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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 26, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am. the united states seeks to tone down the war of words with north korea, with the us defence secretary saying he wants a diplomatic solution to the nuclear crisis. labour calls for a half—a—billion pound bailout for the nhs in order to avoid a winter health crisis. the prime minister will meet the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street to discuss brexit. women, whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb, will give evidence at a public hearing. also in the next hour — should scrums and tackling be banned in school rugby? experts say the move would reduce concussion and other injuries. and ‘lazy and obsessed with social media'. a bbc survey suggests that's what older people think about 16—22—year—olds. but how do they see themselves? good morning.
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it's tuesday, 26th september. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the white house has condemned north korea's claim that it has the right to shoot down us bombers, even if they are outside its airspace. relations between the two nations have deteriorated to the point that pyongyang claims president trump has declared war on north korea — a suggestion dismissed as absurd by the white house. speaking this morning the us defense secretary james mattis says the united states want to resolve the escalating nuclear crisis with north korea diplomatically. danny savage reports. american military aircraft,
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preparing for a show of force close to the north korean coast. these planes went on to fly in international airspace near the east of the country, further north in the region than they ever have. the us said it was a demonstration of their resolve. now north korea has reacted to donald trump's threats and actions by claiming the us has declared war on them. translation: since the us declared war on our country we have every right to take countermeasures, including shooting down us strategic bombers, even if they are not yet inside the airspace border of our country. the question of who will not be around for much longer will be answered them. but the white house said it is absurd to think they are at war with north korea and has tried to strike a more diplomatic tone overnight. it's never appropriate for a country to shoot down another country's aircraft when it is over international waters.
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our goal is the same, we continue to seek peace over the korean peninsula. that's our focus. doing that through the maximum diplomatic and economic pressures. but north korea's interpretation of us actions and its proposed response is another escalation in this ongoing crisis. even during the height of the cold war, they have never threatened to use weapons war, they have never threatened to use weapons like this, unless they're attacked by nuclear weapons. when north korea is blatantly and publicly threatened they will strike the united states with nuclear weapons, we have never seen this
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kind of threat. so far, this has been and remains a war of words but if american planes do clash with the north korean military, the risk of tipping into conflict increases dramatically. our correspondent danny savage is in seoul. a short time ago he sent us this update. the question people are asking is, does this push the crisis further towards conflict? on the surface, yes, but lots of experts believe north korea would have to get lucky if it were to shoot down an american aircraft, so it depends how old the americans are and how ambitious the north koreans are. with these military operations continuing over the next few weeks. american fighters have only flown off the east coast of north korea once over the weekend, we haven't heard of any
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further shows of force and i am sure the americans would tell us if they're aware. so, it depends how frequently the americans will do this and how much they want to antagonise the north koreans, if you like, by doing it. where are they get the balance between showing force about what they could to and getting too close for comfort. my understanding is the operation this weekend stayed quite a distance off the north korean coastline, perhaps out of missile range. there is a suggestion north koreans did not know that operation and taken place until the americans publicised it afterwards. there is all that to be taken into afterwards. there is all that to be ta ken into account. afterwards. there is all that to be taken into account. one military expert in south korea says he does not believe for one minute that north korea has the capability to shoot down an american dollar. it could be just shoot down an american dollar. it could bejust more rhetoric. —— to shoot down an american bomber. if it is compatible to a game of tennis,
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the ball at the moment is in the american court. what will they do next? they have been threatened with having one of their planes shot down. do they keep a wary distance oi’ down. do they keep a wary distance or carry on? that was only emerge over the coming days. some sad news, the actress, liz dawn, best known as the actress, liz dawn, best known as the duckworth in coronation street, has tied, that announcement from her family. she first appeared in coronation street in 1974 and she did leave in 2008, although she did reappear ina did leave in 2008, although she did reappear in a guest appearance in 2010. but today, in a statement from the family of liz dawn, they say they are devastated and heartbroken to announce the death of their much loved wife, mother, sister, grandmother and great—grandmother, as they put it, the incredible liz
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dawn. she died peacefully last night, at home with family around her. they said she had been the love, light and inspiration in our lives. the statement also on behalf of coronation street, the soap opera in which she appeared so famously for so many years, which added its condolences and it said that her family at coronation street are heartbroken. the statement from coronation street continues, "we have been blessed to have lives in oui’ have been blessed to have lives in our lives, as she was such a kind, considerate and caring friend and colleague. 34 years as vera duckworth, she brought so muchjoy and happiness to so many. she was a wonderful actress, who will forever bea wonderful actress, who will forever be a true coronation street legend.
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" and on behalf of itv and the executive producer of coronation street, kieran roberts, they said, liz dawn was a true coronation street legend, everyone lucky enough to have worked with her during her 34 years playing corrie icon vera duckworth, will remember her with huge affection. that is the sad news that liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in coronation street for 34 years, has died. labour claims the nhs needs a half a billion pound bailout from the government in order to avoid a potential winter health crisis. jon ashworth, the shadow health secretary will call for the money to be spent on boosting the number of beds — as well hiring extra staff. our assistant political editor norman smith is in brighton. the nhs is familiar ground, of
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course, for labour, norman, this seems a specific figure, how did they arrive at it? well, they calculated the additional pressures they believe will be on the nhs overwinter based on what is happening in the summer. at the moment, they said bed occupancy is at record levels, the number of delayed discharges has gone up by 1196, delayed discharges has gone up by 11%, an increase in people waiting in a&e departments and that is at summer. they can't do that by winter, things will be much tougher because people are more susceptible to illness, elderly people are more vulnerable, they suggest to me that possible pressure, you need to put in halfa possible pressure, you need to put in half a billion to start recruiting more nurses now, to be ready for that. there was a separate announcement to try to get the gambling industry to pay more money to help people suffering mental health problems around gambling. currently in the hall, there are
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arguing about rule changes to the constitution, which might sound technical but it is very important because many people say the rule changes that are being proposed are consolidating the grip of mr corrigan and his supporters on the labour party. more members on the national executive committee. , labour party. more members on the national executive committee., also changes to elections for a future leaders to try to make it easier to get left—wing candidates. i spoke to john ashworth out there and i was impressing him about why there hadn't been more of a fight by those opposed to this? lam i am pretty relaxed about the number of candidates on the ballot paper. and i would say, we have over 500,000 members in our labour party, i would say, stand for the nec, i wa nt i would say, stand for the nec, i want the biggest possible choice for
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the membership when they vote for out the membership when they vote for our nec members, put yourself forward and get involved. often, some of the most interesting things can happen at fringe meetings and there was one last night, a momentum meeting addressed byjohn mcdonnell, and remember the big announcement from yesterday about nationalising pfi contracts, well, you get a sense of the pressure he believes a labour government might come under from the city, from the banks, where they to go down that nationalisation road was talking about how he thought they would be coming for us and how privately he and others have been war—gaming scenarios where there is a phoney value of the pound, capital flight, a phoney value of the pound, capital flight, have a listen to him talking to about momentum group. we will face all the challenges i am sure you have discussed and we have a scenario planned for those that is exactly what we're doing at the
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moment. bringing the relevant expertise together at every level, to talk through what happens if there is such and such? what are the errors are run on the pound? what happens if there is this concept of national flight? you never know, so we have a scenario planned for about. mr o'donnell also said, don't think that a jeremy corbyn labour government would be a traditional labour government. they would be a radical administration. labour government. they would be a radicaladministration. i labour government. they would be a radical administration. i guess what we have seen here is this is a very different labour party led byjeremy corbyn, presumably previous policies would not have considered scrapping pfi contractor renationalising the water industry, railways, royal mail, part of the energy sector, very, very different labour party. norman, thank you for that. act now
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to the news that coronation street actress liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in the soap for 34 years has died. her family duckworth in the soap for 34 years has died. herfamily hasjust announced the news that she died last night. in a statement, the soap called her a true coronation street legend. our arts correspondent looks back on her life. all i can say is i hope prince charles never set eyes on it! admiring my stone cladding it is certainly. she may have been snooty about giving up's taste but without her, coronation street would not have been the same. are you trying to be funny or what? are you not going to carry her over the threshold? when list on first arrived, she said she felt like cinderella, her palace, number nine coronation st. could you make us
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some chips? you are a right romantic. vera and jack and the pensions and despite the bruises, their relationship lasted because there is something special about this double act. she was born sylvia butterfield, home was the holton moor estate in leeds.” butterfield, home was the holton moor estate in leeds. i never really felt poorer. because we always had a love and nobody has anything in them days. she did all sorts ofjobs, from selling wigs to singing in working men's clubs under a new stage name, liz dawn. the money where good. i had three children under school—age and i really did it for money, singing at weekends. the tv acting work came at a time when directors were looking for talent was natural, authentic, the sort of person you could truly believed would live on coronation street. ella mac you will laugh on the other side of yourface! get ella mac you will laugh on the other side of your face! get off me! ella mac you will laugh on the other side of yourface! get off me! of
