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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 26, 2017 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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weight today at five — labour's plans to tackle a collapse in the value of the pound, if it comes to power. jeremy corbyn tells the bbc that his shadow chancellor was right to point out that labour would need to be ready for all eventualities. if we're going to move into government we need to know what we're going to do, that's set out in our manifesto and we're putting a lot more detail into that, that's what this conference is about and that's what all the policy developments are about, but also look at all the scenarios that we might face. the warning came at a fringe meeting last night from john mcdonnell, and he stood by the remarks today. are you planning for a run on the banks under the labour government? no. why did you say it? because momentum look at different options... are they getting spooked because of the prospect of you in the treasury? not at all. mr mcdonnell said he didn't expect the scenario to unfold , but labour knew it would be under assault.
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we'll have more details. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. in downing street, theresa may and the eu's donald tusk discuss donald tusk discuss brexit — he says there's been no real progress, but there has been a change of approach. victims of the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s win a ruling, allowing them to try to claim damages. thousands of children harmed in the womb by the epilepsy drug valproate , today some mothers give evidence at a public hearing in london. get off me! tributes to the coronation street star liz dawn, known to millions as vera duckworth, who's died at the age of 77. it's 5 o'clock.
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our main story is thatjeremy corbyn has confirmed that labour's preparations for government include planning for the possibility of a collapse in the value of the pound and a flight of investors' capital. he was responding to remarks made last night by his shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell, who said that labour was engaging in ‘war games—type scenario planning', and was drafting legislation so it could ‘hit the deck running' if elected. he added that he didn't expect the scenario to unfold, but preparing was essential. jeremy corbyn has spoken to our political editor, laura kuenssberg. your shadow chancellor suggested last night however unlikely because of the scale you may want to make changes, you might have to prepare for a changes, you might have to prepare fora run on changes, you might have to prepare for a run on the pound and prepare for a run on the pound and prepare for the prospect of people taking money out the country. why would people do that? today, in the
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treasury, there is a whole team of incredibly brilliant people looking at speculation against the pound, looking at runs on the pound and looking at runs on the pound and looking at runs on the pound and looking at the effect on the economy, as exchange rates make a difference. john makes the point that you've got to look at all of these things and look at the scenarios. i recall reading an interesting book by clive ponting, a civil servant in the 1960s, about how the wilson government had to deal with speculation against the pound which was obviously very damaging to social programmes that he tried to introduce. john is right to look at all of these scenarios. if we are to move into government, we need to know what we are going to do, that is set out in our manifesto and we are putting more detail into that, that is what the conferences about and the development policies, but also look at all of the scenarios we
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may face. that's a realistic scenario, there could be a run on the pound ? scenario, there could be a run on the pound? there has been a run on the pound? there has been a run on the pound? there has been a run on the pound the last couple of years... is that how you would tell what has happened? it has made a difference, it has made travel to europe more expensive, but the other side of the coin is that it has made some exports a bit cheaper for more market competitors. the shadow chancellor talks about something rather different, he was suggesting, however unlikely, as he said, that people might want to take money out of britain if you were elected. why do you think people would do that?” would hope that they would recognise that we want an investment led economy, that we are going to increase taxation to corporations and the very wealthiest in order to invest in the education of our children, investing improvements in our health care, and set up a national investment bank which would provide a better basis for industrial element in future. it costs on the way that that the benefits are decent chances of employment all around the country
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and something well worth working towards. john mcdonnell also said you've got to be prepared for what happens when or if they come for us. who are "vague". probably people thatjohn doesn't like, i'm not sure who he is referring to there, i haven't spoken to him this morning but looking back again, looking at both of the past governments, the wilson government had problems about that and we had to look at all of these scenarios. we want to lead a government that would reduce inequality, invest in the future, andi inequality, invest in the future, and i have met with, and john has many times, the cbi, federation of small businesses, visited a lot of the private sector and spoken to them about investment plans and strategies. those conversations go ina very strategies. those conversations go in a very positive way because they wa nt to in a very positive way because they want to see a government working for economic improvement. are you co mforta ble economic improvement. are you comfortable with him talking about that? you say he is talking about
