november, and apparently the german fa are pretty relaxed about p°ppy german fa are pretty relaxed about poppy activities, and they say if thatis poppy activities, and they say if that is what happens, then wear them, by all means. i have the 20 favourite fibs that parents tell their children, nine out of ten pa rents their children, nine out of ten parents believe that porkies are the secret to a happy child, really. stuff like eating carrots will help you see in the dark. if you swallow that chewing gum it will stay inside you for seven years. absolutely. these are true! i am not sure i should mention this at this time of the morning, your pet has gone to live somewhere else. it is true, that has happened quite a few times at my house. and when the ice cream man plays the music, it means they are sold out. and one of my favourite pictures from the papers is this lovely scene. 400 naked fundraisers going for an early—morning skinny dip in northumberland. it is rather lovely.
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a bit ofa northumberland. it is rather lovely. a bit of a surprise if you are walking the dog! you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the number of 85—year —olds living in the uk is expected to double over the next 20 years, and many will have long—term health conditions. yet new research seen exclusively by radio 4's you and yours programme suggests there won't be enough social care workers to look after them. the government says it has invested £2 billion into the sector to ensure a sustainable future, but does that go far enough? samantha fenwick has been to hull to find out more. she was a nurse, spent all her life caring for other people. sarah and pip hockey are sisters. three years ago, they both gave up theirjobs and move back home to look after their mum, annie, who is 82 years old and has advanced parkinson's disease. they get four hours help a day, but it is a real struggle trying to find the right people to look after their mum. this year
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alone, from the beginning of the year, we have had a 230 different carers, which is... peoplejust come and go all the time. they don't get paid enough, the carers. they are exhausted, they are doing crazy long hours. we have had to step in numerous times to cover care ourselves. recruiting care workers is really difficult in many parts of the uk. earlier this year, research done by the bbc found that every day in england more than 900 care staff leave theirjobs. in england more than 900 care staff leave their jobs. rachel in england more than 900 care staff leave theirjobs. rachel was a care worker, but after three years she had had enough and left the profession. she said the pay rate of eight pounds an hourjust wasn't enough. it wasjust so physically demanding, and! enough. it wasjust so physically demanding, and i was starting to get health problems as a result. it was also very emotionally draining, and it started to kind of make me feel a bit hard towards people, and that is and who i am at all, and that worried me. the number of people aged over 85 living in the uk is
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expected to double in the next 20 yea rs. expected to double in the next 20 years. many of them will need to be looked after in places like this. the concern is that there won't be enough people working in social care to look after them. new research suggests that at 2037 we will need an additional 1.2 million people working in social care, to meet growing demands. half of those will be needed in care homes like this. employers say they are finding it difficult to recruit and retain staff. the type of people needing ca re staff. the type of people needing care nowadays is much more complex, so care nowadays is much more complex, so it is hard work. there is a lot of sickness and absenteeism, that means people working double shifts 01’ means people working double shifts or longer, so that is unattractive, and for what? we ask more qualifications, and the pay is not getting more. can't you, as a provider, pay these people more? we could peter moore, but we're working on very tight margins already. the government say they have a plan to attract and maintain staff. they have promised to consult on the future of social care. the worry for
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annie hockey is that this isn't happening quick enough, and she has to rely on her daughters for help.” just couldn't manage without you two being around. that was sarah and pip hockey and their mother, annie, speaking to samantha fenwick, and you can hear more on this story on you and yours on radio 4 this afternoon from 12:15pm. we bought a record amount of gin in shops over the last year, and it is not the only spirit that is doing well when it comes to sales. steph is in london for us this morning, where we are hoping she can distil the facts of this story. good morning. good morning to you. good morning. good morning to you. good morning, everyone. i get all the best jobs, good morning, everyone. i get all the bestjobs, don't i? i am at a craft distillery. there are about seven guys craft distillery. there are about seven guys working here to try and produce lots of different types of
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gin. ayr other spirits as well, and darren can give us a look around. tell us what we have got here. so we started as a whiskey distillery, but the process starts with the mashed tun and the fermenters. then it goes and distils, ages for three years, and distils, ages for three years, and that is whiskey. in the back here we have some fermenters that we make rum in, so we make a london style rum, which is sugar and other bits that get distilled. over here we have christine, allergy and still, and toby is —— our gin still. how long before i can drink it? about a week and a half.” how long before i can drink it? about a week and a half. i will be here for a while then! we want to know all about the botanicals as well. some serious casks in the background. they are very beautiful
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to look at. and we will find out about the process. i think steph will have a taste a little later. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: i would go more to social media than writing a postcard. is a little bit more personal than sending an e—mail. for generations, the picture postcard was as much a part of the summer holiday as a bucket and spade. but, as britain's oldest publisher closes, we are asking have they been replaced by social media snaps and selfies? we are keen to hear your thoughts on this. when was the last time you sent a postcard, and do you display them? perhaps even send us a picture. do you send them? our kids will send them to their grandparents when they go on holiday, but you normally buy them on the first day and forget to send them. and send them when you get home? don't give the secrets
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away! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the app—based minicab service uber says it could make concessions to ensure its london operating licence is renewed. on friday, uber was told it wouldn't have its licence renewed beyond the end of this month, following concerns over safety and security. but uber‘s london boss says the company wants to know what it can do to resolve matters, if transport for london is prepared to hold talks. over 500,000 people have signed a petition calling on tfl to reverse its decision. police have released a 15—year—old boy on bail who they had arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm, following a suspected acid attack in the stratford centre on saturday night. it is believed to have followed an argument between two groups. out of over 400 acid attacks reported in london last year, over 90% of them were in the borough of newham. londoners have been found to be the
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least likely people to have a disabled friend, meaning disabled people in london have the highest levels of feeling isolated. research by the charity sense has led them to encourage londoners to buddy up, spending time with them and maybe becoming good friends. nfl players delivered a defiant message to president donald trump at wembley yesterday, as they linked arms and went down on one knee, after president trump said those who protest during the national anthem should be fired. fulham football club's owner, shahid khan, who also owns nfl's jacksonville jaguars, joined his players. he previously donated $1 million to the trump campaign. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is no service on the london overground, between gospel oak and barking, for engineering works. on the roads, in south—east london, kidbrooke park road remains closed between the a2 and kidbrooke village hall. while in acton, bollo bridge road closed because of a burst watermain. let's have a check
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on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it is a mild start to the new working week, but rather grey one, with a little bit of missed out there this morning. it is also feeling quite damp. there is a little bit of light rain around, at least at first, but it will turn dry out later, the rain fizzling out through the course of the morning, moving away northwards. now, the cloud will start to feel a little, turning some sunshine, perhaps hazy as we had to the afternoon. the breeze from the east is light, the maximum temperature feeling really rather warm, at about 18 or 19 celsius. overnight tonight, there is still a bit of patchy cloud, but some spells of rain as well, some mist and for developing in the north of london by dawn tomorrow morning. the minimum the bridge, again it is going to be really rather mild.
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double figures, 13, maybe 14 celsius. now, for tomorrow that mist will gradually start to lift. it is going to be another warned day right away across the board, around 20 celsius. some brighter spells, some sunny spells, but it is a rather changeable week, particularly from midweek onwards. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. coming up on breakfast this morning: as yet more sports stars defy president trump by refusing to stand before their national flag, we look at the presence of politics on the field of play. battling both a chronic illness and eating disorder, we find out about diabulimia and hear why there are calls for it to be better recognised in the uk. i know i should be taking it, i know what happens and i know what will happen if i don't take it but then i have this other voice saying it's much more important to be skinny.
