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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 25, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm clive myrie. the headlines at 8.00: labour has pledged to end the use of private finance initiatives to fund public building projects i can tell you today, it's what you've been calling for. we'll bring existing pfi contracts back in—house. we're bringing them back. the german chancellor angela merkel says she wants to win back the voters who deserted her party for the far right afd in yesterday's election. michel barnier says real progress on the uk's divorce bill is essential before any discussions on transitional period can begin. the boss of uber has apologised for making mistakes and said it will make changes to win back its licence in london. and the pentagon says if north korea doesn't stop what it calls "provocative actions," it will provide president trump with military options it comes as north korea's foreign
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minister accuses president trump of declaring war on his country. and, all eyes on the turner prize, as we look at the four nominees for one of the art world's most prestigious awards. good evening and welcome to bbc news. labour's shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, has used his keynote party conference speech to announce a radical revision of the way labour would fund large scale building projects. he's pledged that a future labour government would take control of so—called private finance initiatives. it would mark a huge shift in policy. for 25 years, under both conservatives and labour, private companies have built hundreds of schools and hospitals and then been paid to maintain them. mr mcdonnell described the amount of money going to these
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companies as a scandal. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. any spare change... a couple of quid for the speech, but how much to take schools, hospitals, prisons, builtand run by private firms, back into public control? jeremy corbyn‘s best political friends would be in charge of a labour government cheque—book and today he promised they'd look at all pfi contracts and take the bulk back into tax payer's hands. let me give you this commitment, we'll put an end to this scandal and will reduce the cost to the taxpayers. how? well, we've already pledged there will be no new pfi deals signed by us in government. but will go further and i can tell you today, it's what you've been calling for.
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we'll bring existing pfi contracts back in—house. we're bringing them back. they loved it here. an audience full of union members. there had been complaints for years about some of the worst deals and companies creaming off profits. we've seen millions of pounds wasted in pfi buildings and contracts. that's money down the tubes. all the money we are having to pay in interest to big businesses, it will mean that money will come back into services. for 20 years though, tory and labour governments paid private companies... this is proceeding on time and on cost? on time and on cost. ..to spread the cost and the risk of big building projects. new labour, now old—fashioned, didn't want to raise taxes to pay. the reason why we weren't doing the investment is because we are scared to death of not doing a proper tax policy. that debate better start. mr corbyn, do we know how much the pfi bill will be? but injeremy corbyn‘s labour,
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pfi would be a thing of the past. the pfi contract you announced today, do you know how much this is going to cost? i'm going for lunch, you heard the speech, you'll see all the details. there's no detail in the speech, how much is it going to cost, sir? the party says they'd buy a private contacts buy out private contacts with government bonds or borrowing. when are we going to get more details, sir? but it's not clear how much they'd be willing to do, or how many of the existing 700 contracts they'd unpick. the devil is always in the detail. we've got to find out how much this will cost. i've got no doubt whatsoever in paying for it, it will still be better value for the public purse, for the taxpayer than letting these contracts run for the next 20 years. but do you accept though to start with, to take these contracts back in—house, that would at least, in the short term, cost the taxpayer a lot of money? of course it will do, we can't borrow. of course it will do, we can borrow. there's nothing against borrowing. yet this feels more than anything,
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a point of principle. some of them were badly formed contracts which have ended up being rather expensive, but you are not going to save money by getting out of them because presumably, you will have to pay the companies with which you've got the legal agreement in order to get out of them. these days labour doesn't agree on everything. but the election has given this party new confidence to act on its conviction, not driven by cost. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in brighton. good evening. has anyone in the labour party cost to drop this measure will actually end up paying, end up being value that? they were not giving any details. they have been pressed throughout the day to say what the answer to that question would be. another member of the labour treasury team said it would be pretty self financing. paul
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johnson from the iss, who we heard in that report didn't dispute that. he said it is possible that in the end it pays for itself because we would be paying this money anyway as the taxpayer, schools and hospitals are paying that money back to hospitals. the fear some have is how you get out of these contracts. they could last 25, 30 years and in order to get out of that, what do you do? there was a suggestion that the government, if labour were in power, could change the law, said this is the prize we will give you and that. i would be pretty controversial but it is the question that is asked many times and john mcdonnell‘s speech was full of promises like renationalising the railways and possibly the water companies, electricity services, railway services, abolishing tuition fees. all these things have a price tag and there was higher taxes for those
