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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 25, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello. it's monday, it's 9 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. this morning: claims that people are dying because many doctors don't know how to deal with a little understood eating disorder called diabulimia. the minute you wake up you think, i have got to do my blood sugars. you do not get a day off. everyday is all about numbers. and it is all about numbers with an eating disorder as well. there are double the amount of numbers flying around your head. we'll talk to those affected. if you or anyone in yourfamily has diabulimia keen to hear your experiences of getting treatment. do get in touch in the usual ways. also on the programme — american football players have defied president donald trump by protesting during the us national anthem before games yesterday, including the match at wembley where more than 20 players and staff from baltimore ravens and jacksonville jaguars knelt or linked arms during the anthem. as far as taking a knee, we believe
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what is right. it is bringing awareness to the issue that is going on right now in america. we'll get reaction from former nfl players. labour will describe themselves as the grown—ups in the room. that is not how everyone sees it. tensions fizzle and fry over brexit as the mayor of london says we may never leave the eu. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. we will bring you the latest news, developing stories. your messages and tweets are always welcome. we're going to be talking about the rise
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in crash for cash incidents. if that has happened to you, do let me know. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government, after yesterday's election which saw millions of voters choosing the far—right. she was re—elected for a fourth term but on a reduced share of the vote, as the nationalist afd party won its first parliamentary seats since the second world war. our berlin correspondent, jenny hill, has more. just to warn you, her report does contain flash photography. it was a frustrating night for angela merkel. a brave face, though, for the cameras and for the party faithful. mrs merkel‘s won the election for them but it's not the victory they'd hoped for. support for her conservatives is lower than it's ever been under her leadership.
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a verdict perhaps on her decision to open germany's doors to a million refugees. translation: let's not beat around the bush, of course we'd hoped for a better result, but let's not forget we've just had a very challenging for years, that's why i'm happy to say we achieved the strategic goal of ourcampaign, we are the strongest party. mrs merkel casts herself as a symbol of security in a shifting world. for many, a vote for angela merkel is a vote for the status quo. it focused on herfamiliarity vote for the status quo. it focused on her familiarity and vote for the status quo. it focused on herfamiliarity and experience. yet, it seems, that alone was no longer enough. because this was the real success story. anti—islam, anti—immigrant, anti—euro — afd, the far—right, is now part of the german establishment. translation: we will hunt them down.
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we'll hunt mrs merkel down and we'll take back our country and our people. it isa it is a profound shift in post—war german politics. running together in berlin but in the heart of the country there is division, discontent. translation: they are like the nazis under hitler. i am a war child. i grew up in the ruins. they are criminals. it is difficult. there are not many alternatives to angela merkel. she does not do much on her owi'i merkel. she does not do much on her own initiative. surely is a lot to what others do and that is a kind of stagnation. angela merkel must now
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find coalition partners, win back voters and persuade some in the country, perhaps in her party, cheers right woman for the job. exhausted, bruised, the end of a long campaign. mrs merkel‘s centres may be the winners but does not feel much like victory. jenny hill, bbc news, berlin. ukip hasjust ukip has just congratulated the afd party, the anti—immigrant party on its electoral breakthrough in germany. what sort of influence will they have on german nationalise age and an policy when it comes to immigration? what we have seen through the campaign is the new anti—michael party has woody had an influence on the national debate. what we have seen join the campaign is backed angela merkel‘s party was emphasising more patriotism, more than we have seen in previous
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campaigns. over the past few years we have seen her party become tougher on refugees and asylum seekers rules. when the afd moves into parliament behind me, we will have an even bigger impact. they have an even bigger impact. they have almost 13% of the vote. this party is incredibly controversial. it is interesting that ukip has congratulated afd because there are links between those parties in the speeches last night. party leaders we re speeches last night. party leaders were using phrases we have heard from donald trump and nigel farage. nigel fraud was in berlin the other week campaigning for the afd. the reason why they are so controversial is some of its leaders have the city said things that are anti—islam for that you cannot be a good german and a muslim at the same time. islam has no place in germany. that makes
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people, minorities in germany, very worried. they feel now that a populist party is now in parliament which does not believe they belong in that country. that is the debate will now have in germany. the rest of the political establishment is going through a bit of a debate already, trying to figure how they will deal with the afd. that is why the centre—left spd, the rivals of angela merkel in the run—up to the election, has said they will go and not allow the afd to run the opposition. we have seen a dramatic shift all because the anti—migrant party, the afd. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today, as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on the uk's withdrawal from the eu,
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but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market. our political correspondent, iain watson, has more. exit brexit. labour say they're the grown—ups when it comes to brexit, they claim they don't squabble like the government. but as their policy develops, it's showing signs of growing pains. transport policy commission report, can i see all those in favour? last night delegates decided which topics to debate at this week's conference. brexit wasn't amongst them. that means there won't be a vote on an issue some delegates were keen to discuss, long—term membership of the european single market beyond brexit. but with the task of keeping leave and remain voters happy, the party leadership was always wary of doing so. pro—eu mps are blaming momentum, the campaign group supportive of jeremy corbyn, for using its strength to block a vote on the issue. i think a lot of people are angry, frustrated, puzzled by the fact that we're not going to be debating
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the big issue of the day, the existential threat of a hard brexit, to life in britain. but we'll carry on fighting and i'm confident the labour party will be the vehicle it's always been to do what's in the best interests of the country. and even some supporters of jeremy corbyn aren't best pleased. to not be discussing that elephant in the room, the issue of brexit, the single market, freedom of movement, i think is wrong, and i think it's a mistake and i think we should be discussing it. so, to difuse the row, labour's ruling national executive has been hastily drawing up a statement on brexit, and delegates will get to vote on this today. but it won't commit the party to long—term membership of the european single market. instead, the party leadership will keep its options open. iain watson, bbc news, brighton. the fourth round of brexit talks between british and eu negotiators begins in brussels today.
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it will be the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech in florence last week, which aimed to break the deadlock in negotiations. the united states has expanded its controversial travel ban to include north korea, venezuela and chad, but sudan has been removed. it means that, for the first time, restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to cooperate with washington. this programme has learned that young people are being put at risk because of a little understood eating disorder called diabulimia. the term refers to diabetic people who generally don't take essential insulin injections in order to lose weight. nhs england has said it is waking up to the condition. an imam is recovering in hospital after he was stabbed in hale in greater manchester last night
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nasser kurdy suffered a stab wound to the back of his neck after being attacked as he walked to a mosque. two men have been arrested and police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. birmingham has topped the uk's cash for crash postcode league — the second time in a year the city has featured in a table of hotspots for the crime. the scams are run by fraudsters who manufacture collisions with other road users — with the intention of profiting from insurance claims. manchester, bradford and london also featured on the list. a man has been arrested in australia after apparently riding a train in perth by clinging on at the back. the 23—year—old was filmed holding on to the windscreen wipers of the moving train before it reached speeds of up to iiokm an hour. he was arrested by police after being detained at the next station. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. we are going to show you our film
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about diabulimia in the next few minutes. if you want to get in touch with us with your own experience and please do. send us an e—mail, either anonymously or not. now for the sport. the fair has changed its mind about not wearing poppies. it seemed that fifa was going to dig its heels in. three semedo has criticised the ban. now it is expected to be overturned ina now it is expected to be overturned in a decision next week. why now? fifa has changed its stance. they have changed the wording on what they consider a political symbol.
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poppies will now be thought to fall under commemoration of a national or international event. as long as the two tea ms international event. as long as the two teams in the match agree in advance and organisers like uefa and fifa agree a poppy is ok, it should be ok to be used in future matches. the decision is expected in early october. that would mean when england potentially play germany in november in the international break and armistice day, the players should be able to wear poppies. sport and politics are converging on a big scale. players essentially are taking a knee in nfl. a lot of players have spoken about it as though it shows a mark of defiance against donald trump and his comments saying that if anyone abuses the flag and the national anthem they should be sacked. the original reason why this took place last year was because of social
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injustice. what a lot of people have seen as a non—armed black man being killed by police officers. we remember last yearjust killed by police officers. we remember last year just one killed by police officers. we remember last yearjust one player took any. it caught the hearts and minds of other players and they took stuart. in baseball, for the first time one of their players actually took a knee in solidarity with their team—mates here. even high school football players have expressed their solidarity as well. it seems to have all really backfired on donald trump. he says the players should be sacked because a lot of the nfl owners and the nfl itself as an organisation that she gave money to donald trump. he probably expected their support. one of the owners, the owner of the jacksonville jaguars, stood arm in arm with these players to say, donald trump, what you have said is not right and i support my players.
