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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 26, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, it is tuesday 26 september. parents demand answers. a public hearing is held for the first time into an epilepsy drug that has harmed thousands of children. the drug valproate has been linked to autism and physical abnormalities in 20,000 british babies. a safety review will look at whether enough is being done to warn pregnant women about its dangers. also this morning: north korea accuses the us of declaring war, and threatens to shoot down american bombers, even if they are outside north korean airspace. after dating for more than year, prince harry and meghan markle make a public appearance together for the first time, as the two walk hand in hand at the invictus games. businesses caught up in terrorist attacks could be losing thousands of pounds in lost trade,
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because they can't claim on their insurance policies unless they have suffered damage to their buildings. i will be finding out more later. in sport: lacazette strikes again. arsenal's summer signing scores twice against west brom. he has found the net in every premier league game he has played at the emirates. also this morning: should scrums and tackling be banned in schools rugby? we will speak to the doctor who says the government must put an end to what she calls harmful contact. and carol has the weather. morning. good morning from south london, formally at deer park, now owned by the national trust. weatherwise, it is a dull start for many of us. there are some fog around as well, giving way to sunny spells and just a few showers in the east. but it is going to feel quite warm for many of us again today. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: women
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from across europe whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb will give evidence at a public hearing in london today. the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of valproate, to see if warnings were passed on. it is estimated that 20,000 children have been harmed in the uk alone. the company behind the drug, sanofi, say doctors need a range of therapeutic options to help women with epilepsy through pregnancy. here is our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. lillias and ian's son was diagnosed with severe learning difficulties when he was three years old. it was caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate, that lillias took when she was pregnant. the couple say they asked the doctors whether it was safe to take the drug while expecting, and were later horrified to discover they had been wrongly reassured. devastated, upset, angry. just — i felt i was let down by the health service.
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it is estimated tens of thousands of children across the world have been harmed after being exposed to valproate medicines in the womb. it carries a 10% risk of physical problems, and a 40% risk of developmental disorders. today, a safety review by the european medicines agency will look at whether new warnings on pillboxes in the uk, and a range of other strengthened measures, are actually reaching women of childbearing age. the uk's medicines watchdog, the nhra, says it supports the review, and stressed it is important that women don't stop taking valproate without first discussing it with their doctor. parents from across europe, like lillias and ian, with children harmed by sodium valproate, will give evidence to the public hearing, amid concerns that babies are still being damaged by the drug. sophie huthinson, bbc news. and, just after 8:00am this morning,
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we will speak to a mother who blames the drug for harming her daughter. labour claims the nhs needs a £500 million bailout from the government in order to avoid a potential winter health crisis. jon ashworth, the shadow health secretary, will call for the money to be spent on boosting the number of beds, as well hiring extra staff. let's get more detail on this from our political correspondent iain watson, whojoins us from the party's conference in brighton. good morning. it is interesting, isn't it? we hear these claims that the money is needed, but the big question is where is the money going to come from? well, that's right. there is no doubt that money tends to be needed during the winter spike in demand in the national health service, because a&e targets in england have been missed over the last two years, and labour are warning that 10,000 people, that is their estimates, could be affected u nless their estimates, could be affected unless there is a cash injection this year as well. but as you say, whereas the money coming from is a question which is being asked by labour. they say the top 5% of owners should pay more in tax, as far as they are concerned, and
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certainly the shadow health secretary, jon ashworth, he is very clear that he doesn't want to be outbid on the national health service by the conservatives. so we will always see labour offering more money. the question is how much can they spend on how quickly. sometimes it is difficult to make use of an immediate cash injection. the government will say they have a robust target for the nhs in any case. but not just robust target for the nhs in any case. but notjust the nhs, but others in the labour party are asking about their plans, a former labour investment minister claiming they will need a range of plans, including the cost of policy announced yesterday to take back from the private sector into the public sector a lot of the big public sector a lot of the big public infrastructure projects through the private finance initiative. and, in around an hour's time, we will be talking to labour's shadow health secretary, jon ashworth, about that bailout proposal. that is at 7:10am. north korea's foreign minister has
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accused president trump of declaring war on his country, and says pyongyang has the right to shoot down us bombers. the white house has dismissed the statement as absurd. let's speak to our correspondent danny savage, who is in seoul. thank you for coming on the programme. the spat just thank you for coming on the programme. the spatjust continues, doesn't it? it does, it sounds alarming, but it has to be put into perspective. what you have is north korea interpreting the actions of the united states, that is the words of donald trump is at united nations and on twitter, and they are saying what he has said is a declaration of war, and the white house has said, hang ona war, and the white house has said, hang on a minute, that is not the case, that is absolutely absurd. and overnight the white house has tried to strike a much more diplomatic note, if you like, saying that they are still striving towards the denuclearisation of this peninsula through peaceful methods. another element to this is what the north koreans said, because you have
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declared war on us, and that is what we think if you fly any more of your bombers close to our coastline, as you did at the weekend, even if they are in international airspace, we will reserve the right to shoot them down. now, saying and doing it hard to make different things, so whether they will or not, we will have to wait and see, and when the americans did fly this mission, the furthest north that they have in years, they we re north that they have in years, they were a long way off the coast, may be out of range of north korean missiles. if they keep doing that, they will keep the lid on this, but if they get too close, and there is a military confrontation, then we could get something more serious. the prime minister, theresa may, is due to hold talks with the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street later today. mr tusk represents the eu heads of government, who will decide next month if enough progress has been made on so—called divorce issues to allow trade talks with britain. so far, the eu has refused to discuss anything but the irish border, the financial settlement,
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and citizens‘ rights. a 28—year—old man will appear in court today charged with assaulting a surgeon who was stabbed while he made his way into a mosque. nasser kurdy was allegedly injured outside altrincham & hale muslim association in cheshire on sunday. ian anthony rook, of no fixed address, will appear at manchester city magistrates court accused of grievous bodily harm and possession of a lethal weapon. prince harry and his girlfriend, meghan markle, have made theirfirst official public appearance together, at the invictus games in toronto. they walked hand—in—hand before sitting together to watch wheelchair tennis at the sports event for injured service personnel, which was founded by the prince. sarah campbell reports. finally, pictures to accompany a royal love story. the couple have been together for over a year, but until this week have gone to great lengths to keep their relationship out of sight. no more, their
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affection for each other obvious. prince harry is in toronto as the founder of the invictus games, and this is home for meghan markle. she stars in a tv show, which is filmed in the city centre. they're shown here on their way to watch wheelchair tennis, looking casual and comfortable in each other‘s presence. harry told the bbc they have loved the games. toronto as a city has embraced the games. they have come here to support all the nations. young people and their parents are coming out and asking questions and learning stories. the pictures will feature on front pages around the world. in a recent magazine article, meghan markle said they were a couple, and in love — and it shows. indonesia's national disaster agency is warning that the mountain agung volcano on the island of bali has entered a critical phase, and that an eruption is imminent. nearly 60,000 people have now fled the slopes of the volcano. however, some have remained
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in the danger zone, out of concern for their livestock. it is the first time mt agung has threatened to erupt since 1963. the uk's chief medical officers are being urged to protect children from the risk of serious injury by banning scrums and tackling in school rugby. newcastle university researchers say they have new evidence that removing contact from the game would reduce concussion as well as head and neck injuries. we would love to know what you think about this. is it nanny state, is it doctors gone mad, or is it protecting children? a sensible measure to protect children from dangerous head injuries. they can hear people shouting at their televisions already. and that is
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just at us! unusual wedding photo shoots are a popular trend among newly—weds but one couple in canada got more pictures than they bargained for after the groom saved a young boy from drowning. clayton and brittany cook were posing for pictures on a bridge in ontario when they spotted the youngster, who had been pushed into the river while playing with friends. the groom leapt into action, diving into the water in full wedding attire, before pulling the boy to shore. i don't know if that picture was taken before or i don't know if that picture was ta ken before or after. i don't know if that picture was taken before or after. they look fantastic. that is a wedding day to remember. are you a hand holder? public display of affection... harry and meghan probably had to. public display of affection... harry and meghan probably had tolj public display of affection... harry and meghan probably had to. i hold hands with the kids a lot, probably don't hold hands with my wife as
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much as i should do. it must be weird, to plan within minute detail, even an appearance like that, do we hold hands? do you stand this site? do we interlock fingers? the intrusion into everything that they do... just leave them alone, and let them crack on. apparently it means they are definitely going to get married, because they have held hands in public. my new favourite premier league player, lacazette, it is just such premier league player, lacazette, it isjust such a premier league player, lacazette, it is just such a lovely thing to say, and he is proving a good purchase for arsenal, especially at home. but gareth barry deserves a mention, breaking the record in premier league appearances. unfortunately for him it was a loss. arsenal are up to seventh now thanks to their third home win in a row. summer signing alexandre lacazette scored twice in a 2—0 win over
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west brom, whose midfielder gareth barry broke the premier league appearance record. following last week's sacking of england women's manager mark sampson, the fa say they are confident the right procedures are in place to prevent a similar issue arising again. johanna konta's wretched run of form has continued with defeat in her opening match at the wuhan open, in china. she has now lost all of her last four matches. and great britain bobsleigher misha mcneill has hit her fundraising target of £30,000, after the national governing body withdrew financial support, so they will go to the winter 0lympics. she believes they can win a medal in pyeongchang next year. that is my favourite sports story this morning. the women's bobsleigh tea m this morning. the women's bobsleigh team had their funding withdrawn, co ntroversially, team had their funding withdrawn, controversially, and they have gone ona controversially, and they have gone on a crowd funding website and managed to raise enough money to get to the winter olympics. fabulous. it
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is like our version of cool runnings. let's have a look at the papers. you can imagine, it is meghan markle and prince harry on all the front pages, the picture that says we are so in lurve. did they say it lurve? no. on the front page of the daily telegraph, together at last, they have been dating since 2016. the lead story is the fourth british isil kingpin unmasked, a terrorist with links to the manchester bomb, so says the daily telegraph. the front page of the times, the same picture you can see there. labour vowing more state control, with a £200 billion raid, based on whatjohn mcdonnell was saying yesterday. today we are
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speaking to jon saying yesterday. today we are speaking tojon ashworth, at 7:10 a.m., talking about that. the front page of the sun is looking at the university, an oxford university student who stabbed her boyfriend in a rage. she was spared jail yesterday, critics criticising the judge for being out of touch, because he said he feared a spell in prison would damage her career. what are you folding over there, steph? this is drawn taxi that has been tested in dubai. into resting, isn't it? this is a way that they are testing carrying people around. it isa are testing carrying people around. it is a lot bigger than this man's
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head. it called the! a little mini helicopter? -- drone. to rome taxi. -- it is helicopter? -- drone. to rome taxi. —— it is called perspective. —— at drone taxi. it was in the around five minutes. it is a german attack firm who has developed it. interesting, there was a big ceremony in it to buy yesterday. we all kick off about the size of chocolate bars being reduced but you pay the same price. jaffa quakes. followed by a sixth —— fallen.
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pay the same price. jaffa quakes. followed by a sixth —— fallenlj pay the same price. jaffa quakes. followed by a sixth -- fallen. i eat six in one sitting and six in the next sitting usually 15 minutes later. i loved them. in quick succession. if he eats them back, thatis succession. if he eats them back, that is one. there is nothing new, either. i went out to dinner last night but i couldn't wait, i had to eat three jaffa cakes. other brands are available. they are very nice. you know how you guys are talking about rugby and whether we should be banning tackling and scrums in school, a huge row about similar topics brewing in the professional sport itself. we heard about another
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injury on the weekend. he said he would take a pay cut to play fewer games because he is concerned about the toll on his body. lots of rugby stars coming out over the last 2a hours or so saying players might even strike if plans go ahead to extend the season. they want to extend the season. they want to extend it to 11 months per year and players are coming out saying their bodies cannot withstand it. an interesting piece in the times as well, just picking a team of people what might have been. a team of top talent. bad boy in the oven. is it thenit talent. bad boy in the oven. is it then it go? of varnish, that isjust
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cheating. carol will be our conker expert. she is out and about. it's starting to feel like autumn which means it's time to get the varnish, shoelaces and drill out as conkers season is upon us. carol's is out and about on the hunt for them this morning. if you are wondering what a conker is, it is then that you get inside the green spiky cup shall that falls from the chestnut tree. i am here in south london in what used to be at deer park. hopefully here is where we see some of the conkers. there are conker that running under the screen are conker that running under the screen right now. some people say they did spiders. that could be because of their scent but that is not scientifically proven. if you put them in your wardrobes and you have moths, it will deter them. that again, ido have moths, it will deter them. that again, i do not know but it is worth again, i do not know but it is worth
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a try, probably. this morning, not a cold start but we have a dull start with some fog. the fog especially across eastern scotland and the coast and north—east england but also in land around east england and the midlands. that will slowly lift as we go through the course of the morning. then we see a brightening up morning. then we see a brightening up process. we will see the low cloud then and the low level cloud lift. some sunshine will come through. the wind will pick up in the west as well. through western scotland, a warm southerly coming your way. once again, scotland, a warm southerly coming yourway. once again, we scotland, a warm southerly coming your way. once again, we see sunshine around 18 celsius. across northern england, a similar story. the sun will come out and we are looking at the risk of a shower but hit and miss. anywhere across eastern counties of england today. most of us will miss them all together, though, with a dry day.