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earning over 80,000, higher corporation tax as well, but some would say it wouldn't be enough to front this. but some in labour don't have a problem with that, they think interest rates are so low, borrowing to invest to build good hospitals, run hospitals and get the money where it is needed, they think it is a perfectly acceptable way for the labour government to go. they have a lwa ys labour government to go. they have always said, with interest rates being so low, there isn't a problem borrowing. but we know the bank of england is talking about possibly raising interest rates. we know there are issues with the economy at there are issues with the economy at the moment. 0ur taxes, there are issues with the economy at the moment. 0urtaxes, raising taxes, is that a policy that is potentially seriously being talked about at conference? what has happened in the past is labour parties in the past have been very fea rful of parties in the past have been very fearful of going into an election promising rises, particularly in income tax. back at the election in june, that was in their manifesto,
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it was for higher paid wealthier people. labour did pretty well. the feeling here, some were saying, we won the election. of course they didn't, but there are others fearful here people are a bit too blase about that and there is a long way for labour to go and they have to be careful with these promises. if the point we are heading for another general election and it looks like jeremy corbyn could be prime minister, all these policies will be questioned, they will be costed. labour said they cost of them last i’ow labour said they cost of them last row row but there will be a lot of scrutiny about that and it has to be they credible on all of this. we have heard figures from andy burnham, the mayor of greater manchester, is concerned tuition fees, it will cost a lot of money to abolish them. we have to think carefully about what you would like to do with that amount of money. it is an age—old question and won the tories will seize upon, accused labour of having their sums not add up. but people are fed up with
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austerity, they want to live the public sector pay cap and they want a government to front public services. vicky young, thank you very much live in britain. we will find out how this story plays out on the front pages tomorrow. we will tell you what they are reporting tonight. my guests will be baroness roz altman and the author mihir bose. the fourth round of brexit negotiations got under way today and there is some hope that theresa may's speech in florence last week might help to break the deadlock. britain's brexit secretary david davis is in brussels again for talks with the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, who said he is still waiting forfirm proposals from britain. prime minister theresa may's speech
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in florence showed a constructive spirit. today i discussed the state a plague of the negotiations in the european parliament this morning and just now. the european union is keen and eager to understand better, how the uk government will translate the prime minister's speech into negotiating positions. this is essential and would enable us to advance this week, i hope and make real progress over the coming months. real progress on the three main issues, citizens, ireland, financial settlement, is essential to move to the discussion on the transition as well as on the future. the brexit secretary, david davis, at the same, short briefing, told journalists,
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without either man taking questions, that he was confident that progress could be made on one potential stumbling block to a deal being struck. 0n the financial settlement, as part of a smooth and orderly exit, we do not want our eu partners to worried they will need to pay to worry they will need to pay more or receive less over the remainder of the current budget plan as a result of our decision to leave. the uk will honour commitments we have made during the period of our membership. but it's obvious that reaching a conclusion on this issue can only be done in the context of and in accordance with, a new, deep and special partnership with the european union. so the uk is absolutely committed to work through the detail. we are laying out concrete proposals and there are no excuses for standing in the way of progress. it will take pragmatism on both sides to make headway and i hope we can achieve that this week.
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thank you. the german chancellor angela merkel says she wants to win back the voters who deserted her party for the far—right afd in yesterday's election. she begins herfourth term in a weaker position and has to build a new coalition government. to do that she needs to secure at least half of the 709 seats in germany's parlieament. mrs merkel‘s party has more than a third of the seats. the second biggest party has already ruled itself out of a coalition. so that leaves the smaller parties. but the chancellor has already vetoed a collaboration with the anti—immigration, anti—islam afd. 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticas is in berlin and sent us this report. in the heart of german democracy, the far right is back, with dozens of seats in the bundestag. germany's parliament is a building that consciously preserves the scars of the second world war, a reminder to germans of the destruction the far
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right visited on europe. they are far from power, angela merkel endures her position as europe's pre—eminent politician unchallenged for the fourth term as germany's chancellor, but weakened. translation: we had wished for a better result, of course. we are now trying to analyse the votes we lost, especially those which went to the afd. we want to win those people back by addressing some of their issues. this is where many will have to be won back, east berlin and across the former east germany. a million voters deserted mrs merkel‘s party for the far right, many because they believe that during the refugee crisis, she lost control over germany's borders. i didn't like angela merkel because there was no stopping the refugee policy. it was all too quick. translation: i think we should give the afd a chance to see if they are really for the state and democracy and for everyone. but at the very first press
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conference today, splits in the afd were already emerging. frauke petry, one of the afd‘s leaders had just one seat in parliament, and turned on her colleagues. translation: it's been said that the afd has become an anarchic party, that could only be successful in opposition, not to govern. but i want to make real politics, so i've decided i will not be part of the afd in the bundestag. and she walked out saying they were becoming too extreme. the party, already arguing with itself in public. it's remaining leaders are sticking to their line, that the influx of a million refugees means germany is losing part of itself. we don't want that, that's why we've won so many votes, they said. and it's notjust the far right, germany as a whole looks to be