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something you don't like, he is your closest political ally, you've worked alongside one another for decades? you sound like you are approaching some kind of war, where people you don't like might attack you. isn't this about bringing people together? it is, and about changing the terms of the agenda. john mcdonnell himself has been questioned again about the remarks he made at the fringe meeting last night. he was questioned about the precise nature of labour's planning for the possibility of a run on the pound, ora for the possibility of a run on the pound, or a flight of capital. in brighton, vicki young, our chief political correspondent can bring us up—to—date. political correspondent can bring us up-to-date. what is striking having listened to those comments byjohn mcdonnell last night, talking with great confidence about how labour is
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preparing for government, that's the mood here, at least on the floor of this conference, the enthusiasm and the fact they feel the general election result was not a win, but a big improvement and they can now really seriously plan for the future and plan for really seriously plan for the future and planfora programme really seriously plan for the future and plan for a programme of government. we have seen some of that this week already, particularly from john mcdonnell, talking about it being incredibly radical. because of that, he obviously fears that if labour were in power they may encounter barriers. when they talked about those people, if and when they come for us... they establish it is the establishment, it could be business, the city, even the civil service, they may try and stand in the way of these proposals that labour want to bring in. as you said earlier, mr mcdonnell was asked exactly what he meant by his comments. are you planning for a run on the banks under the labour government? no. why did you say it?
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one of the groups, momentum, they practice war games... are investors being spooked by the prospect of you in treasury? not at all, i have been sitting down, as you know. with asset managers and others over the summer. they are very interested in our infrastructure proposals and how we work with them. you do not think there will be financial instability and a labour government with billions... quite the reverse. mr mcdonnell today trying to play down those comments, because he knows, and it has already happened, that conservative ministers have looked at that and said, this is labour themselves accepting the policies that they want to bring in could well damage the british economy. the other thing here, speaking to some labourmps, other thing here, speaking to some labour mps, they are concerned that maybe there is too much overconfidence after the general election result, and there is still an awful lot of work that needs to
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be done and they are concerned that maybe other people in the hall are getting slightly carried away and they need to think more about how they need to think more about how they win over the 60 or so seats that they still need to win if and when there is a general election soon. thank you. vicki young, our chief political correspondent. the european council president donald tusk says there's been ‘no sufficient progress' in the brexit negotiations. speaking in downing street, he said the eu would discuss ‘future relations', including trade agreements, once there was sufficient progress, but that point hadn't been reached yet. but he welcomed what he described as a new constructive and realistic tone from the british government. no one will tell me that brexit is a good thing, because as i have always said, in fact,
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good thing, because as i have always said, infact, brexit good thing, because as i have always said, in fact, brexit is only about damage control. i didn't change my opinion. as you know, we will discuss our future relations with the uk. whilst there is so sufficient progress, besides are working, and will work harder at it. but if you ask me, and today, member states asked me, i would say that there is no sufficient progress yet. but it will work, we will work on it. donald tusk earlier in downing street. our political correspondent chris mason is in downing street. no progress yet, yet he says there
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has been a change of approach on behalf of the uk government. is he therefore hinting that progress will now be made in pretty short order? he seems to be hinting at that, whilst at the same time suggesting that the uk have cleared this hurdle of sufficient progress in negotiations so far. that's the hurdle, although fairly ill—defined, that the eu was put down before there can be further talks about future relationships. we are into round for brussels this week, focused on three issues. the irish border, what will be the frontier between the european union and the uk, the border between northern ireland and the republic. the issue of citizens rights and the financial settlement, the divorce bill. we have from michel barnier, the chief negotiator for the eu, and have from michel barnier, the chief negotiatorfor the eu, and the welcoming of the constructive tone