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this will grumble on for some time yet. we will talk about it more later on the programme. donald trump says he sees this as anti—american and antimilitary. we will talk about it later in the programme. in tennis, rafael dias and roger federer are playing together. who would have thought it? —— nadal. they played doubles together. the equivalent in golf would be the ryder cup where we have team europe against the rest of the world. these quys against the rest of the world. these guys have won multiple grand slams between them. here is federer playing nick kyrgios. look at his celebration! look how excited he is about winning the inaugural labour cup. i saw pictures of federer pouring champagne into that trophy in celebration. he is really happy with himself. i really enjoy it. it isa with himself. i really enjoy it. it is a great idea and something i would love to go and watch.
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hopefully it will happen again. i am sure it will because it has been a great success. people are dying because many doctors don't know how to deal with a little understood eating disorder called diabulimia. that's from a leading psychiatrist treating it. it's an illness where young people with type i diabetes don't take essential insulin injections so they can lose weight. nhs england say, "we've been asleep to it but we're waking up now". in this film by bbc newsbeat and bbc three we film we meet some some of the people who have the condition. there is an eating disorder more dangerous to its sufferers than anorexia or bulimia. it is an eating disorder with a chronic illness. you are trying to fight both on a daily basis. and that's quite difficult to do. most people haven't heard of it. i just never wanted to hurt my family. its name is diabulimia.
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it is like a perfect diet gone wrong. i have someone with me all the time because i'm on section. and apparently at risk to myself, i think. i don't know, really. i think that's why. what way do you want to go? this way? like old type one diabetics, gemma needs to constantly monitor blood sugar levels and inject herself with insulin several times a day in order to live. i've got my test kit.
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i have test strips. then i put it in. it doesn't actually take long. but it's more of a head, mind game. and then... draw the blood out. just like that. oh dear. 4.3. but i'm not allowed my insulin because i'm not allowed to inject it myself. they're doing it. it's addictive not to inject your incident, because, i don't know, you canjust eat whatever you want. and lose weight.
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it's like... two birds with one stone and all that. diabulimia is an umbrella term that consists of three main features. the first is that it only occurs in people with type i diabetes. secondly, that people with type i diabetes have a fear that insulin causes weight gain. and third, that this fear is so strong that it leads them to omit the amount of insulin they take in order to have weight loss. if the person with type i diabetes doesn't take any insulin, they will die very quickly. so the reason i walk with crutches at the moment is because of
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the damage that i've done to my feet. but that's all due to not taking care of my insulin and my diabetic control. the surgeon at the time was like, "yeah, your bone is actually like honeycomb and mush". and it's kind of dissolving it. it's like disintegrating. so that's kind of hard to think that these things are going to be with me for life. becky is on a way to the eating disorder unit where she spent 16 months as an inpatient receiving treatment for her diabulimia. i'm really nervous because i haven't been back in quite a few months. so it would be strange seeing some of the actual staff. this is outside the eating unit, the front door. it's nerve—wrecking this!
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as far as i'm aware, the eden unit is one of very few units in the uk which has been able to take on and treat people who are suffering from an eating disorder with type i diabetes. this used to be one of the old rooms that i stayed in. that was the first or second night that i was in, that one. i got tubed because i wasn't able to physically eat. i was just scared too. i didn't want to put on the weight. i guess it's because i knew that if i'd eaten something i would have to take insulin with it. that was the last thing i wanted to do. like i say, it is upsetting seeing them. but it's a good reminder
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of where i don't want to be. hello! come in. hello. i haven't seen you for ages and ages. take a seat. i know, it's been a year and a half now? goodness, as long as that? at the time you came with us and i think you'd got in touch with the danger of your condition and you are properly frightened. and fortunately, it wasn't too late. you wanted help. becky has had three inpatient admissions with us. the third and final admission that she had was very nearly fatal. she only really got to us just about in time to put her through the very delicate re—feeding process. ok, so we are just about to head into the kitchen, where they are sort of preparing
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for an afternoon snack. i ended to up on a compulsory treatment order. i wasn't allowed to prick my finger on my own. i wasn't allowed to take my insulin on my own. no form of medication on my own. it always had to be with a member of staff. but then when the time comes for you to actually be handed it, to take your insulin, that's the scary part. you're like, no, i don't want it. currently, access to information and support for diabulimia is so hard to come by, that for some it's too little, too late. this is lisa's diary.
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"i feel so fat. everyone looked at me today." lisa was 27 years old when she died. do you miss her? yeah, ido. yeah, this is the dress. i think this dress is a size six. and even then it needed taking in, i think. but naturally, i would say she was a size ten to 12. her cheeks are really, really red in this. it's a sign of not taking your insulin. that one is quite a recent one, i think. it was after lisa died that i first heard about diabulimia. lisa's story was posted
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on social media. and reading a lot of the comments, there were a lot of saying, "i've had this". i don't even know if lisa had heard of that word before. it's nothing that i've ever had a conversation with her about anyway. there is a series of pictures of her in the gym. sending them to her friends. yes so it happened on the 7th september. this was taken on the sixth at 11:45pm. this is one of her on her birthday here. this was... this would have been her last birthday that she was alive, in 2014. she looks a bit drawn in that picture. it's just something that, if she had help with earlier, then maybe it wouldn't have happened.
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my parents know slight things about what i'm going through with the diabulimia, with the skipping injections. what they know is that i'm skipping injections. but they don't know, they don't understand the mental health part of it. but a part of me is too scared to tell them in person, face—to—face, because of their reactions. so are you meant to inject after every meal? yes. but you don't? not every meal, no. ok. so have you injected now? i need to go up and inject but i ended up washing up instead. it's very hard to understand what's going on in her mind, really.
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probably that she wishes she had diabetes. you now? or she wishes she was probably normal like other people without diabetes. at her age she'd want to drink and eat and do things that other youngsters want to do. but she is limited. i really don't know an eating disorder. she's got this, eating disorder. an eating disorder. yeah? we never expected to think that at 16 she would be diagnosed with diabetes. all these years, you know, she has grown up and just before her gcses she was diagnosed with type i diabetes.
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which has changed everything, hasn't it? yeah? what are you thinking? do you wish you didn't have diabetes? is that what you're thinking? what are you thinking? do you think about taking insulin, you put on weight? does that matter? is that the main matter? if the incident didn't make you gain weight, you would take it? what is the maximum you have missed out on?
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the maximum would probably be not taking it at all. for how long? a couple of weeks. not taking any insulin at all for a couple of weeks? wow. that's naughty. you didn't know she missed two weeks on the trot, did you? no. never told this. never ever told this. yes. well, i'm glad she has told us now. i love you babes, remember that. always and forever. ok? i will take my insulin, ok.
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becky is working on improving physical disabilities her diabulimia has left her with. i have to check my blood sugar is to make sure i can carry on with an exercise routine. so what i'm doing is, i have just pricked my finger. all i have to do is soak up a little bit of blood. so i am 11.11, which is great for going into the gym. so it's telling me i need to take two units. and all my insulin isjust in here. and then you count for ten seconds.
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release and out. and that's it, done. i take every day as they come. i don't know how i'm going to wake up in the morning. the minute you wake up, you think, oh, i've got to do my blood sugars. you don't get a day off. and it's all about numbers with an eating disorder as well. so there is double the amount of numbers flying around in your head. i would recommend to anybody, don't muck about with your insulin. don't do it. it is a dangerous game to start. and once you start it, you kind of get obsessed with it. and there's no point in risking your own life. what insight!
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you can watch bbc three's documentary, diabulimia: the world's most dangerous eating disorder which is on bbc three's iplayer channel now — where you can also find more information and support if you're affected by any of the issues raised in this programme. if you have experienced diabulimia, please get in touch. it clearly if it has been difficult to get the right kind of help. american footballers stage their biggest protest so far in defiance of donald trump after he called for players who kneel during the national anthem to be fired. we'll be talking to a former nfl player and a commentator who were both there. birmingham is the uk's "crash for cash" hotspot — that's where fraudsters manufacture collisions with other road users to try to profit from insurance claims — we'll speak to one man whose van company nearly went bankrupt after being involved in ten crash for cash claims. let's cross to the newsroom.
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annita is there. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government, after yesterday's election which saw millions of voters choosing the far—right. mrs merkel won a fourth term. mrs merkel said she had hoped for a better result. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today, as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on the uk's withdrawal from the eu, but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market. the fourth round of brexit talks between british and eu negotiators begins in brussels today. it will be the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech
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in florence last week, which aimed to break the deadlock in negotiations. the united states has expanded its controversial travel ban to include north korea, venezuela and chad, but sudan has been removed. it means that, for the first time, restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to cooperate with washington. an imam is recovering in hospital after he was stabbed in hale in greater manchester last night nasser kurdy suffered a stab wound to the back of his neck after being attacked as he walked to a mosque. two men have been arrested and police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now withjess.