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entering a period that will be more fractious, more divided, diverging angela merkel‘s energies as she tries to cobble together a coalition and tackle the challenges she faces here and across europe. damien grammaticas, bbc news, berlin. i can now speak to charles lees, a professor of german politics at bath university. how significant is this resignation of the former chair of the afd? don't read too much into that. it is staffed by people with large egos. she has always been a loose cannon, she oversaw the original rebellion against the original leadership of the afd and then was overthrown this
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year and replaced as lead candidate bya year and replaced as lead candidate by a team of two slightly less impressive candidates, in my opinion. she has not been happy about being defender straight it in that fashion and having won the single constituency seat in saxony, which was unexpected, she has taken the chance to cut loose from the party and go her own way. she has some longer game she intends to play. given all that, how influential do you think the afb will be in the bundestag? these populist parties, there was a comment made by an american academic, these parties ask the right questions but they come up with the wrong answers. right—wing populist parties are articulating a number of questions that are being asked by people in the population
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who feel they have not done well out of the last 25 years of global capitalism. the kind of answers they come up capitalism. the kind of answers they come up are capitalism. the kind of answers they come up are unacceptable to most voters and pretty much all of the political elites in western europe and elsewhere in the world. it is up to parties to listen to the concerns they are tapping into and come up with answers to those concerns that are consistent with their own policies. what we have seen in practice is parties have tried to attack to the right to neutralise these right wing parties and this hasn't always worked. it has tried to legitimated the message these right wing parties are putting out. the afd will want to disrupt the system, through the german political class of balance and will want to portray themselves as the gallant outsiders being shut out from power bya outsiders being shut out from power by a corrupt and self—serving political class, which, by
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implication, means the voters they can mobilise mobilising, also being shut out by the german political elite class. angela merkel is trying to find coalition partners. the social democrats have made it clear they don't want to play ball with her cdu, is she going to be able to get together the greens and the free democrats, will they be her natural partners now? natural is probably the wrong word, it is going to be a nightmare putting together a coalition which includes the afd... they are incompatible, they disagree on lots of things, like how to tackle climate change. they have different approaches to political economy. i can different approaches to political economy. i can see different approaches to political economy. i can see angela merkel, in a sense it plays to her strengths in that she holds the ring between these two parties but constructing a
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meaningful programme to go forward and address its concerns, is going to be very difficult. it is going to bea to be very difficult. it is going to be a very hard coalition to manage, ha rd be a very hard coalition to manage, hard coalition to form, in fact having said that, the other parties had no choice but to go along with it. there is a norm in germany that the main political parties take funding from the state, have a responsibility for the stability of the german political system. it is really not possible for the greens of the ftp, if they are the last hope of the political class to walk away from a coalition agreement with angela merkel. they will have to make it work, but it is going to be very difficult. thank you for joining us. the headlines on bbc news: labour has pledged to end the use of private finance initiative to front
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private finance initiative to front private building projects. angela merkel says she wants to win back the voters who deserted her party for the far right afd in yesterday's election. michel barnier says real progress on the uk's divorce bill is essential before any details of any transition period can begin. sport now and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. gareth barry has become the premier league appearance record holder, playing his 633rd match tonight against arsenal. the west brom midfielder was named captain. he released jay rodriguez in for a shock. was tipped on to the post by petr cech. jake livermore couldn't
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capitalise on the rebound. arsenal have just scored. 20 capitalise on the rebound. arsenal havejust scored. 20 minutes capitalise on the rebound. arsenal have just scored. 20 minutes gone and arsenal lead i—0. the fa insist they're confident that following last week's sacking the right procedures are in place to prevent a similar issue arising now or in the future. sampson was dismissed following evidence of "inappropriate" behaviour in a previous role. brighton forward tomer hemed has been charged with violent conduct by the football association over an incident in yesterday's match against newcastle. hemed, who scored the winner in the 1—0 victory, is alleged to have stamped on newcastle defender deandre yedlin in the 88th minute. he has until 6pm tomorrow evening to respond to the charge and faces a three—match suspension if found guilty. gordon strachan‘s announced his squad for the two world cup qualifying matches that will seal scotland's fate next month. leeds captain liam cooper has been recalled...
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while leigh griffiths is one of six celtic players in the squad. after winning their last two games... scotland face slovakia and slovenia in october... knowing victory in both would all but guarantee a play—off spot. i spoke to one or two lads and they are looking forward to this. they think it is huge and they all want to be involved in it. between them and the 5 million people who are supporting us at the moment is, i know they are because i bump into them every day, they are supporting us. we are looking forward to a great occasion. we know it can be an occasion, it could be disappointment, but we are not thinking that way. gareth mcauley is backin thinking that way. gareth mcauley is back in the northern ireland squad. he hasn't featured since he limped off against azerbaijan injune. all is there are some first call ups.