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you could catch the odd sharp shower in east anglia. highs in london of 20 celsius and the midlands down towards the south coast, the isle of wight, again, sunny skies. the outside chance of a shower but that is all. another fine afternoon with sunny spells coming through and for northern ireland, a similar story. the wind picking up but it is a southerly so it will feel pleasant. over the evening, we will see fog patches form. low cloud across south—eastern england and the wind will strengthen in england and northern ireland with coastal gales possible. we also see rain by the end of the night. tomorrow, the band of rain will very slowly move eastwards through the course of the day. it will also be windy. ahead of it, after the dull start with cloud around and missed and fog, it will lift and through central and eastern
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areas, once again some sunshine coming through. temperatures generally in the high—teens but again around the london area and the south—east, we could hit 21 or 22. by south—east, we could hit 21 or 22. by the end of the day a game, another front coming in from the we st another front coming in from the west and it will move across the country. either time you get to thursday morning, it will be a cross the final feast of scotland. behind it, a ridge of high—pressure built in —— north—east. the outside chance of shower but that is also another fine and dry day for most of us. but by the end of the day, another atlantique front waiting in the wings to bring in some more wet and windy weather. not too bad for most of us over the next couple of days. good luck with your conker hunting, carol. excellence in use. —— news. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning:
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a snapshot of the challenges faced by families who adopt children has revealed that the majority of those questioned had faced violence or aggression from the youngsters they'd taken in, that's according to research by bbc radio four‘s file on four programme and the charity adoption uk. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been speaking to one couple who experienced problems after bringing up a little girl as their own almost eight years ago. you may find some of the details upsetting. jane and keith met late in life and wa nted jane and keith met late in life and wanted their own family. they tried ivf with failed and then decided to adopt. —— which have failed. you'll actually is very cute, very bright, she had a strong mind and then things started getting more and more challenging after that. we have a lot of empathy, a lot of love to give but nowhere did we imagine that to adopt would be as awful as it was. by the time their daughter
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louise was six, jane and keith were struggling to cope. we have changed the names of everybody involved to protect their identity. it became a fight every day. she would punch you, she would hit you, she would run away, she would spit at you and it wasn't just one run away, she would spit at you and it wasn'tjust one incident at day, it wasn'tjust one incident at day, it wasn'tjust one incident at day, it was about 30. around five and a half thousand children are adopted in the uk every year. radio 4's final four programme conducted a survey with adoption uk. almost 3000 doctors and —— responded. the results are just a snapshot. they show that almost two thirds of families say their child had displayed aggressive behaviour, one third believed they didn't receive a full and correct information about their children before the adoption and also a quarter said the adoption had already been disrupted. after yea rs of had already been disrupted. after years of struggle, jane and keith
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reached breaking point. the relationship was at risk and they decided to hand louise back to the kerobokan authority. it was heartbreaking because if you like you are a failure and you are to blame but you havejust you are a failure and you are to blame but you have just try to mend it. -- blame but you have just try to mend it. —— to the local authority. blame but you have just try to mend it. -- to the local authority. we received a report recently that the wii is witnessed birth father burnt, bit and raped louise. if we had been given that information before we had considered, we would have said no. we weren't equipped to deal with sexual assault of any sort. they had to give you all the facts before you decide and this was a glaring gap. said she has been back in care, she has had a team of about eight people, various foster carers, therapeutic teams, psychologists, psychiatrists. had we had all of the
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support we had now... we would have had a fighting chance. we would have had a fighting chance. we would have had a fighting chance. we would have had a chance. they share all the information they have about a child, that was said. the department of education in england told us that help is available for families through the adoption support fund and they are spending £28 million on it this year. many adoptions do work but campaigners say families like keith and jane ripley under getting the help they need. —— simply aren't getting. it is something that affects many people ‘s lives. after 8:30 today we'll be talking to the charity behind that survey and also to the chair of the adoption leadership board. we will be back with the national headlines in a few minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a potential breakthrough
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in the treatment of a form of prostate cancer, thought to be incurable, could save the lives of thousands of men. researchers from the institute of cancer research and the the royal marsden hospital could directly target cancer cells that had spread from the prostate without harming the surrounding tissue. over seven in ten men were free of the disease five years after treatment. almost 300,000 children in london and the south—east have inadequate mental healthcare. in a report, the charity nspcc says that more needs to be done to care for children who've been victims of abuse. however, nhs england says that the reportjumps to the wrong conclusions and that it is undergoing a significant expansion in mental health services. there are calls this morning for restaurants, cafes and shops to be forced to display its food hygiene ratings, as figures reveal that more than 10% of food businesses in london received a rating of two stars or less — out of a possible five. more than 6,700 companies in london require improvement, following inspections by the food standards agency, according to the gmb union.
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among them are well—known chains of restaurants and supermarkets. westminster had the highest number of places given two stars or fewer. an exhibition showing the dramatic changes around one of london's busiest train stations opens today. photographer david bailey has lived in kings cross for more than 20 years, and his pictures show its transformation from a crime hotspot — when it was for its problems with drugs and prostitution — to a thriving new business district. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there's still no service between gospel oak and barking on the london overground that's because of engineering works. on the roads there's traffic building up on the a13 coming in to town at barking. in acton bollo bridge road is closed because of a burst water main. lets have a check on the weather now with kate. a mild and murky start with mr and
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fog. it will gradually lifted to a bright afternoon. for this morning, the myst may take its time to shift, thanks to the wind being very light. —— mist. when it breaks, it will be a bright afternoon with sunny spells. the wind light and that richer mild. we are looking at a maximum later on of 20 or 21. —— temperature is mild. some clear spells again. it is likely we could see some mist developing. the minimum two bridges are staying in the teens, 13 or 1a. for tomorrow morning —— temperatures. the fog ta ke morning —— temperatures. the fog take the times to lift tomorrow. the maximum temperature still mild tomorrow at around 20. the weather front i was talking about is a cold front i was talking about is a cold front bringing rain overnight wednesday into thursday. it will gradually cleared through thursday morning, leading to a bright afternoon on thursday leading to a
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bit of sunshine. it introduces some slightly fresher air so at bit more cool as we had three thursday and spend the south—westerly drags in various weather fronts for the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though, it's back to naga and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and dan walker. we will bring you the latest news and sport injust a moment. coming up this morning: we will look at a loophole in a set of rules that means businesses caught up in terrorist attacks could be left unable to claim for lost income if they don't have physical damage. a tale of two kittens. the tv presenter dermot o'leary will be on the sofa to tell us how his blind italian ninja cat inspired his new children's book. the cat is not really a ninja, he is
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just in the book. return to the rainforest. the explorer bruce parryjoins us to tell us why he chose to revisit a tribe from borneo to better understand their relationship with nature and the environment. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: women from across europe whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb will give evidence at a public hearing in london today. the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of valproate, to see if warnings were passed on. it is estimated that 20,000 children have been harmed in the uk alone. the company behind the drug, sanofi, says doctors need a range of therapeutic options to help women with epilepsy through pregnancy. north korea's claim that it has the right to shoot down us bombers, even if they are outside its airspace, has been condemned by the white house. relations between the two nations have deteriorated to the point that pyongyang claims president trump has declared war on north korea, a suggestion dismissed as absurd by the white house. labour claims the nhs needs a £500 million bailout from the government in order to avoid a potential winter health crisis. jon ashworth, the shadow health secretary, will call for the money to be spent on boosting the number of beds, as well as hiring extra staff.
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the prime minister, theresa may, is due to hold talks with the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street later today. mr tusk represents the eu heads of government, who will decide next month if enough progress has been made on so—called divorce issues to allow trade talks with britain. so far, the eu has refused to discuss anything but the irish border, the financial settlement, and citizens‘ rights. prince harry and his girlfriend, meghan markle, have made theirfirst official public appearance together, at the invictus games in toronto. they walked hand—in—hand, before sitting together to watch wheelchair tennis at the sports event for injured service personnel, which was founded by the prince. the couple, who have been in a relationship for about 12 months, both attended saturday's opening ceremony, but sat separately. sir terry wogan has been voted the best bbc radio presenter of all time by his colleagues. a radio times poll to mark
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50 years of radio one, two, three and four saw him pip the latejohn peel to the title. sir terry, who died injanuary last year, began his bbc career in 1966 and presented the radio two breakfast show for a total of 28 years. and we were all talking about gareth barry and his premier league record. we talk a lot about how there are so many foreign players in the premier league, are we bringing enough home talent through, and that kind of thing, but it is heartening to see that the top five are all british players, premier league appearance makers. that is pretty good, isn't it? the ones that stick around are the home—grown talent. it? the ones that stick around are the home-grown talent. 22 years, 21 yea rs the home-grown talent. 22 years, 21 years he has been playing in the premier league? a long, long time.