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battling both a chronic illness and eating disorder, we find out about diabulimia and hear why there are calls for it to be better recognised in the uk. and how do you define gender? we'll speak to one woman who transitioned two years ago as a new documentary looks at what it means to be transgender. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on britain's withdrawal from the eu, but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market. sticking with the labour conference, the party says it wants to limit the amount of interest credit card companies can charge people. shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, will tell delegates that millions of credit card holders are trapped by their debt because they've paid more in fees and interest than they originally borrowed. the shadow economics secretary, jonathan reynolds, says the cap that applies to payday loans should be extended to credit cards. we've got about 3 million people in
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this country in long—term persistent debt. that's not good for the individuals involved but not good for the economy either. we want to make sure nobody has to pay back more than double the original someday they borrowed. that's the right way forward. of course there will be a relationship and dialogue with the industry about that but we think effective regulation is the right way forward. in brussels, the fourth round of brexit talks between british and eu negotiators begins today. it will be the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech in florence last week, which aimed to restore momentum to the process. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government. it follows yesterday's election in which mrs merkel won a fourth term. the vote also saw saw millions of people defect from traditional parties to support the far—right. president trump has refused to back
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down in an ongoing row with some of his country's most famous sports stars claiming they should be sacked for kneeling during the national anthem. a number of football players took part in the protest against racism in the us before yesterday's nfl game at wembley. in response the gesture disrespectful. an imam is recovering in hospital after being stabbed as he walked to a mosque in hale in greater manchester last night. doctor nasa kurdy, who works as a surgeon, suffered a stab wound to the back of his neck. two men have been arrested and police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. the regional government of iraqi kurdistan has vowed to press ahead with today's controversial referendum on independence despite opposition from the government in baghdad. the iraqi prime minister has said he will take all necessary measures to protect iraqi unity. the result is expected to be a comfortable majority in favour of independence. the united states has expanded its controversial travel ban to include north korea,
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venezuela and chad, but sudan has been removed. it means that, for the first time, restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to co—operate with washington. those are the main stories. but before we get a full round—up of the sport, have a look at these pictures of a rather more unusual event. this is the first ever world jousting championship. it was held near sydney, australia, over the weekend. i can't believe this is the first—ever one! it took place over the weekend. nice helmet! competitors had to put on 50kg of armour before saddling up and charging at each other at 15mph. the organisers of the event declared it a success because, in their words, it concluded without any loss of life. well, thank goodness for that! i've
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seen well, thank goodness for that! i've seen it up close, jousting, it really is an extremely... the force of the horses is incredible. you can see them thundering along. a rather low bar of success but nobody died! great success! it's like when you go to the grand national or a horserace, the noise when they go past, the ground drops a little bit. are they trying to knock each other off? -- ground rocks. you get points for hitting certain areas. not like the old days when they knocked each other off. i don't think they just do that, much worse! they were fighting on the ground with swords and all of that! i'm sure there are fifa rules for jousting. and all of that! i'm sure there are fifa rules forjousting. probably, they have a role for everything else! they might be adjusting the rules about poppies. there was a long discussion since last year when
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many home nations five the ban on political symbols when england wall poppies on their armbands last season during friendlies and qualifiers —— wore. this time round there was a huge petition and prince william wrote to fifa saying it's not a political thing, £51,000 was the sum total of the fine fifa handed to the home nations for wearing these. we understand perhaps if the ban is lifted on poppies then the fine will be wiped out and the home nations won't have to pay but it looks like the first are expected to lift the ban on football teams wearing a poppy. last year england, scotland, wales and northern ireland were all fined by fifa for their use of the poppy to commemorate armistice day, deeming it to be a political symbol. prime minister theresa may was among those to criticise the decision but the laws could be amended to allow teams to wear the symbol in time for november's matches. records tumbled at bristol yesterday as england went 2—0 up
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in the five—match one—day series against west indies. the match had the most sixes ever in an od! in england, and moeen ali contributed eight of those in a breathtaking innings. at one stage, he hit 61 runs from just 14 deliveries, on his way to a century. the target of 370 was always a daunting one for the tourists and so it proved with england winning by 124 runs, and ali taking the match winning catch. he spoke to charles dagnall. did you get that feeling of i can hit every ball, once you'd cleared the ropes a couple of times, pretty much the cloud going wild as well, you could hit every ball for six?” think they bowled a lot in that slot area for myself and it was just one of those days, i could have easily hit one straight up and got out but everything seemed to go for six. isaid we i said we bring you the rest of the
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weekend's football so let's get on with that! brighton beat newcastle to win their second premier league game of the season. in a match between two of the league's newly—promoted sides, tomer hemed scored the only goal as chris hughton's men ended newcastle's three match unbeaten run. last week we didn't keep the 1—0 until the end so today we knew how important is it. as a striker i know i need to help to defend well and in the end we all gave everything to ta ke the end we all gave everything to take the point and only like that can we win games. in the end we had the control. you have to give credit to them because they did well in part of the first half but we had some chances, they had some chances. not happy with the way we conceded because it's a blog, whether it's illegal or not, and after we had chances to score but we didn't do it. a fifth league win in a row has seen aberdeen close the gap on leaders celtic at the top of the scottish premiership. andrew considine scrambled home the game's only goal as aberdeen beat motherwell1—0.
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it was the perfect response from the dons after motherwell knocked them out of the league cup on thursday. a 4—0 victory for defending champions manchester city over yeovil town got their women's super league season off to a great start. but chelsea thrashed bristol city 6—0 with drew spence scoring their opener against the promoted team. maren mjelde also got a couple. arsenal and sunderland were also victorious. england back row billy vunipola's terrible injury luck has ruled him out of the autumn internationals. after missing the lions tour this summer, a knee injury picked up in saracens' win over sale on saturday will now keep him out until the new year. there were a couple of games taking place in the premiership. olly woodburn scored two tries as champions exeter claimed a 31—17 bonus point victory over wasps. while northampton made it three successive premiership wins as they eased to a 40—25 victory at london irish. saints had a bonus point wrapped up before the break with mike hayward going overfor theirfourth try before half time.
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peter sagan won his third world title in a row in a dramatic finish in the men's road race at the world championships in norway. the slovakian sprinter was in 80th place approaching the final climb up salmon hill in bergen but timed his ride to perfection. sagan beat norwegian alexander kristoff byjust a quarter of a wheel to become the first man to win three consecutive world crowns. britain's ben swift finished fifth. i'm finishing on my favourite story of the day, possibly the week, they've invented the ryder cup of tennis. it's called the leverkusen, obviously after rod laver. roger federer representing team europe —— the lay—back. roger federer beat nick kyrgios in a tie—break to spark wild celebrations. —— laser cup. on
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comes nadal and he jumps wild celebrations. —— laser cup. on comes nadal and hejumps into roger federer‘s arms. i missed that, i don't think we've got the pictures. we are trying to find the pictures because it's all over social media. they played doubles at the weekend. yes, for the first time ever. they are yes, for the first time ever. they a re clearly yes, for the first time ever. they are clearly loving it, aren't they? there are pictures of rafa nadal giving roger federer coaching from the sidelines. but how good is that asa the sidelines. but how good is that as a concept? team europe against tea m as a concept? team europe against team rest of the world in tennis.” did some work on jousting while you we re did some work on jousting while you were doing the sport.” did some work on jousting while you were doing the sport. i noticed! modern—day rules ofjousting, the lance has to be ten feet in length. in the olden days it could be as long as you like. as long as you lift it it could be a whopper! you could push the other fella off from miles away! rules make you enjoy the game! organised fun! thanks very much! top—flight american football came to london yesterday as the baltimore ravens took
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on the jacksonville jaguars at wembley. it was meant to showcase the thrills of the nfl to a global audience, but the biggest talking point of the event came before the game had even kicked off. a number of the players knelt down during the national anthem in protest over the treatment of black americans in the us. their actions followed president trump's comments that players who do so should be fired. let's speak to eric ham, a political analyst who's been following the story from washington, dc. it really seems to be gaining traction with more and more players choosing to do this. tell us about why it is so significant. it is. we saw this take place about a year ago when the san francisco 49ers quarterback colin kaepernick decided to ta ke quarterback colin kaepernick decided to take a knee and now he's out of the league a year later and many think it's because of that protest. now you had donald trump at a
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campaign rally call for the firing of these players last week. what's interesting about this is many of the nfl owners actually contributed directly to donald trump's inauguration. you had more than eight owners give more than $7 million. then you have the nfl itself give $100,000. now it looks as though donald trump is throwing these owners under the bus because he is calling for consumers to boycott the games should players continue to take a need. so today you had an overwhelming number of players across the league actually kneeling during the national anthem. —— takea kneeling during the national anthem. —— take a knee. in fact some of the performers of the national anthem actually took a knee as well. in fa ct actually took a knee as well. in fact what you have is donald trump now pitting himself against wealthy, influential owners of the national
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football league. we can see so many different pictures of so many people choosing to do this. where does this end? the choosing to do this. where does this end ? the rhetoric choosing to do this. where does this end? the rhetoric is also increasing, isn't it? it is. actually just yesterday you saw for the first time a professional baseball player for a major league baseball team here in the united states taking a need. that's the first time we'd seen a baseball player from one of the professional baseball teams doing so —— taking a knee. now you're seeing high school players taking a knee as well to express their solidarity with these players who are actually not protesting the flag but actually protesting the flag but actually protesting and demonstrating against injustice of unarmed people of colour being killed by police officers. that's what the issue is about, not about the flag. let's face it, protests by sports figures
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have been happening for more than 50 yea rs. have been happening for more than 50 years. it's as american as apple pie. so this is the first time you've actually seen a president of the united states come out in such strong and vitriolic language against such demonstrations, which is actually protected by the constitution. interesting, you say it's protected by the constitution. the president denying it's a race issue. how is it playing? is he playing towards a certain sector of society, what's going on here? sure. i think this language that he used at the debate on friday was definitely red meat for his base. you have to understand where he was, he was in the state of alabama. alabama has a long history of racial tension going back all the way to the governor bull connor and the dogs and the hoses that were used on people of colour who were protesting and fighting for civil rights. many
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people think this is a racial issue because until today many of the players who were taking a knee were african—american players and, of course, on the heels of that we saw him actually disinvite steph curry, professional nba player for the golden state warriors, from a visit to the white house, which is customary for all teams that win a championship in the united states, to ta ke championship in the united states, to take a trip to visit the white house. eric ham, thanks very much indeed, interesting to talk to you andi indeed, interesting to talk to you and i feel we'll talk about this again. i can't see that debate stopping. i can't see that debate stoppingm seems to be escalating. let's find out what is happening in the weather throughout the uk. carol is with us this morning. you certainly will need your umbrella across some parts of the uk today. the rain that we currently have is starting to eat
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and will continue to do so as we go through the morning. but still some heavy bursts. we have had some heavy bursts this morning. if you are travelling there is quite a bit of surface water and spray on the roads. it is courtesy of this weather front which will weaken through the day as it starts to bump into an area of high pressure and doesn't make much progress. if you are to the west of that weather front it is a drier and brighter start. some patchy mist and fog where we have a clearer skies to start with, then we have this rain. the odd heavy bursts coming out of it, the far east of east anglia and parts of eastern england starting off on parts of eastern england starting offona parts of eastern england starting off on a dry on that. the weather front straight across the central swathes of the uk, all out through scotla nd swathes of the uk, all out through scotland into the northern isles, and again you will get the odd heavy bursts coming out of it. west of that, we have clearer skies this morning. we have some sunshine, and again some patchy mist. but some fog, some of which is dense across northern ireland, a yellow weather warnings after that. that will
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slowly lift as we go through the course of the morning. patchy fog across parts of wales, but not everywhere. equally, we will see some sunshine. when the fog does lift, it will not be a bad day in northern ireland. sunshine, as there will be across other western parts of the uk. you can see how this weather front is weakening, a band of cloud around it, and the far south—east seeing some sunshine. if you are stuck under this band of cloud, and some showery outbreaks of rain, it is not going to feel particularly special. yesterday around the london area we hit 23. today we are likely to hit around 19. through the evening and overnight we have our weak weather front producing some drizzle. where we have the brakes on the cloud, for parts of south—east england, northern ireland, western scotland, wales and the south—west, patchy mist and fog forming. the breeze will pick up in the west, lifting the fog more readily across northern ireland, and this morning we will see that. it will linger a bit longer across the far south—east. we
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start off on a great note. low cloud, patchy mist and fog around, is that lifts and the cloud breaks we will see some sunny spells could starting to come through. one or two more showers more likely in eastern areas, but they will be fairly hit and miss, and the breeze will strengthen out towards the west. if you are in the sunshine, ties between 14 and 21, it will feel quite pleasant —— highs. on wednesday we start off on a great note, some patchy mist and fog around. it is just that time of year. we will see some sunshine coming through, but we do have some rain coming in from the west. and with exposure in the north—west we could well be looking at some gales, so could well be looking at some gales, so changes afoot. change is on the way, carol. thank you very much this morning. the uk drank the equivalent of 1.25 billion g&ts in the last 12 months, as we satisfied our thirst for gin, which is growing in popularity. and it is not the only british spirit that is doing well. steph is at a distillery in london for us this morning.