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the fair is to lift the ban on displaying poppies after talks with the uk football associations. last year fifa find the home nations when the players wore poppies on the armband. the football governing body is expected to change the rules in early october. over 20 knee the american é;;}ll;;;£§;£;; 51:2: a knee during the american national anthem yesterday when an nfl game came to wembley. they showed solidarity with players despite president trump denouncing the protest a nd president trump denouncing the protest and calling for players to be sacked. moeen ali starred for england when they beat west indies in the third one—day international. he hit a century in 53 balls, making it the second fastest odi tonne by an england batsmen. they now lead the series 2—0.
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it's the biggest issue facing the uk right now but brexit won't be voted on at labour's annual party conference — much to the frustration of some members who say debate is being silenced. instead, delegates chose grenfell tower, rail, growth and investment, public sector pay, workers' rights, the nhs, housing and social care as issues worthy of a vote. the issue of brexit is a divisive issue for labour — which is trying to balance appealing to core supporters like students who voted overwhlemingly to remain — and core supporters in some northern towns who voted decisively to leave. it's left various politicians treading on eggshells on the issue. we need to look very carefully at the terms of any trade relationship, because at the moment we are part of the single market, obviously. that has within it restrictions on state aid and state spending. that has pressures on it through the european union to privatise rail, for example and other services. i think we have to be quite careful about the powers we need as national governments.
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this is britain's future. this is our children's future. it would be irresponsible to take options of the table. jeremy corbyn said on sunday the benefits of the single market are dependent on membership of the eu, making it quite clear that he believes we should be out of the single market? i was with jeremy corbyn this afternoon. and he's quite clear we are not taking options off the table. there will be no bigger or more important negotiation in my political lifetime. it would be foolish at this stage to take options off the table. but he said we should be out of the single market. he made it perfectly clear. andrew marr pressed him on it and that is what he said. what we're saying is that when the come out of the single market, freedom of movement will obviously fall. but we're not taking options off the table. what we have said is the transitional period, from march 2019 until we get to a new and final
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deal, will be within a customs union and within the single market. there is absolute clarity about that. and it is a united labour party position. it is a u—turn, because it wasn't long ago thatjeremy corbyn was sacking people for saying much the same thing? no. it's not a u—turn. it is a development of our policy. on the question of what are the terms of the transitional arrangements, labour has never said anything other than we retain the benefits of the single market and the customs union. we believe we can have a relationship with the single market. we think that will overcome a lot of the perceived dis—benefits that were highlighted during the referendum campaign, and maintain a lot of the existing benefits. now, again that has to be negotiated. our issue all the way along is that the government isn't serious about these negotiations. that's why we said you need to have a transitional period in which we remain in the single
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market and the customs union, to give us time to have a proper transition and a proper negotiated process. let's talk to four labour supporters. john mcmahon is a remainer, christopher barbour is a brexiteer, brendon chilton a director of labour leave, which campaigned for brexit. we are hoping to speak to another remainer ina we are hoping to speak to another remainer in a moment if they arrive in time we will talk to them. kia starmer is going to say today that labour are the only grown—ups in the room when it comes to brexit but not grown—up enough to allow members to have about whether they want continued membership of the single market. it is an interesting issue. iam not market. it is an interesting issue. i am not that surprised to see there is going to be a debate today, not a vote. i think that is quite a powerful demonstration of what a broad coalition the labour party is on the issue of brexit and freedom
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of movement more specifically. two thirds of labour members voted to remain but to thirds of constituents voted to leave. you can see a great breadth of opinion within the parliamentary labour party ever way you have figures likejohn mann or frank fields, who are certainly looking for tightening of free movement, even andy burnham on the other side of the party from both the left and the rightful you have figures sadiq khan and clive lewis who are campaigning for a kind of a retention of free movement to a certain extent. where did you stand on that as a labour supporter?” certain extent. where did you stand on that as a labour supporter? i am probably somewhere in the middle. my
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philosophical preference, i really kind of value to the idea of free movement as an ideal. in terms of navigating where the country is at the moment, where the party is at the moment, where the party is at the moment, where the party is at the moment, i think that maybe an ethical tightening of free movement might be the best way forward. something that protects the rights of eu citizens who are already here. it protects the country's needs around skill shortages. it does not demonise migrants in any way. one thing with freedom of movement as it currently stands, there are some restrictions built into the kind of eu legislation that we don't apply here at the moment. so, some eu states ta ke here at the moment. so, some eu states take it tighter approach to it than we do, adopting some of those could be a possibility as well. you voted to leave. briefly,
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what do you think about the fact there will be no votes on whether labour members want continued membership of the single market? no chance for them to influence labour policy. i think our conference is oui’ policy. i think our conference is our democratic process. they chose not to debate brexit. it was a democratic vote by delegates. they are firmly behind the labour party leadership policy on the brexit issue. this is me says there is a transition period of to years. jeremy corbyn said he favoured the open end period. how long do you wa nt open end period. how long do you want the transition for? a transition period between two and four years would be fine because it would allow businesses time to prepare for exit from the single market. it would give labour enough
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time to negotiate tariff free access. after that you don't want access. after that you don't want access to the single market?|j access. after that you don't want access to the single market? i don't wa nt to access to the single market? i don't want to continue it, i want tariff free access. and the movement of people? i support the movement of people? i support the movement of people and workers. one thing which is overlooked is the eu also allows for movement of capital which only benefits big corporations. google moved its corporation in order to avoid paying uk corporation tax. we have to look at that as well. that may bring in brendan. you are a labour supporter and he voted to leave. how will the party reconcile the two wings? those who want to continue with membership of the single market. i think this is a very difficult issue for the labour party. it is worth noting that the overwhelming majority of labour party members of parliament and
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members supported to remain. 70 cents of our constituencies voted to leave. of the 20 17th general election vote we got 13 million votes, around four and a half million of those voted to leave the european union. what compromise could labour come up with? the ma nifesto could labour come up with? the manifesto is very clear. we are leaving the european union. we are all leaving the european union. we are a ll clear leaving the european union. we are all clear on that. we made a strong commitment that freedom of movement would end. the difficulty we have is why we want to retain the benefits of access to the single market, if you remain in the single market as david cameron learns, you cannot really end freedom of movement. we somehow have to square that circle. you're asking how we can bring most two wings of the party together, it will be very difficult. we should be debating this subject. peoples opinions and views need to be aired. there are valid and noble views on
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all sides of the debate. i don't think the labour party should be frightened to discuss this. there will be discussions, there is debate, just not a vote on whether the party would a policy of continued remission of the single market? that is right. at some point we will have to determine this. immediately after the referendum i distinctly remember on the very early hours of referendum morning, jeremy corbyn was one of the first to say we ought to invoke article 50 and has said in subsequent interviews that we ought to leave the single market and indeed the customs union. i think barry gardner, our shadow trade secretary, referred to britain as being a vassal state if we remain in the customs union and outside the customs union and outside the customs union. i think the labour party will move to leaving the single market and the customs union. we like to debate things and it will ta ke we like to debate things and it will take a little while longer for us to get there. london's labour mayor said on the
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radio this morning if we leave the eu, as though it may not happen, john, what do you think? will it happen? i heard the interview as well. i think it is going to happen. ok. all well. i think it is going to happen. 0k. all right. christopher?” well. i think it is going to happen. 0k. all right. christopher? ithink we will leave the eu because the only pro eu party who advocated a second eu referendum were annihilated at the general election. brendan, you're going to tell me, it's going to happen? of course, it's going to happen? of course, it's going to happen. thank you very much. this is from hannah. it is not about the labour party annual conference or brexit. it's about diabulimia. we brought you a film earlier made by bbc news beat and bbc three which you can see on bbc three's iplayer channel and this e—mailer says, "i'm sitting here crying watching your report about diabulimia. i'm 37. i was diagnosed
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as type one diabetes when i was 24. since my mother died three years ago, i have had a loss of appetite and have gone from a size 16 to a size 6 in a year. i do eat sometimes, but i don't take my insulin sometimes. i find sometimes, but i don't take my insulin sometimes. ifind it sometimes, but i don't take my insulin sometimes. i find it so sometimes, but i don't take my insulin sometimes. ifind it so hard to control my diabetes and my eating habits and i also have depression. soi habits and i also have depression. so i find it hard to pick up the phone and make an appointment to see anyone. it has been years since i saw anyone and the only time i do, is when i end up in hospital. i wish i had someone like my mum who was close to me who could kick me up the bum. i'm a mother of three. thank you for the report. it is shocking and has made me think about what is going to happen to me." thank you very much for that e—mail. can i urge you to go to the bbc three iplayer channel where you will find many organisations that will be able to help you and in the meantime,