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duty, liz tom was a keen campaigner for the labour party and became lady mayoress of leaves. say you've never loved anybody else. after the years of laughter and ups and downs, liz dawn had proved she was one of acting's naturals. she admitted she didn't even quite know where liz stopped and vera began. liz dawn, who has signed the damage. —— who has sadly died. the prime minister, theresa may is due to hold talks with the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street later today. mr tusk represents the eu heads of government who'll decide next month if enough progress has been made on so—called divorce issues to allow trade talks with britain. so far, the eu has refused to discuss anything but the irish border, the financial settlement and citizens' rights. our political correspondent leila
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nathoo is in westminster. how significant is this meeting? rebecca, it is exactly because of what you said about talks trying to be pushed on by the british government to talk about future trade and the fact the eu council is the one that will decide that, the 27 eu heads of state are the ones who will decide whether sufficient progress has been made on those divorce issues. that is why theresa may is meeting donald tusk in downing street this afternoon, as pa rt downing street this afternoon, as part of a concerted diplomatic push, a bit ofa part of a concerted diplomatic push, a bit of a charm offensive, if you like, theresa may was hosting the irish taoiseach yesterday in downing street and we had borisjohnson going to visit the czech republic, slovakia and romania. the fourth round of brexit talks are ongoing in brussels at the moment, so there is a many fronted process going on at
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the moment and theresa may will be hoping to keep those lines of communication open with donald tusk to try to persuade him after that florence speech in which an overture was made about the transition period and honouring obligations to the eu, she will be hoping that these talks being held alongside the official round of brexit negotiations, will go some way to persuade you cancel that sufficient progress has been made in order to kick—start brexit talks on to trade. realistically, how likely is it? i think theresa may will hope the speech in florence has generated enough good will. she has generated enough good will. she has certainly gone some way to be explicit about the uk honouring our financial obligations. of course no figure was put up on that and that is one of the big sticking point in the negotiations, so far, that is what has helped them up before moving on to future trade. theresa may also try to make an overture about eu citizens, another key point
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that brussels wants sorted. she promised to guarantee eu citizens and meeting with the irish tea —— irish taoiseach yesterday was part of that. the big picture that theresa may set out in the concrete negotiating position and i don't think donald tusk will be deviating from the line of looking for that. we have this week and then one more round to go for enough progress to be made and i think this week is crucial because it will be after theresa may's speech, where she tried to shift the tone, where we will learn a lot about how the brexit talks are going and whether the eu doesjudge that have been sufficient progress by the end of this week thank you. the headlines
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on bbc newsroom live... the coronation street actress liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in the soap, has died at the age of 77. after an exchange of threats between america and north korea, the us defence secretary says he wants a diplomatic solution to the crisis. labour calls for half £1 billion bailout for the nhs. to avoid a winter health crisis. in a moment, would banning scrums and tackling in school rugby help to reduce injury or harm the game? you like and sport, the west brom match, and sanchezis sport, the west brom match, and sanchez is accused of cheating,. they lost 2—0 at emirates. arsenal move up to second in the table. ben youngs says rugby union players cannot be pushed any further and echoes fears of billy vunipola that
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an11 echoes fears of billy vunipola that an 11 month season would cause injuries and burn—out. british bobsleigh withdrew financial support but this team will now be able to compete at the world cup and hopefully the winter olympics. more on all of those stories in the next hour. more now on that new study coronation street actress liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in the soap for 34 years, has died, at the age of 77. on the line is mervyn watson, a former coronation street producer. we are grateful for you joining us on this sad day. what are your thoughts? well, when i heard just now, literally just your thoughts? well, when i heard just now, literallyjust now, it was shocked and upset because even though it is a long time since i worked with liz, on coronation
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street, 15 years ago now, she was somebody who really held a special place in my heart and in the hearts of all people who worked with her. and with her audience. she was legendary, she was wonderful. why? what would she like to work with? well, she was real. she wasn't a pain to work with, she was a delight to work with, a real person, and eventually end her life, she got involved with a fantastic amount of charity work. so, to meet her, you we re charity work. so, to meet her, you were dealing with a real person, a real big personality with a big heart, a delight, really. she was lovely. generous and funny. people people wonder when they watch soap
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operas is how similar the character is to the actor. how different was sheep from vera duckworth? she wasn't so different, in the sense of the size of her personality, she was big, a sort of colourful and real person and those are the qualities that came over in her character on screen and for those reasons, she was wonderfully theatrical and the relationship she had with jack, bill itami, it was just pure gold for any tv drama series, never mind coronation street. it was pure gold. and you just loved them. you certainly loved watching them on screen, did they get on well
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off—screen as well? screen, did they get on well off-screen as well? yes, no problem, they had separate lives and interests but they were very close on screen and off screen and the magic chemistry took over and the character and the humour and the pathos and emotion or came across in spades. mervyn watson, we are grateful for your time. that's a former coronation street producer, thank you. with us is our media correspondent. what more can you tell us, david? a statement from itv, saying, we're devastated and heartbroken at the passing of our much loved and incredible liz dawn. originally, sylvia butterfield, the nightclub singer, she had three children, need to make ends meet and
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thatis children, need to make ends meet and that is where she got her break, small acting roles to start off with but in the early days of coronation street, what you wanted where people who seemed as though they were real, they would convince you on a nightly basis that you were actually watching someone who might be living at number nine, coronation street and liz dawn was exactly that. when you think about what actually makes coronation street watchable and so special for so many people, coronation street watchable and so specialfor so many people, i think there are two things, one is strong women and the other is comedy. and if you want to boil it all down, really, the heart of it where characters such as featured duckworth and hilda ogden. interestingly, i rememberi duckworth and hilda ogden. interestingly, i remember i met liz dawn once and she was remarkably similarto dawn once and she was remarkably similar to vera duckworth. hilda ogden, no. complete separation, chalk and cheese, the character from the actress. but liz dawn, it was
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almost as if you are talking to vera duckworth. of course, a rather sharper and brighter version, a lot of the comedy was the fact she was sort of unaware that everyone around her was laughing quietly behind her back, and so she made one faux pas after another. but we have seen in some of the clips, the episode where jack sells what he feels to be a superfluous pot dog and there is genuine laughter. and you feel, this is like a sitcom. and then you can turn ona is like a sitcom. and then you can turn on a sixpence and there is real pathos. and, you know, the final scene, where she returned in 2010 and it was jack's final performance,
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he she appeared as a ghost and you felt there was real acting breadth there. there is a good reason people last 34 years in a side and it is because they are a really good actor. thank you. women from across europe, whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb, will give evidence at a public hearing in london today. the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of valproate to see if warnings were passed on. it is estimated that 20,000 children have been harmed in the uk alone. the company behind the drug says doctors need a range of therapeutic options to help women with epilepsy through pregnancy. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. lillias and ian's son was diagnosed with severe learning difficulties when he was three years old. it was caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate, that lillias took when she was pregnant. the couple say they had asked the doctors whether it was safe
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to take the drug while expecting, and were later horrified to discover they had been wrongly reassured. devastated, upset, angry. just — i felt i was let down by the health service. it is estimated tens of thousands of children across the world have been harmed after being exposed to valproate medicines in the womb. it carries a 10% risk of physical problems, and a 40% risk of developmental disorders. today, a safety review by the european medicines agency will look at whether new warnings on pillboxes in the uk, and a range of other strengthened measures, are actually reaching women of childbearing age. the uk's medicines watchdog, the mhra, says it supports the review, and stressed it is important that women don't stop taking valproate without first discussing it with their doctor. parents from across europe, like lillias and ian, with children harmed by sodium valproate, will give evidence
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to the public hearing, amid concerns that babies are still being damaged by the drug. sophie huthinson, bbc news. some breaking news, officers yesterday arrested a 22—year—old man from newcastle on suspicion of offences under the explosives act, he has been taken to a local police station for questioning, a property and what is being described as a premise are being searched as part of the investigation, which was a preplanned intelligence led operation, we will of course bring you more on that if we get it. the uk's chief medical officers are being urged to protect children from the risk of serious injury by banning scrums and tackling in school rugby. newcastle university researchers say they have new evidence that removing contact from the game would reduce concussion as well as head and neck injuries. with me is giselle mather,
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giselle is director of rugby for wasps ladies and the former junior ace manager of london irish... and i'm alsojoined by allyson pollock, one of the people behind the report that recommends banning tackling in school rugby. i will start with you if i may, they have been researching injuries in by have been researching injuries in rugby for the last ten years. why do you think a ban is necessary? everyone agrees rugby is a high risk game and the average child player in school has a one in eight chance of being injured in the season. in fa ct, being injured in the season. in fact, that can increase to as high as one in four. many of these injuries are very serious, fractures, concussion, spinal injuries, dislocated shoulders,