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mainly with aston villa, wasn't it? yes, and everton and west brom. have we heard how ryan giggs feels about his record falling? it is interesting, ryan giggs had a0 appearances before the premier league, so in actualfact he is on 672, which is still more than gareth barry, but we conveniently forget those, because we only talk about premier league appearances. and gareth barry went straight into the premier league, and just stuck there. ryan giggs played more before there. ryan giggs played more before the premier league. maybe he is at home saying i have played more top—flight football. it was a record—breaking night for former england midfielder gareth barry, who made his 633rd appearance in the premier league, but his west brom side lost 2—0 at arsenal. summer signing alexandre lacazette scored both goals, taking arsenal up to seventh in the table. he has scored in all three league games so far at the emirates. we come out of four or five games
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where we won the game, and didn't concede goals. so we have better stability, defensively, at the start of the season we conceded too many goals, and you have no future when that happens. and overall i think we stabilised well, and were more patient, under pressure, mentally as well. it's something different this week. the media attention, not something i craved, but it would be nice to put this milestone to bed and concentrate on the game. you have gone past the record of ryan giggs. has he been in touch with you? yes, he did. he has been in touch to say congratulations. so a disappointing result for gareth barry, but what an achievement —
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633 appearances. he has now broken the premier league record, surpassing the legendary ryan giggs, with frank lampard, david james, and gary speed making up the top five. barry has scored 52 goals in the top flight, most of them for aston villa, as well as three for england. after last week's sacking of england women's manager mark sampson, the fa say the right procedures are in place to prevent a similar issue again. sampson was dismissed following evidence of inappropriate behaviour in a previous role, and the case was discussed in full at an fa board meeting yesterday. you will rememberjohanna konta's remarkable run to the wimbledon semi—finals earlier this summer. well, things haven't gone so well for her since. she has suffered herfourth consecutive defeat, this time at the wuhan open, in china, where she lost to australian ashleigh barty. she should still reach the end—of—season world tour finals, though. one of the biggest stars in american basketball, lebronjames, has come out in support of the recent kneeling protests made by american football teams, and condemned comments made by president trump on the matter. trump said on friday that nfl
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players who fail to stand during the national anthem should be sacked or suspended. james was one of the first to hit back at the president on twitter. people find teams, people find players, people find colours because of sports, and theyjust gravitate towards that, and this makes people so towards that, and this makes people so happy, and it brings people together like none other. anyone who has any association with the nfl, it was a unbelievable, the solidarity, and there was no divide. british bobsleigh pilot mica mcneill has hit her £30,000 target as she attempts to give herself a chance of qualifying for next year's winter olympics. mcneill launched an online campaign in the wake of the decision by the british bobsleigh & skeleton federation to cut her funding. more than 500 people donated, as she reached her goal in under a week. i think we can handle the pressure. it isjust... i said earlier, we are powered by the people now, and for
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people to believe in us, and support us, and all the nice messages we have had, and all the donations, you know, people believe in us, and that lifts you up a little bit. and that gives you what you need to push that little bit harder, and work more, and, you know, make everyone proud. the women bobsledders, powered by the people. and you are saying, that is your favourite story of the day. like you say, cool runnings for britain. schools should ban harmful contact from rugby games — that is according to health experts at newcastle university. writing in the british medical journal, academics suggest tackles and scrums should be removed from school playing fields. let's speak to professor allyson pollock, who is one of the report authors, and joins us from our westminster studio. thank you very much for coming on this morning. i am sure, as we are about to speak, you can probably hear people shouting at their
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television screens about the nanny state and about protecting children when they don't need protecting. explain to us why this research is important. well, we have been doing this research for over 15 years, and what we are finding repeatedly and consistently across all studies is the very high rates of risk of injury for children. so in an average season the child player will have a risk of injury of anything between one and eight to one in four of having an injury, and about one in eight counts of having an injury which will require up to seven days away from the game. and most of these injuries are occurring during these injuries are occurring during the collision elements of the game. more than three quarters of concussions occur in the tackle, and about two thirds of all injuries also occur during the tackle. so the collision element is a very dangerous part of the game. it is where most injuries occur. these injuries can be very serious, and
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they also include concussion, which we have growing concerns about. isn't it a trade—off, though, between... yes, everyone who plays by between... yes, everyone who plays rugby knows there are risks, because it isa rugby knows there are risks, because it is a physical sport, but there are benefits to taking up that sport, and surely most people who ta ke sport, and surely most people who take part in it are aware there are risks, because they will tackle and ta ke risks, because they will tackle and take part in scrums, that is, in essence, what the sport is about. well, we are talking about children, and there is a special duty of care for children under the un convention of the rights of the child. governments have a duty to protect children from unnecessary harm, and those injuries can be physical, mental, and of course sexual, and we really need to take special steps to respect and make sure that children are not harmed. we have a special duty of care for them. most children do not know about the risks of injury, and neither do parents, which is why i have spent the last decade working on this and putting together... even writing a book on this for parents, about injuries,
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because injury monitoring in general is very poor. it is not being done, and when it is being collected, it is not being fed back into the system. so parents actually allow their children to play without really knowing about the real risks of injury, and the real harms to their children, which can be both short—term and long—term. and we are particularly worried now about concussion, and repeated blows to the head, which is a very real and significant injury in rugby. it is one of the major causes now of injury in the game. which is a serious issue in the professional game as well. what about the rfu, who have pointed out that that collision element is introduced gradually in rugby in school. surely thatis gradually in rugby in school. surely that is the best way to do it, rather than when you turn 18, being thrown into a full contact sport at that point? well, most children give up that point? well, most children give up the game by the time they are 18. and now we are talking about the uk
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government wanting to roll out rugby toa government wanting to roll out rugby to a million children across the uk. that, according to the data, is going to result in 100,000 to 200,000 injuries presenting, outpatients or gp practices. and an extra 200,000 injuries a year is unsustainable, and we shouldn't be exposing children to that risk. so what we are really concerned about is exposing children to unnecessary risks, when most of these children give up again. only a few hundred, at the most, children go on to play the professional game. so we want to keep the game, but we want to change the laws of the game that make children particular vulnerable. and thatis children particular vulnerable. and that is why are calling for a ban on the very dangerous collision elements. and what we do know from studies, even from nine —year—olds, they can have the same acceleration force as the current american football players. so we are really worried about this sport in the
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collision elements, and it has been really underestimated. and it is an issue that is not being looked at and taken issue that is not being looked at and ta ken seriously issue that is not being looked at and taken seriously enough. thank you very much for that this morning. iam sure you very much for that this morning. i am sure that is going to start debate in many households. let us know what you think on that issue. is it something that should be scaled back? should we take the contact element out of it, or could rollout of rugby to thousands of children across the uk, will that be a good thing? wasn't conkers banned in schools? yes. and carol will be showing us her tips for conkers later. good morning to you. here is a fine specimen of a conker. nice and shiny, nice and solid, and if you want to make yours solid, keep them for a year, paint them with varnish, cook in the oven or them.
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look at the view behind me. lovely tranquil scene this morning. there is quite a bit of low cloud around as well is missed and fog. for many parts of the uk, it is a dull start. we have dense patches of the fog for example around bristol. we also have fog around edinburgh airport right now. parts of east anglia and the midlands and as we go through the course of the morning that and the low cloud will thin, break and lift, allowing sunny spells to develop. there is a chance we could see showers developing also in parts of eastern england but they will be fairly hit and miss. there will also be in northern ireland and scotland, a southerly wind. this afternoon in scotland, it will actually be mostly
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dry with highs up to 18 in gloves go and edinburgh. in england, a similar story. —— glasgow. across eastern —— across eastern counties, we are at risk of the odd shower. most of us will miss them biting east anglia, it could be sharp. again, to their west coast, highs of 18 and 21 and as we move over towards south—west england and wales, a similar story. it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. particularly this lake in september, we are seeing temperatures above average. —— late. we are looking at the wind strengthening for northern ireland. it will feel pleasant, though, with highs up to 16. through the evening and overnight, once again mist and fog developing and low cloud developing across south—east england. the wind will strengthen across south—west england and
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northern ireland. they could have coastal gales. overnight, the first signs of rain. the rain will slowly move eastwards as we go through the course of wednesday at you can see its progress is not fast. ahead of it, although it will be a dull start with the mist and fog and low cloud, it will give way to sunny skies coming through. tomorrow, highs of 21 or 22 once again in the south—east. later on in the day, another weather front comes in south—east. later on in the day, another weatherfront comes in but overnight wednesday and into thursday, the rain atjourney ‘s eastwards and behind it, a ridge of high pressure also builds in. things have settled down, another bright and fine day. temperatures still above average for this time in september. in fact, that is a sequence. september. in fact, that is a sequence. we are seeing fronts coming in from the west, moving eastwards at it looks a moron
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settled towards the end of the weekend and into next week as well. i will keep you posted on that in the coming days. big reactions to the rugby story coming in. as predicted, people are getting angry. why don't we ban chemicals in physics. we mentioned conkers. they are also getting askew mentions. we will talk more about it later. businesses caught up in terrorist attacks could be left unable to claim for lost trade if they don't have any physical damage — even if they've been forced to shut or lost money in other ways. steph‘s been looking into this today. obviously the first thoughts after a terra attacker is with the people that have been hurt but then we think about the businesses that could be affected by it. this is to do with what businesses can and can't claim for, when a terrorist attack impacts them. one insurance firm says that the current rules need updating, because they don't cover businesses unless they
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are physically damaged. for example, jewellers arthur kay & brother in manchester lost business after this year's terror attack in manchester. but the insurance claim was rejected. the insurance company explained i was not eligible for any loss of earnings because i wasn't directly affected by the bomb as in the shop wasn't damaged and no one was injured. without passing trade, we haven't really got business and that's why, i mean, we were right in the centre of manchester and we have been hit 120 years. we have been through a lot of different scenarios but this is probably, i would say, one of the worst short—term scenarios. let's speak now withjulian enoizi, who's the chief executive of poole re the industry body that looks after this particular type of insurance and have published this report. can you explain how that cover works
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for terrorism? good morning. terrorism insurance since 1993 has essentially been reinsured with a joint—venture between government and the insurance industry. the reason being that because of the frequency and severity of terrorist events in the 90s when the ira with president lee targeting the economy by targeting billion —— buildings and physical assets, it was difficult to cover the loss. we provide insurance to insurance companies who in turn provide insurance to businesses so the economy is resilient in the face of terrorism and can be up and running the day after an event. and you think the rules around this needs updating? the legislation that
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created the insurance company were first specifically to physical damage. the report we put out this morning has highlighted the terrorist threat has evolved since the 90s. you have terrorists targeting crowded places and focused on creating fear and the looping —— looming threat of cyber terrorism. what of course is happening is you are still getting physical and economic loss sorry —— sorry, you are still getting economic and financial loss but when it comes to property damage, it is not covered because of that hasn't been physical damage. in terms of business is taking on this insurance, are there many of them? for example, could small businesses afford this? you have touched on one of the many issues in this area. first of all,
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there is a lack of awareness in that small businesses aren'tjust covered this by purchasing their property insurance. the report aims to highlight what the three tiers and make people aware that they are insurance doesn't cover it. —— what the threat is. as you described, a dual life in the vicinity of manchester arena, jeweller. they may not have been directly affected. most importantly, you have got to ensure that cover is fit for purpose. this loophole and gap we have identified by not covering financial loss when there hasn't been physical damage is something we think we need to either resolve ourselves or at least stimulate the insurance market to resolve. thank
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you for speaking when asked today. nearly 60,000 people in bali have been evacuated from their homes as dozens of tremors suggest the volcano mount agung might be about to erupt. the indonesian island is under its highest alert and a 12 kilometre exclusion zone has been set up. it has erupted in the past, most recently in 1963 when more than 1,000 people were killed. the volcanologist, juliet biggs from bristol university joins us now. good morning. you take a look at the patterns of volcano eruptions. how seriously should we be taking this potential eruption. very seriously. there are small earthquake happening close to the surface of the volcano
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and that is a sign there is probably magma close to the surface. we can't actually make a prediction about when it could erupt but all we can say there's mt dare. this could go on for days, weeks or even months before an eruption occur. —— magma there. how can you predict the difference between mt helena situation and a slow burner? difference between mt helena situation and a slow burner7m difference between mt helena situation and a slow burner? it is difficult to tell what kind of eruption it could be all when it could run. the eruption in 1963, the earthquake —— earthquakes started a month before. it is possible the same pattern is repeating here. can you measure the scale of volcanic eruption? leigh you have so many questions. what classifies a big volcanic eruption? there are a few
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different ways. first of all, the magnitude. the volume of material that comes out. that's what we have in our minds, the picture we paint. there are different types of eruptions. if there is lots of trapped gas as it rises, it will cause a big explosion. another eruption could be more if you sit and love will slowly flow down the sides. the hazards are quite different. we are seeing the pictures here in 1960s when mount agung slowly erupted. it was so damaging because 1000 people died. most of those people died in the surges of hot ash and that travel 100 of kilometres per hour and it is difficult for people to escape. that is why this zone has been placed
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around the volcano. studying the eruption in 1963, that is why there is such a large exclusion zone because if it goes off, it won't generally have a chance to go —— to get out of there. exactly. it is better to move people out earlier. does it depend on the steepness of the volcano as to how quickly it flows or was it the speed of... ? much faster than you can escape, run, much faster than you can drive. they come down the side of the volcano. and when do they stop? i'm just trying to put this in my head. if something is travelling hundreds of kilometres per hour, eight miles doesn't seem very much. does it stop because it cools down? it reaches flat typography and yes, it stops. they are concerned about livestock
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left on the side of the volcano because you can't predict the time. and that is one of the big frustrations. all of these earthquakes do tell us there is magma quite close to the surface so it is really important that people do take this seriously but they also need to understand we cannot make a prediction. it doesn't mean it may ru ptu re prediction. it doesn't mean it may rupture tomorrow but the fact the infatuation has been put in place, people are concerned. —— evacuation. sorry if we asked you and ignorant question. there are 100 and 10,000 active volcanoes in the world, is that right? —— volcanoes in the world, is that right? -- 110,000. yes. volcanoes in the world, is that right? --110,000. yes. we know a lot now, thank you. there is your lesson time over and done with. we are at getting the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news. a potential breakthrough in the treatment of a form of prostate cancer, thought to be incurable, could save the lives of thousands of men. researchers from the institute of cancer research and the the royal marsden hospital could directly target cancer cells that had spread from the prostate without harming the surrounding tissue. over seven in ten men were free of the disease five years after treatment. almost 300,000 children in london and the south—east have inadequate mental healthcare. in a report, the charity nspcc says that more needs to be done to care for children who've been victims of abuse. however, nhs england says that the reportjumps to the wrong conclusions and that it is undergoing a significant expansion in mental health services. there are calls this morning for restaurants, cafes and shops to be forced to display its food hygiene ratings, as figures reveal that more than 10% of food businesses in london received a rating of two stars or less — out of a possible five. more than 6,700 companies in london require improvement, following inspections
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by the food standards agency, according to the gmb union. among them are well—known chains of restaurants and supermarkets. westminster had the highest number of places given two stars or fewer. an exhibition showing the dramatic changes around one of london's busiest train stations opens today. photographer david bailey has lived in kings cross for more than 20 years, and his pictures show its transformation from a crime hotspot — when it was for its problems with drugs and prostitution — to a thriving new business district. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there's still no service between gospel oak and barking on the london overground because of engineering works. on the roads in barking there's traffic building up on the a13 at movers lane coming in to town — one lane blocked because of a collision. in acton bollo bridge road is closed because of a burst water main. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning.