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huge to have gareth back. i know he has played in a cup tie the west brom for 65 minutes. hoping he will play against arsenal. just as presents within the squad and on the pitch is massive. he is always a player that has been great. i looked at his performance consistently and he has been immense. we missed him in recent games, although we got the the results we wanted, but it is a lwa ys the results we wanted, but it is always good to have him back. johanna konta's recent run of bad form has continued in china where she has gone out of the open at the first attempt. the british number one loss to the australian ashleigh barty in the second round in china. she lost the first set to love before recovering to take the second and then served for the match in the decider before losing in the tie—break. england's billy vunipola
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said he'd accept taking a pay cut to play fewer matches with the number eight facing another four months out injured. his comments came before his latest injury to his knee, but after missing the lions tour with a shoulder problem, hill now have to sit out the autumn internationals. he isa sit out the autumn internationals. he is a natural big loss but nathan came in last year when billy had a similar injury and was outstanding. he had a terrific autumn and a great signal emissions as well. here's a quy signal emissions as well. here's a guy who can slot in fine and i think the back row is a hugely competitive area anyway the back row is a hugely competitive area a nyway across the back row is a hugely competitive area anyway across england. alexandre lacazette is given arsenal the lead against west brom tonight. that is all the sport for now, more coming up later on. north korea's foreign minister has accused us president donald trump of declaring war on his country and said pyongyang had the right to shoot down us bombers even if they were outside north korean airspace. in a show of force over the weekend, us lancer bombers flew in international airspace over waters east of north korea.
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the pentagon has warned that mr trump will be "provided with options" to deal with pyongyang if it continues its "provocative actions". a 16—year—old schoolgirl has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder following the stabbing of a school welfare officer near scu nthorpe. the 61—year—old woman is being treated for serious injuries. she was attacked this morning at winterton community academy in north lincolnshire. dan johnson reports. at the start of the school day at this small—town comprehensive, it was shaken by an incident that ended with a member of staff seriously injured and a year in ii people under arrest. we reacted immediately and were on scene in minutes. the pupil had been detained by staff and treatment was being given to the victim. a stabbing involving a knife? that is what we believed. we understand the incident took place in an office away from children. the 61—year—old hurt is a welfare officer and she is in hospital being treated for what are described
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as serious but not life—threatening injuries. the headteacher was one of the first to see what had happened. when i arrived in the office there were a number of staff dealing with the situation and administering first aid, restraining the students. this is the opposite of the big inner—city school where you might have problems like this. completely. we are all surprised. the score stayed open but after a text alert many the school stayed open but after a text alert many parents to children home. we had a message to say there had been a serious incident and everyone was safe. the kids said they were locked in the tutor room so panicked. i want to get her home now. officers expect to be here most of the week and are still questioning the 16—year—old girl, held on suspicion of attempted murder. a seventh person has been arrested by counter terror police investigating the parsons green tube bombing. the 20—year—old was arrested in cardiff in the early
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hours of this morning. he's been taken to a police station in south london. it brings the number of people in custody to four, one of whom was charged on friday with attempted murder. siddique khan has told the city to be available to meet uber after their licence was revoked for public safety concerns. it has been said it wasn't perfect unrecognised the need to change. tom edwards reports. its licence has been revoked but even today the demonstrations against uber continued. these were cab—drivers in brighton, joined by the capital's taxi trade. down here they have also felt the impact of uber drivers from london. they are here, stealing our livelihoods. they work here, stay the night in the car.