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serious injuries and most of them are occurring during the tackle, during the collision phase of the game. for concussion, 75% of injuries are happening during the tackle. so, it makes sense to remove the harmful elements of the game and we now have enough evidence from across the world, consistently, to show that you have to take action and remove the harmful elements of the game and this comes at a time when the government is now rolling out rugby to 1 million children across the uk and many schools are making it compulsory. we are going to put some of those points that you have made very well. a ban would reduce serious injuries, risk of concussion and head and neck injuries. that has got to be a sensible thing, hasn't it?|j injuries. that has got to be a sensible thing, hasn't it? ithink if you look at it from that point of view, to ban tackling and scrummaging, it stops being rugby, it stops the game so what they are
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calling for is a ban on rugby union in general. the sport itself has done an incredible amount of work, particularly since the recent concussion research came out, where all players, managers, coaches and referees have had to do the concussion module before you are allowed to play the game, so the awareness has gone up, allowed to play the game, so the awareness has gone up, which means they have also changed the laws of they have also changed the laws of the game, such as you can no longer hit a tackle above shoulder height, and it's the responsible of the league end of the game to police that consistently so it filters down —— the elite end. but what it gives to children that is different to any sport, it is very inclusive of all shapes and sizes. it is the camaraderie and the value of the diversity of those who play it, that is why it is being rolled out to a million children in schools and being so well received. at my own club, i had 700 young players this sunday turned up to play, that's got to bea sunday turned up to play, that's got to be a good thing. so, alison, it is good the children and inclusion
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and some of the issues she zelljust mentioned but in 2016, the chief medical officer is for this country said it was safe to play, so are you saying they are wrong? well, they didn't say it was safe to play, they looked at the evidence of a physical activity expert group, which didn't review a single piece of evidence, and that is a big problem and the only other evidence cited was a world rug by only other evidence cited was a world rugby sponsored study. what we are now showing is we are putting together more and more accumulating evidence to show the risks and harms of rugby. a one in eight chance of being injured. high concussion rates. rugby has the highest concussion rates. these children are young, their brains are maturing and they need to be protected and government has a special duty of care. we are saying make the game different, make it touch rugby, remove the harmful elements and keep the professional game away from it,
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because a government has a special duty of care under the un convention to respect, protect and fulfil those rights, which means children have a rights, which means children have a right to be protected from harmful elements of the game. one of the important things is we are not putting the children centre first, because physical activity is good. we wa nt because physical activity is good. we want children to be physically active, but they do not need to have harmful collision elements in the game to be physically active, to be happy and to enjoy team sports. and indeed, many countries don't have by indeed, many countries don't have rugby and the children are fulfilled and happy and physically active and do other things. it is hard to argue, surely, with the point that children's sadie has got to come first? absolutely but if they are coached correctly and looked after responsibly, there is no issue, so for example... well, there clearly is an issue because children are getting injured. but they get injured crossing roads, injured in cars, they can get injured doing
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anything and that is live and to ta ke anything and that is live and to take the risk element out of everything, we wouldn't leave our homes. so from my point of view, we can make things safer, so helping pe teachers to be more comfortable with the tackle technique, similar to the way the concussion role has been brought out, but to follow the model in new zealand, where at school level, rugby is played on weight, not on age, therefore you are reducing the situation of perhaps an eight or nine stone young man or young lady tackling a 12 or 13 stone at that age, because of the difference in physical maturation in that time. that is what has to be managed well. unfortunately, we have to leave it there. both of you, really grateful for your time, thank you, both. let's catch up with the weather now. simon king has the forecast. thank you. it has been a misty and murky start of the day, but the sun is gradually breaking through and as you can see in hertfordshire, we have some blue
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skies finally breaking through that cloud. that process will continue for many of us as we go into this afternoon and feeling quite pleasant. there will be some showers across eastern parts of yorkshire, lincolnshire towards norfolk and suffolk but the most of us, dry and brightening up and feeling very pleasa nt brightening up and feeling very pleasant in the sunshine. temperatures up to about 16—20dc. through this evening and overnight, we see a bit more cloud developing and there could be some mist and fog patches into the early hours of wednesday morning, but it will be fairly similarto wednesday morning, but it will be fairly similar to today in that it will start to break up and there will start to break up and there will be some sunshine in central and eastern areas. in the west, you notice the cloud increasing and the breeze picking up and rain spreading in as well, but despite that, temperatures on the high side for the end of september. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines. liz dawn comedy actress best known
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for her role as vera duckworth in the soap coronation street, has died. herfamily the soap coronation street, has died. her family say she died peacefully in her sleep yesterday. the us defence secretary is seeking a diplomatic solution to the nuclear crisis, as north korea accuses washington of declaring war. labour is calling for the government to spend an extra £500 million on a&e departments in england this winter to avoid crisis. the prime minister is due to meet with european council president donald tusk later today. it's the first time the pair have met since theresa may set out her plans for a two—year transitional period post—brexit. the uk's chief medical officer is calling for a ban on tackling and scrums in school rugby. experts claim the move would reduce head and
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neck injuries. some news just some newsjust in some news just in to us here at the bbc and a man has beenjailed for life at the old bailey for the murder of a computer repair man. judge nicholas hillyard qc told jason marshall, who is 29, that he should serve a minimum sentence of 39 years. jason marshall was caught on camera torturing the man, the computer repair man, who was a vulnerable gay man, and that was in his own home. as i say, he has been jailed at the old bailey for at least 39 years. our correspondent andy moore will be with us soon with more details. back now to the other news we have had today, liz dawn, the actress who played vera duckworth in coronation street for 34 years died last night. on the
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line now is kevin kennedy, best known for playing curly watts in coronation street. he starred in that role for 20 years. we also grateful for you joining that role for 20 years. we also gratefulfor you joining us that role for 20 years. we also grateful for you joining us and that role for 20 years. we also gratefulfor you joining us and it is such sad news, isn't it? yes, it is such sad news, isn't it? yes, it is very sad, but i can't help, when i think of lives, she always brings a smile to my face —— when i think of liz. i think that is a wonderful legacy. i had a lot of good times with liz. i used to live near her in chorlton in manchester and then we lived close together when we had a small coronation street conclave in spain. so she was always around and she was a lot better actress than she was a lot better actress than she thought she was. i thought she was superb. she was very humble and isa was superb. she was very humble and is a great loss, but as i say, i can't think of her without smiling and that is probably the best thing
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i could say about her. how different was she from vera duckworth? i often think that is the problem, when you play a soap character for a very long time, that in the public‘s perception, you are one and the same thing. well, liz was a very clever actress. she knew her limitations, but she knew what the audiences liked and she knew what the coronation street viewers liked and she really developed that with her and bill, as jack duckworth. they formed that relationship in a brilliant way. she was a lot cleverer tha n brilliant way. she was a lot cleverer than she gave herself credit for. but she was very lovely and very caring about the younger members of the cast, taking a lot of us members of the cast, taking a lot of us under her wing when we first joined. she was very wise in the ways of the world and how to deal with the media and things like that and she was just brilliant with us
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all. can you give us a sense of what she was like to work with? i mean, why she somebody that was trying to make you laugh, or did she take it all very seriously? she took the job seriously but she never took herself seriously but she never took herself seriously and she was a joy to be on the set with. she and bill weren't the set with. she and bill weren't the greatest at learning lines, they liked to leave little notes around the place to remind them and it could be a bit dangerous when you are working with them, because if you move the problem something, liz would say, there is a note under their —— if you moved a prop. you had to be careful what you touched. but as i say, she was a lot better than she thought she was. kevin kennedy, we are really grateful for yourtime, kennedy, we are really grateful for your time, thanks for sharing your thoughts on liz dawn. thank you, and love to dawn and liz's family. ——
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don. at least six president ron's closest advisers, including his daughter, are reported to have breached the rules by using private e—mail accounts to do white house business since trump took office. during his election campaign, donald trump repeatedly called the imprisonment of his rival hillary clinton over the use of her private e—mail when she was secretary of state. according to reports, ed least six of his closest advisers, including his daughter if anchor trump and his son—in—law including his daughter if anchor trump and his son—in—lanared kushner, used private accounts to discuss white house business. a report in the new york times suggests that some of those advisers might have used those private e—mail accou nts might have used those private e—mail accounts in order to correspond with members of the press amongst others. quite aside from the fact that
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federal rules require that official correspondence be retained as part of the government record, this is potentially significant for two reasons. the first being that a special counsel is currently investigating alleged russian meddling in last year's presidential election here in the united states. as pa rt of election here in the united states. as part of that inquiry, the special counsel has requested a trove of e—mails and documents from the white house and obviously if some of those e—mails were on private accounts, it makes it all the more difficult for the special prosecutor to get to the truth. and then there is of course the potential simple double standard here, that during the presidential campaign, donald trump repeatedly called for his rival hillary clinton to be "locked up" as he putted for her use of a private e—mail server while she was serving the us secretary of state. that is david willetts in washington. a man who has been in a vegitative state for 15 years has begun to show