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a mild and murky start with mist and fog. it will gradually lift to a bright afternoon. for this morning, the mist may take its time to shift, thanks to the wind being very light. when it does, it will be a bright afternoon with sunny spells. the winds light and temperature mild. we are looking at a maximum later on of 20 or 21. a later on of 20 or 21. repeat performance tonight. some clear spells again. later on of 20 or 21. it is likely we could see some mist developing. the minimum temperatures bridges are staying in the teens, 13 or 1a. the fog take the times to lift tomorrow. the maximum temperature still mild tomorrow at around 20. the weather front i was talking about is a cold front bringing rain overnight wednesday into thursday. it will gradually clear through thursday morning, leading to a bright
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afternoon on thursday leading to a bit of sunshine. it introduces some slightly fresher air so at bit more cooler as we had three thursday and then the south—westerly drags in various weather fronts for the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and dan walker. parents demand answers. a public hearing is held for the first time into an epilepsy drug that has harmed thousands of children. the drug valproate has been linked to autism and physical abnormalities in 20,000 british babies. a safety review will look at whether enough is being done to warn pregnant women about its dangers. good morning, it is tuesday 26 september.
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also this morning: north korea accuses the us of declaring war, and threatens to shoot down american bombers, even if they are outside north korean airspace. after dating for more than year, prince harry and meghan markle make a public appearance together for the first time, as the two walk hand—in—hand at the invictus games. more than half the electricity we used this summer came from renewable sources and nuclear energy, for the first time — that is according to stats from the national grid. i will be looking at what it could mean for bills. in sport: lacazette strikes again. arsenal's summer signing scores twice against west brom. he has found the net in every premier league game he has played at the emirates. also this morning: should scrums and tackling be banned in school rugby? one leading expert tells breakfast it is time for an end to what she calls harmful contact. we will be finding out what you think. and carol has the weather. good morning. iam in south
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good morning. i am in south london, at home to 370 horsechestnut trees. we hope to see some conkers later. some patchy mist and fog, that were left. many of us having warm, sunny spells and the wind picking up across northern ireland and scotland. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: women from across europe whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb will give evidence at a public hearing in london today. the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of valproate, to see if warnings were passed on. it is estimated that 20,000 children have been harmed in the uk alone. the company behind the drug, sanofi, says doctors need a range of therapeutic options to help women with epilepsy through pregnancy. here is our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. lillias and ian's son was diagnosed with severe learning difficulties when he was three years old. it was caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate, that lillias took when she was pregnant. the couple say they had asked
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the doctors whether it was safe to take the drug while expecting, and were later horrified to discover they had been wrongly reassured. devastated, upset, angry. just — i felt i was let down by the health service. it is estimated tens of thousands of children across the world have been harmed after being exposed to valproate medicines in the womb. it carries a 10% risk of physical problems, and a a0% risk of developmental disorders. today, a safety review by the european medicines agency will look at whether new warnings on pillboxes in the uk, and a range of other strengthened measures, are actually reaching women of childbearing age. the uk's medicines watchdog, the mhra, says it supports the review, and stressed
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it is important that women don't stop taking valproate without first discussing it with their doctor. parents from across europe, like lillias and ian, with children harmed by sodium valproate, will give evidence to the public hearing, amid concerns that babies are still being damaged by the drug. sophie huthinson, bbc news. labour claims the nhs in england needs a £500 million bailout from the government in order to avoid a potential winter health crisis. jon ashworth, the shadow health secretary, will call for the money to be spent on boosting the number of beds, as well hiring extra staff. let's get more detail on this from our political correspondent iain watson, whojoins us from the party's conference in brighton. good morning to you. we will be speaking to jon ashworth good morning to you. we will be speaking tojon ashworth about this inafew speaking tojon ashworth about this in a few minutes' time, but how importantan in a few minutes' time, but how important an announcement will this be that he makes today? well, i think it is an announcement you would expect, really, from labour. they want to be seen to be the party of the nhs. that is usually how they are seen of the nhs. that is usually how they are seen by their own supporters, so
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calling for an extra cash injection into the nhs ahead of the winter spike in demand is perhaps not hugely surprising. they have talked about £500 million, but labour would argue that in effect there should be cost effective, it should get people out of hospital more quickly and in the social care, recruiting more staff and stopping more expensive agency staff being brought in. the government say they have robust plans in place for the nhs this winter and some managers say it is difficult to spend an immediate cash injection anyway, so it makes little difference. labour were outbid on spending in the 2015 general election by the conservatives, and are absolutely determined that that should not happen again. the plans are should not happen again. the plans a re costed by should not happen again. the plans are costed by the nhs, they will ta ke are costed by the nhs, they will take more money from the top 5% of earners, but there are questions about reforming what is called a private finance initiative, taking back from private finance contracts to run schools, hospitals and
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prisons, potentially worth £200 billion, and bringing that into the public sector. we are getting far less detail about how they will finance that. and, in a few minutes, we will be talking to labour's shadow health secretary, jon ashworth, about that bailout proposal. relations between the us and north korea have deteriorated to the point that pyongyang have claimed that president trump has declared war on north korea. andrew plant has more. —— plant. it is a trading of insults where neither side shows any sign of backing down, a verbal game of chicken between north korea and the usa. the north korean foreign minister saying donald trump's criticism of his country amounted to a declaration of war. since the us declared war on our country, we have every right to take countermeasures, including shooting down us strategic bombers, even when they're not yet
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inside the air space border of our country. the question of who won't be around much longer will be answered then. the white house has called his statement absurd. it's never appropriate for a country to shoot down another country's aircraft when it's over international waters. our goal is still the same. we continue to seek the peaceful denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. that's our focus. there is concern among many at the un that the belligerent tone between the two seems to be heading from hostile to actively threatening. north korea has blatantly threatened to strike the us with nuclear weapons. we have never seen this kind of threat. the us said they had flown fighter jets close to north korea at the weekend, a demonstration of their military
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capabilities, they said donald trump said the us would hopefully destroy north korea if it was ever forced to defend itself. the prime minister, theresa may, is due to hold talks with the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street later today. mr tusk represents the eu heads of government, who will decide next month if enough progress has been made on so—called divorce issues to allow trade talks with britain. so far, the eu has refused to discuss anything but the irish border, the financial settlement, and citizens‘ rights. indonesia‘s national disaster agency is warning that the mount agung volcano on the island of bali has entered a critical phase, and that an eruption is imminent. nearly 60,000 people have now fled the slopes of the volcano. however, some have remained in the danger zone, out of concern for their livestock. it is the first time mount agung has threatened to erupt since 1963. prince harry and his girlfriend, meghan markle, have made theirfirst official public appearance together, at the invictus games in toronto. they walked hand—in—hand,
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before sitting together to watch wheelchair tennis at the sports event for injured service personnel, which was founded by the prince. sarah campbell reports. finally, pictures to accompany a royal love story. the couple have been togetherfor over a year, but until this week, have gone to great lengths to keep their relationship out of sight. no more — their affection for each other obvious. prince harry is in toronto as the founder of the invictus games, and this is home for meghan markle. she stars in a television show which is filmed in the city centre. they are shown here on their way to watch some wheelchair tennis, looking casual and comfortable in each other‘s presence. she did attend the opening ceremony on saturday, but was seated some distance from the prince. harry told the bbc they have loved the games. toronto as a city has embraced the games. they have come here to support all the nations. and there‘s these interactions happening, as well, where young
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people and their parents are coming out and asking questions and learning stories. the pictures will feature on front pages around the world. in a recent magazine article, meghan markle said they were a couple, and in love — and it shows. and you confessed earlier that you area and you confessed earlier that you are a handhold. yes, aren't you? i am with my kids, not so much with mrs walker. i will not try and hold your hand, you don‘t need to worry. edging away... the uk‘s chief medical officers are being urged to protect children from the risk of serious injury by banning scrums and tackling in school rugby. newcastle university researchers say they have new evidence that removing contact from the game would reduce concussion as well as head and neck injuries. in an average season the child player will have a risk of injury of anything between one in eight
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to one in four of having an injury, and about one in eight of having an injury which will require at least seven days away from the game. and most of these injuries are occurring during the collision elements of the game. more than three quarters of concussions occur in the tackle, and about two thirds of all injuries also occur during the tackle. so the collision element is a very dangerous part of the game. it‘s where most injuries occur. these injuries can be very serious, and they also include concussion, which we have growing concerns about. not surprisingly, this has divided many of you. emily said my son, now 27, played from seven. no harm. what next? netball, rounders, but never football? and sean says if you have poor technique, you will get
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injured, but if you take the tackle away, you will never learnt not to be injured. andy says this will be a thing of the past, my daughter a head —— suffered a head injury. it took four hospital visits to even get it recognised. she said we need more publicity about the dangers of hand school and sports clubs need to be aware of the risk. john says in his son‘s year group have been a number of broken bones and other and suggests adopting the new zealand approach where it is split by weight category and not age groups. children grow at different rates and sizes, so limiting that factor. lots of people saying at least they are playing sport, getting them out there, not just sitting playing sport, getting them out there, notjust sitting in front of a computer screen, there, notjust sitting in front of a computer screen, eating chips and drinking pop, which is another word
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for fizzy drinking pop, which is another word forfizzy drinks. every year, we hear about the so—called nhs winter crisis, brought about by cold temperatures and outbreaks of the flu. to help hospitals cope, labour is calling on the government to invest an extra £500 million. let‘s get more detail from the shadow health secretary, jon ashworth, whojoins us from the party‘s conference in brighton. thank you very much for your time this morning. so that is the question, really. £500 million for the health service, no one would say thatis the health service, no one would say that is a bad thing. what people will say is where is the money going to come from? know, and i think that isafair to come from? know, and i think that is a fair point. at the general election we outlined proposals to make some changes to taxation levels, corporation tax, changes to taxation for the 5% highest earners in the country, asking them to pay some more tax in order to fund a national health service properly. what we are now saying today is last winter we had an absolutely terrible
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winter we had an absolutely terrible winter in the nhs. we had people in trolleys and corridors, ambulances backed up outside overflowing hospitals. we are saying to the government, bring forward an emergency £500 million to allow hospitals, community services, the nhs across the country, to prepare for this winter. because i never wa nt to for this winter. because i never want to see a winter like the one we saw last year in the nhs. so i really hope the government listen to us, follow our lead, and do something ahead of the winter. this extra £500 million you have announced. you have mentioned how you will pay for it, is this on top of the money you have already said you can raise? no, this is part of the money that we have said we can raise, because we believed within the money we would raise with the nhs we would increase funding going into the nhs quite significantly. but we are also saying to the government it is possible to find this money. philip hammond has a budget coming up in the next few
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weeks. he has changed the timing of budgets, his budgets will be in the autumn, so there is no reason he can‘t act, find some money, give the nhs some room, some emergency money to prepare for winter. in some hospitals, people are in trolleys for 30 hours. how can we tolerate a situation where somebody is on a trolley for 30 hours? no one wants to see that began. you are absolutely right, no one would want to see that again. the conservatives in 201a did allocate an extra £700 million, so it has done that. the money has gone in, but it doesn‘t make a difference. every year there has been extra bailout money for the nhs. how are you going to make a difference? how am i going to save now the nhs appears to be working, and there appears to be less strain, with the extra bailout money? two things, money used to get allocated at this time of year, that doesn‘t happen any more. money goes in at the beginning of the financial year and gets absorbed into the
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wider running of the nhs and if you look at seven years of nhs funding, this huge natural squeeze, you can see the nhs is overstretched because it hasn‘t had the money it needs. that‘s why the waiting list is four million and white 2.5 million people wait over four hours in a&e. apologies for interrupting, you have accepted that in terms of saying you need extra bailout money, you‘re not saying we‘re going to change the way the nhs is funded, you‘re saying we‘re going to get another bailout fund, so you‘ve accepted that‘s the problem. we are saying we will change the way the nhs is funded. the proposal we put to the british people in the general election was an extra £7 billion a yearfor people in the general election was an extra £7 billion a year for the nhs. we didn‘t win the election u nfortu nately, if we nhs. we didn‘t win the election unfortunately, if we did an extra £7 billion would be going in now but we‘re the opposition. i‘m calling on the government ahead of this winter to find an extra five £500 billion, so we can to find an extra five £500 billion, so we can avoid what happened last year. there‘s a big difference
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between the position we are arguing for and the position of the government. can you explain why potential labour voters should believe what the party is saying at the moment? the reason i ask is yesterday we had john mcdonnell promising to bring pfis back in—house, then some of his collea g u es in—house, then some of his colleagues had to go around saying no, we‘re not going to do that, we‘re going to review the idea. jeremy corbyn promised to write of student debt and since then that has been backtracked on. what you say doesn‘t always go as a party, does it? what i say always go when it's comes to the nhs. —— goes. pfi contracts across the public sector, costing the taxpayer billions, they should be reviewed to see if there‘s a better way of running those contracts a better way of running those co ntra cts by a better way of running those contracts by bringing them in—house. in the nhs, for example, something like £800 million has gone to private companies. if we can get
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those pfi contracts back in—house we can geta those pfi contracts back in—house we can get a better deal for the taxpayer but these pfi contracts are individually negotiated with individually negotiated with individual hospital trusts. they‘re not just about the hospital buildings but about the facility management is in hospital trusts, they are very complex so they need be reviewed, these contracts. it‘s the right things to do to review the contracts so if we can find a way to make it better then it‘s our responsibility to bring them in—house if we can do that. given you have so many contracts across so many different trusts, it will be quite a complicated programme of work, but it‘s the right thing to do to embark upon that programme of work. john mcdonnelljumped the gun? i wouldn‘t characterise his position asjumping i wouldn‘t characterise his position as jumping the gun. i wouldn‘t characterise his position asjumping the gun. he was outlining his approach, he wants these contracts in—house. it‘s notjumping the gun but he was clear that we have to review these contracts and we have to do what is in the
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interests of prudent management of the finances, which is why we review them. we go through each contract, we understand them properly, and where we can save money by bringing them in—house, as happened at a hospital in northumberland, then we will do that. talking about the labour conference, on sunday diane abbott said it‘s one of the nicest conferences and best atmospheres she has seen so far. there‘s been talk of grassroots members having their say on stage. the labour party has put itself up as the party that will challenge the government and ensure the government takes britain along the government takes britain along the right track when it comes to brexit. why was there only an hour of time given to discussion of this at conference yesterday? across what happens at the conference is the delegates vote for the priority issues they want to debate —— because. they prioritise the nhs because. they prioritise the nhs because we know the nhs under the tories is on it‘s knees. with a prioritised housing because we know people can‘t get a decent house in this country that we prioritise.