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please go and see your gp as well if you can. if you think you can. birmingham is right at the top of the uk's "crash for cash" postcode league. "crash for cash" scams are run by fraudsters who manufacture collisions with other road users, hoping to make money from insurance claims. in the table, compiled by the insurance fraud bureau, its estimated there were over 55,000 personal injury claims linked to scams in the uk in the last year costing the insurance industry a total of £340 million a year. if you've been a victim of a crash for cash scam do let me know. we can speak to stuart lever in our salford studio. stuart runs a van hire firm in bolton and has been the victim of ten of these frauds. we can also speak to ben fletcher from the insurance fraud bureau via webcam. stewart, good morning. good morning. tell us what happened ? stewart, good morning. good morning. tell us what happened? well, i have had several of these large claims in the past. i have had a claim where we had what we believed to be a vic
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tish shoulds accident and the total bill ended up coming out at £85,000 forjust a minor shunt. 0k. who paid out what? the insurance company ended up paying out. the people who got hit by our vehicle claimed they had brain damage which then sent the claim up to £85,000. which was a spurious claim. how do you know it was spurious? well, it was the way it was done. we couldn't get hold of our hire after the vehicle was just dumped back with us. the insurance company couldn't contact the hire after. it had the hallmarks of something that was a made up claim. the claims came in in dribs and drabs the claims came in in dribs and dra bs afterwards. the claims came in in dribs and drabs afterwards. ben fletcher, is it getting worse crash for cash is a significant problem. birmingham is the top of the hotspots, but we have 160 nationwide investigations under
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management. we estimate there is in excess of 100 of these types of accidents or collisions every single day so it is a significant problem and one that's not going away any time soon by the looks of it. do you think people think it is a victimless crime, ben?” think people think it is a victimless crime, ben? ithink think people think it is a victimless crime, ben? i think there isa victimless crime, ben? i think there is a perception by members of the public and some of the people that are persuaded to take part in these scams that it's a harmless way to make a bit of money to try to beat the system, and that it is victimless, but the reality is far from the truth. these people are taking cars out on to the public road, and therefore forcefully endeucing collisions with innocent members of the public. it is far from harmless and it is far from victimless. stewart, how much has it cost you in terms of your own money in terms of the crash for cash incidents? it could have cost us at least £80,000 over the years because i have to repair the vehicle and the claim just finds its way on to my
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i have to repair the vehicle and the claimj it:finds it's way on to my i have to repair the vehicle and the claimj it certainly; way on to my i have to repair the vehicle and the claimj it certainly isn't on to my i have to repair the vehicle and the claimj it certainly isn't ap to my i have to repair the vehicle and the claimj it ( crime y isn't ap to my victim. you are looking at the victim. you are looking at the victim. it's not the insurance m—m company. theyjust load it on to the policies. of course. have you been able to do anything to try to stop this happening to your vans? we fitted trackers and within weeks of the trackers being fitted we had a claim. it came in. looked like it was suspicious. when the insurance company investigated the claim and interviewed the claimant she said that this vehicle had driven into the back of her. she didn't know anything about it, but the tactor showed that the vehicle was parked outside her court and when she was taken to court she pleaded guilty to fraud. so since the trackers, that's it, it hasn't happened? since the trackers we have never had a problem since. that's good to hear. thank you very much for coming on the programme. thank you very much. ben fletcher, thank you very much as well. angela merkel has won her fourth term as chancellor of germany
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but it was her party's worst performance since 1949. and for the first time since the second world war, an anti—immigrant, anti—islan and anti—eu party will enter the german parliament as the the third largest party. nikolaus blome is the deputy editor in chief for the bild newspaper in germany. thank you for talking to us. good morning. why did so many people vote for the anti—eu party, the afd? morning. why did so many people vote for the anti—eu party, the afd7m is 13% of the electorate is not that much, but it is far more than expected and it's, well, it's a break in post—war german parliamentary history because we never had such a party in the federal parliament. we had them on a regional level. numerous times. but they came and they went off again. and this is like for the first time that such a party openly is
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xenophobic and antiestablishment is entering the bundestag with roughly 100 people. matthew karnitschnig is chief europe correspondent for website politico. and the significance of the afd party getting 13% of the vote. tell our british audience of that significance? well, as nicholas said this is really unprecedented in germany and it's going to up end the political landscape here because germany has been very consensus driven since the second world war really and for the first time you have this openly racist party that's come into parliament and it is not happy about the migration policy obviously, but other core policies of the german government over the past years and decades. sol of the german government over the past years and decades. so i would expect a much more confrontational approach in the german parliament
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going forward. and it's not going to be sort of the cosy days of german politics that many of us have been used to. 0k. nicholas, more confrontational in the parliament... it will change. sorry, go ahead. well, it will change the parliament, that's for sure and it is like the immediate outcome out of a grand coalition which is the second, it was the second grand coalition within 12 years so we had more grand coalition times than any other in the last 12 years and 12 years and as matthew said, it was the cosy days of grand coalition with almost no opposition and this will change now thanks to the social democrats too if they stick to what they said yesterday evening after the polls closed saying well, we will go into opposition. we have to regenerate
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our party and we will have to have an opposition, a strong opposition, besides what we'll do, the afd in the bundestag. that's the one good thing of the outcome that we will have a strong opposition and a majority for the government. matthew, how will it change the way germany treats immigrants and refugees? well, on the ground that might not change that much, but in terms of policy of letting in more immigrants and letting in more asylu m immigrants and letting in more asylum seekers, i wouldn't be surprised if you see pressure on angela merkel to really crackdown on a lot of these regulations we have already seen that over the past year. that will likely continue. and conversely i think she is going to get tougher with europe in demanding that europe do more to share some of this burden because this issue of refugees which a lot of people in the german establishment thought had faded into the background came back in the last weeks of this campaign
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and a lot of people are looking at this and saying that despite the fa ct this and saying that despite the fact that germany is doing well economically and in many other ways, this issue of migration, of foreigners and what it means for germany's future wasn't really dealt with the in campaign or by politician over the past couple of years and that's really come back to haunt angela merkel this morning. very interesting. thank you both. we will bring you the latest news and sport. before that, the weather. here is carol. good morning. good morning, victoria. wasn't it wet on ourjourney to work? we have had a lot of fog, dense fog this morning as depicted by this weather watcher's picture in northern ireland. notjust watcher's picture in northern ireland. not just in watcher's picture in northern ireland. notjust in northern ireland, where we have had the band of rain across the central swathe of the uk, victoria and i werejust talking about, we have had low cloud and generally murky conditions and it is courtesy of this weather front which is not moving quickly and
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continuing to weaken. the fog in the west is starting to lift nicely for many areas and we will see sunshine. here is our weather front producing the rain, increasingly turning more patchy as we go through the course of the day. now, through the course of the day. now, through the course of the day. now, through the course of the day, what you will find is there will be some fair—weather cloud around. we will see a few showers develop across eastern england, but they will be fairly hit and miss. a lot of us will stay dry, but the thicker cloud will be the re m na nts of but the thicker cloud will be the remnants of the weather front. so for south—west england, for west wales, some sunshine, but a few showers affecting wales here and there as we will have across northern england coming out of the thicker weather frontal crowd. over to the isle of man and northern ireland, it's a different story. when the fog lifts, we are looking at some lovely blue skies today. feeling pleasant with highs of 17 celsius in belfast. a similar story across western scotland with one or two showers, but for the rest of scotla nd two showers, but for the rest of scotland where it is raining, there will be some cloud and the rain
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turning increasy patchy in nature as it will continue to do so as we push down parts of eastern england. through this evening and overnight, where we have got the cloud, there will be drizzle and murky. under clearer skies we will see patchy mist and fog forming. out towards the west and northern ireland we are expecting fog this evening, but by the end of the night as the win picks up, that should lift. in the east, where we don't have the wind, well, you'll find that the fog will last into the morning and it's not going to be a cold start to the day, but it is going to be quite a grey one with the fog and with the cloud. through the day, the cloud will start to thin and break and we will see sunny spells coming through, but eastern parts of england once again not immune to showers. they are hit and miss. many of us will miss them and miss. many of us will miss them and stay dry. and in the sunshine highs up to 19, 20, and 21 celsius, it will feel pleasant for this stage in september. out towards the west, it will be breezy, but it's going to turn windier in the west during the
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course of wednesday with some rain coming into some western areas as we move towards central and eastern parts, we are looking at sunshine and warmer. hello. it's monday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. this morning — psychiatrists are being warned they need to "wake up" to the eating disorder diabulimia — where purposefully give themselves too little insulin to treat their diabetes so they lose weight. it is addictive not to use your insulin. you can eat what you want and lose weight. two birds with one stone and all that. if you or anyone in yourfamily has diabulimia keen to hear your experiences of getting treatment. do get in touch in the usual ways. also on the programme — nfl players' protest against racial injustice in the united states continues — with over 20 players kneeling during the american anthem at wembley.