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signs of consciousness after receiving pioneering nerve stimulation treatment. scientists have hailed it as a very exciting finding but have also urged caution. with me is our medical correspondent fergus walsh — tell us more. —year—old man, 15 years ago, he had a car accident and since then, had beenin a car accident and since then, had been ina a car accident and since then, had been in a vegetative state —— a 35—year—old man. that means no consciousness, no awareness of his surroundings and then doctors, in a brief procedure that lasted about 20 minutes, they attached an electrical stimulus in his neck to that vay just nerve. —— the vagus nerve. it travels down the stem to the vital organs, part of our sort of primitive evolutionary development that gives us our fight or flight response. they stimulated the vagus
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nerve for about a month and then afterwards, he showed signs of responsiveness. so, for example, he could stay awake when read to, he could stay awake when read to, he could respond by moving his head when asked to, although that took some time. and they did electrical stimulation on his head to see what level of activity there was in the brain and quite clearly, it showed he had more awareness and he had come out of this vegetative state. so what are the implications of this? presumably, this could have some quite significant ethical considerations? there are lots of caveats. it is one patient and, for example, he might be like a small proportion, about one in five vegetative patients, who are not vegetative patients, who are not vegetative at all but they are able to respond when put in an mri
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machine and can be talked to and a nswer yes machine and can be talked to and answer yes or no questions. there was research done in oxford and canada by a british neuroscientist adrian owen. the biggest indication might be for patients with less severe brain injuries, to perhaps enhance their awareness. but he is still paralysed, he still can't talk, this chap, so it's an improvement but he is still at a very low level of consciousness and awareness. ok, fergus walsh, thank you for that. a man who falsely posed as a policeman has been sentenced to at least 39 years in prison after being caught on camera torturing a vulnerable man in his own home in january 2013. vulnerable man in his own home in january 20 13. jason marshall set fire to the flat of his victims, peter fasoli, before flying to italy, where he committed a second
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murder. our correspond and andy moore is at the old bailey now and bring us up to date with exactly what happened. well, we had the sentencing today and the judge nicholas hillyard qc said this was a very serious, very grave case, and he jailed jason marshall, who is 29, a whole life sentence but he recommended that he serve at least 39 years, and that was because of elements of sadism in the case and that the defendant had shown no remorse at all. in fact, when he was sentenced, there was no emotion from him in the dock. to go back to this case, it happened in 2013. jason marshall went to the home of peter fasoli, who was 58, a computer repair man. he smothered him with clingfilm. he then escaped, he set fire to the property to cover his tracks. it worked, because the
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police believed it was an accidental death. he used the victim's credit ca rd to death. he used the victim's credit card to get money. he bought a ticket with it and he fled to italy, where he carried out a very similar murder a short time afterwards and another attempted murder. so he was found dead, he was discovered in italy and jailed for 16 years. then nearly two years later, a relative found on the computer of the victims that the whole incident had been recorded on a webcam and then, of course, police went back, reinvestigated the case and jason marshall was brought back to the uk today sentencing here. questions we re today sentencing here. questions were raised by thejudge today sentencing here. questions were raised by the judge about the police investigation because the victim's credit card was used, there was evidence on social media that he had seen jason was evidence on social media that he had seenjason marshall was evidence on social media that he had seen jason marshall and was evidence on social media that he had seenjason marshall and the judge said he wanted to raise concerns with the police that their procedures might not be robust enoughin procedures might not be robust enough in circumstances like this,
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where there was an unexplained death. thank you for that. in a moment, a summary of the business news but first, here are the headlines on bbc newsroom live. liz dawn, the actress best known for her role as vera duckworth in coronation street, has died. herfamily say role as vera duckworth in coronation street, has died. her family say she died peacefully in her sleep yesterday. the us defense secretary is seeking a diplomatic solution to rising tensions with north korea, who are accusing washington of declaring war. now the business news. people in northern ireland are waiting for an american court ruling that could have a big impact on the largest industrial employer in the province. rival us aircraft makers have taken action against the canadian company bombardier, which manufactures partly in northern ireland. we'll have more on this in a moment. travel company, thomas cook, says it expects the price of spanish holidays to rise by another 5%
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to 10% next year because of the weak pound. chief executive, peter fankhauser, told the bbc that spain was seeing strong demand because of safety fears elsewhere and that this was driving prices higher. the parent company of fizzy drink irn bru, ag barr, has reported strong sales but total profits are down for the last financial year. that's partly because the firm is in the process of changing some of its formulas for its soft drinks but cutting the amount of sugar in them. a us trade court will rule today on a major case that could have big impactions forjobs in the us, canada and the uk. the american aviation giant boeing had alleged that its canadian rival bombardier had engaged in "price dumping" in 2016, bombardier bombardier had engaged in "price dumping". in 2016, bombardier won its biggest ever order to provide its c—series passenger plane to delta, a major us airline. boeing alleges that bombardier sold those 75 planes to delta for almost those 125 planes to delta for almost
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$14 million below their cost price — something they allege is possible because of subsidies from governments of canada and the uk. in a statement, bombardier said that "boeing says it wants "a level playing field, but it is not even on the field." that is because according to bombardier, boeing doesn't even make a comparable aircraft. uk prime minister theresa may is concerned because bombardier employs 4,500 staff at a factory in belfast, northern ireland and her government is now propped up by votes from northern ireland's democratic unionist party. let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page, who is in belfast. what are we expecting to hear today? well, we are expecting to hear a ruling from the us department of commerce, it will be published sometime today, we are not sure exactly when. it is just before 7am washington time but we do know it
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will come at some stage through the course of the day and what officials in the us department of commerce have been looking at is basically whether the financial assistance given to bombardier amounts to giving them an unfair advantage when it comes to selling their products, the c—series jet it comes to selling their products, the c—seriesjet in it comes to selling their products, the c—series jet in particular, it comes to selling their products, the c—seriesjet in particular, in the c—seriesjet in particular, in the us market and they have been looking at £750 million given to bombardier by the regional government of quebec back in 2015, when it looked like the c—series project could be in trouble. also, there has been some aid from the british government and the stormont executive in northern ireland, they have pledged to invest £135 million or thereabouts in the bombardier plant in east belfast. so the crux of the issue is have bombardier been engaging in anti—competitive practices? if the answer is yes in the view of the us department of commerce, the department will impose some financial penalty, some punitive tariffs, on bombardier and that will make it much more
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difficult for them to sell the c—seriesjet into difficult for them to sell the c—series jet into the market. difficult for them to sell the c-series jet into the market. you are in belfast, where more than 4,000 people are employed by bombardier. our people worried? there is a great deal of concern, particularly among politicians, businesses and trade unions. in the last hour, northern ireland secretary james brokenshire has last hour, northern ireland secretaryjames brokenshire has been holding a meeting with the unite trade union to discuss this. people are aware of the importance of bombardier to the northern ireland it back to its economy, both in terms of its symbolism, it is the largest manufacturing employer with more than 4,000 staff and also, the jobs in bombardier are high end jobs, they tend to be well—paid jobs. there is a knock—on effect in the supply chain in northern ireland. for example, 15 smaller aerospace firms in ireland supplied to bombardier, not to mention other firms across the uk and also think of the affect on, for example, retailing, the amount of money that would be taken out of the northern ireland economy if bombardier was to suffer a major hit to its workforce asa suffer a major hit to its workforce as a result of the ruling going
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against it. so plenty of people in northern ireland will be waiting for thejudgment to northern ireland will be waiting for the judgment to be northern ireland will be waiting for thejudgment to be published in washington. chris page in belfast, thank you. let's take a quick look at the markets. they are all up ever so slightly. they have added tricky couple of days, those uncertainties that markets don't like, the issues in north korea, thejolt to the right in the german elections and uncertainty from the us federal reserve , uncertainty from the us federal reserve, their head is due to speak today and investors will look to see if she is increasing interest rates in december. so the markets are waiting to see. brent crude is just over $56 a barrel, it has had a great run recently, a real steady rise, and that has been down to compliance of opec countries cutting their production of oil and those concerns over north korea. we will bring you more business throughout the afternoon. work hard and play hard, that's how generation x are remembered, but what about the youth of today — generation z? are young people lazy
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and obsessed with social media? a bbc survey suggests that's exactly how older people see them. and yet, if you ask 16—to—22—year—olds themselves, they'll say family, education and equality are the issues that matter to them. here's radio 1's newsbeat reporter nick rotherham. today, teenagers are often told they'll struggle for work and should give up on the hope of ever owning their own home, but a survey by ipsos mori which spoke to 1,000 16 to 22—year—olds and 2,000 from older generations suggests a quarter generation z suggests a quarter of generation z are optimistic about their future. i spoke to this group in birmingham. success, ithink, is measured in a different way for our generation. it is almost like if you are able to make a living or survive off something that you want to do and you enjoy, i think that is labelled as success. the older generation not being optimistic toward us, what kind of effect does that have on the younger generation? like, if you are constantly told you of the doomed generation, you are the doomed generation,