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billions has been cut from social ca re billions has been cut from social care and there‘s hundreds of thousands of elderly and vulnerable people going without —— we prioritise. they were the top issues at this conference but we had a debate about brexit and i‘ve happy to save the position keir starmer has endorsed, and which theresa may is following because she‘s a rather wea k is following because she‘s a rather weak prime minister that doesn‘t lead but follows,... weak prime minister that doesn‘t lead but follows, . .. thanks for joining us on breakfast. time for the weather with carol, who, wait for it, she has got conquers. good morning. good morning from morden hall park in south london. this is a real hidden gem in london. beautiful this morning, home to 350 horse chestnut trees and, as dan said, producing some of these beauties. if you see this line under the horse chestnut tree, this is a conqueror still inside its capsule. it‘s trying to
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get out and here‘s one that has been dissected rather beautifully —— conquer. there it is, we hope to string this up and have a game of conquers if we can. the weather, a nice start to the day in london, not especially cold. across the country it isa especially cold. across the country it is a dull start. some cloud around and also some fog. fault at the moment in parts of eastern scotla nd the moment in parts of eastern scotland and north—east england, on the coastline, also in land in northern england and the midlands, east anglia and around bristol —— fog. some if it is dense. through the morning that will thin, lift and break —— of it. as will the low cloud we have an sunny spells will develop. one or two showers in eastern counties of england through the afternoon and the wind will strengthen in northern ireland and western scotland. it is a warm wind, coming from the south, so this afternoon in scotland, we‘re looking at brighter spells, sunny spells, highs of 18 in glasgow and any
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borough. in northern england, sunny spells this afternoon. —— edinburgh. we will lose the fog. there‘s the chance anywhere in the eastern england of a shower. they will be hit and england of a shower. they will be hitand miss, most england of a shower. they will be hit and miss, most will miss them altogether, but you could catch one for example in east anglia and it could be heavy but they will be the exception rather than the south—east, highs of 20 or 21, from the midlands to the isle of wight —— rather than the rule. in the south—east, highs of 20 or 21, from the midlands to the isle of wight. the sun coming through and the wind picking up in the south—west. dry in wales. 16 in belfast with a southerly wind. through the evening and overnight you will find mist and fog patches will reform and low cloud forming across eastern and south—eastern england. by the end of the night the winds will strengthen in south—east england and also northern ireland, with possibly coastal gales and we‘ll also start to see the arrival of some rain. through tomorrow that rain will
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extend from the west, moving slowly eastwards, its progress isn‘t fast. ahead of it, where we‘ve got the patchy mist and fog and low cloud, that will thin, lift and break like today and the sun will come out and tomorrow we could have highs of 21 or 22 tomorrow we could have highs of 21 or22 in the tomorrow we could have highs of 21 or 22 in the south—east. if you‘re in the rain in belfast, looking at 15. overnight the rain continues to advance across the rest of the uk so by thursday morning it is ensconced in the far north—east of scotland and a ridge of high pressure builds in behind it so the weather settles down against be a fair bit of sunshine around, just the outside chance of a shower, you will be very unlucky —— down again. wet and windy weather with the next weather front. turning more and settled towards the end of the weekend and into the early pa rt end of the weekend and into the early part of next week. thanks very much, carol. iwas early part of next week. thanks very much, carol. i was going to ask if we we re much, carol. i was going to ask if we were going to get to see her
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conquers. she has done it. i didn't see them. you were having a chat withjohn ashworth. see them. you were having a chat with john ashworth. she unveiled them earlier. naga, you have to pay more attention! sorry, carol! that's 0k, more attention! sorry, carol! that's ok, naga, i know you're busy!|j more attention! sorry, carol! that's ok, naga, i know you're busy! ifeel bad now! hundreds of families who adopt are facing violence and aggression from the children they take into their homes. that‘s according to new research by the bbc looking at the help and support that‘s available to parents. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been speaking to one couple who experienced problems after bringing up a little girl as their own almost eight years ago. you may find some of the details upsetting. jane and keith met late in life and wanted their own family. they tried ivf, which failed, and then decided to adopt. she was very cute, very bright, she had a strong mind and then things after that started getting more and more challenging. we have a lot of empathy, a lot of love to give but nowhere did we imagine that to adopt
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would be as awful as it was. by the time their daughter, louise, was six, jane and keith were struggling to cope. we‘ve changed the names of everyone involved to protect their identity. itjust became a fight every day. she would punch you, she would hit you, she would run away, she would spit at you and it wasn‘tjust one incident at day, it was about 30. around 5,500 children are adopted in the uk every year. radio a‘s file on a programme conducted a survey with the charity adoption uk. almost 3,000 adopters responded. it‘s not a representative sample and the results are just a snapshot. but they show that almost two thirds of families said their child had displayed aggressive behaviour, a third believed they didn‘t receive full and correct information about their children before the adoption and also a quarter said their adoption is at risk of breakdown or had already been disrupted. after years of struggle, jane
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and keith reached breaking point. their relationship was at risk and they decided to hand louise back to the care of the local authority. it was heartbreaking because you feel like you‘re a failure, you feel like you‘re to blame but the trauma hasn‘t come from you, you havejust tried to mend it. we received a report fairly recently. there were allegations that louise witnessed birth father raping and beating birth mother and allegations that birth father beat and burnt louise with cigarette stumps. if we'd been given that information before we had said yes we're willing to consider louise, we would have said no. we weren‘t equipped to deal with sexual assault of any sort. they have to give you all the facts before you decide and this was obviously a glaring gap.
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since she's been back in care, she has had a team of about eight people, various foster carers, therapeutic teams, psychologists, psychiatrists. had we had all of the support she has now... we'd have had a fighting chance. we would have had a chance. jane and keith‘s local authority told the bbc they provide an extensive range of support and training and that they share all the information they have about a child prior to placing them with a family. the department for education in england told us that help is available for families through the adoption support fund and they are spending £28 million on it this year. many adoptions do work, but campaigners say families like keith and jane simply aren‘t getting the help they need. graham satchell, bbc news. after 8:30am today we‘ll be talking to the charity behind that research and also to the chair of the adoption leadership board. keep your messages coming in this
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morning, lots of issues. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a potential breakthrough in the treatment of a form of prostate cancer, thought to be incurable, could save the lives of thousands of men. researchers from the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden hospital could directly target cancer cells that had spread from the prostate without harming the surrounding tissue. over seven in ten men were free of the disease five years after treatment. almost 300,000 children in london and the south—east have inadequate mental healthcare. in a report, the charity nspcc says that more needs to be done to care for children who‘ve been victims of abuse. however, nhs england says that the reportjumps to the wrong conclusions and that it is undergoing a significant expansion in mental health services. there are calls this morning for restaurants, cafes and shops to be forced to display its food hygiene ratings, as figures reveal that more than 10%
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of food businesses in london received a rating of two stars or less — out of a possible five. more than 6,700 companies in london require improvement, following inspections by the food standards agency, according to the gmb union. among them are well—known chains of restaurants and supermarkets. westminster had the highest number of places given two stars or fewer. an exhibition showing the dramatic changes around one of london‘s busiest train stations opens today. photographer david bailey has lived in king‘s cross for more than 20 years, and his pictures show its transformation from a crime hotspot — when it was for its problems with drugs and prostitution — to a thriving new business district. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there‘s still no service between gospel oak and barking on the london overground because of engineering works. at the blackwall tunnel, traffic is extra slow northbound this morning because of a crash just after the tunnel.
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queues from before sun in the sands. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s another very mild and murky start to the day. a lot of mist and fog. it will gradually lift to a bright afternoon. for this morning, the mist may take its time to shift, thanks to the wind being very light. when it does, we will see the cloud thing and break into a bright afternoon with sunny spells. the winds light and temperature again very mild. we are looking at a maximum later on of 20 or 21. a repeat performance tonight. some clear spells, again the wind is light. we could see a bit of mist developing. the minimum temperatures staying in the teens, 13 or 1a. tomorrow morning, the mist again taking its time to lift but it will eventually. may get one or two sunny spells ahead of our next weather front arriving tomorrow evening. the maximum temperature still mild tomorrow at around 20. the weather front i was talking
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about is a cold front, bringing rain overnight wednesday into thursday. it will gradually clear through thursday morning, leading to a bright afternoon on thursday with a bit of sunshine. it introduces some slightly fresher air so a little cooler as we had three thursday and then the south—westerly drags in various weather fronts for the rest of the week. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and naga munchetty. here is a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news: women from across europe whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb will give evidence at a public hearing in london today. the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of valproate, to see if warnings were passed on. it is estimated that 20,000 children have been harmed in the uk alone. labour claims the nhs needs a £500 million bailout from the government
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in order to avoid a potential winter health crisis. jon ashworth, the shadow health secretary, will call for the money to be spent on boosting the number of beds, as well hiring extra staff. the proposal that we put to the british people in the general election was an extra 7 billion for the nhs. i am calling on the government ahead of this winter to find an extra £500 million, put it into the nhs, so we can avoid a winter like the one we had last year. so there is a substantive difference between the position we are arguing forand difference between the position we are arguing for and the position of the government. north korea‘s claim that it has the right to shoot down us bombers, even if they are outside its airspace, has been condemned by the white house. relations between the two nations have deteriorated to the point that pyongyang claims president trump has declared war on north korea, a suggestion dismissed as absurd by the white house.
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the prime minister, theresa may, is due to hold talks with the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street later today. mr tusk represents the eu heads of government, who will decide next month if enough progress has been made on so—called divorce issues to allow trade talks with britain. so far, the eu has refused to discuss anything but the irish border, the financial settlement, and citizens‘ rights. prince harry and his girlfriend, meghan markle, have made theirfirst official public appearance together, at the invictus games in toronto. they walked hand—in—hand, before sitting together to watch wheelchair tennis at the sports event for injured service personnel, which was founded by the prince. the couple, who have been in a relationship for about 12 months, both attended saturday‘s opening ceremony, but sat separately. price comparison websites will have to be more clear about how they make money, as part of new rules that have just been announced by the competition and markets authority.