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donald trump has called for players to be fired. wouldn't you love to see one of these nfl owners, when somebody disrespects the flag, to say get him off the field right now? he is fired. he is fired! we'll get reaction from nfl players. and britain's most powerful people are 97% white. we'll look at why there are so few black and ethnic minority people at the top of british society. good morning. here's a summary of today's news. angela merkel is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government. the boat also saw millions of people supporting the far right. she said she would listen
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to the concerns of voters of the afd party to win them back. translation: no doubt about it we hoped for a better result, that is clear. of course we are facing a huge test. the afd entering parliament. we will carry out a profound analysis because we want to bring back —— win back voters of the afd by solving problems and listening to their worries and sometimes theirfears. listening to their worries and sometimes their fears. above all through good politics. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today, as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on the uk's withdrawal from the eu, but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market. the fourth round of brexit talks between british and eu negotiators begins in brussels today. it will be the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech in florence last week, which aimed to break
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the deadlock in negotiations. the united states has expanded its controversial travel ban to include north korea, venezuela and chad, but sudan has been removed. it means that, for the first time, restrictions have been put in place for two non—muslim countries. citizens of nations on the list are prohibited from entering the us because of poor security or the alleged failure to cooperate with washington. an imam is recovering in hospital after he was stabbed in hale in greater manchester last night nasser kurdy suffered a stab wound to the back of his neck after being attacked as he walked to a mosque. two men have been arrested and police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. birmingham has topped the uk's cash for crash postcode league — the second time in a year the city has featured in a table of hotspots for the crime.
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the scams are run by fraudsters who manufacture collisions with other road users — with the intention of profiting from insurance claims. manchester, bradford and london also featured on the list. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. — more at10.30am. we're going to talk more about diet —— diabulimia in the next half an hour. the report we brought you earlier would suggest that potentially some people are slipping through the net. american footballers across the united states and in the uk havejoined pre—match protests in defiance of donald trump. the president says players that
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kneeled during the singing of the national anthem were disrespecting the flag and the country, but that didn't stop hundreds of them joining in the ‘take a knee' protest that first happened over a year ago to highlight racial injustice. wouldn't you love to see one of these nfl owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, say, "get that beep off the field right now, he's fired"? fired! you're going to call every player who takes the knee a beep? huh? tonight i'm taking
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a knee for america. cheering. it's not what leaders do. that guy that disrespects our flag? he's fired. we were going to talk to keith mitchell, a former nfl linebacker for the new orleans saints, the houston texans and
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iamjoined by i am joined by a former vice president who was a member of donald trump's and team. as a form of protest against excessive use of force by police against african—americans, how force by police against african—america ns, how effective force by police against african—americans, how effective do you think it has been?” african—americans, how effective do you think it has been? i think it has been very ineffective. it has hurt businesses. let me first say that they have every right to their freedom of speech. however they are paid to do a job. the fans are upset about a political issue coming into play. in the sporting arena? in the sporting arena. americans go to football games. they get there between 7:30am and 9am and start with mimosas. they are barbecuing. they have a great time to go in at one. we go to sport for enjoyment. asa one. we go to sport for enjoyment. as a result, last week, the 49ers,
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the san francisco 49ers in the los angeles rams game, the stadium was half empty. when the tickets usually are $60 to $200 and they were selling them for $14 and could get takers. is that because of them taking the knee? yes. we have got a sports broadcaster for cbs and taking the knee? yes. we have got a sports broadcasterfor cbs and fox announced he was at the game at wembley yesterday. you have got back there overnight, have you? thank you for talking to us. donald trump says any player who does this should be fired. what do you say? that is not going to happen. what we saw was a bunch of teams and nfl owners who support their players. they are trying to keep this out of politics as mad as possible and turning it into a demonstration and protest for
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change. —— as much as possible. right now i think the ownership in the nfl has firmly been pretty clear in the last 24 to 40 towers that thatis in the last 24 to 40 towers that that is what they want to do. do you agree that people are staying away from the games because politics is being brought into the sporting arena? i think so. being brought into the sporting arena? ithink so. i don't being brought into the sporting arena? i think so. i don't know yet if we have a big enough sample of what this may mean long—term. this isa what this may mean long—term. this is a vocal, i don't want to say minority right now. it is a vocal topic on both sides. it is too early topic on both sides. it is too early to say just topic on both sides. it is too early to sayjust because what has transpired this week and people are not going to turn up at jacksonville, florida, orwall across the country. we have had a lot of talk on social media and a lot of talk on social media and a lot of talk on social media and a lot of e—mails to tv stations on my social media can go saying i am done
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with nfl, i am done with the jaguars, iam with nfl, i am done with the jaguars, i am done with this team and that team. we will see how long that takes to happen and if they will act on that. i think it is working for that whatever the players are trying to accomplish. they are trying to spark change. when you do that you also try to spark conversation. whichever side you agree on and how you feel about it, we spent the entire flight home, there were many pockets in the aeroplane talking about this topic. it is about this conversation and it is not going away. the fact that discussions are being made about it, that we are discussing it right now from the united states to the united kingdom, i think that is a positive for the folks that are trying to spark change. what would you say? he says it is a positive. i agree it is a positive to bring the issue out. i
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don't agree with the fact that these players are paid to entertain and not to bring politics in. here is the other hypocrisy of it. the nfl owners are supporting them. the dallas cowboys wanted to put a decal ona dallas cowboys wanted to put a decal on a helmet saying arm in arm. meaning they supported the dallas police and they were forbidden to do that. if they want their freedom of speech, why do you deny the dallas cowboys that but yet you let people really disrespect our national anthem and our flag? sorry, go on. what the steelers did, only one player came out for the national anthem on the other stayed in the locker room. i think that says a lot more. keep it hidden. let me bring
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in keith mitchell, a former linebackerfor in keith mitchell, a former linebacker for the in keith mitchell, a former linebackerfor the new in keith mitchell, a former linebacker for the new orleans saints and the jacksonville jaguars. they were playing at wembley yesterday from the thank you for talking to a foot is it disrespecting the flag? -- for talking to us. i don't believe it is disrespecting the flag it is about getting the mood out. it has been used in music, you name it. books, etc. the situation still remains. people still have not got it. this is putting the word out on the platform of sport. i don't think it is to do with patriotism or respect for the military. i am retired now but i do for the military. i am retired now butidoa for the military. i am retired now but i do a lot of work with military. these guys put their lives on the line to protect us. they have nothing to do with those guys. it is
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about the injustice in our community. as a black man if you are playing in the nfl at the weekend, which you have taken a knee during the anthem ? which you have taken a knee during the anthem? i would. which you have taken a knee during the anthem? iwould. only in which you have taken a knee during the anthem? i would. only in regards to injustice in the community. nothing to do with the military. sure. do you accept that? it is donald trump who says it is anti—american, anti—military. keith mitchell has said absolutely not he has respect for the military who have fought for people like me and you. i respect his right to do it in his own time, on social media, on his own time, on social media, on his facebook page. here are some of the ramifications. one is that espn has lost 3 million subscribers and, asa has lost 3 million subscribers and, as a result, disney stock has gone down 17.5%. the stadiums are empty. they are absolutely empty and that
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is hurting advertising revenue because people are not watching the nfl on tv. in fact they are estimating 200 million loss in ad revenue. the teams are not making that much money and when there are salary negotiations the players will think about it. they are thinking about it and using a decision, making an informed decision on whether you disagree with it or not. i cannot believe you and your guests are saying it is just a political issue. this issue has hit the world stage and rightly so for the change comes through people who are famous doing things like this. i love visiting the state your guest is wrong. if donald trump as it is here, i will take any. each to his own really, i respect that. i respect their right and i respect the issue and it is a concern, but they're not talking
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about all the money that has gone to make the police forces that were really biassed wear body cameras so it's monitoring their behaviour as well as tracking what's going on. thank you very much. those, protests, of course, began under president obama, it is worth saying. "we've been asleep to it but we're waking up now" — that's what the nhs in england has admitted about a condition called diabulimia. it's a little known eating disorder where people with type 1 diabetes purposely miss essential insulin injections to control their weight. it can be a very hidden illness, where those with it can have a normal body size, but be very unwell. a leading psychiatrist says patients are dying waiting for the right care. radio1 newsbeat and bbc three have been to meet one young woman who is now in recovery. we played you the full film earlier,