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of theresa may's speech in florence. clearly there is a desire from the eu about more detail. progress to be made on the final points of these negotiations going on in brussels this week. there's a clear indication from donald tusk here a fewer hours ago. that hasn't happened yet. the issue then is, are you detecting behind the scenes there is the prospect of a genuine and measurable amount of progress on one or more of those three big points? as you mentioned, citizens rights and the divorce bill, and northern ireland. are any of those showing any signs of moving? when you speak to people in downing street, they say that yes, there has been some movement on some of those. they point to the fact that the prime minister talked about, albeit without putting a number on it, money in that speech in france last week. david davis has spoken about some progress in the discussion on
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citizens rights. to an extent, there has been some movement. but crucially now, we are heading towards what was seen by some as a deadline in october, which was spoken about a few months ago as a possible moment when these talks may have made sufficient progress, as i say, it's an ill—defined concept from the eu. so that these talks can move the broader future trading relationship. there has been an a cce pta nce relationship. there has been an acceptance from some here in westminster that there was a likelihood, a possibility, that it could push back a little bit, it could push back to potentially november or december. we aren't yet at that stage of knowing for certain but donald tusk‘s words would potentially point to that. that being said, there's another
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round of negotiations to come in brussels before the summit which ta kes pla ce brussels before the summit which takes place of all of the leaders, chaired by donald tusk, which is happening next month. chris mason in downing street, thank you. charities, experts and women whose children have been harmed by the epilepsy drug, sodium valproate, have been evidence to a public hearing in central london. the european medicines agency is holding a safety review of the drug, designed to control seizures, to establish whether new warnings about taking it in pregnancy are reaching patients. the drug has been linked to physical abnormalities and autism in children, as our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. lily and ian's son was diagnosed with severe learning difficulties when he was three years old, caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate that lily took when she was pregnant. the couple say they asked doctors if it was safe to take the drug while expecting and were then horrified to discover they had been wrongly reassured. devastated. upset. angry. i just
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been wrongly reassured. devastated. upset. angry. ijust felt that i was let down by the health service. upset. angry. ijust felt that i was let down by the health servicem is estimated tens of thousands of children across the world have been harmed after being exposed to valproate medicines in the womb. it carries a 10% risk of physical problems and a 40% risk of developmental disorders. today, a safety review by the european medicines agency is looking at whether new warnings on pillboxes in the uk and a range of other strengths and measures —— strengthening measures are reaching women of a child—bearing age. the medicines watchdog says that it supports the review and stressed it is important that women do not stop taking valproate without first discussing it with their doctor. pa rents discussing it with their doctor. parents from across europe like lillias and ian, with children harmed by sodium valproate, will give evidence to the public hearing, amid concerns that babies are still being damaged by this drug. stay with us, because...
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and after 5.30 we'll be talking to the chief executive of the epilepsy society and sam scott—edgar, who says her daughter faith has been left disabled after being exposed to the drug in the womb. we will talk to sign in a short while. a look at the headlines... jeremy corbyn tells the bbc that his shadow chancellor was right to point out a labour government should be ready for all eventualities, including a possible run on the pound. downing street, as we reported, theresa may and the eu's donald tusk discussed brexit, he says that there has been no real progress but there has been a change in approach. victims of the contaminated blood scandal in the 19705 contaminated blood scandal in the 1970s and 1980s when a ruling for them trying to claim damages. england all—rounder ben stokes will not be available for the match tomorrow against the west indies after being arrested yesterday morning following an incident in a bristol nightclub. jason kenny has told the bbc that he plans to
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compete at tokyo 2020. britain's joint most successful olympian had secretly decided to retire but he has now reversed that decision after taking a year off and becoming a dad. manchester city are one of three british teams with group games in the champions league tonight. they welcome ukrainian side shaktar donetsk, and liverpool and spurs are also in action. north korea's claim that the usa has declared war on it is absurd, according to the white house. tensions between the two countries have intensified after pyongyang said it now had the right to shoot down us bombers, even outside north korean airspace. south korea has called for a level—headed response and warned that accidental clashes in the region could quickly spiral out of control. from seoul, our correspondent danny savage reports. american military aircraft preparing for a show of force close to the north korean coast.