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steph has got more on this. this is around some issues around how comparison sites make money, the deals that they are actually offering and whether all companies are listed when they give you the potential options for when you are looking at things like your insurance, your energy bills, and what is interesting about this is the report has found that actually more people have used a comparison site at least once sense... a lot of people are using them all the time, and there are three main issues that they have found from this. one is about the fact that they are saying they need to be a lot more transparent about what happens with your personal data. so sometimes you might usea your personal data. so sometimes you might use a comparison site and get a load of spam from other companies. so they want you to be very clear on
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whether they are handing over that information to third parties. also issues around how they make money, other issues around than not giving you the full price that you will get when you click through to the website that you are going to. so they want people to be a lot more transparent with what they are actually giving you on those comparison sites. and also, they say, when you use a comparison site, do notjust say, when you use a comparison site, do not just use say, when you use a comparison site, do notjust use one. so use a comparison site and another comparison site and another comparison site, so compare your comparison site, so compare your comparison sites, which gets a bit complicated. we need a website to compare comparison sites. there already are. so once you click through the price you get is not necessarily the one which said it was the best price in the first place, so use another comparison site to check that. yes. that is simple. they said on the whole they do give people a good deal but there are concerns around the transparency of it all, and they need to be really clear about all of that on
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their websites. last time, i tried to go through a comparison site for home insurance, and in the end i searched home insurance in my area, and rang the top site and they were cheaper than the top price anyway. you need to talk to the competition and markets authority, and given that information. i might set up my own website. i wonder if there is a comparison website for footballers, because there is this debate, isn‘t that? this guy has beaten ryan giggs‘s record, but whether or not he has truly beaten it, because he leads in premier league matches, not total top—flight matches. leads in premier league matches, not total top-flight matches. before the premier league was even born, through the mists of time, comes teenage ryan giggs. and there is a really good gareth barry quiz on the bbc sport website, maybe you should
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do itand bbc sport website, maybe you should do it and learn some top gareth barry facts. i got 50%. can almost guarantee you are not going to be doing that. he has now played the most premier league matches of anybody else, and has also u nfortu nately anybody else, and has also unfortunately been booked more times than anyone else, which is what you might expect. 119 times in his career. it was a record—breaking night for former england midfielder gareth barry, who made his 633rd appearance in the premier league. he has now broken the premier league record, surpassing the legendary ryan giggs, with frank lampard, david james, and gary speed making up the top five. barry has scored 52 goals in the top flight, most of them for aston villa, as well as three for england. barry‘s west brom side lost 2—0 at arsenal. summer signing alexandre lacazette scored both goals, taking arsenal up to seventh in the table. he has scored in all three league games so far at the emirates, but he is a long way short of barry‘s achievement. it's something different this week, the media attention. not something i craved, but it would be nice to put this milestone to bed, and
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concentrate on the game. you have gone past the record of ryan giggs. has he been in touch with you? yes, he did. he has been in touch to say congratulations. after last week‘s sacking of england women‘s manager mark sampson, the fa say the right procedures are in place to prevent a similar issue again. sampson was dismissed following evidence of inappropriate behaviour in a previous role, and the case was discussed in full at an fa board meeting yesterday. you will rememberjohanna konta‘s remarkable run to the wimbledon semi—finals earlier this summer. well, things haven‘t gone so well for her since. she has suffered herfourth consecutive defeat, this time at the wuhan open, in china, where she lost to australian ashleigh barty. she should still reach the end—of—season world tour finals, though. england scrum—half ben youngs has echoed the fears of his team—mate billy vunipola about the demands of modern rugby. vunipola has been ruled out forfour
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months following another operation. he said he would take a pay cut to play less. but the plan is for the season to be stretched to 11 months, and youngs agrees that would be too much. we need to understand that the toll it is going to take on our bodies, and we don‘t want to cut people‘s career short, we want them to leave the game in good health and able to do the next challenge. i want to leave the game in good health so i am able to do my nextjourney, whatever that might be. i think it is vitally important that we get it right, and i think the powers that be have been vocal, the players have been vocal, and i am sure they will listen to them. british bobsleigh pilot misha mcneill has hit her £30,000 target as she attempts to make next year‘s winter olympics. she launched the appeal after the british bobsleigh & skeleton federation cut her funding. she and team—mate mica moore can now compete in world cup races next season, to try to seal qualification
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for the games in february. i think we can handle the pressure. it‘s just... i said earlier, we‘re powered by the people now. and for people to believe in us, and support us, and all the nice messages we‘ve had, and all the donations — you know, people believe in us, and that lifts you up a little bit. and that gives you what you need to push that little bit harder, and work more, and, you know, make everyone proud. that will be a great story, the funding cuts, had to raise £30,000 of their own money, and money from crowd funding, to even get to qualification. there is a film in this. cool runnings! they have to qualify first, but if they get there, they might win a medal. and already our hearts are behind them, because they are so passionate and
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determined to compete. at the weekend, during the opening ceremony of the invictus games in toronto, much was made of the fact that its founder, prince harry, was sat a few rows away from his girlfriend, the actress meghan markle. yesterday, royal watchers were treated to a public display of affection, as they strode hand—in—hand for their first official public appearance together to watch a wheelchair tennis match. so is this a significant milestone in their relationship? let‘s speak to the royal writer charlie jacoby, who is in our bristol newsroom. charlie, thank you very much for being with us this morning in your bristol studio. give us an idea, first of all, how much careful planning has gone into making sure that every detail, the way they held hands, where they walk, how long they had been together four, was carefully managed in this? obviously much was made careful planning, and we learnt that prince harry‘s private secretary was personally in charge of arrangements. i am not sure i can see them sitting down and talking about three days to
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handholding day, two days to h—day. i think prince harry generally disdains the media, and i think this was a little more natural than the media is picking out. do you think that disdain is one of the reasons why they chose to do this a long way away from the intense uk media pressure, and do it in toronto? no, i think they are just happy in toronto. she works in toronto, the invictus games is in toronto, that is his great sporting events, i think it is a normal place for them to get together. it is kind of surprising that they were not actually seen together at the opening ceremony, and i suppose it is rather charming that a get—together in the audience for the disabled tennis. apparently there was aghast as they walked in together, and the handholding took place after that —— a gasp. together, and the handholding took place after that -- a gasp. he has done a lot of this, growing up in public. i his own admission he has
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made some mistakes and said some things he shouldn‘t have over the yea rs, things he shouldn‘t have over the years, but a man who has been so much in the public eye, how do you think he has managed this relationship so far? i think it has been spectacularly successful. he was the skate great sibling for a long time. so many comparisons could be made with 80 years ago and king edward viii, and wallis simpson, another american divorcee, i think the royal family got over that problem shortly after 19a6. they continued to have a problem with marrying divorcees into the 1960s, but i think that is all behind us now. in terms of the royal family, you say how much they have changed in terms of welcoming in those from outside the social circle, do you think because of that intense scrutiny, and virtually anything she has ever said and ever put on social media has been investigated and looks at, are they ready for a californian who once wrote that most things can be either do it with y°93r things can be either do it with yoga, the beach or a few avocados?
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it will be a shock, but they have a lwa ys it will be a shock, but they have always been good at adapting. i don‘t think that that will be a problem. i think they are quite capable of coping with meghan one final one, if that is all right. i know you have watched the royal family for many years. do you think that the way that both prince harry and his elder brother and his wife have managed their own life, do you think they have been responsible for growth in popularity in the royal family, and can continue, do you think? yes, i think they have. perhaps the handholding is a marker. you see... prince william and kate do not hold hands, they are very like the queen. no touching family, no touching faces. people like sophie wessex, who are in touch with... sophie, sophie wessex, who are in touch with. .. sophie, countess sophie wessex, who are in touch with... sophie, countess of wessex, as in touch as meghan markle with the media, are good at managing the media. perhaps you have a more
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touchy—feely royal family on that side, and perhaps a more stiff royal family on the other. we have certainly seen a terrific bounce in royalfamily certainly seen a terrific bounce in royal family popularity over the last ten years. i can‘t see that stopping, but then no one could have predicted the horrors of the 1990s, either. thank you very much, that is really interesting. we are talking about this, because it is a picture which has gone around the world. and how well managed it may or may not have been. prince harry and meghan markle, here is the incident itself, the handholding. touching as yet. again, looking at each other, but touching. there you go. i‘ve been hearing some wonderful news, carol has got a dog? look at that beauty! look! this is dillis, isn‘t she good? dillis, give me a paw, what a clever girl! the reason
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dillis is here is because she is with her mum, the head gardener here. hello. you have 185 acres of parkland to look after, how do you do it? with a fantastic team of national trust staff and volunteers who come in every day of the week and look after this beautiful green space where people live. you can see it's being used by commuters and dog walkers already. morden hall park in south london of course and we are talking conquers and we‘ve got a line of trees here. are you an expert on conquers? i'm getting to be one, it's a good year so far, they are starting to drop. as you can see on the lovely avenue our colour is starting to change and it will be a good, long autumn so great to get out and enjoy the green spaces that we look after don't save any, there's no point. we
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we re don't save any, there's no point. we were saying earlier if you say then they will harden and they will be good for next years. i believe it is against the rules! it might be cheating! there are lots, there are 350 horse chestnuts. between the ages of we think 50 years and 150 years when the park was donated to the national trust. we inherited a numberof the national trust. we inherited a number of beautiful trees to look after soap everyone can enjoy it for free. is it true that they are good for getting rid of moths and scaring away spiders because of the oil? there's a sent there and people would like to prove it but they haven't managed to yet but possibly, worth a try. ajoint meeting you and dillis. this morning the sun is trying to break out in london —— a i°y- trying to break out in london —— a joy. a dull start for many and there‘s some fog around as well, fog
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particularly in parts of eastern scotland, northern england, east anglia, midlands and around bristol. through the morning that and the low cloud will tend to lift and for many of us we‘re looking at a day of bright or sunny spells. in the sunshine it will feel quite pleasant. in the east of england, prone to a few showers, many will miss them all together, they are hit and miss but they could be heavy in east anglia and the other thing happening today is the wind will strengthen in northern ireland and scotla nd strengthen in northern ireland and scotland but a southerly wind so warm. this afternoon in scotland you got bright spells, sunny skies, windy in the west and highs in glasgow and edinburgh of around 18. lot of sunshine in the afternoon in northern ireland but the risk of showers in north—east england and other eastern counties. through yorkshire, lincolnshire, east anglia, you could catch a shower but most won‘t. through london we‘re looking at highs of 20 or 21. from
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the midlands heading to the isle of wight and all points west into south—west england, again, sunny spells through the afternoon. unlucky if you get a shower. for wales and northern ireland, a fair bit of sunshine but don‘t forget, the wind strengthening in northern ireland, coming from the south but still feeling pleasant. through the evening and overnight, many will see the mist and fog reforming, low cloud developing in eastern and south—eastern england. by the end of the night what you will find is the wind will strengthen in south—east england and also northern ireland, possibly reaching gales around the coast. we‘ll also see some rain coming in. tomorrow that rain in the west will slowly moved eastwards. ahead of it where we lose the mist and fog and low cloud we‘re looking at another daewoo of sunny spells, highs tomorrow a bit more than today, 21 or 22 —— another day of. through the evening and overnight, that band of slow—moving rain speeds
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up that band of slow—moving rain speeds upa bit that band of slow—moving rain speeds up a bit and it moves across the rest of the uk so by thursday morning it‘s going to be ensconced in the north—east of scotland. behind it a ridge of high pressure builds in settling things down nicely. lot of sunshine around. once again the outside chance of a shower but that is all. later we see a return to another weather front coming from the west and that will introduce some rain and the wind once again will start to strengthen. as we head towards the end of this weekend and the beginning of next weekend and the beginning of next week things will start to turn a lot more unsettled we think at this stage, but thejury more unsettled we think at this stage, but the jury is still out on that one, it could be the opposite. really, the weather could change? just coming out and covering her bases. did you like dillis? will we see her again? possibly, here she comes, dillis! look at her! what a clever girl! gorgeous! you arejust
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gorgeous, come over! you've got the touch, carol, you've got the touch. thanks, carol. not many people get offered a cuddle with carol and turn it down. something more interesting to do! fabulous! more than half of the energy used to power homes and businesses across the uk this summer came from renewables or nuclear for the first time. steph‘s here to explain more. good morning. this is really interesting. it‘s about how energy sources are changing essentially and the national grid look at this and they say we are starting to see a change in how energy is being produced. yes, the national grid controls how electricity is distributed across england and wales. they connect the electricity generated from power stations or renewable sources like wind farms to local substations where it powers homes and businesses. it‘s a finely tuned system, managing supply and demand on a minute—by—minute basis. and figures for the summer showed over half of all electricity came from low—carbon sources, that‘s nuclear and renewables
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rather than coal and gas. that‘s up from just over a third in 2013. and if you take nuclear out of the equation and just look at renewables, so that‘s wind, solar, tidal, they supplied a quarter of our energy this summer. that‘s up from just 9% four years ago. professor lenny koh is an expert in energy, environment and sustainability at the university of sheffield. good morning to you. thanks for joining us. what are your thoughts on this change in terms of where energy is coming from? this is definitely a very positive trajectory in terms of achieving a low carbon energy future. it's fantastic news to identify the possibility of a good energy mix, which is from renewable sources. that fits with government policy and agenda in terms of how we can drive demand and changed them aren't in
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that particular demand and reduce our negative impact to the planet in terms of energy consumption and improving energy efficiency. renewable energy is very important. i think for instance if we look at the offshore wind market like siemens investment, that technology has showed efficiency has improved and therefore it has the ability to drive down costs, making it more efficient and if the savings can be passed to the consumers so it will potentially reduce the energy bills, that will be an excellent outcome. but will it? could we see energy prices come down? more often i am talking about them going up. there's the potential definitely, it depends on how the structure and governance will look like in the future. if the mixture is a combination of renewable, balancing with the baseload with nuclear, then allowing smart grid, smaller scale energy supply system, that is controlled at
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the city or regional level so that we can have a more responsive and flexible system to control energy supply and an at the local level. are we starting to see more of that, more local suppliers into the grid? that's the trend, a lot of research and innovation is helping in that trajectory in terms of not just policy change but also technology innovation, understanding the supply chain, getting the supplier involved and getting more smes involved, drawing in international investment in this area, such as the example already mentioned. there are huge investments we already know about that have already been announced, including civil nuclear power facilities with small nuclear reactor, smr technology, very highly efficient solar power, and also pv, solar power. this combination is going to be very important to meet
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the paris agreement as well as stimulating the energy supply chain nationally in the uk. it's important for the environment that we look to more renewable sources. absolutely. the more we can do to drive down c02 emissions and other harmful gases to the atmosphere, the better it will be. notjust for the environment alone but also having the opportunity to drive the economic and sustainable growth in the region and sustainable growth in the region and beyond. so having a combination of environmental benefit together with economic benefit, that will also drive health improvements, improving air quality and social benefit. this is the ideal combination in terms of how all of the important things will develop. thanks for your time this morning. that‘s it from me. thanks for your time this morning. that's it from me. very interesting, thanks very much for that this morning. you‘re watching breakfast.