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here's a short extract. becky lives daily with the consequences of diabulimia. so the reason i walk with crutches at the moment is because of the damage that i've done to my feet. the surgeon at the time was like, "yeah, your bone is actually like honeycomb and mush". and it's kind of dissolving. it's hard to think that these things are going to be with me for life. she was diagnosed with type one diabetes aged 19. it's not the lifestyle related type, but an autoimmune disease controllable if you take regular insulin injections. but becky stopped doing that. she restricted the mind of insulin she took to lose weight. doing this has no official name, but it's become known as diabulimia. it's a dangerous game to start. and once you started, you become obsessed with it. becky was admitted to hospital when her weight became critical. the next image is shocking. that was the first or second night
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of the others in, that one. i got tubed because i wasn't able to physically it. it's a good reminder of where i don't want to be. becky was lucky that she found support in aberdeen, one of the very few hospitals which combine treating an eating disorder with insulin abuse. charityjdrf estimates there are 60,000 15 to 30—year—olds living with type one diabetes in the uk. and experts believe one in three of those may abuse their insulin to control their weight. the uk's first—ever outpatient clinic specifically for people with diabulimia has been running here at kings college hospitalfor a year. they are treating 40 patients and they tell us that a quarter of them are getting better. but this is just one service in one part of the country. and experts and sufferers say more needs to be done. my observation is that these patients are falling between the nets. and as a result they're getting worse diabetes
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control, they are increasing their risk of getting diabetes complications and of early mortality. i think people are waking up to it. you know, we have been asleep, no doubt. but we are waking up. there is some to do, but we will get there. nhs england says 17 new community eating disorder teams will be set—up and running by the end of this year. now becky is in recovery, she is injecting her incident now becky is in recovery, she is injecting her insulin regularly and working on improving physical disabilities that diabulimia has left with. i think to get a range of movement back my feet so that walking is actually going to be easier, so that i can actually do things that i enjoy, like going on a bike! professor tim kendall is the national clinical director for mental health for nhs england. he says that nhs england is trying to bring physical health and mental health closer together. i was involved in producing the nice
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guidelines on eating disorders, and we devoted a whole section on how you manage people who have got diabetes and who have got an eating disorder. so we spent a deal of effort in doing that. we are now disseminating that around the country. so i think people are waking up to it. we have been asleep, no doubt, but we are waking up. there is some to do, but we will get there. i think in two to three years' time, i want to make sure that everybody, all children and young people with an eating disorder, are seen within four weeks if it's not urgent and within a week if it's urgent. i want that to be at 95%. so everybody with an eating disorder gets seen quickly. now if they have diabetes as well, we have to reach out to those services and make sure we deal with it together. let's speak to lesley and neal davison, who are
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the parents of megan. she is a primary school teacher who took her own life last month. she had diabulimic. also with us drjane morris a consultant psychiatrist at the eden ewe nit in aberdeen. we are going to speak to kt in nottingham. kat got in touch after watching our film. she is 27 and she has been hospitalised several times with diabulimia. welcome all of you. neal, leslye, you want to talk to our audience about diabulimia because that's what your daughter meg arne wanted. megan left a detailed suicide note and the point she made in that was she wanted us a, to help her express her views with her experiences. it helps us to do that. it honours her memory and
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it also means that it's therapeutic for us to do the same thing and it helps us to go through the process and ultimately what she was trying to do is help the people caught up in this situation and she has seen these people in this particular environments and it scares the life out of her and it scares us. we don't want anybody else to be in the same situation as we are in now. tell us about megan. she was a very bright little girl. she did her gcses, she got top a—levels, she was diagnosed just before she took her a—levels. .. diagnosed just before she took her a-levels. .. with type one diabetes? with type one diabetes and because she was 16, 17, she was an adult and therefore, we were kept out of the treatment, partly obviously because that's what she chose. so everything that's what she chose. so everything that she did from then on, she was doing with diabetes and now we've
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discovered also suffering from diabulimia and to look at her, while she got her degree, while she worked for a year, while she was waiting to start her pgc to start the teaching, you wouldn't have known that there was an issue. she kept it from all, but a very close friends. when did you first know that something wasn't right? approximately 12 months ago. i moon that was the first occasion when we were phoned from a hospital where they were just about to section our daughter under the mental health act because she had tried to take her own life. up to that point, she had been very successful and selfless in keeping us successful and selfless in keeping us out of the equation. it would have put undue pressure on her. she wa nted have put undue pressure on her. she wanted to be in control and deal with this thing herself and it was getting out of her control and she realised that and what really upset
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her was the fact that all of a sudden we were involved in that process. we knew about what was going on. and there was a second attempt at suicide and ultimately the third attempt was she died on the third attempt was she died on the 4th august and basically we have had 12 months to process that stuff when in fact it was going on from a much earlier age. much earlier age. how did you discover that your daughter had taken her life? two police officers turn up at the door and itjust, police officers turn up at the door and it just, you police officers turn up at the door and itjust, you knew why they police officers turn up at the door and it just, you knew why they were there. did you? yeah. we knew. having had the two previous attempts, what you were dreading was exactly what happened, that one day two policemen or two police officers we re two policemen or two police officers were going to turn up and itjust, the first thing i said to them was,
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"is it megan? " the first thing i said to them was, "is it megan?" and they, it was go inside, sit down, so you just knew and we had been getting increasingly concerned that although she had treatment and was still in therapy, she seemed to be spiralling back out of control again and that was what we we re of control again and that was what we were dreading and that's exactly what happened. neal, you mentioned that megan left you a very detailed letter. yes. which gave you so much information which you have found helpful. definitely. i know that you are comfortable with reading a little of it for our audience. yes. this is just an extract from a six page this is just an extract from a six pa g e letter this is just an extract from a six page letter effectively. "i really hope that this helps in some way to explain diabulimia. there are thousands and thousands of people out there who do not have the identity issues i have. they actively want life. they knew what happiness was before they developed eating disorders or diabetes, but no one is helping them. their illness
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isn't acknowledged. diabetic doctors tell them they are bad zoetics and mental health experts don't know how to insulin watch. not one member of staff in the ward was trained to administer insulin let alondon understand it. they missed dose and gave the wrong insulin and had to wait for me to point out their mistakes. what if someone were intellectually challenged or sky cottic. it is not good enough. ." we will come back to that point about the mental health side of things and the mental health side of things and the physical health side of things and the fact that there is a gulf. i know that you lesley, are able to read the end of the letter for our audience. the very last paragraph is, "i can honestly say that i've loved you all with all my heart up until my very last breath. thank you for packing so much light into a life that was only going to become darker with time. i've genuinely
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been blessed to be protected and comforted by you all for so many years. with all always, megan." that is very, very disstreging and very, very moving. i'm going to bring in jane morris before we bring in our viewer, kat. what megan wrote about the mental health professionals not really understanding about insulin and the diabetic medics not understanding about the mental health side of things is crucial when it comes to this disorder is it not? megan has clearly nailed the problem. even when we understand both sides of it, this is a very deadly disorder and when it's not deadly, it can ruin quality of life for people with diabetes. but the point is that if we do work together, if we don't go into increasing little compartments of medical specialisation, but we
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increasing little compartments of medicalspecialisation, but wejoin hands, then we can learn how to manage people's diabulimia and i think the secret for us was we met up think the secret for us was we met up with a superb diabetic specialist dr ann gould and we had a number of junior doctors and nurses and dieticians who were interested to organise workshops between the two professions and what we do now is to regularly meet up and also co nsta ntly regularly meet up and also constantly correspondent with our collea g u es constantly correspondent with our colleagues in the diabetic services and they with us... across the country? no, this is in the north of scotland. i am at the moment tacking about our own service. ok. because that information needs to be rolled out across, doesn't it, across the country? well, i think if our experience could be shared across the country then more people would get services and this is not a wildly expensive thing to do. this isa wildly expensive thing to do. this is a matter of colleagues sharing
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expertise and we really enjoy it. let me bring in, kat is with us. i wa nt to let me bring in, kat is with us. i want to read you this text from mike who is a dad. he says, "type one diabetes is a dreadful pernicious condition that is a eye sent killer. it took the life of my daughter at the age of 38 after many years of her thinking she could control her blood sugars simply by how she felt. not measuring and controlling your blood sugar as a diabetic puts you on the road to early death. my daughter's kidneys failed. she developed a heart condition. circulation problems in her legs that ended in gangrene and amputations. control of diabetes with insulin pumps is so much easier andi with insulin pumps is so much easier and i urge all those with that condition to take control of it or it will take your life." kat got in touch with us. kat, good morning to you, hello. good morning. thank you very much for coming on our programme. i appreciate it. you were
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watching our film earlier and programme. i appreciate it. you were watching ourfilm earlier and you too, as i understand it, kat have diabulimia, you are 27, is that right? are you able to get help? i was diagnosed a type one diabetic at seven. my family took charge of my care. there was a distinct lack of education. we werejust care. there was a distinct lack of education. we were just left to it really. when it came to starting secondary school, i began to take charge of my own injections and it became all on me. there was not much support from the hospital. very early on at school i didn't like injecting in front of everyone. there was a lot of stigma. it quickly led me to learn if i did not inject i would lose weight. as well as being accused of being slightly