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you're not going to do very well, what kind of message or energy is that passing towards you? austerity has been a big part of this generation's upbringing. in spite of this, though, they are accused of being lazy. i think people stereotype and think teenagers in 2017 are saying they are lazy or always on the phone, but if you look and go to college, the people who want to succeed will succeed and if some people, bothered to work, i mean, that is their loss. one of the biggest differences between generation z and those that came before it is the changing attitude towards sexuality. two—thirds of 16—to—22—year—olds say they are only attracted to people of the opposite sex. that's a big drop when you compare it to the 88% of baby boomers. i think our generation genuinelyjust does not care. they don't see couples and go, that's a straight couple, that's a gay couple, we just think, that's a couple, those two people are in love and it doesn't matter. no one cares. it's like, you just want to be who you are. if someone's happy, who cares? there is some agreement on the issues that are most important to britain, though, with all generations putting the nhs and making the economy work
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after brexit top of their list. and there is a special live debate, as an audience of 16—to—22—year—olds discuss whether the world has got generation z wrong. that's newsbeat debates: generation misunderstood ? with tina daheley and nick rotherham at 9pm tonight on the bbc news channel and radio 1. let's catch up with the weather with simon. thank you, good morning. we have still got some misty and foggy conditions across parts of the uk. this is just conditions across parts of the uk. this isjust one conditions across parts of the uk. this is just one example conditions across parts of the uk. this isjust one example in denbigh, just a short time ago, but that is starting to clear away. we can see some holes in the cloud here across the uk, this is the satellite picture and the north—west of scotland, there is some sunshine. you can see from this weather watcher photo just sent in. eventually, many of us will see the blue sky and sunshine and it will
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feel quite pleasant this afternoon. notice we have a gentle southerly wind, that is bringing in the milder air. so through into the abdomen, pleasa nt air. so through into the abdomen, pleasant and fine and driver much of scotland. we might see the cloud hang on across central and eastern parts of scotland but it will remain dry and temperatures at 14—16 degrees, but far north of scotland, temperatures could get up to 18. northern ireland, plenty of dry weather with some sunshine, sunshine across wales in south—west england but across eastern parts of england, there is the chance of catching the odd shower or two during this afternoon, but they will be light and few and far between. for many, feeling pleasant in the sunshine and temperatures up to 21 celsius in the south—east. through this evening and tonight, cloud developing, there could be some mist and fog but with the breeze picking up across western areas, not so much of it here. but another mile died, temperatures no lower than 12—15dc. that takes us
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into wednesday, it could be a rather dull and misty start to the day across dull and misty start to the day a cross m ost dull and misty start to the day across most areas but like today, the cloud will break up and some sunshine could come through. you may notice this area of cloud, associated with an area of low pressure, the white bars of the pressure, the white bars of the pressure chart closer together so the rain picking up and spreading into northern ireland and wales and the south—west of england. still quite mild, quite warm, temperatures up quite mild, quite warm, temperatures up to 16, 21 degrees. that weather system will continue to push eastwards as we go through wednesday night and with a small ridge of high pressure going into thursday, things aren't looking too bad but the area of low pressure will be with us for the end of the week. but for thursday, we will see this cloud across eastern areas, a bit of rain here as well, that'll clear so for many of us on thursday, not a bad day once again. that southerly wind will bring temperatures of 17—20dc. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories
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developing at midday. the coronation street actress liz dawn who played vera duckworth for more than thirty years has died at the age of 77. the united states seeks to tone down the war of words with north korea — the defence secretary saying he wants a diplomatic solution to the crisis. labour calls for a half—a—billion pound bailout for the nhs — to avoid a winter health crisis. the prime minister is to meet the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street to discuss brexit. when a man who was caught on camera killing a man in his own home has been jailed killing a man in his own home has beenjailed for killing a man in his own home has been jailed for life. jason marshall will save at least 39 years for the murder of a man in 2013. also this hour... should young people be allowed to tackle and take part in scrums in youth rugby? there are calls for contact not
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to be allowed in schools. and lazy and obsessed with social media? a bbc survey suggests that is what older people think about 16—22 —year—old, but how do they see themselves? good afternoon. it's tuesday, 26th september. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the actress liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in coronation street for more than 30 years, has died. she was 77. her family says she died peacefully at home in her sleep — and they are heartbroken. itv have paid tribute, and in a statement, the executive producer of coronation street said... all i can say is i hope prince
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charles never sets eyes on it! admiring my stone cladding? it's certainly eye—catching. some may have been snooty about vera duckworth's taste, but without her, coronation street would not have been the same. are you not going to carry her over the threshold? when liz dawn first arrived, she said she felt like cinderella, her palace, number nine coronation street. and prince charming was jack duckworth, played by bill tarmey. could you make us some chips?
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you're a right romantic! vera and jack and the pigeons and despite the bruises, their relationship lasted because there is something special about this double act. she was born sylvia butterfield, home was the halton moor estate in leeds. i never really felt poor. because we always had love and nobody had anything in them days. she did all sorts ofjobs, from selling wigs to singing in working men's clubs under a new stage name, liz dawn. the money were good. i had three children under school—age and i really did it for money, singing at weekends. the tv acting work came at a time when directors were looking for talent that was natural, authentic, the sort of person you could truly believe would live on coronation street. you will laugh on the other side of yourface! get off me! off duty, liz dawn was a keen campaigner for the labour party
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and became lady mayoress of leeds. say you've never loved anybody else. after 34 years of laughter and ups and downs, liz dawn had proved she was one of acting's naturals. she admitted she didn't even quite know where liz stopped and vera began. a little earlier, david davis more details about the statement from liz dawn's itv colleagues. devastated and heartbroken at the passing of the incredible liz dawn. originally, sylvia butterfield, a nightclub singer, part—time, she had three children who needed to make ends meet and that was where she got her
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break, small acting roles to start with but in the early days of coronation street, what they want it was people who seemed they were real people, who could convince you nightly that you are watching somebody who might be living at number nine coronation st and liz dawn was exactly that. you think about what actually makes coronation street watchable, what makes it so special for so many people and their two things. one is strong women on the other one is comedy and if you wa nt to the other one is comedy and if you want to actually boil it all down, really, the heart of it where characters such as vera duckworth, and hilda ogden. what is interesting is that i remember, i met liz dawn once and she was remarkably similar to vera duckworth. hilda ogden, no! com plete to vera duckworth. hilda ogden, no! complete separation. they were chalk and cheese, the characterfrom
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complete separation. they were chalk and cheese, the character from the actress. but liz dawn, it was almost as if you were talking to vera duckworth. of course, rathersharper and brighter than vera, because a lot of the comedy balls the fact that she was sort of unaware that eve ryo ne that she was sort of unaware that everyone around were laughing quietly behind their backs and so she made one faux pas after another but you have seen it in the clips people are watching, i watched it back only a few weeks ago, the pot dog, where jack sells this, what he considers a superfluous pot dog to make a bit of cash and then she thinks, she spots it and goes and buys it and thinks she now has a pair. and there is genuine laughter, like a sitcom and then it can turn ona like a sitcom and then it can turn on a sixpence and there is real pathos and, you know, the final scene, where she turned... i think it was 2010, and it was bill
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tarmey‘s final performance, she appeared as a ghost and you realise, there was a sort of acting breadth there was a sort of acting breadth there as well. it is a good reason why people last 34 years in a soap thatis why people last 34 years in a soap that is because there are good actresses. tracy brabham is a former coronation street actress joins us from the labour conference in brighton. we're very grateful for you joining us. this is such sad news. are your memories of liz dawn? well, firstly, i deeply sad to hear she has passed away, she was a legend and an icon, an incredible person to work with, deeply authentic, a natural comedian and a heart as big as manchester. what was she like to work with? fantastic, always energetic, being on the soap operas, it is really intense, it is a very tight schedule, occasionally your lines aren't always learned and
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sometimes we would have lines lying around the set to help out and one christmas episode i remember some of the lines were on the bottom of the chicken! but she was also a great campaignerfor chicken! but she was also a great campaigner for the labour party, chicken! but she was also a great campaignerforthe labour party, i think that is in her dna. i would hope that she would be as chuffed as nuts to see that she had a minister for early years and she was just an incredible person in my heart goes out to her family and all her fans across the world, not just manchester and the uk. you were in coronation street in the mid—90s for a few years. what was she like when a few years. what was she like when a new actorjoined the cast? was she welcoming? oh, hugely generous. there were people coming in and out all the time, so not everyone takes much notice that she was always a shoulder to cry on, good with advice and very kind and generous. why did you need a shoulder to cry on? well, you need a shoulder to cry on? well, you know, sometimes when you're away
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from your family, it can be hard and my daughter at the time was only six months old. she was an incredible mother, great—grandmother and valued family and! mother, great—grandmother and valued family and i think she put them first and certainly, her work she did have that humanity. her relationship with her on—screen husband, jack, was crucial to her success and popularity as well, wasn't it? yeah, absolutely, and their dynamic wasjust wasn't it? yeah, absolutely, and their dynamic was just a joy to watch on screen. and certainly when i had terry duckworth's lovechild, i was part of the family for a while, giving birth behind the bar at the rove rs giving birth behind the bar at the rovers return and it was just fantastic to be part of that little family and to see them riff off each other. and just so authentic and genuine. we are grateful for your time and thoughts. earlier, we spoke