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still to come this morning: grammar traditionalists, avert your ears, language experts have concluded that there‘s nothing wrong with splitting an infinitive. we‘ll speak to one of the researchers who says that what was once considered a howler is now part of modern spoken english. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m claudia—liza armah. a potential breakthrough in the treatment of a form of prostate cancer, thought to be incurable, could save the lives of thousands of men. researchers from the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden hospital could directly target cancer cells that had spread from the prostate without harming the surrounding tissue. over seven in ten men were free of the disease five years after treatment. almost 300,000 children in london and the south—east have inadequate mental healthcare. in a report, the charity nspcc says that more needs to be done to care for children who‘ve been victims of abuse. however, nhs england says
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that the reportjumps to the wrong conclusions and that it is undergoing a significant expansion in mental health services. there are calls this morning for restaurants, cafes and shops to be forced to display its food hygiene ratings, as figures reveal that more than 10% of food businesses in london received a rating of two stars or less — out of a possible five. more than 6,700 companies in london require improvement, following inspections by the food standards agency, according to the gmb union. among them are well—known chains of restaurants and supermarkets. an exhibition showing the dramatic changes around one of london‘s busiest train stations opens today. photographer david bailey has lived in king‘s cross for more than 20 years, and his pictures show its transformation from a crime hotspot — when it was for its problems with drugs and prostitution — to a thriving new business district. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there‘s still no service between gospel oak and barking on the london overground
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because of engineering works. on the roads, in barking, traffic is slow moving on the a13 at movers lane coming in to town. one lane was blocked because of an earlier collision. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s another very mild and murky start to the day. there is a little bit of mist. some fog out there as well. it will gradually lift, though, to a brighter afternoon. for this morning, that mist may take its time to shift thanks to that wind being very light. but when it does we‘re going to see eventually the cloud thinning and breaking too. a brighter afternoon with some sunny spells. the wind is very light and the temperature again very mild. we‘re looking at a maximum later on 20, maybe 21 celsius. a repeat performance tonight. some clear spells. again the wind is light. we could see a little bit of missed developing. the minimum temperature staying in the teens, around 13 or 1a celsius. now, for tomorrow morning, that mist again taking its time to lift but it will eventually. may get one or two brighter spells,
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some sunny spells ahead of our next weather front, which arrives tomorrow evening. the maximum temperature still mild tomorrow, around 20 celsius. that weather front i was talking about is a cold front, bringing rain overnight wednesday into thursday. it will gradually clear, though, through thursday morning, leading to a brighter afternoon on thursday with a bit of sunshine. but what it does do is introduce some slightly fresher air. a little bit cooler as we head through thursday. and that south—westerly drags in various weather fronts for the rest of the week. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though, it‘s back to naga and dan. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and dan walker. parents demand answers. a public hearing is held for the first time into an epilepsy drug that‘s harmed thousands of children. the drug valproate has been linked to autism and physical abnormalities
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in 20,000 british babies. a safety review will look at whether enough is being done to warn pregnant women about its dangers. good morning it‘s tuesday 26th september. north korea accuses the us of declaring war and threatens to shoot down american bombers even if they‘re outside north korean airspace. after dating for more than year, prince harry and meghan markle make a public appearance together for the first time as the two walk hand in hand at the invictus games. price comparison websites will have to be more clear about how they make money as part of new rules that have just been announced by the competition on markets authority. i will have more in a moment. a record—breaking night for gareth
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barry but it is lacazette who shined on the pitch as arsenal beat west brom. he‘s back on our screens with x factor but dermot 0‘leary has been keeping himself busy while it‘s been away. he‘ll be here to tell us this cat inspired him to write his first children‘s book. just for confirmation, it is not boxing day. i‘m so sorry. carroll will prove it, it isn‘t that wintry outside. morning, carol. good morning from south london. a beautiful start to the day. we are talking about conkers, ready for competition later. after a dull start with patchy fog, things will brighten up and it will feel pleasa ntly warm brighten up and it will feel pleasantly warm to this time of year. i will have the details in 15 minutes. merry christmas! it is not christmas, i am willing to clear this up. people will have just woken up and they will be very
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confused. isaid confused. i said good morning, today is the 26th of december, it‘s just been in my head, i‘m very sorry, it‘s september, carol will make that clear with the weather. people might wake up and find at christmas has already gone! good morning, whatever day you might think it is. women from across europe, whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb, will give evidence at a public hearing in london today. the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of valproate to see if warnings were passed on. it is estimated that 20—thousand children have been harmed in the uk alone. the company behind the drug, sanofi, says doctors need a range of therapeutic options to help women with epilepsy through pregnancy. here‘s our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. lillias and ian‘s son was diagnosed with severe learning difficulties when he was three years old. it was caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate, that lillias took when she was pregnant. the couple say they had asked the doctors whether it was safe to take the drug while expecting,
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and were later horrified to discover they had been wrongly reassured. devastated, upset, angry. just — i felt i was let down by the health service. it is estimated tens of thousands of children across the world have been harmed after being exposed to valproate medicines in the womb. it carries a 10% risk of physical problems, and a a0% risk of developmental disorders. today, a safety review by the european medicines agency will look at whether new warnings on pillboxes in the uk, and a range of other strengthened measures, are actually reaching women of childbearing age. the uk‘s medicines watchdog, the mhra, says it supports the review, and stressed it is important that women don‘t stop taking valproate without first discussing it with their doctor. parents from across europe, like lillias and ian, with children harmed by sodium valproate, will give evidence to the public hearing, amid concerns that babies are still being damaged by the drug.
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sophie huthinson, bbc news. and just after eight o‘clock this morning we‘ll speak to a mother who blames the drug for harming her daughter. labour claims the nhs in england needs a half a billion pound bailout from the government in order to avoid a potential winter health crisis. jon ashworth, the shadow health secretary will call for the money to be spent on boosting the number of beds as well hiring extra staff. let‘s get more detail on this from our political correspondent, iain watson who joins us from the party‘s conference in brighton. lovely to see you. we spoke tojohn as hworth lovely to see you. we spoke tojohn ashworth earlier. one of the questions is, where will the money come from, and will it make a difference as the need to see? that‘s right, because some nhs managers say it is difficult to spend a cash injection. john as hworth spend a cash injection. john ashworth has said there is a demand
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to get cash into the nhs ahead of the winter spike in demand. what is interesting is as far as health policy is generally concerned in the labour party and his well costed. they say they will take more money from the top 5% of people in tax. that will bring an overall cash injection of £7 billion to the nhs. another policy was announced here yesterday which also affects the health service, a finance initiative. money is given to build and maintain hospitals. john mcdonnell said these contracts would end. but when john mcdonnell said these contracts would end. but whenjohn ashworth was asked on this programme to clarify that his tone was, i thought, rather different. what he was saying yesterday was that the contracts across the public sector, which are costing the taxpayer billions of pounds, these should be reviewed and looked at to see if there is a better way of running those contracts, by bringing them in—house. in the nhs, something like £800 million has gone to
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private companies. if we can get those pfi contracts back in house we could get a better dealfor the taxpayer. what‘s interesting there from his tone is that he was stressing that there has been a review of these private sector contracts, rather than simply saying these will end. we will bring them back, those were his words. he also put a new criteria on this. saying they would only come back if it represented good value for the taxpayer. it wouldn‘t be brought backjust for ideological reasons. a difference in tone on the labour front bench with this policy announcements, i think. indeed, thanks. north korea‘s claim that it has the right to shoot down us bombers, even if they are outside its airspace, has been condemned by the white house. relations between the two nations have deteriorated to the point that pyongyang claims president trump has declared war on north korea — a suggestion dismissed as absurd by the white house. danny savage reports. american military aircraft,
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preparing for a show of force close to the north korean coast. these planes went on to fly in international airspace near the east of the country, further north in the region than they ever have. the us said it was a demonstration of their resolve. now north korea has reacted to donald trump‘s threat and actions by claiming the us has declared war on them. translation: since the us declared war on our country we have every right to take countermeasures, including shooting down us strategic bombers, even if they are not yet inside the airspace border of our country. the question of who will not be around for much longer will be answered them. but the white house said it is absurd to think they are at war with north korea and has tried to strike a more diplomatic tone overnight.
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it's diplomatic tone overnight. it‘s never appropriate for a country to shoot down another country‘s aircraft when it is over international waters. our goal is the same, we continue to seek peace over the korean peninsula. that‘s our focus. but north korea‘s interpretation of us actions and its proposed response is another escalation in this ongoing crisis. so far this has been and remainsa ongoing crisis. so far this has been and remains a war of words, but if american planes do clash with the north korean military the risk of tipping into conflict increases dramatically. danny savage, bbc news, seoul, south korea. prince harry and his girlfriend meghan markle have made their first official public appearance together at the invictus games in toronto. they walked hand—in—hand before sitting together to watch wheelchair tennis at the sports event for injured service personnel, which was founded by the prince. sarah campbell reports. finally, pictures to accompany
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a royal love story. the couple have been togetherfor over a year, but until this week, have gone to great lengths to keep their relationship out of sight. no more — their affection for each other obvious. prince harry is in toronto as the founder of the invictus games, and this is home for meghan markle. she stars in a television show which is filmed in the city centre. they are shown here on their way to watch some wheelchair tennis, looking casual and comfortable in each other‘s presence. she did attend the opening ceremony on saturday, but was seated some distance from the prince. harry told the bbc he is loving the games. toronto as a city has embraced the games. they have come here to support all the nations. and there‘s these interactions happening, as well, where young people and their parents are coming out and asking questions and learning stories. the pictures will feature on front pages around the world. in a recent magazine article, meghan markle
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said they were a couple, and in love — and it shows. sarah campbell, bbc news. most people remember their wedding day. as robert —— as long as it is a happy day. this is a canadian couple. they were posing for photos on a bridge in ontario. but they spotted a youngster he was pushed into the river by his friends. the groom let into action, in full dress, and let into action, in full dress, and let into the water before pulling the ball out to shore. we think this photo was taken before that happened. what a great story to tell. carol will take a look at the weather in a few minutes. and we have the sport in about half an hour. it is estimated that tens of thousands of children across the world have been harmed after being exposed to the epilepsy drug, valproate while they were in the womb.