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overweight, it goes hand in hand. when i would go to hospital, to the diabetes clinic, i would just be told i need to try harder. you are being a bad diabetic. there was no support. no recognition elemental health issues going on. absolutely nothing. the term diabulimia i had never heard. i came across mice —— myself by typing into a search engine. i had never heard anyone else with it or met anyone else with it. we were sort of left to it and it. we were sort of left to it and it got progressively worse. and now? and now i am older. i have been hospitalised before for blood sugar issues relating to diabulimia where
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i have had a condition where the blood is turning acidic and your organs are shutting down. it is very dangerous. i have been in numerous times. i have had two sons over the last few years. my oldest is also type one diabetic. after he was born idid slip type one diabetic. after he was born i did slip back into it, trying to lose baby weight. i actually lost three dress sizes in a month. i went down three dress sizes in a month. the disease each to get back into. there still was not the support available. i wonder if you would like to say anything to lead to cat. our daughter was 27 when she died. —— directly. we can have plenty of sympathy with your situation. insulin starts off as being your friend. it is the one thing that will keep you alive if you deal with
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it in the right way. quickly, based on the knowledge that also is an effective way of losing weight very quickly, it really becomes your enemy. and insulin, iwould say, becomes an association with weight andl becomes an association with weight and i think that is part of the problem. what would you say as a co nsulta nt problem. what would you say as a consultant psychiatrist? you hear her say it was easy to slip back into not taking the insulin. what would you say to her? that is of course the nature of an eating disorder, to keep slipping back. it is important to do everything you can to refresh your motivation and talk to people, try to hold herself committed to recovery whenever you possibly can. you have to keep picking yourself up and doing it again, as all my patients would say. it is so worthwhile. specially when you are now a mother and a role model for somebody else with
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diabetes, i would encourage you... you are now on national television. you are now on national television. you are now on national television. you are saying to the whole world you want to get better but i do hope that your doctor, your gp, is on board with you and your family because families can really help. perhaps you have come across a website for diabetics with eating disorders. it is run by a group of people with diabulimia. they can be very inspiring. they are a group with great solidarity. i would encourage you to look after yourself. will you do that? tha nkfully yourself. will you do that? thankfully i have been very stable for the last few years. i found have motivation in my family and a lot of support. i do take very good care of myself now. i'm also on an insulin pump. i have found... every day is hard. you have to consciously think, i need to take my medication, but
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gets progressively easier when you're ina gets progressively easier when you're in a more positive situation. well, i am so grateful. i never underestimate what it takes to come onto national television to jog right things like this which are so personal to you for that thank you so much. i have some messages. simon says that such brave parents trying to raise awareness for diabulimia. thank you so much. your dignity will save lives. ed says, brave parents. too sad to think that even with such support and clearly a very bright daughter the end was so you. thank you. thank you for coming onto the programme. thank you for your time as well. and you can watch bbc three's documentary — ‘diabulimia: the world's most dangerous eating disorder‘ which is on bbc three's iplayer channel now — where you can also find more information and support if you're affected by any of the issues raised in this programme. time for the latest news.
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the german chancellor, angela merkel, is beginning the process of forming a new coalition government, after yesterday's election when mrs merkel won a fourth term. mrs merkel said she had hoped for a better result. labour will set out to unite its members over brexit today, as it looks to calm growing anger over the subjects that will be voted on at the party conference. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, will give a speech on the uk's withdrawal from the eu, but there will be no vote on contentious issues such as staying in the single market. the fourth round of brexit talks between british and eu negotiators begins in brussels today. it will be the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to theresa may's speech in florence last week, which aimed to break the deadlock in negotiations. japan's minister has announced a
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snap election. he will dissolve parliament on thursday. it is seen as an move to take advantage of his improved ratings. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now withjess. fifa is expected to lift the ban on football teams wearing a poppy. last year england, scotland, wales and northern ireland were all fined by fifa, for their use of the poppy to commemorate armistice day, deeming it to be a political symbol. the world governing body is expected to change the rules in early october. nfl players either knelt or linked arms during the american national anthem yesterday, when the jacksonville jaguars & the baltimore ravens played at wembley. president donald trump denounced the protest and called
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for the players to be sacked. billy vunipola is now injured again after injuring his knee. more sport throughout the day on the bbc news channel. this just in. the 16—year—old girl has been arrested on session of attempted murder in humberside it has just come on session of attempted murder in humberside it hasjust come in on session of attempted murder in humberside it has just come in from humberside it has just come in from humberside police. a 61—year—old woman has been taken to hospital with stab wounds following an incident at the school. the woman is a welfare officer at winterton academy was that she has non—life—threatening injuries. a 16—year—old girl arrested on suspicion of attempted murder. she is currently being questioned by officers. pro—eu labour mps have expressed their anger after no brexit motions were chosen to be
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voted on at party conference. our political guru norman smith is at the labour party conference in brighton. hello. hello. how you doing? there isa hello. hello. how you doing? there is a terrific row going on in the conference hall over there on brexit. i want to start with this thought. this conference really is something out. i say that because of thejeremy something out. i say that because of the jeremy corbyn something out. i say that because of thejeremy corbyn phenomenon. i have never seen anything like it. i remember when tony blair was in his heyday and there was huge enthusiasm for him. it is quite astonishing, the sort of passion forjeremy corbyn amongst many, many labour people here. just have a listen to the start of the conference and the sort of reception he got. cheering and applause
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#jeremy corbyn!# extraordinary, isn't it? in my living memory i don't recall a party leader getting that sort of response. in a way it is a little bit odd because so much of the
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labour party now almost seems to be built around the person narrative jeremy corbyn. i put it to one of their treasury team this morning, jonathan reynolds. i said, are you co mforta ble jonathan reynolds. i said, are you comfortable with this sort of personality cult around jeremy corbyn? we have seen before with very popular leaders. tony blair was very popular leaders. tony blair was very popular. no doubtjeremy very popular leaders. tony blair was very popular. no doubt jeremy corbyn has been able to do something which very few thought possible. it is remarkable to see the kind of rallies he pulls an up and down the country. i thought those days were gonein country. i thought those days were gone in terms of how the british people reacted to british politics. there are 13,000 passes issued for the conference. it is in brighton. not easy for some parts of the country to get to them that there is huge interest here. labour fields rejuvenated. people have said, comparing with the tory conference where people do not go any more. it has to be a good thing for us. let's
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just park the jeremy corbyn personality issue. the other huge issue at the conference is brexit. there is an extraordinary debate taking place in the conference hall at the moment. very passionate and very charge. heartfelt arguments on all sides. an italian lady got up and said, i do not feel welcome in this country any more. another woman got up and accused pro—eu mps of demonising people. on the plus side, this is what politics should be about. this is what conferences used to be about when it was not all top—down and control people said what they felt. boy, oh boy, is it passionate argument!” what they felt. boy, oh boy, is it passionate argument! i accept the result even though i was not asked to participate. i do not accept it means that brexit cannot be stopped. i think brexit must be stopped and labour needs to be seen to contribute to that end. otherwise we will be judged. we will be judged on
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enabling a brexit which is hurting the country and will continue to do so the country and will continue to do so for decades to come. in my constituency we did not vote for brexit. we want to take a few minutes to explain why we did that. firstly we are debating brexit today for that we did not need to take up more time to discuss brexit when we can use it to discuss things like our nhs. you voted away a chance to preserve the massive opportunities that our young people have through erasmus and programmes like that, opportunities for people to work and do business wherever they please within 27 states of the european union and wider economic area. now thatis union and wider economic area. now that is still bumping on. a lot more
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very charged interventions. from the point of view of the party leadership they will not be terrific happy. the tensions and disagreements over brexit are laid bare for everyone to see. as a journalist, it is great. you have open debate and open argument for that i can't help feeling that this problem what people want from politics. probably, yes. thank you very much. more throughout the week from brighton. football's world governing body fifa is set to lift the ban on the poppy following talks with the football associations in the uk. last year england, scotland, wales and northern ireland were all fined for their use of the poppy to commemorate armistice day because it was deemed it to be a political symbol. england and scotland wore the emblem on black armbands during their world cup qualifier at wembley last november. wales and northern ireland displayed it in their stadiums. last year theresa may called fifa's stance "utterly outrageous. i think the stance that has been taken by fifa is utterly outrageous. our football players want to recognise and respect those who have
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given their lives for our safety and security. i think it is absolutely right that they should be able to do so. it's for the football associations, but i think a clear message is going from this house. we want our players to be able to wear those poppies. and i have to say to fifa, that before they start telling us what to do, they jolly well ought to sort their own house out. your reaction to the fact that this is like lin to be lifted soon? i'm surprised after everything that fifa said, the fact that they are changing their mind and accepting that the poppy is our national symbol of remembrance. it is not a