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to kevin kennedy and asked for his reaction. it is very sad. i can't help when i think of liz, she brings a smile to my face and i think that's a wonderful legacy. i had a lot of good times with her. i used to live near her in manchester and then they lived close together when we had a small coronation street conclave in spain, so she was always around. she was a much better actress than she thought she was, i thought she was superb. and as loss. ican think thought she was superb. and as loss. i can think of it without smiling and that's probably the best thing i can say about her. when you have
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played a character for a long can say about her. when you have played a characterfor a long time, you are one and the same thing. well, liz was a very clever actress, she knew her limitations but she knew what the audiences liked and she knew what the coronation street viewers liked and she really developed that with current bill tarmey, who played jack mcgrath, they formed a relationship quite brilliantly. she was a lot more clever tha n brilliantly. she was a lot more clever than she gave herself credit for her she was very lovely and caring about younger members of the cast, taking a lot of us under her wing when we firstjoined. she was very wise in the ways of the world and how to deal with the media and things like that. she was just brilliant with us all. can you give usa brilliant with us all. can you give us a sense of what she was like to work with? was she is somebody that was trying to make you laugh or did
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she take it all very seriously? she took thejob she take it all very seriously? she took the job seriously but she never took the job seriously but she never took herself seriously. she was a i°y took herself seriously. she was a joy to be with the set because she and bill where not the greatest at learning lines, they used to leave little notes around the place to remind them. it could be dangerous because if you move to prop, liz would say hey! there is a note under their! so, you had to be careful what you touched. but she was a lot better than she thought she was. that was kevin kennedy who played curly watts in coronation street, with his memories of liz dawn, who has died at the age of 77. we also have news that the actor and political campaigner tony booth, who starred in till death us do part,
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has died. he was also in coronation street but was best known as mike in the 1960s sitcom, till death us do part. he was also the father of cheri blair and his family have released a statement saying that it is with sadness we announce the death of anthony booth, actor and poetical campaigner. he passed away late last night with close family members in attendance. and his character in that hugely popular sitcom did reflect his own left—wing political beliefs. the actor and political beliefs. the actor and political campaigner tony booth, who starred in till death us do part, has died. he was 85. some other news just into us from the metropolitan police, officers from the met‘s counterterrorism command have this morning arrested a 17—year—old man atan
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morning arrested a 17—year—old man at an address in east london. he was arrested on suspicion of dissemination of terrorist material. he was detained and taken to a police station in south london, where he currently remains in police custody. officers are also currently searching an address in east london, so just to repeat that news that officers from the counter—terrorism can't have this morning arrested a 17—year—old man for dissemination on suspicion of dissemination of terrorist material. more on that as we get it. the prime minister, theresa may, is due to hold talks with the european council president, donald tusk, in downing street this lunch time. mr tusk represents the eu heads of government who'll decide next month if enough progress has been made on so—called divorce issues to allow trade talks with britain. so far, the eu has refused to discuss anything but the irish
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border, the financial settlement and citizens' rights. let's me to our political correspondent in westminster. how significant is this meeting?m correspondent in westminster. how significant is this meeting? it is clear theresa may is trying to turn on the charm alongside david davis being in brussels carrying out his official but the negotiations. theresa may ‘s meeting donald tusk, represent the eu council. it is the eu council that has set the guidelines for the brakes on investigations and it is those 27 eu heads of state who will decide whether sufficient progress has been made in the brexit talks to get them going on to trade and over the divorce settlement. theresa may will be keen to capitalise on the goodwill she thinks she has generated in her foreign goodwill she thinks she has generated in herforeign speech in which she talks about a two—year transition period and first to honour the uk obligations to the eu budget as well as time to guarantee
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the right of eu citizens, so she is holding parallel talks with donald tusk here, we're david davies in brussels talking with michel barnier, borisjohnson brussels talking with michel barnier, boris johnson is brussels talking with michel barnier, borisjohnson is talking brexit in romania, slovakia and the czech republic, so it is clear there are many lines of communication open at the moment. theresa may is keeping the channels open to kick—start the negotiations on to trade. we will leave it there because kevin, if i might turn to you for your take on how you think this meeting between theresa may and donald tusk will feed into negotiations ongoing in brussels? there's quite a blizzard of donald tusk related diplomacy for the uk at the moment, theresa may met him last week at the un general assembly in new york, she is meeting today in london will see him again in the estonian capital, tallinn, and the week. and of course, he would expect that brings it will, in some way in
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those discussions. the european union adamant that there can only be one set of negotiations, so the eu sticks firmly to the line that all negotiations going through michel barnier, so donald tusk is at pains to tell us today, before he went to see theresa may, that he had checked in with michel barnier, to make sure he knew the very latest in what was going on in the talks in brussels. behind closed doors, we don't hear much about them as they go on but it is clear, i think, and one of the signals of this increased uk diplomatic activity, is that the british side is finding the rigidity of that structure, but the eu has imposed, a little frustrating. they talk about the need for creativity, leadership, flexibility, the eu site says no trade talks about the future until we have settled the divorce issue. a little friction is emerging
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between the sides and we will hear more about that perhaps later in the week, when we hear from david davis here in brussels. thank you. but catch up tv sports news. the lancashire spinner sophie ecclestone has been named in the england squad for the ashes, which starts next month. she replaces beth langston in the early change. it will be the first time that captain heather knight has left side into an ashes series. they leave for brisbane on october seven. tony keolis has accused arsenal striker alexis sanchez of cheating in them at the emirates last night. he won a free kick early in the game, going down under a challenge from craig dawson, but keolis was equally incensed over this penalty
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and an apparent foul inside the box. arsenal went on to win. we tell players not to roll but i think the thing jade wanted to do was to try to score and then dismissed, you pull him back and left us a penalty. so, not only could we score but they could be counted ten players. manchester city take on shaq to donetsk. he is always giving up words of encouragement the standard of players he has managed in the past speaks volumes. it is a good motivation. the kind of manager he is. hopefully we can keep performing. he always still once more. that is one of three matches
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involving english sides, liverpool face after moscow, loris karius playing, farrakhan are without christian eriksen for their trip to cyprus to face a 12 legacy. at other british bobsled ta ken cyprus to face a 12 legacy. at other british bobsled taken to crowdfunding after financial support for the women's programme was withdrawn. donna crichton was a skeleton slider and was promised to be frustrating to the gb team got as the funding was withheld, she launched her own crowdfunding campaign. and that is all the sport. plenty more live in the next hour. look forward to it. the white house has condemned north korea's claim that it has the right to shoot down us bombers, even if they are
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outside its airspace. relations between the two nations have deteriorated to the point that pyongyang claims president trump has declared war on north korea — a suggestion dismissed as absurd by the white house. speaking this morning the us defense secretary james mattis says the united states want to resolve the escalating nuclear crisis with north korea diplomatically. danny savage reports. american military aircraft, preparing for a show of force close to the north korean coast. these planes went on to fly in international airspace near the east of the country, further north in the region than they ever have. the us said it was a demonstration of their resolve. now north korea has reacted to donald trump's threats and actions by claiming the us has declared war on them. translation: since the us declared war on our country we have every right to take countermeasures, including shooting down us strategic bombers, even if they are not yet inside the airspace border of our country.
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the question of who will not be around for much longer will be answered then. but the white house said it is absurd to think they are at war with north korea and has tried to strike a more diplomatic tone overnight. it's never appropriate for a country to shoot down another country's aircraft when it is over international waters. our goal is still the same, we continue to seek peace over the korean peninsula. that's our focus. doing that through the maximum diplomatic and economic pressures. it was a point echoed by james mattis. i believe president trump has been very clear on this issue. but north korea's interpretation
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of us actions and its proposed response is another escalation in this ongoing crisis. this former secretary general says the situation is alarming. even during the height of the cold war, including the soviet union, they never threatened to use nuclear weapons unless they are attacked by nuclear weapons. when north korea has blatantly and publicly threatened that they will strike the united states, with nuclear weapons. so far this has been and remains a war of words, but if american planes do clash with the north korean military the risk of tipping into conflict increases dramatically. danny savage, bbc news, seoul, south korea. news coming in from greater
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manchester police that a 17—year—old schoolboy has been stabbed in sa lfo rd. schoolboy has been stabbed in salford. here is what we know. shortly after age 50 am, police received a reported a 17—year—old boy had been stamped with a knife at a school in swinton. he has been taken to hospital, where he is being treated for multiple stab wounds and is said to be in a stable condition. officers went there and a 16—year—old boy was arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and remains in police custody for questioning but detectives who are investigating are appealing for any witnesses to come forward relating to the stabbing of a 17—year—old schoolboy in salford. more details as we get it. women from across europe, whose children were harmed by exposure to an epilepsy drug in the womb, will give evidence at a public hearing in london today.