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trouble is, our council has no jurisdiction over them. uber, where you can smartphone to hail a car has radicalise the industry. in london the licence was stopped over its approach to serious offences. to criminal record and drb checks and medical records. the black cab trade are delighted. they are making out tfl is the bag i put uber do not want to play they are making out tfl is the bad i put uber do not want to play by the rules everybody else does, taxi drivers and legitimate private hire. if they do not want to play that game you drop out of the game. 3.4 million londoners are registered with the apt and a petition to get it reinstated has hundreds of thousands of signatures. uber admits mistakes. now it wants talks and to change. you are confident your dbs checks were good enough? we have been following the rules
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ever since we launched in london. we have been audited many times by tfl and always passed unknown request to do anything different have been made of so this is an area we need to understand better. my understanding is last week's announcement should not have come out of the blue to uber. there had been contacts between tfl and the company. i also understand tfl's concerns about uber are not yet in the public domain and could emerge during the legal appeals process. the mayor has told tfl officials to meet with the company. i welcome the apology from the global ceo of uber today. acting with humility and recognising the issues raised by tfl, i wish uber uk had been less aggressive and more humble. what i have said to tfl staff, they should make themselves available for the global ceo
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who appears to understand some of the concerns raised by tfl. this is a long way from being over and the appeals process could take months. in the meantime uber can continue to operate. prince harry and his actor girlfriend meghan markle have arrived together at the invictus games in toronto. it's the first time the pair have appeared holding hands in public. prince harry founded the invictus games for disabled and wounded servicemen and women in 2014. the competition is meant to support their recovery and rehabilitation. time for a look at the weather. sunshine all grey skies? nothing in between. a lot of cloud over the tending to push its way west, the
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cloud well and we could get some low local food. some drizzle cloud well and we could get some low localfood. some drizzle here cloud well and we could get some low local food. some drizzle here and there but not as wet as earlier today. a good deal of cloud around with temperatures around 13—14. many places starting of grey, misty and murky, things brightening up, much drizzle tending to fade away, a bit of sunshine here and there could trigger some light showers down eastern side of england. an onshore breeze keeping cool, damp it in the north—east of scotland and breeze picking up, breaking the cloud in northern ireland with top temperature towards the south—east of england. we look west to see patchy rain in northern ireland, wales and the south—west, many areas north and east are probably having a dry and bright day and still quite one for the time of year. you are watching bbc news. this is bbc news,
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our latest headlines. labour has promised to end the use of private finance initiatives, where companies pay the upfront costs of large public sector projects, then lease them back to the government, charging interest. i can tell you today. it's what you've been calling for. we'll bring existing pfi contracts back in house. we're bringing them back in house. we're bringing them back.we're bringing them back. the german chancellor angela merkel says she wants to win back the voters who deserted her party, for the far—right afd in yesterday's election. this the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier, says real progress on the uk's divorce bill is essential, before details of any transition period, can be discussed. the white house has dismissed as "absurd" the north korean foreign minister's statement that president trump's warning to the leadership in pyongyang amounted to a declaration of war. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has asked transport for london, to sit down to talks with the taxi hailing firm uber. it follows their ceo's apology for mistakes he says uber has made, resulting in it's license to operate in london, being revoked.
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a fourth round of brexit talks is taking place in brussels between british and european union negotiators. it's the first since theresa may's speech in florence on friday which was designed to break the deadlock in the process. well we can speak now to chris morris, who's covering the story and other developments for us now in brussels. is one thing that has changed in the last few days is the tone of these negotiations, that was set by the prime minister ‘s speech. negotiations, that was set by the prime minister 's speech. the rest of the eu was listening carefully. they saw a different tone from the last big speech he gave in london on brexit at the beginning of the year. everyone saying the sounds more collaborative but, from the eu side, they say we still need more detail on things like a potential financial
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settlement, on the issue of sitters and brother are right and other things. the british side say, pointing to mrs may's side of the link, we have given proposals, you can no longer stall progress. listening to them as they stood next to each other opening the talks, it seemed like they were talking past each other rather than talking to each other rather than talking to each other. even though the tone has improved, i think that is still a problem. michel barnier also briefed mrto limit the problem. michel barnier also briefed mr to limit the ministers from top the other 27 states including the italian that presents did was interesting because he was in florence last friday when theresa may spoke. he listen to her than he listen to michel barnier today. i asked afterwards how he think the deadlock could be broken. there is a lot to be done. still. i think that what is important, to start to put the negotiation on a
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better track. the road was going to better track. the road was going to bea better track. the road was going to be a difficult road, the less bumpy it is, the better. i wouldn't dramatise the fact that we make it we cannot make it by october, if there is some progress, ithink we cannot make it by october, if there is some progress, i think the european council in october should ta ke european council in october should take stock of progress. if this purposeis take stock of progress. if this purpose is there, but is not sufficient, we should name at the european council in december. wouldn't dramatise it, is important to is to get the right dynamic in the negotiations. you can hear from that that it doesn't think it really matters in a way if we don't start talking about trade which is what the uk once in the next few weeks. the problem is but if saying we can't really sort out these initial issues until we know what a future trade relationship looks like. but we heard from michel barnier today that not only will he not move on to the future trade talks, he doesn't even the future trade talks, he doesn't eve n wa nt the future trade talks, he doesn't even want to talk about transition until these issues like a financial settle m e nt until these issues like a financial settlement and citizens' rights are
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resolved. so there's a real problem still as there was when these talks began, with the sequence in which things take place. thanks, chris live in brussels. more now on yesterday's german elections, with the far right populist movement, afd, confirmed as the third biggest party in parliament. it's promising to tackle what it calls ‘an invasion of foreigners' into germany. the result is normal because people are disappointed chancellor but there is no alternative that this is why people voted for her. it is disappointing that a ft made such a big game but also logical. the a ft boat is to contest the establishment. we can say that in four years' time, this party will no longer be playing an important role. germany has always had a worldwide recognition excepted by everybody.