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finding out why gin turns out to be... wait for it, just the tonic! let me explain where i am, because this is a craft distillery, and this is quite a small one, seven people employed, toby is one of them. tell us employed, toby is one of them. tell us what you are doing this morning. so in christina, our wonderful gin still, we have juniper, so in christina, our wonderful gin still, we havejuniper, some grain and honey, along with water. we have just let the steam generator off and ina minute just let the steam generator off and in a minute it will come to a boil, and we will make gin.” in a minute it will come to a boil, and we will make gin. i will let you crack on, thank you very much. it is interesting how much gin sales have grown, reaching about £500 million worth of sales in terms of the shops last year. darren is the boss here.
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good morning to you. tell us about your business, how is it doing at the moment? so we started out as a whiskey distillery originally, and we made gin or cash flow, and it has been incredible how well it has done. we are building a new distillery just done. we are building a new distilleryjust for the gin. but yes, gin, like we made ourwhiskey, it is sitting in warehouses and we are waiting for the age. and this looks like quite a small operation to me, but you are pumping out a lot of stuff. tell us what you are making, and how many of them. yes, so we partner with another company, we go down to kew gardens, and makea company, we go down to kew gardens, and make a triple sec, and again, a different selection of gin. and this has gone into marks & spencer is, as well. and it is amazing to see that diversity. and how do you compete
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with the big companies, the brands we all know? it is not really about competition, to be honest. it is common entry. so the big brands that eve ryo ne common entry. so the big brands that everyone knows, people are starting to explore the different flavours and different profiles, and it is ha rd and different profiles, and it is hard for a big distillery to just make something random or something unique or different or fun, make something random or something unique or different orfun, and put it out in small quantities. so for us, with our little still, we can be a bit more experimental. that is where people can tap into what we are doing. so it is a bit different, you know, it is not competition. and i know you are going to show us a bit more of the process later on. let's talk to miles, from the trade association. why is gin doing so well? it is a mixture of things, but mainly we think it is british —ness. gin is well known to come from britain, and london in particular. people want drinks where they know
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where it has come from, what is in it, and they can trace it back to its locality. when i go and buy gin, there are so many different types. we heard darren talking about the types they make. is there a danger it could be oversaturated, just too many of them? some people have been saying that for a while, but the truth is we're not seeing any sign of that. we are seeing to suggest this kind of growth will go on for a number of years. so we have seen since 2012 in particular an enormous explosion of gin, and you can see distillery is popping up all over the place, some of which grew up to create whiskey, and others to do gin. and the last two years there have been almost 100 new distillery is open in the uk. thank you very much for your time this morning. as isaid much for your time this morning. as i said earlier, i am going to be showing you the process a little bit more. it is fascinating, the guy over there is making run this morning as well, so it is all going on! dan was saying, what were they doing down the? but now we know.
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there you go. would you pay good muqqy there you go. would you pay good muggy to see jane mccubbin perform on stage? us! -- us! when it comes to musical royalty, birmingham boasts a number of claims to fame — black sabbath, duran duran, and ub40 to name just a few. but now, the city has received royal approval for its training academy for classical musicians. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at the royal birmingham conservatoire for us this morning. and they have turned up in droves to see you. do you know what? you don't have to put up with me playing chopsticks. good morning from all of us. chopsticks. good morning from all of us. yesterday it was the birmingham conservatoire, today is the royal birmingham conservatoire. this seal of approval is very rare, special and precious, and nobody is more
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proud than julian, the and precious, and nobody is more proud thanjulian, the principle here. nice to meet you. how big a deal is this royal seal of approval, and this magnificent, £57 million new building which you move into today? it is an incredible moment for music education in this country. we have just merged with a school of acting, and we have suddenly been presented by birmingham city university with a £57 million facility. we have five performance spaces, seven recording studios, over 100 rehearsal rooms. it really is amazing. shall give you a taste of the talent? these do so. plays piano. and ten seconds from the fletcher quartet, please. and over here, the
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unique elliott samson and his quintet. and if that hasn't woken you up, nothing will. you are here to teach undergraduates, but you think your job is to do much more than that, don't you? well, music should be for everyone. there has been a situation with the government taking all arts subjects out of the baccalaureate, and it is creating havoc as less
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stu d e nts and it is creating havoc as less students are taking gcses in arts subjects were never. because the focus is on english, maths and science... yes, because those are the subject the schools are rated on, but children deserve far more than this tiny little narrow curriculum. they need to come out of schools knowing something about the world, and having a more rounded education. and you are worried as well that there are far too many private school students to get into music. look, that is great, but music. look, that is great, but music should be for everyone. it is not just for music should be for everyone. it is notjust for kids, with rich parents who can pay for expensive lessons and instruments. everyone has a soundtrack to their lives, everyone loves music. it is important, you will be reaching out to children and adults, and everyone. more from us later. take it away, chaps. let's hear this last bit. fantastic to hear this last bit. fantastic to hear them this morning, it has woken me up. acoustic magic in there, what
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a building. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the app—based minicab service uber says it could make concessions to ensure its london operating licence is renewed. on friday, uber was told it wouldn't have its licence renewed beyond the end of this month, following concerns over safety and security. but uber‘s london boss says the company wants to know what it can do to resolve matters, if transport for london is prepared to hold talks. over 500,000 people have signed a petition calling on tfl to reverse its decision. police have released a 15—year—old boy on bail who they had arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm, following a suspected acid attack in the stratford centre on saturday night. it is believed to have followed an argument between two groups. out of over 400 acid attacks reported in london last year, over 90% of them were in the borough of newham. londoners have been found to be the least likely people
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to have a disabled friend, meaning disabled people in london have the highest levels of feeling lonely and isolated. research by the charity sense has led to them to trying to now encourage londoners to what they call "buddy—up" with a disabled person, spending time with them and maybe becoming good friends, and there are already cases where it is proving successful. nfl players delivered a defiant message to president donald trump at wembley yesterday, as they linked arms and went down on one knee, after president trump said those who protest during the national anthem should be fired. fulham football club's owner, shahid khan, who also owns nfl's jacksonville jaguars, joined his players. he previously donated $1 million to the trump campaign. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the board first, a good service on all loa ns the board first, a good service on all loans apart from the overground.
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it is closed because of engineering works, and it will be like that for a few more weeks. on the roads, in south—east london, kidbrooke park road remains closed, causing knock—on residual delays. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it is a mild start to the new working week, but a rather grey one, with a little bit of mist out there this morning. it is also feeling quite damp. there is a little bit of light rain around, at least at first, but it will turn drier a bit later, the rain fizzling out through the course of the morning, moving away northwards. now, the cloud will start to thin a little, turning some sunshine perhaps hazy as we head through the afternoon. the breeze from the east is light, the maximum temperature feeling really rather warm, at about 18 or 19 celsius. overnight tonight, there is still a bit of patchy cloud, but some clearer spells, as well. that could lead to some mist and fog developing in the north of london by dawn tomorrow morning.
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the minimum temperature again is going to be really rather mild. double figures, 13, maybe 14 celsius. now, for tomorrow, that mist will gradually start to lift. it is going to be another warm day right the way across the board, around 20 celsius. some brighter spells, some sunny spells, but it is a rather changeable week, particularly from midweek onwards. va nessa vanessa feltz has just gone on air with her breakfast show which is on until ten with her breakfast show which is on untilten a.m.. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. labour's divisions over brexit are laid bare, as they avoid voting on membership of the single market at its annual conference. the party will claim today it's ready to take charge of brexit negotiations, but some of its mps say the lack of a vote on contentious aspects of the party's policy is absurd. good morning. it's monday, the 25th of september. also this morning: victory
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for angela merkel in germany's elections, but she's punished at the polls as her support falls to its lowest level, and the far—right makes unprecedented gains. american football stars at wembley defy president trump by kneeling during the national anthem. they say they're protesting against racism in the us. he says it's unpatriotic. good morning from this whiskey and gin distillery. we bought more than half £1 billion' worth of gin in the shops last year. it is an industry thatis shops last year. it is an industry that is booming. sales have more than doubled in the last six years, so than doubled in the last six years, soiam than doubled in the last six years, so i am going to be looking at why. good morning. in sport, the ban on poppies on the football field is set to be lifted.
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fifa have held talks with the home nations in time for matches in november. some of you have overcome emotional challenges that until very recent yea rs challenges that until very recent years would challenges that until very recent yea rs would have challenges that until very recent years would have seen you written off and ignored. team uk is celebrating two golds on the first full day of competition at the invictus games. and carol has the weather. good morning. we've got some rain across the centre of the uk at the moment. some of that is heavy. on either side of it we have bright skies and patchy fog especially in northern ireland. that will lift, allowing sunshine and just a few showers to develop. i will have more details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today, as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on britain's withdrawal from the eu, but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market.