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the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of valproate to see if warnings were passed on. it is estimated that 20,000 children have been harmed in the uk alone. the company behind the drug says doctors need a range of therapeutic options to help women with epilepsy through pregnancy. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. lillias and ian's son was diagnosed with severe learning difficulties when he was three years old. it was caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate, that lillias took when she was pregnant. the couple say they had asked the doctors whether it was safe to take the drug while expecting, and were later horrified to discover they had been wrongly reassured. devastated, upset, angry. just — i felt i was let down by the health service. it is estimated tens of thousands of children across the world have
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been harmed after being exposed to valproate medicines in the womb. it carries a 10% risk of physical problems, and a 40% risk of developmental disorders. today, a safety review by the european medicines agency will look at whether new warnings on pillboxes in the uk, and a range of other strengthened measures, are actually reaching women of childbearing age. the uk's medicines watchdog, the mhra, says it supports the review, and stressed it is important that women don't stop taking valproate without first discussing it with their doctor. parents from across europe, like lillias and ian, with children harmed by sodium valproate, will give evidence to the public hearing, amid concerns that babies are still being damaged by the drug. labour claims the nhs needs a half a billion pound bailout from the government in order to avoid a potential winter health crisis. jon ashworth, the shadow health
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secretary will call for the money to be spent on boosting the number of beds — as well hiring extra staff. our assistant political editor norman smith is in brighton. the nhs is familiar ground for labour? it is that this call for a response to a potential winter crisis goes along with demands for other payments they want, including ending the public sector pay cap and providing tuition fees and that is pa rt providing tuition fees and that is part of a radical package which the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, has been speaking about. he was saying at a fringe meeting that a future jeremy corbyn saying at a fringe meeting that a futurejeremy corbyn government would be unlike anything we have ever seen before, it would be much, much more radical. but as a result of that, he said, there was a danger
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we could face opposition from asset managers, the city and the banks and therefore, he said that labour figures had been war game for different scenarios to try to ensure there was not a rung on the palme d'or capitalflight there was not a rung on the palme d'or capital flight or investors did not pull out of britain, so sketching out a pretty dramatic scenario, whether to be a labour government. —— that there was not a run on the pound. we have been talking about what if there is a run on the pound, what if there is a run on the pound, what if there is a run on the pound, what if there is this concept of capital flgm? there is this concept of capital flgm7| there is this concept of capital flight? i don't there will be but you never know, so we have to
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scenario plan for that. mr dobson assertion that this would be a very different sort of a labour government may have actually been reinforced with the debate going on in the whole of the moment about rule changes to the labour party. this might seem very technical, that i future labour leaders the this might seem very technical, that ifuture labour leaders the position of the national executive committee but overall, they will have the effect of strengthening the position of mr corbyn's support, strengthening his hold on the labour party and so far, there has really been no pushback at all from there you might call the main stream. if i put it to john you might call the main stream. if i put it tojohn ashworth but you might call the main stream. if i put it to john ashworth but they seem to have given up without a fight. to be honest, i'm pretty relaxed about that, in more candidates who go on the ballot paper the better. another change is putting representatives onto the national executive. i would say we've got over 500,000 members in our labour party now, i would say to members, join, stand for the nec,
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our labour party now, i would say to members, join, stand forthe nec, i won the biggest possible choice for the membership when we fit for our nec members, so get involved and the fit for our nec members, so get involved in yourself. be since you haveis involved in yourself. be since you have is that this is a very different labour party to what we have seen in previous conferences but the relationship with business, that warning from john mcdonnell about capital flight, a that warning from john mcdonnell about capitalflight, a run on that warning from john mcdonnell about capital flight, a run on the pound, perhaps underscored by his announcement yesterday that a labour government would nationalise pfi contract because the cbi, the main business organisation, have said that could send investors running for the hills. norman, in brighton, many thanks. i want to just take you to downing street, these are live pictures from there, where theresa may, the prime minister, is expecting the arrival of the european council president donald tusk. they are meeting in
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downing street to discuss brexit and there he is, emerging from that car, so that is the european council president donald tusk, arriving in downing street to meet the prime minister theresa may, as she attem pts minister theresa may, as she atte m pts to minister theresa may, as she attempts to secure a breakthrough in the brexit process. let's just watch them posing together on the steps of number ten. neither answering any of the questions and we also don't know how long they will chat for, but if they do emerge from those talks and say anything, we will of course bring you all the news here on the bbc news channel. in the meantime, let's catch up with all of the weather prospects and sarah has the forecast.
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well, it's turning into a glorious afternoon at their across many parts of the country. it was misty and murky to start the day but the sunshine has been breaking through the cloud and lifting the mist. it is not going to be dry everywhere, one or two showers cropping up across the parts of eastern england, the likes of lincolnshire, east anglia and kent, one or two on the heavy side but they are hit and miss and away from there, a dry afternoon. with sunny spells, it will feel pleasantly warm with a southerly breeze dating temperatures toa southerly breeze dating temperatures to a roundabout 14—20. those showers in the east fade away quickly this evening and overnight, so driver many of us but similar to last night, it will turn misty and murky and some fairly dense fog patches across south—east england tomorrow morning. it will be i'll start but watch out for potential disruption. richard it reasonably quickly through the day, so an improving picture once again and it is northern and eastern parts that will stay dry and sunny but from the
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west, things turning wet and windy. northern ireland, the rain pretty heavy, pushing into wales and south—west england later on but in the sunshine in the east, we could see 21, possibly 22 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines. liz dawn, the actress best known for her role as vera duckworth in the soap coronation street, has died. her family say she died peacefully in her sleep yesterday. tony booth, actor and father of cherie blair, has died at the age of 85. he was best known for his appearance in the bbc series till death us do part. the us defence secretary is seeking a diplomatic solution to rising tensions with north korea, who are accusing washington of declaring war. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell has said that his party is preparing for a has said that his party is preparing fora war
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has said that his party is preparing for a war type scenario in case party policies alarm investors and cause a fall in the value of the pound. a man who was filmed killing another man in his home has been jailed for life. jason marshall will serve at least 39 years for the murder of peter fasoli in 2013. researchers are calling for a ban on tackling and scrums in school rugby. experts claim the move would reduce head and neck injuries. wa nt to want to briefly take you to brighton and to the labour party conference, where we are expecting a keynote speech in the next few minutes or so from angela rayner, the shadow education secretary, and we will bring you that speech live, so do stay with us for that. the actress liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in coronation street for more than 30 years, has died. she was 77.
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her family says she died peacefully at home in her sleep and they are heartbroken. itv have paid tribute — in a statement, the executive producer of coronation street said: david sillito looks back at her life. she was somebody who really held a special place in my heart and all the hearts of the people who worked with her and her audience. she was legendary, she was wonderful. what was she like to work with? well, she
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was she like to work with? well, she was real. she didn't... you know, she wasn't a pain to work with at all, she was a delight to work with, she was a real person and eventually in her life, she got involved with a fantastic amount of charity work and to meet her, you are dealing with a real person, a real big personality, a big heart. a delight, really, she was lovely. generous and the main thing, she was funny. people sometimes wonder when they watch soap operas is, especially, how similar the character is to the actual person playing them. how different was she from vera duckworth? she wasn't so different in the sense of, what ijust described as the funny side of her personality. she was big, she was colourful and she was real and those are the qualities that came over in
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her character on the screen and for those reasons, she was wonderfully theatrical. and the relationship she had with jack, bill tiny, was pure gold —— bill tarny. forany had with jack, bill tiny, was pure gold —— bill tarny. for any tv series, never mind coronation street, it was pure gold. and you just loved her. you certainly loved watching them on screen, did they get on very well off screen as well? yes, no problems there. they both had their separate lives and their separate interests, but they were very close on—screen “— separate interests, but they were very close on—screen —— off—screen but on screen, this magic chemistry took over, the character and the humourand took over, the character and the humour and then the pathos and emotion, it all came across in spades. that was the voice of mervyn
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watson, who used to produce coronation street, with his memories of liz dawn. a sadistic killer who was caught on camera torturing a vulnerable gay man in his own home has beenjailed for at least 39 years. jason marshall, who was 29, posed as an mi5 marshall, who was 29, posed as an m15 agent before smothering 58—year—old peter fasoli to death in his home in north holt, in north london, in 2013. andy moore followed the case at the old bailey. well, we had the sentencing today and the judge, nicholas hillyard qc, said this was a very serious, very grave case and he jailed jason marshall, who is 29, a whole life sentence but he recommended that he serve at least 39 years and that was because elements of sadism in the case, that the defendant had shown no remorse
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at all and the defendant had shown no remorse at alland in the defendant had shown no remorse at all and in fact, when he was sentenced, there was no emotion from him in the dock. now, to go back to this case, it happened in 2013. jason marshall went to the home peter fasoli, who was 58, a computer repair. he smothered him with cling film. he then escaped, he set fire to the property to cover his tracks. it worked, because the police believed it was an accidental death. he used the victims was my credit ca rd to he used the victims was my credit card to get money, he bought a ticket with it and he fled to italy, where he carried out a very similar murder a short time afterwards and another attempted murder, so he was found out, he was discovered in italy and jailed for 16 years. and then nearly two years later, a relative found on the computer of the victims that the whole incident had been recorded on a webcam and then, of course, police went back, reinvestigated the case and jason
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marshall was brought back to the uk to face sentencing here. questions we re to face sentencing here. questions were raised by thejudge to face sentencing here. questions were raised by the judge about the police investigation because the victim was my credit card was used, there was evidence on social media that he had seenjason marshall —— the victims's credit card. and the judge said he wanted to raise concerns with the police that there procedures may not be robust enough in circumstances like this where there is an unexplained death. at least six of president trump's closest advisors — including his daughter ivanka — are reported to have breached the rules by using private e—mail accounts to discuss white house business since mr trump took office. during his election campaign, donald trump repeatedly called for the imprisonment of his rival, hillary clinton, over her use of personal email when she was secretary of state. david willis has more from washington. according to reports here, at least