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but with this afd, they won't ever be the same. somehow, we also have to understand the people, not their vote but their despair. now chancellor merkel faces months of coalition talks to try to form a stable government. 0ur berlin correspondent damien mcguinness has the latest. for the election campaign was sedate but building a coalition won't be. that's because angela merkel will be the chance again talked for a fourth term, she will have to cobble together a coalition was four parties, her own centre—right cdu, the bavarian conservative sister party, the free—market liberals and at the other end of the spectrum, the green party. all these parties have very different views on key issues like the economy, refugees, eurozone reform, she will find it difficult to get an agreement between all these parties. it will
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ta ke between all these parties. it will take a long time, potentially weeks or months. today, angela merkel said she wished for another result. that's because more votes for more seats in parliament would have given her a stronger hand at building a coalition. but we have to figure out some agreement because that is the mandate the german people have given them. meanwhile, this new anti—migrant afd party, has entered parliament. they are also seeing splits emerging within their party. during the election campaign, two factors within the party, the pragmatic side if you like and the radicals, have papered over their difference not to stay voters. but today after the election results, those differences became clear. co—leader announced that she would not sit in the parliament with the afd. that was a sense of breaking away. she is the leader of the pragmatic side, she wants to be part
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ofa pragmatic side, she wants to be part of a girlish governing toned down the nationalist rhetoric in their party. she wants to take away this toxic reputation that the party has. in order to enable other parties in germany to work with her. the radical end of the party does not wa nt radical end of the party does not want that, they have said they will stick to their core values and now is who splits emerging between those two parties. the afd managed to get a decent sewing, almost i3% of the vote, a lot of seats in parliament, that was done. there will find it more challenging to actually be in parliament, because that means getting the parties together, getting the parties together, getting party loyalties. that's the challenge they will see over the next parliamentary period. a surgeon who treated victims of the manchester arena attacks has been stabbed in a suspected hate crime. nasser kurdy was attacked in greater manchester yesterday. he was taken to hospital, and has since been discharged. police are questioning two men over the attack,
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as judith moritz reports. i don't know. this he had something in his hand. moments after he was stabbed, this is nasser kurdy inside the mosque where he had gone for prayers. mr kurdy was on his way into the building when he became aware of another man across the road. moments later, he was attacked. so i had to run into the hall and i felt threatened. today, he is recovering at home, and is very thankful to be alive. i remember a heavy blow to the back of my neck. and that was after i've entered the premises. it was a total shock. i genuinely felt he was going to run after me into the mosque and just carry on what he started. it felt that way. the anger that was coming across was quite clear to me. greater manchester police are treating the attack as a hate crime but have not classified it as terrorist related. they've arrested two
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men aged 5a and 32. this is an active muslim association. the building used as a mosque for prayer and to hold classes is for hundreds of children. whilst leaders here have told me they do now intend to increase security, they also say they want to reassure parents and worshippers that they should continue to come here as usual. nasser kurdy has been watching the footage of himself after the attack. an orthopaedic surgeon, he operated on some of those heart in the manchester arena explosion. last night he was treated in hospital by his colleagues and he's very aware that his neck wound could have been a lot worse. there's a lot of vital structures in that area. and some of them can be fatal. there's no two ways about it. some of them can be very disabling. nasser says he won't be deterred from going to mosque, and he has been comforted by the support he has received from people of all faiths.
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judith moritz, bbc news, altrincham. japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, has called a snap election, saying he needs a new mandate to deal with the growing threat from north korea. polls suggest voters approve of the hardline stance taken by abe on north korea, which has fired two missiles over the country in the space of a month and has threatened to "sink" japan. north korea's foreign minister has accused us president donald trump of declaring war on his country and said pyongyang had the right to shoot down us bombers even if they were outside north korean airspace. white house spokesman sarah sanders dismissed the statement from pyongyang. not at all, we have a acquired war on north korea and frankly the suggestion of that is absurd. what is the reaction to north korea threat to shoot down us air crash evenif threat to shoot down us air crash even if not in the essbase chris
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wright red is never appropriate for another country to shoot down another country to shoot down another country's aircraft when it is in over national water. we seek to have the deed utterly knackered denuclearisation of peninsula. it needs to be through diplomatic pressure. but a un spokesman said fiery talk could lead to fatal misunderstandings. 0ur correspondent nada tawfik is at un headquarters in new york the pentagon is apparently drawing up the pentagon is apparently drawing upa the pentagon is apparently drawing up a list of options for president trump in dealing with pyongyang? absolutely. we have had this kind of back and forth between north korea's leaders and president trump, the pentagon on saturday salute bombers to the east of north korea in international waters, the furthest north of the demilitarised zone in the 21st century. after the north korean foreign minister there
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responded to that saying that after the us had essentially in fairview declared war on north korea, they felt they have the right to self defence and would take countermeasures including taking down any aircraft even if it is not in the essbase. the pentagon this morning saying they will give the president further options. it looks like both sides, there is no side that either will back down from the task rhetoric. not only has the un spokesman said there could be fair fettle understandings, we have heard from the chinese ambassador saying this is getting too dangerous, that it is time for both sides to come down from the get negotiations because the alternative is disaster. if the north koreans decided to attack any american aircraft that could be flying in that area,