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this is our top story this morning. later today women from across europe will give evidence at a public hearing set up to assess whether warnings were passed on. we‘re joined now by sam scott—edgar who is one of 20,000 parents in the uk who says the drug damaged her child. also on the sofa is dr rebecca bromley who has carried out research on the effects of valproate on unborn children. good morning to you both. can you start by telling us a little bit about your situation, you mentioned that you are one of those 20,000 pa rents, that you are one of those 20,000 parents, what was your experience like? my daughter, she was born in 2003. and i was told, when i decided to get pregnant, i was told by the neurologist that there were not any problems or risks. in taking the drug? yes. because you are epileptic? yes, and i was taking the
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highest toast, 3000 mg of tranexamic —— the highest dose of valproate. i was told there was no chance of any problems. tell us about your daughter. she is 14. she has had 12 surgeries altogether. cleft palate surgery. surgeries altogether. cleft palate surgery. she has the mental age of a four—year—old. she is still wearing nappies. she is heavily dependent on me. she has noise sensitivity and she cannot live without me doing everything for her. at what stage we re everything for her. at what stage were you told that it was the drugs you were taking which caused all of this? after! you were taking which caused all of this? after i gave birth you were taking which caused all of this? after! gave birth to her they
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told me, the consultant told me, the next day that it was a particular syndrome afterwards. the doctor knew but the neurologist didn‘t. syndrome afterwards. the doctor knew but the neurologist didn't. doctor bromley, 20,000 women who have experienced the after effects of taking valproate without adequate warning by many people you have spoken to. how does this drug affect the foetus? how is it not traceable or detectable? we know that children exposed to valproate in the womb carry a one in ten risk of having a defect, which could be a heart problem or a spinal problem. it disrupts early developmental processes. we also know unfortunately that it affects the brain development of these children. about four in ten children will also be developing at a slower rate in
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comparison to their appears. when you say one in ten, and i would be interested to hear your thoughts on this, isn‘t this a massive risk for any drug? how has a gp and neurosurgeons not said, don‘t do this? are there other drugs out there with a high risk? we have the highest concern about valproate. it has been licensed for a long time. the reasons why the warnings have not for now is multifactorial. it has taken time to collect the data. it takes time to follow up children. but there are lots of opportunities where things could have happened in this area. sanofi come on the company behind the drug, say that the risks of stopping treatment are discussed before planning a pregnancy. what sort of action have you taken since then? since taking
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the drug, i gotjoined in with a class action suit, which was dropped in 2010 due to legal aid being withdrawn by the government. since then, we‘ve just been trying to fight to get a public enquiry into the drug. the fla other drug. they got justice. it is time that valproate got justice justice. it is time that valproate gotjustice for their children as well. the regulatory agency says that as with all medicines the safety of valproate in pregnancy has been kept under review and as new data become available the warnings have been updated, however, it is vital that women and girls have the updates which is why we supported
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the valproate toolkit. doctor, can you tell us about the toolkit? the valproate toolkit. doctor, can you tell us about the toolkit7m was done by the uk regulator to inform women directly. it had a pack of information for health care professionals and had information that pharmacists should have gun giving out with the tablets. what we have heard this week in the press some of the major epilepsy charities did a review and found out that 70% of women are reporting that they are still not getting that information despite the fact that it has been out for the last year. the medicines agency in the uk and the european medicines agency are taking steps to understand why the information isn‘t going out. where is the problem with the dissemination. it is notjust a problem in this country, it is a problem in this country, it is a problem in this country, it is a problem in europe. what would a positive outresult? getting the awareness of these drugs because if this drug was made aware that it had
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consequences for their actions it means other drugs companies will learn from their mistakes. so, it betters everybody all—round. and it just means that somebody has taken acceptability for what happened which is what everyone wants. everyone wants the justice for these children and no one has held their hands up to say, "it was our fault." thank you for coming on and talking about it. i‘m sure you have gone through it in your mind if you had not taken that drug at the time. thank you for talking to us. carol is out and about. good morning from morden hall park. we‘re talking
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conkers today. they come from horse chestnut trees. you get them in new zealand, canada and iceland and norway and there are 350 horse chestnut trees here in morden hall park, but as well as that, the river flows through the park and that‘s home to many wet land birds as well such as mallards, heron and egrets. the forecast for the uk today is it isa the forecast for the uk today is it is a dull start. there is a lot of cloud and fog as well. we‘ve got fog at the moment around the edinburgh area, parts of northern england, the midlands, east anglia around the bristol area as well. some of it is dense, but it will slowly lift, thin and break as we go through the morning and what you will find through the morning is welds further sunny spells develop. we could see showers today across some eastern counties of england, not all of us
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will catch one and through the day the wind will strengthen across northern ireland and western scotland, but it is a southerly wind, so it is coming from a mild direction. it won‘t feel cold. this afternoon across scotland expect bright spells or sunny spells. highs up bright spells or sunny spells. highs up to about 18 celsius across the central belt and the wind strengthening in the west. for northern england, you will see sunny spells after this morning‘s fog lifts, but there is the risk of showers. anywhere across eastern counties of england really from durham, northumberland, lincolnshire and down into east anglia. most of us will miss them, but you could catch a sharp one, but there will be sunny spells. sunny spells through the midlands and across southern counties. in the the south east we could hit 20 or 21 celsius. as we drift towards the south—west, it will be a beautiful day. for wales and northern ireland, a similar story, we are looking at sunny spells and the winds strengthening across northern ireland. as we head through the evening and overnight, once again we will see mist and fog
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patches reform. there will be low cloud developing across eastern and south—eastern england and by the end of the night the wind will strengthen across south—east england and northern ireland. strengthen around the coast toll gale force and we will start to see the arrival of ranl. tomorrow that band of rain in the west starts to move very slowly eastwards. its progress isn‘t great so ahead of it, when we lose the low cloud, mist and fog, the sun will come out and if anything it will be warmer tomorrow than today. so parts of the south—east for example could be 21 celsius, 22 celsius. if you are in the rain in northern ireland, when it sets in you will have it for the day, we are looking at 15 celsius. overnight that rain accelerates as it pushes towards the north sea, becoming ensconced across the far north—east of scotland. a ridge of high pressure builds in behind it so the weather does settle dounl. you could catch a shower, but it‘s such a small chance, and then later on in the day the cloud thickens out towards the west. the
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wind will strengthen and we will see more rainmed coming our way, dan and naga. carol, thank you very much. such gorgeous surroundings. beautiful. we have got our conkers ready for a little competition later on. hang on, stand—by. ready for a little competition later on. hang on, stand—bylj ready for a little competition later on. hang on, stand-by. i saw the lens cracking and everything. i hope you‘ve done your health and safety report for that. we certainly have. paul has assured me if the lens cracks, it‘s not my fault! there is not a trapped of litter in the background where carol is. we like a good clean park. drivers are being encouraged to throw rubbish out of their windows, not onto the road but into bright orange funnel—shaped drive—thru bins. they‘ve been designed so that motorists don‘t have to leave their vehicles. it‘s all part of an attempt to keep our motorways clean and they‘ll be introduced at 25
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service areas around england. let‘s find out what drivers and pedestrians think of the idea. i think the idea of putting a bin somewhere where people don‘t throw the litter on to the grass is a good idea. i think people should learn how to put their rubbish away. i think it's not great seeing that on the corner of our roads. i hope that it will work. i think it's worth a try. having not seen one in real life, i think they are quite bizarre. i get annoyed when people just chuck stuff out of cars. it drives me nuts so i don‘t know if that will help. it is really annoying when you see somebody wind their window down. it is really annoying when you see somebody wind their window downm makes me grind my teeth. allison ogden—newton from environmental charity keep britain tidyjoins us now. i bet that probably annoys you as well? absolutely. how big a problem are we talking about? clearing up litter costs £1 billion. it couldn‘t
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be more important to get people to do the right thing. any money spent on clearing up litter could be spent on clearing up litter could be spent on other things. so there is a big sort of orange funnel bin. there is one. as you leave a motorway service station, that‘s there and the idea that anything you bought, apple coarse, you fling it in there? we found that people, those that have a tendency to throw things from their ca rs are tendency to throw things from their cars are unfortunately doing it as they slow down to leave the service station so what we want encourage people to do, if they want to clean out their cars, throw them in the funnel bin. one is for lorries... that‘s right. funnel bin. one is for lorries... that's right. here is the devil's advocate view, they are a blight. they look awful. they‘re big, orange things on the side of the road where he there should be grass and trees all because people are too stupid not to throw litter. so should we not to throw litter. so should we not be just educating them or increasing the fines on them so we don‘t have to have the orange
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monstrosities on the street? well, i appreciate your point of view and i can see how others may see. it the bins are more attractive than the litter and anything that can encourage people to do the right thing has to be a good thing. what about the fines? what about the deterrents against litter throwing? are you saying they don‘t work? goodness me, no. at keep britain tied yes we encourage people to use all strategies... are we getting worse? different sorts of littering. food and drink on the go, dog fouling is getting better. u nfortu nately fouling is getting better. unfortunately our food and drink on the go, so as we‘re heading around, dashing around the country, with our soft drinks and our snacks we are getting unfortunately rather disorganised about how we‘re getting rid of it. the bottom line is we wa nt rid of it. the bottom line is we want people to put it in the bin and keep it with them and find a bin and put it in a bin so let‘s make it
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easy to do the right thing. the annoying thing is when people drop it near the bin when president bin isn‘t full. that‘s lazy and selfish combined together? yeah and lacking in skills really. these hopefully, big open, orange, we‘re hoping people can make their target. you are in the presence of somebody who made a song up when she was much younger and it is sung in schools today. i did and i was hoping to hear it, dan. naga, any chance. don‘t disappoint the nation. hear it, dan. naga, any chance. don't disappoint the nationlj apologise for the cringiness. i was nine. # don‘t be a litter bug # don‘t be a litter bug # keep britain clean. # keep britain clean. # don‘t be a litter bug # don‘t be a litter bug # put your stuff in the bin. # put your stuff in the bin. # don‘t be a litter, bitter, bug, bug. # that‘s still sung. is it your
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school? no it was a centre for young musicians and they still sing it 32 yea rs musicians and they still sing it 32 years on. very wise words, don't be a litter bug! it goes into schools as well because the children help the parents, they tell the parents off, don‘t they? maybe that‘s the place to get the message through we run an eco schools programme and teaching kids not to litter and get out and about and enjoy the countryside and leave it how they find it is part of that programme. it isa find it is part of that programme. it is a really important message. i love the song. we are going to have to integrate that into the uk schools programme. lovely to talk to you. thank you very much. that was a special moment for us all. special is the right word! coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. it isa it is a misty and murky start this morning. we have patches of fog around, as well. an area of high pressure is keeping things relatively settled and the light winds is keeping the misty nurse
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with us. things will improve as we go into the afternoon. —— mistiness with us. there will be some drying bright spells across the uk. it might stay cloudy towards eastern scotland. here, temperatures in aberdeen around 13 to 15 degrees. about 17 or 18 in glasgow and edinburgh. sunshine for northern ireland. warm sunny spells for much of wales and south—western part of england. sunshine across the south—east, temperatures could reach 21 celsius. we could catch the odd shower across parts of east anglia, up shower across parts of east anglia, up towards lincolnshire and east yorkshire. through this evening and into tonight, more cloud returning. it could start off misty and murky wednesday morning. across many eastern areas it should brighten up in the afternoon. further west, more
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cloud and outbreaks of rain working their way into northern ireland, western parts of wales and the south—west of england. this weather front is slowly moving in. that is introducing the rain. and the isobars are closer together, so turning breezy in these western parts. temperatures still on the higher side for the end of september. on wednesday night, that weather front will continue to push east. as it does, we have this small ridge of low pressure coming in the late in the week. thursday morning, a wet start over eastern areas. that will clear away. for many on thursday, another dry day with sunshine. and fairly warm, temperatures around 16 to 20 celsius. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and rachel horne. flying into a trade storm — boeing and bombardier go head to head in a dispute that leaves jobs in the us, us and canada on the line.
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—— the us, -- the us, uk, —— the us, uk, and canada on the line. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday the 26th of september. a us court prepares to rule on a plane row between america‘s boeing and canada‘s bombardier. we‘ll explain why it matters. also in the programme — whatsapp gets blocked again in china in the biggest clamp—down so far on the encrypted chat app. this is how the european markets look at
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