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our political correspondent, iain watson, has more. exit brexit. labour say they're the grown—ups when it comes to brexit, they claim they don't squabble like the government. but as their policy develops, it's showing signs of growing pains. transport policy commission report, can i see all those in favour? last night delegates decided which topics to debate at this week's conference. brexit wasn't amongst them. that means there won't be a vote on an issue some delegates working to discuss, long—term membership of the european single market beyond brexit. but with the task of keeping leave and remain voters happy, the party leadership was always wary of doing so. pro—eu mps are blaming momentum, the campaign group supportive ofjeremy corbyn using its strength to block a vote on the issue. i think a lot of people are angry, frustrated, puzzled by the fact that we're not going to be debating the big issue of the day,
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the existential threat of a hard brexit to life in britain. but we'll carry on fighting and i'm confident the labour party will be the vehicle it's always been to do what's in the best interests of the country. and even some supporters of jeremy corbyn aren't best pleased. to not be discussing that elephant in the room, the issue of brexit, the single market, freedom of movement, i think is wrong, and i think it's a mistake and i think we should be discussing it. so, to difuse the row, labour's ruling national executive has been hastily drawing up a statement on brexit, and delegates will get to vote on this today. but it won't commit the party to long—term membership of the european single market. instead, the party leadership will keep its options open. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in brighton this morning. disagreements about brexit hang over the conference. they have plenty to discuss. good
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morning. yes, they do. and while delegates decided they wouldn't be debating and voting the issues of brexit, they instead decided to vote and debate on things like the nhs, public sector pay, even the rental tower. and there is one thing that the shadow chancellor will announce today on credit cards. john mcdonald will tell the conference that labour would bring a cap on interest on credit cards so that would stop people getting into so much debt. john mcdonald will say there are more than 3 million people with credit cards who are locked in debt because they pay more in interest and fees than they have actually borrowed. so labour would bring in a cap like we already have with payday loa ns. cap like we already have with payday loans. i think one thing is clear at this conference, jeremy corbyn is widely adored. it feels a bit like a victory parade rather than a political conference. nevertheless, with brexit overshadowing absolutely everything, jeremy corbyn's not
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going to have an easy ride and he is not going to be able to avoid difficult conversations. ok, thank you very much for that. perhaps we will have a difficult conversation withjohn mcdonnell will have a difficult conversation with john mcdonnell in will have a difficult conversation withjohn mcdonnell in a couple of minutes time on brexit and a couple of other things labour will be talking about at the conference. the fourth round of brexit talks begins in brussels today in the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech in florence which aimed to restore momentum to the process. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government, following yesterday's election which saw millions of voters defect to the far—right. she was re—elected for a fourth term but on a reduced share of the vote, as the nationalist afd party won its first parliamentary seats since the second world war. our correspondent damien mcguinness is in berlin for us this morning. morning to you. tell us first what about this rise of the far right and where will they find a deal? yeah,
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this is going to be very tricky for angela merkel. as you say, she will serve angela merkel. as you say, she will serve another four years as chancellor, which is a victory for her. but her party's numbers are right down. that means she has lost some support. some conservative voters who are nervous about migration have moved to this anti— migrant party, afd, alternative for germany. the centre—left social democrats, the spd, some supporters have shifted over to the afd. that means this anti— migrant party has won around 13% according to the latest predictions of the vote. that is an stonking and mount given they we re is an stonking and mount given they were not in the parliament last time around. they see this as a major victory. the problem for angela merkel, because her party has fewer votes a nd merkel, because her party has fewer votes and the smaller parties have more votes, she will have to cobble together a coalition between some very different parties. on one side the green party, very left—wing on many issues, and on the other hand the free—market liberals, with
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opposing views on the economy and the eurozone. to bring those partners together in the only possible coalition is going to be difficult for her. yes, interesting times. thank you. and some news from america, president trump has refused to back down on his row with some of the most famous sports stars, claiming they should be sacked for kneeling in the national anthem. an number of players took part in the process against racism in the us ahead of yesterday's nfl game at wembley. # god save our gracious queen... these players stand for national anthems... # oh, say can you see... ..but not their own. the protest known as taking a knee began last year when one player refused to rise for the star spangled banner over what he said was the oppression of black people in the us. but it's now spread. yesterday's game at wembley began the biggest demonstration at matches yet. we chose to take a knee, we believe that it's right, it's bringing awareness to the issue going on right now in america
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in a non—violent way of doing it. we did it together as a team, interlocked arms. it's just a way of doing that. donald trump says american footballers who refuse to stand should be fired. he says the country has to be respected and he believes most people agree with him. we have a great country, we have great people representing our country, especially our soldiers, ourfirst responders, and they should be treated with respect, and when you get on your knee and you don't respect the american flag or the anthem, that's not being treated with respect. he may be used to a collision course but in american football, that could prove quite painful. the united states has expanded its travel ban to include north korea, venezuela and chad, and sudan has been removed. it means that, for the first time,
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restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to co—operate with washington. and an imam is in hospital after being stabbed in the evening. two men have been arrested and they say they are treating the attack as a hate crime. team uk has struck gold on the first full day of competition at the invictus games, an event for sick and injured servicemen and women. sarah campbell reports. the competition is already as hot as the sweltering temperatures. prince harry took his seat to watch the athletics. and it was a successful start 14 uk, taking gold, silver and bronze. paralyse ten years ago,
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lindy chapman took the gold. it has given me a goal and purpose again.” feel better. i feel fit. given me a goal and purpose again.” feel better. ifeel fit. i have met loads of excellent people. all of the other teammates are wonderful. very special friends already that hopefully i will keep alive. prince harry have spent the last couple of hours here at the athletic centre talking to competitors, handing out some medals in some of the first ceremony. his focus today is purely and simply on those taking part in the games. the games got off to a spectacular start. all 550 competitors have gone through so much to get this far. they were cheered on by the prince, america's first lady and canada's prime minister. seated and few metres away from harry, meghan markle. toronto isa from harry, meghan markle. toronto is a first time and this was her first appearance at an official royal engagement involving the prince. these games were harry's idea and there is a deep respect
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between him and the competitors. some of you have overcome emotional challenges that until very recently would have seen you written off and ignored. and now you are here on the world stage, flags on your chess, representing your country is again. over the next week these men and women cheered on by theirfriends and family will all be winners, no matter who crosses the line first. that is a summary of the latest news. we will have the weather in a couple of minutes' time. pro—eu labour mps have expressed anger over plans to discuss the eu withdrawal and not include a vote on the single market. delegates will debate a range of other policy issues including public sector pay. let's speak with shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell. sorry about the weather. thank you for holding an umbrella
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for us. that's all right. can i ask why. .. crosstalk sorry, what were you saying? no, that's all right. i was going to suggest you get more umbrellas. some workers here are getting soaked. ok, we shall try to sort that out. good use of the licence fee. can i ask why you are not having a vote on brexit party policy today? well, there will be a debate on brexit but i think you have got this wrong. there will be a debate about brexit. a very thorough one. keir starmer is introducing it. there will be the normal report from the national executive committee and the people wa nt to executive committee and the people want to vote on that, they can. the way we organise conference now, we have introduced... well, basically, the delegates themselves, no longer the delegates themselves, no longer the leadership, the delegates decide on what motions they will debate. that is what the delegates have
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done. they have chosen another issue. there will be debate on brexit. there will be a report. people have the chance to express views and there is also an opportunity for people to do that by way of a vote. i think you have got this wrong. the issue for us, though. what is interesting, i have been talking with delegates and saying what issues have you chosen? they have chosen housing, health and transport, issues like that, bread and butter issues. on brexit the interesting thing is people are trying to build consensus now and not divide the party. and also i think what's interesting, build consensus not just in think what's interesting, build consensus notjust in the party but within our community. i think that is the nature of the decision. you say that we got it wrong. can you give me some moments way i think we don't have it wrong in asking that question. it is simply endorsing a statement. you say that delegates are deciding the issues. momentum had backed jeremy corbyn. they have been sending around via the
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conference app on things that are not on brexit, and you talk about issues, well, clive lewis says brexit is the quintessential issue for this generation. i think he is right and that is why we are having a thorough debate on it and that is why there will be a statement upon which people can vote. so we are having a thorough debate. with regard to momentum and other groups. all of the groups send around advice to delegates on what they think should be the priority is to be debated. that is whether it is momentum or labour first or progress or whatever but it is delegates themselves who decide. and this is themselves who decide. and this is the nature of the party. we are saying it is the rank and file of the membership who would take the decisions of control —— and control the agenda, not the leadership any more. can i ask you in more detail about, a, brexit policy. yesterday you said you wanted a reform single market. can you tell us what that will look like? ok. look, through
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the referendum campaign and beyond that, what we have been saying is we wa nt that, what we have been saying is we want tariff free access to the single market because we want to protect jobs single market because we want to protectjobs in single market because we want to protect jobs in the single market because we want to protectjobs in the economy. one of theissues protectjobs in the economy. one of the issues which came up in the referendum was obviously these four freedoms, one of which is freedom of movement, and people expressed the view their need to be controls on migration. and our view through the campaign and since then is we agree there shouldn't be exploitative employers in particular on the way —— migrant labour. of course there will be reforms in future that we are at irritating. that means we believe we can have a relationship with the single market —— advocating. we think that will ove rco m e advocating. we think that will overcome a lot of perceived dis— benefits highlighted in the referendum campaign and maintain the existing benefits. that is to be negotiated. our issue all the way a long is that the government isn't serious about these negotiations.