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military aircraft, then we could be on the verge of something that would escalate beyond anyone's imagination? the white house spokesperson sarah sanders said that it would be against international law if north korea did that. you would be talking about a major escalation in what has been so far limited to tough words and a show of force on both sides. but is never really crossed that line. if north korea did take that step, that would change things considerably, and i'm sure the united nations there would bea sure the united nations there would be a rush to try to see what could be a rush to try to see what could be done. this is why there is some concern at the united nations at the moment, because there is this fear that this is going down a very dangerous path, that both sides need to calm down the harsh rhetoric, you've heard that from leaders across the board drawing killing
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un assembly last week, both sides need to take a pause and reassess. labour has pledged to end the use of private finance initiatives, to fund public building projects. the german chancellor angela merkel says she wants to win back the voters who deserted her party, for the far—right afd in yesterday's election. half the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier, says real progress on the uk's divorce bill is essential, before talks on any transition period, can begin. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. let's return now to the labour party conference. the shadow chancellor has pledged
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that the party would impose the same limits on credit card debt repayments that apply to pay day loans. the effect would be to restrict the amount that any borrower had to repay — in charges and interest — to twice the amount originally borrowed. so, does this sound like a good idea? with me is the personalfinance expertjasmine birtles, from moneymagpie.com. thanks forjoining us. on the face of it is ita thanks forjoining us. on the face of it is it a good idea? it seems to me everything all of these ideas have a good and bad side. on the bad side, if this were implemented and the current government says they don't think it is worth doing, but if it were, then it would be likely that credit card companies would withdraw certain credit cards. it is probably the ones that are aimed at people with poor credit etc. that is not helpful in one sense, it reduces
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the options for certain people to get loans. they might go to more expensive, maybe more dangerous ways to get loans. but on the good side, if you look at the figures, it is a bit crazy that you should get to the point where the interest and charges that you are paying, come to more than the original amount that you borrowed. so as they say, it has worked with payday loans companies, a lot of them have closed down. but to me, it seems like a sensible way to me, it seems like a sensible way to go. in this particular sector. we are getting a comparison here between access to credit which can go up, and the interest rate would go up, and the interest rate would 9° up go up, and the interest rate would go up the more you borrow, and if fixed loan that you get with another company. are we talking apples and pears or apples and apples. apples and apples. with a credit card, you have the same interest rate, it's just that if you only pay the
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minimum, and if you're not paying it at all, you get more and more compound interest and you get charges as well. this all mushrooms after a while. it's easier if you can pay off more each month, then you will pay less in actual interest over time. this is the annoying thing with interest. certainly, compound interest. just over a few months, if you don't manage to pay the debt of fully, sort of compound in can grow really fast and quite worryingly. that is, i think, what overta kes worryingly. that is, i think, what overtakes people plus of course, charges. if it can be capped, that would help those who are in what they call persistent debt, it is said in money advice service, but there are over 3 million people in this type of persistent debt, they just can't get out of it. they are not paying off the debt, the interest is accruing to the charges
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are occurring, they get to the point where they have paid off enough that they borrowed and more which is a bit crazy. as you say, the danger potentially is that credit card companies will withdraw giving cards to people who perhaps slightly more risky, as clients. therefore, potentially driving those slightly more risky clients into others' forms of trying to get loans, which could be even worse? high this was a lwa ys could be even worse? high this was always the argument against capping payday loans companies. it's kind of needs to be not so much a carrot and stick but a more holistic approach. if the government can take these and do the sort of caps but at the same time, put more money perhaps into credit unions, for example, to help people do go to those, credit unions are like non—profit banks, law or call savings and loans. they will often give small loans to people and
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helped them to budget. the ideal would be to push them in that direction if possible. and more of these helpful lenders, if you like. there are some, not many, but some on the market, who will not fully strum and who will help them to pay back or will be able to tell them you can't have that money, you have to do without this or that for a while but let's help you budget so you can afford it later on. the discount supermarket chain, aldi, has reported record sales in the uk and ireland. despite the rise, the german company said operating profits were down by nearly a fifth , amid a price war among supermarkets. it plans to open 70 new stores this year and said britain's decision to leave the european union would have no impact on its plans for expansion. a man who fell 30 feet down a disused tin mine in cornwall has paid tribute to the search and rescue team who he
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says saved his life. 51—year—old andrew williams had been out walking with friends when an opening to the mine gave way, plunging him 30ft down a mineshaft. trapped in a disused tin mine, 25 metres underground. rescue teams said it was one of their biggest ever challenges. they struggled for six hours in a deep and narrow shaft. securing ropes, installing pulleys, to try and reach the casualty. and then try to get him out. this afternoon, one of the rescue team took me back to the mine entrance. you can see how narrow this bit is. and whilst it opens out a bit more... the man was trapped in a ventilation shaft, deep beyond this point. almost impossible to reach. a lot of mines we would be working in are big, open mines. where actually bringing someone back up to the surface is quite simple. here was a lot more difficult.