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six president ron's closest advisers, including his daughter ivanka and his son—in—law advisers, including his daughter ivanka and his son—in—lanared kushner, used private e—mail accou nts kushner, used private e—mail a ccou nts to kushner, used private e—mail accounts to discuss white house business. a report in the u zero —— new york times suggests some of those advisers may have used those private e—mail accounts in order to correspond with members of the press, amongst others. quite aside from the fact that federal rules require that official correspondence be retained as part of the government record, this is potentially significant the two reasons. the first being that a special counsel is currently investigating alleged russian meddling in last year's presidential election here in the united states. as pa rt of election here in the united states. as part of that inquirer, the special counsel has requested a trove of e—mails and documents from the white house and obviously if some of those e—mails are on private accounts, it makes it all the more difficult for the special prosecutor to get to the truth. and then there
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is of course the simple potential of double standard here, the fact that during the presidential campaign, donald trump repeatedly called for his rival hillary clinton to be "locked up", as he put it, for her use of a private e—mail server whilst she was serving as the us secretary of state. let's have a look at some of today's other developing stories. police in israel say three people have been killed in an attack on a jewish settle m e nt killed in an attack on a jewish settlement north—west ofjerusalem. local media is reporting that a man, thought to be palestinian, entered the west bank settlement with a group of labourers before opening fire on israeli is. the security forces say the attacker was neutralised and was later confirmed dead. a 28—year—old man will appear in court today charged with assaulting a surgeon who was stabbed while he made his way into a mosque. he was
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allegedly injured outside altrincham and hail muslim association in cheshire on sunday. ian anthony rocca, who is of no fixed address, will appear at manchester city magistrates accused of grievous bodily harm and possession of a lethal weapon. footage has been released of a teacher being deliberately struck by a motorist at the school gate. he was carried on the school gate. he was carried on the car's bonnet for several metres before being flung off. the driver, 22—year—old rainer schoeman, was jailed last week or dangerous driving and causing actual bodily harm. the incident took place outside a school in woking in february. indonesia is a national disaster agency is warning that mount agung volcano on the island of bali has entered a critical phase and that an eruption is imminent. nearly 60,000 people have now fled the slopes of the volcano. however,
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some have remained in the danger zone out of concern for their livestock. it is the first time mount agung has threatened to erupt since 1963. dubai has staged a test flight since 1963. dubai has staged a test flight for what it said will soon be the first drone taxi service. the flying taxi, developed by german drone firm volocopter, resembles a small two seater helicopter cabin topped by a white hoop studded with 18 propellers. it is meant to fly without remote control guidance for a maximum flight duration of half an hour. unusual wedding photo shoots area hour. unusual wedding photo shoots are a popular trend among newlyweds but one couple in canada cop more pictures than they bargained for after the groom saved a young boy from drowning. clayton and brittany cook were posing for pictures on a bridge in ontario when they spotted the youngster, who had been pushed into the river whilst playing with friends. the groom let into the
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action, diving into the water in full wedding dress, before pulling the boy to shore. and still having time to kiss his new bride. for a full summary of the news, you can go to our website, where you will be able to get more details on all of those stories. counting is under way in the independents reference in the kurdish region of iraq. the ballot went ahead despite objections from the iraqi government, turkey and iran. there's little doubt it will endorse the idea of an independent homeland. our correspondent tom bateman is in irbil. well, the reaction here in irbil. well, the reaction here in irbil to this vote has been frankly one of euphoria. we had spontaneous dancing in the streets last night, you could barely move for the kurdistan regionalflag, you could barely move for the kurdistan regional flag, but you could barely move for the kurdistan regionalflag, but further afield, things are more complex and what we have had overnight is a
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series of statements from the international community and then there was a statement from the united nations secretary—general, who regretted that the vote had taken place without the consent of the government in baghdad... we will leave tom bateman in irbil and join the labour party conference in brighton to listen into angela rayner, the shadow education secretary. thank you. conference, it's an absolute pleasure to be before you today and i'm really proud that my shadow education team are all here with me and my staff, who do such amazing work throughout the with me. isaid amazing work throughout the with me. i said what a year it has been, conference, this last 12 months. theresa may started it by warning of a coalition of chaos, and now,
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conference, she is leading it. applause and her education ministers have spent the last few months ripping up their own manifesto page by page. they wanted to open new grammar schools, but, conference, they can't. they said they would build 114 free schools, but they couldn't. they pledged their healthy pupils fund would not fall below 400 million. now it will. and they promised they would provide free school breakfasts but, unlike our collea g u es school breakfasts but, unlike our colleagues in wales, they won't. when we beat them in parliament on tuition fees, they refused to accept it. instead, they willjust stop turning up for the votes. they have
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gone from running the place to running away from the place. applause in fact, conference, infact, conference, i in fact, conference, i went through their manifesto line by line. there are more education policies that are being reviewed or abandoned than are actually being implemented. they are binning their manifesto, we are building on hours. —— ours. conference, the next labour government will create a national education service, a cradle to grave system supporting everyone throughout their lives. applause it will start in the early years, where we know it has the most impact
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in changing people's lives. just like my life was changed by a labour government. conference, when i became pregnant at16, it conference, when i became pregnant at 16, it was easy to think that the direction of my life and that of my young son, was already set. my mum had a difficult life and so did i and it looked as if my son would simply have the same. instead, conference, the last labour government, through support from my local sure start centre, transformed my son's childhood and made sure that his life would not have to be as hard as mine had been. so, conference, when i say that
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politics changes lives, i say that as someone whose own life has been changed. yet those services, those crucial local services, are being lost across the country. we reveal today that since 2012, £437 million has been cut from sure start. nearly half of their entire funding. that means that more children and families with less control over their lives. and i'm proud to say that we will give £500 million a year directly to sure start, reversing these cuts in full. cheering because, conference, to give every
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child a fair chance to succeed, we need to give them the best possible start in life. for too many, that simply isn't happening. the tories, they promised free childcare to the children of working parents. they promised over 600,000 places. but they created less than a quarter of them. the most disadvantaged aren't even eligible as costs are rising more than twice wages. today, we are publishing a report setting out of the alternative. free, high—quality early education, universally available for every 2—4 —year—old, extra affordable care for every family, saving them thousands of pounds a year. applause so, conference, our children will be
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ready for school. and when the children arrived, they won't be let down for a lack of resources there are. the government's latest u—turn was on their so—called fairer funding formula two weeks ago. thanks to our pressure and the great, fantastic campaign that was run by parents and teachers, they have abandoned the cash cuts to schools. but, conference, the truth here is that there is no new money. every single penny has been found by cutting other education spending and they still won't meet their promise that funding will go up in real
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terms over the next five years. this a continuation of real term means a continuation of real term cuts to the funding of 88% of our schools, and they will hit the most disadvantaged areas the hardest. conference, a labour government would meet that promise instead. a fairerfunding formula would meet that promise instead. a fairer funding formula but genuinely fairer funding formula but genuinely fairand fairer funding formula but genuinely fair and properly funded. applause and, conference, we will remember the most important resource that we have. people. learning needs teaching. teachers will be at the heart of our national education service and we will pay them properly to do it. cheering conference, that is why i am proud
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that the labour party have announced that the labour party have announced that we will bring an end to the public sector pay cap. but it's not just about our teachers, is it? it's about our teaching assistants and our support staff to. >> studio:: we have been listening to angela rayner, the shadow education secretary, in her keynote speech to the labour party conference in brighton. much more on that during the course of the afternoon. in a moment the news at one with soapy way worth. first, the delete weather with sarah keith lucas. good afternoon. so many others, the afternoon is shaping up to be fine and dry. it was a murky start but we have high pressure sitting out towards the heart near continent and scandinavia, dominating the weather
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but low pressure sitting in the atlantic. at a murky start, things have been brightening up nicely. here is a scene in hampton court taken by one of the weather watchers. as we had through today, it won't be dry across the board, some shows popping up in eastern england and tend towards lincolnshire and east yorkshire but away from here, elsewhere looking largely fine and dry and reasonably warm with a southerly breeze. particularly northern parts of scotland, a decent afternoon. also northern ireland, plenty of sunshine in the mid to high teens. one of two shows across part of the north, then towards lincolnshire. south—west across wales to cornwall and devon, across wales to cornwall and devon, a fine afternoon in store. after the missed this morning, it is brightening up, bit of fair weather cloud here and there but most places dry and temperatures towards the london region, 20 or 21 degrees. a southerly breeze continuing into this evening. any of those isolated showers in the east fade away so
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overnight, most of us clear and dry but once again, we see some mist and fog patches forming fairly widely across central and south—eastern areas in particular. it will be a mile by bush you may well wake up to quite a murky start for wednesday morning. then through wednesday, we will sue the rain arriving across parts of northern ireland, they could listen standing water around as we head into the afternoon hours as we head into the afternoon hours as low pressure moves into the atlantic. the central and eastern parts of the country, you are likely to stay dry for a good part of the day and it will feel warm and the sunshine with temperatures around 21 in the south—east. cooler in the west with the arrival of that heavy rain later on. as we move through wednesday evening and overnight into thursday, that frontal system heads its way from west to east across all of the country, so i think we will see a spell of rain as we had through into thursday morning but during thursday, there is a ridge of high pressure building in and it will be an improving picture. some
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rain lingering in the far north—east but elsewhere clear and dry and reasonably warm, 15—20d. the baikonur. —— goodbye for now. international calls for north korea and america to stop using hostile language towards each other amid fears it could trigger a confrontation. china, russia and south korea warn of dangerous consequences after north korea said america had declared war. we've not declared war on north korea, and frankly, the suggestion of that is absurd. also on the programme this lunchtime: one of the biggest stars of the small screen, liz dawn, the coronation street actress who played vera duckworth for more than 30 years has died at the age of 77. the european council president, donald tusk, arrives for talks with theresa may ahead of a decision next month on whether to begin post—brexit trade talks. preparing for government, labour says its plans include a strategy to deal with a dramatic fall in the pound if it came to power.
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