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that's why we said you need to have a transitional period in which we remain in the single market and the customs union to give us time to have a proper transition and a proper negotiated process. and we have only been listening to business leaders from the cbi, chamber of commerce and others and we are building consensus on the issue. talking about the transitional period, theresa may said on friday she would pay £20 billion over two yea rs she would pay £20 billion over two years to stay in the single market over the transitional period. how much would labour pay? what we have said again as i don't know where she has got the £20 billion from. i would like to have it independently assessed, exactly what the liabilities are. i have suggested the national audit office. why don't we have complete openness and transparency on this? exactly what we are talking about. at the moment theresa may appears to be plucking figures out of the af. why can't we have the national audit office or
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the offers of budget responsibility comeback with a report to parliament, to the public, and we will know what liabilities we have, and then come to review what we think is the appropriate amount. up until then we are working in the dark. there has been such a lack of openness and transparency, and now there is a sense of panic within the conservative party and the government about what this all means. one more thing to bring up, if we could. this is a point raised by andy burnham, who has criticised the party as being london centric, giving a platform to sadiq khan, the london mayor, but no platform to a northern mayor. what has happened to the labour party on that point?” think he has got a point, and i have been making this point for the last couple of years, particularly in the way the government distributes resources . way the government distributes resources. this is about the labour party, john, not the government.” know, let me finish the point, if
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you don't mind. andy burnham has a strong point, and what we have been saying, time and time again, now that the elected mayors are in place, we have marvin in bristol, steve rotherham in bristol, andy in manchester, we will give them a strong voice and build that into the structure of the party, and that is what we will consult on in the next 12 months. the choice of the party this year was that steve would speak. the main issue was having delegates rather than shadow ministers, and the issue was which may speak this year, and people chose sadiq i think in future years you will see andy burnham for manchester, steve rotherham from liverpool, marvin from the still, a whole range of representation from outside london, at andy does have a point, and we will address that in our review of sieges. so was that a
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mistake, do you think? people have made a conscious choice that this year it be sadiq, i am hoping next year, it is up to the delegates themselves and the conference arrangements committee which the delegates elect, i am hoping they ta ke delegates elect, i am hoping they take the view that we need at least andy, i would like a number of mayors to speak in a different way, but maybe that means more of us on the shadow cabinet giving up our position so that they can speak. the most important thing for us now, the people who control our conference and make the democratic decisions are the rank—and—file delegates to come. that is democracy, and i think it isa come. that is democracy, and i think it is a refreshing movement in our party over the last couple of years. thank you for your time, mr mcdonnell. you can get as many bbc employees under that umbrella as you like, now. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. the weather is not fantastic there, good morning. good morning. we have some rain across the central swathe of the uk. some of it is heavy at
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the moment but as we go through the course of the morning it will start to ease off and some of us will see some sunny spells developing. the rain has been heavy, it has been moving from west to east through the night. this is roughly where it is at the moment. still some heavy bursts in it, so subsurface water and spray on the roads. it is courtesy of this particular weather front. just ahead of it and behind it there is some patchy fog to content with. that will slowly lift, and then we are looking at some sunshine. for south—west england, are bright start with some low cloud. wales is looking at a bright start with some patchy fog, then there is a loose rein, especially heavyin there is a loose rein, especially heavy in the midlands currently. parts of east anglia sticking out of the cloud, some patchy mist and fog here as well, but that will lift when we see the sun come through and as we move across northern england, in through central and eastern scotland, all the way through the northern isles, we have that rain again and some of it will be heavy. if you are travelling today, take extra ca re. if you are travelling today, take
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extra care. moving further west, brighter skies with some sunshine. patchy mist, but thick fog across northern ireland. that will slowly lift as we go through the course of the morning. we have already mentioned the fog and wales, but as that lifts we will see the rain coming through. this rain will lift in situ as we go through the course of the day. there will still be some showers left on it, and if you are under that, it will feel cool. showers left on it, and if you are underthat, it will feel cool. if showers left on it, and if you are under that, it will feel cool. if we get out towards the west, although we will see a few showers develop, there will be some sunshine as well. in glasgow and belfast, 17 celsius, will feel quite nice. yesterday in london it was 23, tomorrow 19. we still have the remnants of the weather front producing some drizzle at times, but there will be some clearer scales and fog forming. in northern ireland, we will see the fog reform. —— clearer spells. it shouldn't be so long in clearing tomorrow, in the south—east it could ta ke tomorrow, in the south—east it could take a bit longer, with less of a
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breeze. so tomorrow we start off in quite a great note. patchy mist and fog, one or two showers through the course of the day in some eastern areas. there will be fairly hit and miss. most of us will get away with a dry day, with some bright and some sunny skies. it will be breezy out towards the west. if you are out of the breeze and in the sunshine, temperatures fairly respectable for this stage in september. we are looking at 14 to 21. by wednesday, still a lot of dry weather around. still some sunny breaks coming through. but the wind strengthening in the west, and you can see we have the arrival of some heavy rain coming in across western areas as well. in fact, the wind could well be touching gale force with exposure in the north—west. but if you are away from that, in the sunshine, again we are looking at highs of 21, thatis again we are looking at highs of 21, that is 70 fahrenheit. that will feel quite nice. thank you very much indeed. and i love the word you invented earlier, umbrolly, it is a day to bring your umbrolly. that is
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what you do when you put your umbrella down, you unbrolly. starting with the daily mirror, we have an interview with gloria honeyford, and debbie mcgee after a sparkling performance from her on weekend one of strictly come dancing. the front page of the daily telegraph, lots of analysis over what happened in germany. angela merkel is triumphant, but they are talking about... it makes it like a hall of mirrors. the vendor is rather awkward! and a better look, angela merkel the front page of the guardian as well, a fourth term win, but marred by the rise of the right. i think we should bend all our pictures like that, it makes them more entertaining. angela merkel eclipsed by the resurgence of the
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far right, and parkinson's sufferers denied a key right. in the front page of the express talks about brexit, and meghan markle makes a lot of the front pages. they are talking about receptionist sat gps, who are screening patients in a scheme designed to cut the number of appointments. and meghan markle at the invictus games, and i love the detail of this. this is where prince harry was sitting, and she is not next to him. lots of people talking about this on social media. a story about this on social media. a story about the 20 favourite feared that pa rents tell about the 20 favourite feared that parents tell their children, nine out of ten say that those white lies are the secret to parenting. number one is don't tell fibs. well, there area one is don't tell fibs. well, there are a few i don't want to stay because they might be children watching. there is hurry up, or i am
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leaving without you. when the ice cream van plays music, it means they have sold out, and mum and dad are notarguing, have sold out, and mum and dad are not arguing, they are having a discussion. lots of us have employed quite a few of those. we bought a record amount of gin inshops last year. it is not the only spirit doing well when it comes to sales. and steph is at the distillery in londinium upon thames. good morning to you. investigating is one way of putting it. it is fascinating, this. this is one of the distillers, christina, named after the owner's wife. we have been watching them put thejuniper berries wife. we have been watching them put the juniper berries in, wife. we have been watching them put thejuniper berries in, and all the different botanicals. you can see the gin which is coming out of it now, and this will be running for a few hours, i am told. this place makes thousands of bottles of gin every month. this is a glass were obviously not going to drink, at punchy. it is one of the first craft distilleries that we have seen, they
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make whiskey as well, tony is one of the trainee distillers. and you have run being made down on the back. but we are talking specifically about gin today, because we have seen a big increase in the amount of gin we are buying, so sales of the stuff in the shops worth about £500 million last year. so it is certainly big business. that has doubled over the last six years. we have the boss here, darren, we will talk to him a bit later on. making run this morning, so he is pouring the yeast into the barrels. i wish you could smell it here, because it does smell proper gorgeous, and down there at the back they are bottling the stuff as well. i will talk about why the industry is doing so well, why we are buying so much gin, and what it means for other industries. first we will get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the app—based minicab service uber says it could make concessions to ensure its london operating licence is renewed. on friday, uber was told it wouldn't have its licence renewed beyond the end of this month,
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following concerns over safety and security. but uber‘s london boss says the company wants to know what it can do to resolve matters, if transport for london is prepared to hold talks. over 500,000 people have signed a petition calling on tfl to reverse its decision. police have released a 15—year—old boy on bail who they had arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm, following a suspected acid attack in the stratford centre on saturday night. it is believed to have followed an argument between two groups. out of over 400 acid attacks reported in london last year, over 90% of them were in the borough of newham. nfl players delivered a defiant message to president donald trump at wembley yesterday, as they linked arms and went down on one knee, after president trump said those who protest during the national anthem should be fired. fulham football club's owner, shahid khan, who also owns nfl's jacksonville jaguars, joined his players. he previously donated $1 million
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to the trump campaign. londoners have been found to be the least likely people to have a disabled friend, meaning disabled people in london have the highest levels of feeling lonely and isolated. research by the charity sense has led to them to trying to now encourage londoners to what they call "buddy—up" with a disabled person, spending time with them and maybe becoming good friends, and there are already cases where it is proving successful. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is no service on the london overground between gospel oak and barking, for engineering works. on the roads, in south—east london, kidbrooke park road remains closed between the a2 and kidbrooke village hall. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it is a mild start to the new working week, but a rather grey one, with a little bit of mist out there this morning.