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these planes went on to fly in international airspace near the east of the country, further north in the region than they ever have been. the us says it was a demonstration of their resolve. now, north korea has reacted to donald trump's threats and action by claiming the united states has declared war on them. translation: since the us declared war on our country, we have every right to take countermeasures, including shooting down us strategic bombers, even when they're not yet inside the airspace border of our country. the question of who won't be around much longer will be answered then. the white house, though, says it's absurd to think they're at war with north korea, and is trying to strike a more diplomatic tone overnight. it's never appropriate for a country to shoot down another country's aircraft when it's over international waters. our goal is still the same, we continue to seek the peaceful denuclearisation of the korean peninsular, that's our focus. doing that through both
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the most maximum, economic and diplomatic pressures. it was a point echoed by the us defence secretary on a visit to india, jim mattis said diplomatic efforts were continuing. and that is our goal, to solve this diplomatically, and i believe president trump has been very clear on this issue. but north korea's interpretation of us actions, and its proposed response is another escalation in this ongoing crisis. this former secretary—general of the united nations, who himself is south korean, says the situation is alarming. even during the height of the cold war, including soviet union, they have never threatened to use nuclear weapons, unless they are attacked by nuclear weapons. but north korea has blatantly publicly threatened that they will strike the united states
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with nuclear weapons. so far, this has been and remains a war of words. but if american planes do clash with the north korean military, the risk of tipping into conflict increases dramatically. danny savage, bbc news, seoul. victims and their families have won a ruling allowing them to launch high court action, seeking damages over contaminated blood products. the case concerns imported blood—clotting products derived from blood plasma, which caused haemophiliacs and others to be infected with hiv and hepatitis in the 1970s and 80s. so far it's led to the deaths of at least 2,400 nhs patients. that is what experts say. let's turn to our health editor hugh pym, who joins us now at the high court.
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underline the significance of what has happened today. it is significant, it's been a very long—running saga, going right back to the 1970s and 80s, when victims we re to the 1970s and 80s, when victims were given contaminated blood products, haemophiliacs, others needing blood transfusions thought they were being cared for by the nhs but they were being infected and as we have heard, 2500 or so have died, others are still alive but their lives have been ruined. it is called the biggest disaster in the history of the nhs. they mounted court action in the 1980s and eventually there was a settlement where they had to waive the right to take further action. lawyers are now arguing that there was a cover—up at the time, and the government did not make available the full range of information. the allegation is that there was a cover—up of crucial information that doctors knew of the risk and continue to treat patients.
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that information did not emerge at the time so they are mounting new action and today at the high court they were given leave to manful class—action starting in the new year representing 500 claimants. the department of health argued that few months ago theresa may, the prime minister, announced that would be a public enquiry. she conceded it would take place so there was no need for this action. lawyers for the victims though say that is absolutely needed because they want to get to the bottom of precisely whether or not there was a cover—up. they are not sure what the enquiry will be looking at. given potential confusion, what will the next step likely be in legal terms? and the claimants, where do they want to get to, what do they want at the end of all of this? i think at the end of it they want everything that is known to be put before a public enquiry, and put before to the high court judge, enquiry, and put before to the high courtjudge, to enquiry, and put before to the high court judge, to establish enquiry, and put before to the high courtjudge, to establish that there was a cover—up at the time, and that
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the government was culpable and that they would be seeking very large damages as a consequence of that. the public enquiry hasn't decided whether it will be a judge leading quarry or a hose prostyle fast track approach. victims are being consulted about that. that will be very interesting, to see whether it isjudge led like very interesting, to see whether it is judge led like the grenfell tower enquiry and has powers to convene and bring together a full range of witnesses. there will be a lot happening on this story over the next few months. hugh pym, our health editor at the high court, thank you. the coronation street actress liz dawn, who played vera duckworth for more than three decades, has died at the age of 77. she first appeared in coronation street in 1974, but after falling ill ten years ago she left the soap. herfamily said she had been the ‘love, light and inspiration' in their lives.