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such a narrow space, half of the width we are talking here. so just how narrow are we talking about? we are talking a space kind of like this, narrowing to something this kind of size. at its biggest constriction. racing against time, a combined force of 50 emergency responders. with volunteer search and rescue teams underground trying to get a specialist stretcher to the seriously injured man. all of you volunteers? yeah, we had a shop owner, a primary school teacher, taxi driver, offshore rig worker. eventually the man was brought out and taken to hospital with a suspected broken pelvis. tonight his condition is said to be stable. the man was on a walking holiday with an experienced group of friends but the incident has raised questions about whether the mines should be sealed off. this is cornwall history,
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this is what cornwall is. we are on part of the heritage coast here. poldark is filmed just down the coast here. come and enjoy cornwall history but don't take any risks. these are dangerous places. u nsta ble roofs, u nsta ble unstable roofs, unstable floors. andrew williams is due to have surgery later this week. he says he hopes to get back to walking very soon. jon kay, bbc news, cornwall. the winner of this year's turner prize, one of the best—known prizes in the world for the visual arts, will be awarded in december. previous winners including damien hirst and grayson perry. each year four artists are short listed, and the curator of the exhibition, george vasey, has been telling us about each of this year's candidates. hurvin anderson is a painter and works across landscape portraiture in still life. her to significant
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exhibitions last year. each artist is nominated for a show or project they've done in the previous year. anywhere in the world. her paintings refer to the british landscape tradition but also his own heritage. his most famous paintings of partnerships that refer to his upbringing but also to the afro—caribbean communities that establish this barber shops in terms ofan establish this barber shops in terms of an entrepreneurial spirit when they came to the uk. his work move between the figurative and abstract. andrea buttner is much more diverse printmaker but she also makes sculptures and collaborative project. she is showing a range of works but one work is basically a big fluorescent yellow wall, that's fabric from security guard uniforms. she's interested in value, how things are perhaps undervalued and
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bringing the gravitas to them. thinking about labour that maintains and protects public spaces because it's you dignity is taken for granted. what we are trying to do with this year's prize is embedded in the finance. we are seeing the long —— in the fennins. it has a reference to the history to hull. lubaina himid has been working since the 1980s and we're showing fashionable marriage which mixes hogarth's fashion a la mode from the 18th—century, updating it for the political climate. what you are seeing in it is margaret thatcher as the countess and ronald reagan as her lover. she is still making really urgent, interesting work that deals with slavery and the contribution of black people and
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culture. there's lots of meaty ideas in there, it's a serious thought this was serious time. we live in a political climate at the moment but there's lots to see. the galleries in the centre of the city and free, so we are asking people to give us a bit of time and curiosity and i think they will be surprised by what they see. rosalind nashashibi is showing to works, vivian's garden and electrical gaza which commission from the imperial war museum to make a film from the imperial war museum to make afilm in from the imperial war museum to make a film in gaza. she's a documentary film—maker but her work as scripted and state element. in this film is the animated sequences, she talks about this film be a way of countering the usual media depiction of gaza and its citizens. articulate the contradictions he felt on the visit there. time for a look at the weather. sunshine or grey skies? nothing in between.
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a lot of cloud overnight tending to push its way west, the cloud and we could get some low local fog. some drizzle here and there but not as wet as earlier today. a good deal of cloud around with temperatures around 13—14. many places starting off grey, misty and murky, things brightening up, much drizzle tending to fade away, a bit of sunshine here and there which could trigger showers down the eastern side of england. an onshore breeze keeping cool, damp it in the north—east of scotland and breeze picking up, breaking the cloud innorthern ireland with top temperature towards the south—east of england. on wednesday, we look west to see patchy rain in northern ireland, wales and the south—west, many areas north and east are probably having a dry and bright day and still quite warm for the time of year. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source live from berlin. angela merkel looks
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set for a fourth term as german chancellor, but it's her party's worst result in 70 years. translation: of course this shows we have not responded satisfactorily to the themes and situations that are important for the people. as party leader, i take my share of the responsibility. the spd of martin schulz also lose votes and are quick to announce they were quitting the grand coalition to head into opposition. the far right afd were the big winners, coming third in the polls. butjust a few hours later they were already
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