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it's also feeling quite damp. there's a little bit of light rain around, at least at first, but it will turn drier a bit later, the rain fizzling out through the course of the morning, moving away northwards. now, the cloud will start to thin a little, turning some sunshine perhaps hazy as we head through the afternoon. the breeze from the east is light, the maximum temperature feeling really rather warm, at about 18 or 19 celsius. overnight tonight, there is still a bit of patchy cloud, but some clearer spells, as well. that could lead to a little bit mist and fog developing, particularly towards the north of london by dawn tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature again is going to be really rather mild. double figures, 13, maybe even 14 celsius. now, for tomorrow, that mist will gradually start to lift. it is going to be another warm day right the way across the board, around 20 celsius. some brighter spells, some sunny spells, but it is a rather
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changeable week, particularly from midweek onwards. vanessa feltz is in bbc radio london which is on until 10:00am. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on britain's withdrawal from the eu, but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market. in the last half an hour the shadow chancellor gave his reaction. there will be a debate about brexit, and a very thorough one. keir starmer is introducing it. they will be the normal report from the national executive committee and people want
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to vote on that they can. but the way we organise conference now, basically, the delegates themselves, no longer the leadership, the delegates decides what motions they will debate. there will be a debate on brexit. there will be a report. people will have the opportunity to express their views and there is a lwa ys express their views and there is always an opportunity to do that by way of a vote. in brussels, the fourth round of brexit talks between british and eu negotiators begins today. it will be the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech in florence last week, which aimed to restore momentum to the process. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government. it follows yesterday's election in which mrs merkel won a fourth term. the vote also saw saw millions of people defect from traditional parties to support the far—right. president trump has refused to back down in an ongoing row with some of his country's most famous sports
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stars claiming they should be sacked for kneeling during the national anthem. a number of football players took part in the protest against racism in the us before yesterday's nfl game at wembley. in response the gesture disrespectful. an imam is recovering in hospital after being stabbed as he walked to a mosque in hale in greater manchester last night. doctor nasa kurdy, who works as a surgeon, suffered a stab wound to the back of his neck. two men have been arrested and police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. the united states has expanded its controversial travel ban to include north korea, venezuela and chad, but sudan has been removed. it means that, for the first time, restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to co—operate with washington. before we get the monday sport,
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would you like to see some jousting? why not? we don't have enough jousting on breakfast. this is the worst... worst? the world's first. it was held near sydney, australia, over the weekend. i can't believe this is the first—ever one! it took place over the weekend. competitors had to put on 50kg of armour before saddling up and charging at each other at 15mph. the organisers of the event declared it a success because, in their words, it concluded without any loss of life. just extraordinary! you have done what carol did, mixing the words together. and my favourite from carol... it is quite a brutal sport, isn't it? we were looking at some of the rules. initially you just had to a nswer the rules. initially you just had to answer your opponent. it was really for noblemen in the olden days to laugh and for their entertainment,
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when kngihts would try to poke each other off their horses. and a rose for the lady. i have watched too many movies, obviously. those were the good old days. i am going to talk about poppies going on in the proper sport at the moment. fifa said to the home nations that they can't wear poppies to play in the internationals because it is a political symbol. it has been a year of argument and now fifa have said that they think they might regrade it as not a political symbol.” that they think they might regrade it as not a political symbol. i have spoken with richard conway and he says they should discuss it in october. fifa is expected to lift the ban on football teams wearing a poppy. last year england, scotland, wales and northern ireland were all fined by fifa for their use of the poppy to commemorate armistice day, deeming it to be a political symbol. prime minister theresa may was among those to criticise the decision but the laws could be amended
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to allow teams to wear the symbol in time for november's matches. there is more football coming up in a minute. records tumbled at bristol yesterday as england went 2—0 up in the five—match one—day series against west indies. the match had the most sixes ever in an od! in england, and moeen ali contributed eight of those in a breathtaking innings. at one stage, he hit 61 runs from just 14 deliveries, on his way to a century. the target of 370 was always a daunting one for the tourists and so it proved with england winning by 124 runs, and ali taking the match winning catch. he spoke to charles dagnall. did you get that feeling of i can hit every ball, once you'd cleared the ropes a couple of times, pretty much the crowd going wild as well, you could hit every ball for six? i think they bowled a lot in that slot area for myself and it was just one of those days, i could have easily hit one straight up and got out but everything
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seemed to go for six. i said we bring you the rest of the weekend's football so let's get on with that. brighton beat newcastle to win their second premier league game of the season. in a match between two of the league's newly—promoted sides, tomer hemed scored the only goal as chris hughton's men ended newcastle's three match unbeaten run. in the end we had the control. you have to give credit to them because also they did well in part of the first half, but we had some chances, they had some chances. not happy with the way we conceded because we know it's a block, a legal block or illegal, and after we had the chances to score but we didn't do it. a fifth league win in a row has seen aberdeen close the gap on leaders celtic at the top of the scottish premiership. andrew considine scrambled home the game's only goal as aberdeen beat motherwell1—0. it was the perfect response from the dons after motherwell knocked them out of the league cup on thursday. a 4—0 victory for defending champions manchester city over yeovil town got their women's super league season off to a great start. but chelsea thrashed
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bristol city 6—0 with drew spence scoring their opener against the promoted team. maren mjelde also got a couple. arsenal and sunderland were also victorious. england back row billy vunipola's terrible injury luck has ruled him out of the autumn internationals. after missing the lions tour this summer, a knee injury picked up in saracens' win over sale on saturday will now keep him out until the new year. he has talked about becoming a plumber because he has so many injuries and he doesn't know how long he can carry on. it has become normal in rugby that at the age of 25 you are on the surgeon's table because the tackles are so big these days. everyone needs a plumber. you are never at work then. and maybe fewer injuries, who knows? there were a couple of games taking
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place in the premiership. olly woodburn scored two tries as champions exeter claimed a 31—17 bonus point victory over wasps. while northampton made it three successive premiership wins as they eased to a 40—25 victory at london irish. saints had a bonus point wrapped up before the break with mike hayward going overfor theirfourth try before half time. peter sagan won his third world title in a row in a dramatic finish —— justin thomas has won the $10 million fedex cup after his second—place finish at the pga tour championship. the tournament was won by fellow american xander schauffele in atlanta, who secured the victory with a birdie on the last to finish on 12 under par. that was a tense moment, almost out the back door. england's paul casey led before the final round and had an outside chance of winning the fedex cup too. but his challenge for both titles faded. $10 million, not bad. and team europe has beaten team
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world in the leiva cup in prague. this is the ryder cup of tennis. they were saying that there was a moment, there is rafa and roger having a hug. and theyjumped into each other‘s arms. having a hug. and theyjumped into each other's arms. look at this. there is a picture of them hunting at the end. look at that. they are such good friends as well. i am a big fan of the leiva cup. it has just been invented —— laver cup.” am watching triathlon super league as well, which is also extremely exciting. there are all of these newfangled "let's make sport more in —— exciting". my producer is a sheffield wednesday fan. probably
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don't mention. maybe that is why it was left out. more than 750,000 people in the uk are affected more than 750,000 people in the uk a re affected by more than 750,000 people in the uk are affected by some form of eating disorder and now psychiatrist are being warned to wake up to one condition which affects people already battling a different chronic illness. yes, one professor wants to raise awareness of diabulimia, where people reduce insulin intake to lose weight. now to a bbc documentary in which we meet a patient with the condition. diabulimia is extremely dangerous and in some cases fatal. and lack of awareness in health—care services means helpful sufferers in the uk is very scarce. one psychiatrist runs a diabetes clinic which aims to break new ground for
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those with this condition. would you like to give me a bit of a summary of where you are now? you know, i am quite a rational person. i know i should take insulin. i know what it does and i know what will happen if i don't take it, then i have this other voice that says it is important to be skinny. well, that isa very important to be skinny. well, that is a very complicated issue. we will speak with the psychiatrist and becky as well, who also took part in the documentary. we will speak to you ina the documentary. we will speak to you in a minute, becky. this is a very specific issue. are you seeing more people... just explain what it is and are you seeing more people with it? so diabulimia is an umbrella term for people with type 1 diabetes who have weight and eating concerns. and although there is still consensus for it, there are
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three main features of it. first of all, it only occurs in people with type 1 diabetes. secondly, these patients have an overwhelming fear that insulin is weight gaining. and the third, that this fear is so extreme that they will reduce the amount of insulin that they need in order to control their weight. ok, becky, for you, what was your experience of the condition, how did it effective? in different ways, really. it took me away from a family, friends, likewise for myself the kind of stopped everything. you know, i didn't have the energy. i jaswant is leap. or did you do, you started reducing your insulin? straightaway, yeah. iwas started reducing your insulin? straightaway, yeah. i was missed off the list because i was 19 at the time, iwas the list because i was 19 at the time, i was an agile and was in an adult, so i was missed and i fell through the net for about eight months. so i was having to train
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myself with my mum how to take insulin. and then it snowballed from there. it was like, i can't do this any more. i don't want to inject. wendy did come across this term, diabulimia, what did you know about it and what impact has it had? now i have a better understanding of it over the last four years since my la st over the last four years since my last admission. but beforehand i didn't know anything about it. we have to be clear, because people stopping taking insulin has very serious consequences, doesn't it? that's right. if you don't take insulin unique insulin to transport la caze insulin unique insulin to transport lacaze in your blood in order to live and get on with the job. —— transport glucose. if you don't the glucose leaves the body through the urine and takes the body's water with it. eventually the patient will die. with high blood sugar, you are also causing damage to various bodily systems, such as your eyes, kidneys, nerves and your heart.