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militaristic or a political symbol, it isa militaristic or a political symbol, it is a symbol of remembrance and sacrifice and i'm overjoyed that they are saying you know what, you can wear it on your armbands. i am not one of those people who say you must wear a poppy. if you don't want to wear one, that's fine by me, but nobody should be able to tell us, you can't wear one. the new wording of the fifa law will tighten the definition of what is deemed a political symbol commemorating any living or dead person? we're getting wrapped up in the precise words. i had a look through the original wording before i came on and fifa is wrapping itself in knots. i understand why they don't want some symbology, but that's not to say you can have an overall ban on everything. the poppy is not a
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militaristic symbol. it is not a nationalistic symbol. it's a symbol of sacrifice. it has been our symbol of sacrifice. it has been our symbol of sacrifice. it has been our symbol of sacrifice since they started growing in the flanders fields in 1918. there was nothing political about it. it was about the death and the sacrifice and how we would never forget that death and sacrifice from 1918 or the death and sacrifice that we see today which is why we're so celebratory of our invictus games and everything that's going on there. it is not about mill tarrism, it is about remembering what our men and women in our armed forces do for us so and women in our armed forces do for us so that you and i can live in safety a nd us so that you and i can live in safety and in peace. and your online petition has contributed to this, no doubt? well, i would not want to accept any responsibility for that to be honest. it allowed a focus of attention. it allowed people to say, "we don't agree with that. we should
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be allowed to wear our national symbol." thank you very much. john nickle, former raf navigator. a seventh person has been arrested by detectives investigating the parson green terrorist attack. a 20—year—old man has been arrested at an address at cardiff at 6am this morning under section 41 of the terrorism act. he has been taken to a south london police station where he remains in custody. so far, seven people have been arrested as part of the investigation into the parsons green terrorist attack. a holiday—maker arrived home from france and there was an illegal immigrant hiding in his boot. he is called paul edmond. hi paul. how are you? i'm good, thank you. tell us what happened ? you? i'm good, thank you. tell us what happened? well, we were away for a long weekend and on our return, left our hotel, put all the
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bags in the back of our pick—up truck. did a little bit of shopping in calais before we came back. got through to the shuttle port, went through to the shuttle port, went through immigration, went through passport, both borders, the french and the british control. parked up. my and the british control. parked up. my friends that were with us and my wife went for a coffee, i decided to go for a sleep and that's probably when he got into the vehicle. was it not locked? no, it wasn't. iwas catching a nap before we drove home. we had a five hourjourney home and he must have crept in at that stage and that would have been, we think, on the passport control side, you know. when did you notice him? we didn't notice him until we come back
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to our village in mid—wales. we had a couple of stops for petrol and toilet, but we didn't know anything until we started to unload the vehicle and hey press owe there he was. what did you see first of all? we started to take the shopping out and some goodies and i noticed a par of dirty trainers and i won't wondered whose ed were and i said, "whose are these and the next thing i noticed was a pair of legs attached to them. what conversation did you have? he couldn't speak english and i knew what had happened and guessed that and just gestured really had he come from calais and he said calais, yes. he asked was it england and i said yes and then he sort put his hands together to make a prayer, a prayer sign with his
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hands and smiled and you know, actually we were in wales. did you ascertain where he is from originally? yeah, he said that he was from africa. what part of afterrica, we don't know. and now, where is he now? well, we obviously phoned the authorities and the police came, the local police came and they were there in 15 or 20 minutes and took him away and said they were going to take him, there was a holding place in newport, south wales. so we know nothing. we know nothing. do you want to find out what happens to him? yeah, it would be quite interesting, you know, things like this don't happen every day in your life, but it would be quite interesting to see how he ends up. whether he gets asylum or not, but i think that's what he was here for. interestingly he had a mobile phone and i think he was trying to contact or make contact with the people whether it was this side of the water or back in france,
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i don't know, but i'm guessing he may have wanted to get in touch with his friends this side of the water or other migrants. thank you, paul. thank you for talking to us. you're welcome. the home office say that the young man will be dealt with in accordance with immigration rules. a man will appear accordance with immigration rules. a man willappear in accordance with immigration rules. a man will appear in court today for an extradition hearing after being arrested over the alleged kidnapping ofa arrested over the alleged kidnapping of a british model in italy. chloe ayling was snatched last month. we were due to speak to chloe ayling today but she pulled out overnight. her agent told us "she's very anxious about today's hearing and she's not up to doing the interview. she won't be attending the court, but hopes that her alleged attacker will be extradited to italy to stand trial." we're hoping to speak to chloe ayling on this programme later this week. ba rely
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barely 3% of britain's most powerful and influential people are from black and minority ethnic groups. 13% of the population are from bme backgrounds. so why the huge difference? let's talk to the director and one of the founders of operation black vote which helped compile the colour of pour we are data. we have got the police and crime commissionerfor data. we have got the police and crime commissioner for derbyshire and he is the first aronly person to hold such a role from a ba me background. hello. hi. tell us more about the research you did simon. we think it is ground—breaking research. i want to thank our partners for making this process and this research. look, ithink partners for making this process and this research. look, i think we have the opportunity to have a potentially fantastic debate about
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who wields power. power is nonexistent. in a post brexit world we need all the talent we can muster to turbo charge britain plc. when you say path ways to power, what are you say path ways to power, what are you talking about? some significant path ways, first, education, the route to power, it is vital through education. when you consider there are five public schools that account for 50% of the intake of oxford and cambridge, as opposed to 1800, you can see that class and privilege rank high. secondly, of course, then you see government and you see how that's disproportionately white. they make our key decisions. we need more diversity in there. then, of course, when you're going forjobs, david cameron said it is a national scandal that a black woman has too to change her namejust
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scandal that a black woman has too to change her name just to get an interview. yes. thank you for talking to us. in terms of your reaction to the fact that 3% of 97% of the most powerful people in british society are white, how do you react? well, it's not surprising. it's something that i'm aware of. i'm pleased to be in that small minority. but the work i'm doing as the first bme police crimer in policing in england and wales is to really work on how policing can have more, a better representation of diverse communities that they police and represent. what practical measures are you bringing in to change things we are trying to pursue the principle of the public are the police and the police are the public which means that if you wa nt the public which means that if you
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want to have confidence, co—operation, and support of the public, in terms of helping policing to be carried out, you need to reflect those communities. so, all across the country there is no single police force which represents their population in their workforce and there is a challenge that's been put out to police and crime commissioners across the country to proactively work with their chief constables to close that gap. in derbyshire, there is 3.4% of our workforce is bme. 6.7% according to the 2011 census is, the population diversity in derbyshire. so i'm working with the chief constable through positive action to see how we can actually close that gap and actually see how we can increase the confidence of people from bme communities to think that they can have a career in policing. and also increase confidence of people in the
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force to actually recruit bme communities. a final thought. if you did the search in ten years, do you think the figures will be different? we have to have the conversation first. open up the pathways. we believe in every street, in every city in in every corner of the country, there lies talent. we need the framework so everybody is excel. everybody benefits, black and white, britain plc is turbo charged. thank you very much for coming on the programme. on the programme tomorrow: who are generation z? they've grown up only knowing the internet and war on terror, but what else makes them tick? youn us tomorrow. have a good day. thanks for watching. good morning. a bit ofa good morning. a bit of a brim start to the weather
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week for some of you. the rain will ease a little bit, turning light and patchier. it has not been raining everywhere. for some, it patchier. it has not been raining everywhere. forsome, it will patchier. it has not been raining everywhere. for some, it will be a day of sunny spells. the best of the isn't shine is across parts of northern ireland, western areas of england and wales and scotland. the morning fog is starting to lift and shift. we will see more in the way of brightness break through the cloud across eastern counties, but in between this zone of grey, cloudy weather, mist over the hills and patchy rain or drizzle, but a mild and muggy day. that mild and muggy weather stays with us through tonight. temperatures not dropping too much. the weatherfront tonight. temperatures not dropping too much. the weather front that's been bringing the rain or drizzle remains stranded across the uk. producing hill fog. tomorrow may start grey again. the morning mist and low cloud will start to thin and break. a few showers around, but for many of you a brighter day than today with temperatures peaking at 15 to 20 celsius. bye for now. this is bbc news, and these are
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the top stories developing at 11. labour divisions over brexit. labour denies it is stifling debate after rolling out a vote over contentious issues at its conference. angela merkel wins a fourth term in office, but now has to form a coalition government amid a surge in support for the right wing nationalist party afd. two men after —— are arrested after a man was stabbed outside a mosque in what police described as a hate crime. no sign of an end to the row between president trump and us sportsmen and woman over protests
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during the national anthem. we have great people representing our country, especially our soldiers and first responders and they should be treated with respect, and when you get on your knee and you do not respect the american flag or the
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