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becky, did you find medical professionals were not aware of what was going on? what was your experience with regard to that side of things? with the likes of the eating disorder services that i had when i was at home, they didn't really understand anything about type 1 diabetes. they were not sure how to work the two of them together, and it was the same whenever i went to hospital because of my diabetes, they didn't know how to deal with they didn't know how to deal with the eating disorder aside, so it was a bit the blind leading the blind, really. what is your message to people who have type 1 diabetes as well is an eating disorder, and the concern that it might be something to do with weight gain?” concern that it might be something to do with weight gain? i think that isa to do with weight gain? i think that is a dangerous game, and that is what was demonstrated in the documentary. most people with type 1 diabetes want to have good health,
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but they are having to struggle looking after a condition which is really quite hard work. they have to calculate how many grams of carbohydrate they have to take. they have to calculate how much insulin to ta ke have to calculate how much insulin to take based on the blood glucose reading and how much exercise they are doing. so while it looks easy, it is hard work, and perhaps it seems that the only way they can control their condition is to reduce the amount of insulin, it is a form of control. here is one thing i can do, i hate this condition, it has taken my identity, my life, and one thing i can do is cut down the insulin and lose weight and look reasonably all right. is it a recognised condition? that is an interesting question. i think we understand that this happens. in terms of its classification, we are still waiting to arrive at a consensus but there is increasing recognition that this is happening. and just from your point of view, where are you now with this?” and just from your point of view, where are you now with this? i take every day as a kind of kalms, because i can wake up and have
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really good blood sugar is for the day, and that will be perfect, and there are times i will wake up and have really bad blood sugars, and that will put me on a downward for the day. so i take every day as it comes. are you getting support still? yes, definitely. this support that i have got is absolutely amazing. i couldn't ask for any better. the documentary the world's most dangerous eating disorder is on iplayer. and details about organisations offering support on eating disorders and diabetes via the bbc website. you can call the bbc action line for free recorded information. around half an hour ago we spoke tojohn mcdonnell from the
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labour party, from brighton. let's see how the weather is improving or not in brighton this morning. a little murky. a bit cloudy, rainy and damp. what is it like for everybody else? good morning. across the central swathe of the country, thatis the central swathe of the country, that is just what it is like. we have a band of rain, but as we go through the course of the morning it will start to ease, and sunny spells more especially in western parts, where we have some fog. this is the rain extending from north to south. pulses of rain moving up with a weather front, so some of it is heavy. it will more or less stay in situ and we can. out towards the west it will brighten up. weaken. the four were lifted and we will see the sun come through, and through the sun come through, and through the day we will see one or two showers. a bright start across the far east of east anglia and the south—east. as we move through the day we will continue to see some
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sunshine. you can see how in parts of scotla nd sunshine. you can see how in parts of scotland we hang on to the cloud, some hill fog as well, some drizzle left behind the rain. across northern england, quite a bit of cloud around as well, again producing some showers. moving into the east, we are back to brighter skies and some sunshine. highs in ipswich around 17 celsius. as we come back through the midlands, down towards the south coast, we are back under the weak weather front, so some cloud and some showers. south—west england has a fine day in prospect, at again you can see how as we move around through bristol, we're back to cloud. cloud and much of wales, in the west of wales, brighter and smashing day across northern ireland, when we lose that fog. through the evening and overnight we will still have a weak weather front producing some drizzle. where the cloud breaks, we will see some patchy mist and fog form. again we will have it in northern ireland, but it will be quicker to clear tomorrow. in the
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south—east it will take its time in terms of clearance. it will not be a cold night, most of us staying in double figures, so a grey and a fine start tomorrow morning, with that fog. for many of us it will be a dry day, with bright spells, or sunny spells. we are prone to some showers down the east of england, but again they will be hit and miss. not all of us will see them, some of us getting away with a dry day. it will be pretty towards the west. in the sunshine, 14 to 21, it will not feel too bad for the stage of september. as we move into wednesday, a lot of dry weather around, especially across mainland britain. you can see across mainland britain. you can see across northern ireland we have rain coming in and the wind strengthening, and through the day that edges into some western areas. very windy with exposure across the north—west of scotland. here we could well be touching gale force. and it is turning a bit more u nsettled and it is turning a bit more unsettled towards the weekend. and we will watch out for that. thank
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you very much. over the last year, the uk drank the equivalent of well over a billion g&ts, so it is little wonder perhaps that sales of the spirit are up. steph is at a distillery in london this morning to find out why, for many, gin appears to be just the tonic. good morning to you. yes, really fascinating, the surprise boost in gin sales. and these guys are just bottling up some gin in the background, getting them labelled up, ready to go out to the shops. they are making something like 3000 to 5000 bottles of gin here every month, so it is certainly keeping them busy. and darren is making rum. it looks like you have been making a lot. i have been adding some yeast, and mixing it up so it will
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activate. over the next week, this will ferment into 7% rummy beer, and then we will distil it. tell us about your business. you started off in whiskey, didn't you? yes, we were the first whiskey distiller in london for a number of years, and in 2013 we invested in an import company in china with another two guys. so we now import... exporter, sorry, to china, australia, all over europe. we have just sorry, to china, australia, all over europe. we havejust gone into north america, we own our own distribution in canada. exciting times. and over here is one of the first ones you have got, named after your ground. yes, my scottish grandmother. matilda, tilly. so it seemed fair enough to name still after her, but after that i found out that whiskey was made in london in 1060, 300 yea rs before was made in london in 1060, 300 years before scotland even made it. are you surprised by the way gin has
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grown? yes and no. when you look at a lot of the major companies, ten or 15 years ago, when i was working in bars, they were investing in education to bartenders and consumers. so the big brands have made people educated, and that has made people educated, and that has made the people who are educated wa nt to made the people who are educated want to know more. it is the same with the whiskey brewing. people got taught what whiskey was about and it went up. gin is doing the same thing now. i will let you crack on. let's talk to the editor of spirits business. tell us about this trend in the growth of gin. yes, it has been an incredibly rapid pace of growth for gin been an incredibly rapid pace of growth forgin in been an incredibly rapid pace of growth for gin in the uk distilling industry in general, and i think the cockell renaissance as people are calling it has a lot to do with it. we are seeing a lot of people drink a lot more classic cocktails, and
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gin isa a lot more classic cocktails, and gin is a big ingredient in these drinks —— cocktail renaissance. consumers have been more interested in handcrafted, local, artisan product is, so places such as the london distillery company are getting a lot of traction. what about the other spirits?” getting a lot of traction. what about the other spirits? i think it is generally positive, i thinkjen has managed to tap into a millennial audience, so younger drinking age consumers, and a lot of the spirits such as scotch whiskey have not been able to make it into that market, not yet, anyway. it is interesting, it is fascinating. and just to leave you with this, this is christian, named after darren's wife, which is distilling the gin. so thejuniper berries are stuffed in here. you are answering all the questions i wanted to know the answer of. put it down!
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i wanted to know why it is called christine r. put the gin down, mcgovern! when it comes to musical royalty, birmingham boasts a number of claims to fame — black sabbath, duran duran and ub40 to name just a few. but now the city has received royal approval for its training academy for classical musicians. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at the royal birmingham conservatoire for us this morning. very good morning. good morning to you. good morning from all of us. this is such a special day, because this place has been around since 1859. today, a double whammy. they move into this fantastic, new, £57 million eildon, and they get the royal seal of approval. this is the kind of talent. take it away. this is the kind of talent you will hear. plays piano. so beautiful. have a
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look around. let's get the stage lights up, shall we? so we can see, this is just lights up, shall we? so we can see, this isjust one lights up, shall we? so we can see, this is just one of five new performance spaces in this new building. there are over 100 rehearsal rooms for students, as well. over 100. the students come from all over the world, and many of them come from private schools. this is something thatjulian lloyd webber thinks that we should try and address. we need more home—grown talent from the comprehensives coming through the ranks. for now, i will leave you with alpinist, and the news, travel and weather where you are —— our pianist. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the app—based minicab service uber
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says it could make concessions to ensure its london operating licence is renewed. on friday, uber was told it wouldn't have its licence renewed beyond the end of this month, following concerns over safety and security. but uber‘s london boss says the company wants to know what it can do to resolve matters, if transport for london is prepared to hold talks. over 500,000 people have signed a petition calling on tfl to reverse its decision. police have released a 15—year—old boy on bail who they had arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm, following a suspected acid attack in the stratford centre on saturday night. it is believed to have followed an argument between two groups. out of over 400 acid attacks reported in london last year, over 90% of them were in the borough of newham. nfl players delivered a defiant message to president donald trump at wembley yesterday, as they linked arms and went down on one knee, after president trump said those who protest during the national anthem should be fired. fulham football club's owner, shahid khan, who also owns nfl's jacksonville jaguars, joined his players.
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he previously donated $1 million to the trump campaign. slough has come out top of a survey of the 25 best towns and cities to live and work in, beating manchester and cambridge in the top three. it is hailed as a prime spot forjobs, cost of living and worker satisfaction in the search byjobs website caty cap glass door. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the victoria line has minor delays. there is no service on the london overground between gospel oak and barking, for engineering works. the a40 is very busy in both directions. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning.
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it's a mild start to the new working week, but a rather grey one, with a little bit of mist out there this morning. it's also feeling quite damp. there's a little bit of light rain around, at least at first, but it will turn drier a bit later, the rain fizzling out through the course of the morning, moving away northwards. now, the cloud will start to thin a little, turning some sunshine perhaps hazy as we head through the afternoon. the breeze from the east is light, the maximum temperature feeling really rather warm, at around 18 or 19 celsius. overnight tonight, there's still a bit of patchy cloud, but some clearer spells, as well. that could lead to a little bit mist and fog developing, particularly towards the north of london by dawn tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature again is going to be really rather mild. double figures, 13, maybe even 14 celsius. now, for tomorrow, that mist will gradually start to lift. it is going to be another warm day right the way across the board, around 20 celsius. some brighter spells, some sunny spells, but it is a rather changeable week, particularly from midweek onwards.
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temperatures still up, though. i will be back in half an hour on bbc one. hope you can hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. labour's divisions over brexit are laid bare, as it avoids voting on membership of the single market at its annual conference. the party will claim today it's ready to take charge of brexit negotiations but some of its mps say the lack of a vote on contentious aspects of the party's policy is absurd. good morning. it's monday 25th september. also this morning... victory for angela merkel in germany's elections but she's punished at the polls as her support falls to its lowest level, and the far right makes unprecedented gains. # oh say, can you see?#
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american football stars at wembley defy president trump by kneeling during the national anthem. they say they're protesting against racism in the us. he says it's unpatriotic. good morning. we bought more than half £1 billion worth of gin from the shops last year. that figure has more than doubled over the last six yea rs. more than doubled over the last six years. i found it in sport... the ban on poppies on the football field is set to be lifted. fifa have held talks with the home nations in time for matches in november. team uk is celebrating two golds on the first full day of competition at the invictus games. and carol has the weather. out wide there is such a boom by
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going to a gin distillery. we have some rain across the central swathe of the uk. it will ease as we go through the course of the day. to the west and east there is patchy mist and fog which will list. —— lift. we will see sunshine and a few showers. good morning. first, our main story. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today, as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on britain's withdrawal from the eu, but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market. our political correspondent, iain watson, has more. exit brexit. labour say they're the grown—ups when it comes to brexit, they claim they don't squabble like the government. but as their policy develops, it's showing signs of growing pains. transport policy commission report, can i see all those in favour?
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last night delegates decided which topics to debate at this week's conference. brexit wasn't amongst them. that means there won't be a vote on an issue some delegates were keen to discuss, long—term membership of the european single market beyond brexit. but with the task of keeping leave and remain voters happy, the party leadership was always wary of doing so. pro—eu mps are blaming momentum, the campaign group supportive of jeremy corbyn, for using its strength to block a vote on the issue. i think a lot of people are angry, frustrated, puzzled by the fact that we're not going to be debating the big issue of the day, the existential threat of a hard brexit, to life in britain. but we'll carry on fighting and i'm confident the labour party will be the vehicle it's always been to do what's in the best interests of the country. and even some supporters of jeremy corbyn aren't best pleased. to not be discussing that elephant in the room, the issue of brexit,
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the single market, freedom of movement, i think is wrong, and i think it's a mistake and i think we should be discussing it. so, to difuse the row, labour's ruling national executive has been hastily drawing up a statement on brexit, and delegates will get to vote on this today. but it won't commit the party to long—term membership of the european single market. instead, the party leadership will keep its options open. iain watson, bbc news, brighton. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, is in brighton this morning. it is interesting. so much discussion about what will or will not be discussed. that is right. delegates have decided not to have a formal debate and vote on the tricky issues brexit. they have decided to do that and things like the nhs, social care, public sector and also
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the grenfell tower. john mcdonnell is hoping to bring in a cap on the amount of interest that credit companies can charge. he says people are trapped in debt because they pay more on interest and fees than they actually borrow. they would bring in actually borrow. they would bring in a cap actually borrow. they would bring in acapa actually borrow. they would bring in a cap a bit similar to what we already have on payday loans. that is one idea that will be put forward by labour. what is clear at this conference is jeremy by labour. what is clear at this conference isjeremy corbyn is widely adored. it feels more like a victory parade and a political conference. because brexit is dominating absolutely everything, jeremy corbyn were not have an easy ride and will not be able to avoid lots of difficult questions. thank you. the brexit secretary, david davis, will find out today if the prime minister's speech in florence last week has done enough to restore momentum to the negotiating process. that's because the fourth round of
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brexit talks begin in brussels. our europe correspondent, kevin connolly, is there. kevin, good morning. any suggestion imight be kevin, good morning. any suggestion i might be some productive talks ongoing today? good morning. away from the domestic political manoeuvring is about what wrecks it may may not mean for the future, the actual nuts and bolts does get under way again here today. —— brexit. we do have an interesting question, which is weathered theresa may's big set piece speech in florence which is meant to oil the wheels of the process is really going to make the wheels turn more easily. the general impression in brussels was it was well can and a constructive tone from the prime minister but also a feeling there are still more questions than answers in the uk's position from the brussels point of view. as the week unfolds, expect a lot of talk about the separation
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issues and, above all, the big question of how much money the uk is prepared to pay to get out of the eu. good to talk to you. thank you very much. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government after winning a fourth term. yesterday's vote also saw millions of people defect from traditional parties to support the far—right. our correspondent, damien mcguinness, is in berlin for us this morning. so, it she'll be having to look for different partners to go into coalition. just tell us the latest. it will be quite a challenge. the coalition parties that are available to her, the green party and the free market liberals, have completely opposite views on things like the eurozone and the economy could all be very hard to strike agreement. that process can ta ke strike agreement. that process can take weeks and months before they have signed the coalition agreement. the two big parties have lost
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supporters as he quite rightly say to the anti—migrant afd which has scored just over 12%, almost 13% of the seats in the parliament. that is a stonking winford for them they didn't have any seats at all in the last parliament. that means angela merkel will find it difficult to make a coalition. she will have to manage. she will remain chancellor but we will see quite a contentious period of wrangling because both of those party she will work with have their own red lines. there will be a lot of wheeling and dealing going on here in berlin over the next few weeks. thank you. president trump has refused to back down in his ongoing public row with some of his country's most famous sports stars — claiming they should be sacked for kneeling during the national anthem. a number of american football players took part in the protest against racism in the us ahead of yesterday's nfl game at wembley. here's simon clemison. the united states has expanded its controversial travel
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ban to include north korea, venezuela and chad, but sudan has been removed. it means that, for the first time, restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to cooperate with washington. an imam is recovering in hospital after being stabbed as he walked to a mosque in hale in greater manchester last night. dr nasser kurdy — who works as a surgeon — suffered a stab wound to the back of his neck. two men have been arrested and police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. team uk has won two gold medals on the first full day of competition at the invictus games. prince harry was among the spectators in toronto as our royal correspondent, sarah campbell reports. the competition is already as hot as the sweltering temperatures. prince harry took his seat to watch the athletics. and it was a successful start for the uk, taking
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gold, silver and bronze. paralysed ten years ago, lindsay chapman took the gold. it has given me a goal and purpose again. i feel better. i feel fit. i have met loads of brilliant people. all of the other teammates are wonderful. very special friends already that hopefully i will keep alive. —— keep for life. prince harry has spent the last couple of hours here at the athletic centre talking to competitors, handing out some medals in some of the first ceremonies. his focus today is purely and simply on those taking part in these games. the games got off to a spectacular start. all 550 competitors have gone through so much to get this far. they were cheered on by the prince, america's first lady and canada's prime minister. seated a few metres away from harry, meghan markle. toronto is herfirst adopted home
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and this was her first appearance at an official royal engagement involving the prince. these games were harry's idea and there is a deep respect between him and the competitors. some of you have overcome emotional challenges that until very recent years would have seen you written off and ignored. and now you are here on the world stage, flags on your chest, representing your countries again. over the next week these men and women, cheered on by their friends and family, will all be winners, no matter who crosses the line first. you are up to date with the latest news. after an acid attack near the westfield shopping centre in stratford on saturday night left six people injured, police are warning that this type of crime is on the rise. between 2012 and 2013 there were 146 victims of attacks involving "noxious or corrosive" substances, such as acid. this number rose to almost 400 cases
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between 2016 and 2017. injuly, the home secretary, amber rudd, called for review into jail terms, saying those responsible should feel "the full force of the law". it's predicted this year will see the highest number of acid attacks ever recorded in the uk. let's talk about this with the former chief prosecutor for the north west of england, nazir afzal, who has worked on a number of such cases. also, we can speak to daniel rotariu — who was the victim of an attack last year. thank you forjoining us. explain a little bit pleased about the story and what happened ? little bit pleased about the story and what happened? -- please. i had and what happened? -- please. i had a relationship that was coming to a head. my girlfriend threw acid when
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i was sleeping. i and a stand. you are asleep at the time. we can see your injuries. tell us a little bit about how it has affected your life. it burned me more than 50% of my body. i had burns on my back, on my chest, my hands. i lost vision in both eyes. i lost one eye. i am never going to see again. it is scary. i am so sorry. thank you so much for telling us a little bit about the effect on you. he is not the only person of course to have been affected by this. are you worried by what you are seeing?m course i am worried that we have a situation where we have had pretty much a tripling of the use of this type of attack on individuals. more
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often than not, as in daniel's case, relationships with ex—partners, strange attacks are rarer than perhaps we understand them to be first at what seems to have happened is, whereas previously a knife was a weapon of choice or some other weapon of choice or some other weapon was, as it has taken over. particularly among young people. perhaps because there has been a crackdown on knife use and possession. some individuals have decided carrying acid would potentially carry less risk for them in terms of being caught. the reality of very different. in daniel's case, his partner was given a life sentence for what happened to him. he has a light sentence, you have just heard. she will be out after 17 years and he will not recover his site. for the police, it is possible to ban the sale of corrosive substances like this. what
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is the answer if more and more people are carrying this as a weapon of choice? firstly what justice can do. the crown prosecution service issued guidelines to remind prosecutors you get the life sentence for this kind of behaviour. gbh is what you get for it. there are some significant sentences attached. that is with intent to use. absolutely right. louise has mentioned a moment ago, the government has said we need to look at how retailers sell it for that you can get 93% sulphuric acid in a department store. he would need that for lawful reasons? we have to work with retailers. the government has made the poisons act to make it more difficult to get it. in the same a few have to go for prescription drugs behind the counter, maybe we haveis drugs behind the counter, maybe we have is to look at those who produce it to make sure it does not have to be 93%. it could be 20% of that there is some serious work to be done with the product but also
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educational work among young people in particular to understand the impact. daniel's is one they should be hearing on a daily basis to realise it is notjust ten seconds of fun for them, it is a lifetime of painfor him. of fun for them, it is a lifetime of pain for him. from your point of view, i know you have called for tougher restrictions on acid. what kind of things would you like to see change? take them out from the shops. i don't see the reason why they should be 96% sulphuric acid. i spoke with my friends and a lot of people, i asked them if they used. nobody is using that kind of acid. they didn't
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