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our arts correspondent david sillito looks back at her life. all i can say is i hope prince charles never sets eyes on it! admiring my stone cladding, are you? well, it's certainly eye—catching. certain neighbours may have been snooty about vera duckworth‘s taste, but without her, coronation street just wouldn't have been the same. nobody'll dispute that! are you trying to be funny or what? aren't you going to carry her over the threshold? when liz dawn first arrived, she said she felt like cinderella — her palace, 9 coronation street. and prince charming — jack duckworth, played by bill tarmey. you haven't met my husband, jack? where's my dog? have you moved it? vera, i wouldn't have done, only it was an emergency! there is much to miss. her kindness, her generosity, her natural comedy timing and talent, there was not much difference between her and vera in that they were both very grounded, warm—hearted, generous spirited,
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working—class women. will you make us some chips? oh, you're a right romantic! the marriage was a threesome, vera, jack and the pigeons, and despite the bruises, it lasted because there was something special in this double act. come back here! you! she was born sylvia butterfield, home was the halton moor estate in leeds. i never really felt poor. because we always had love and nobody had anything in them days. she did all sorts ofjobs, from selling wigs to singing in working men's clubs under a new stage name, liz dawn. the money were good. i had three children under school—age and i really did it for money, singing at weekends. you'll hear from my solicitors, love. the tv acting work came at a time when directors were looking for talent that was natural, authentic, the sort of person you could truly believe would live on coronation street. you will laugh on the other side of yourface! get off me!
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off duty, liz dawn was a keen campaigner for the labour party and became lady mayoress of leeds. say you've never loved anybody else. i've never loved anybody else, shall i go and get your slippers? after 3a years of laughter and ups and downs, liz dawn had proved she was one of acting's naturals, admitting even she didn't even quite know where liz stopped and vera began. music: coronation street theme. the actress liz dawn, who's died at the age of 77. the actor and political activist tony booth has died at the age of 85. he starred as mike in the bbc sitcom ‘till death us do part‘, in a 50—year acting career spanning film and television. he also served as president of the actor's union equity. a leading trade unionist has called on the government
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to resolve a trade dispute which could threaten thousands of jobs. unite's tony burke said workers at bombardier which employs some 5,000 people in northern ireland are ‘holding their breath‘ over the compa ny‘s future. the aerospace giant boeing has claimed bombardier received unfair state subsidies from the uk and canada, a claim the us authorities are examining. our ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast. what is your understanding of the latest stage of this? it has been an anxious day for workers at the bombardierfactories here, anxious day for workers at the bombardier factories here, there anxious day for workers at the bombardierfactories here, there are four of them but the biggest plant is in east belfast, where the wings are made for a jet called the c series, at the centre of this dispute. bombardier claim because of financial assistance from canadian and british governments, bombardier have been able to sell these planes are have been able to sell these planes a re less have been able to sell these planes are less than what they cost to
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build. the biggest order that bombardier received they got last year from the bombardier received they got last yearfrom the us bombardier received they got last year from the us airline delta for 125 c seriesjets. year from the us airline delta for 125 c series jets. now the us department of commerce is expected to say something later today, the latest reports from north america is that it may come at 10pm or 11pm tonight. officials from that department in washington consider whether the financial assistance amounts to anti—competitive arrangements and then they could. create a barrier to bombardier selling those c series jets into the most lucrative aviation market in the world. chris page in belfast, thank you. we will have the headlines in a moment and an update on this board. but sarah is here the weather. the weather is feeling pretty summary
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out there for many of us. although it was a murky start of the day, things bright and nicely. how breaking up, some sunshine and showers in eastern england, they fade over the next few hours. overnight, missed and and low cloud forming. mild, bear in mind my morning the old folk patch could cause some disruption in central and south—eastern parts. and improving day tomorrow. in many eastern parts in particular, an east and west split. rain arrives in northern ireland and the south—west of england, it could be heavy in northern ireland with standing water. in the north and east, down towards the south—east, a decent day but the breeze picking up. overnight and into thursday, the rain works eastwards a cross and into thursday, the rain works eastwards across the country. and through thursday, lingering for a time across the northern isles, some showers returning to the south—east. a decent day, temperature is good at this time of year, about 15—20d.
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this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: jeremy corbyn says his shadow chancellor was right to point out that a labour government would need to be ready for all eventualities, including a run on the pound. the prime minister theresa may and the eu‘s donald tusk discuss brexit inside number 10 — he says there‘s been no real progress, but there has been a change of approach. victims of the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s win a ruling, allowing them to try to claim damages. charities, experts and women whose children have been harmed by the epilepsy drug, sodium valproate, have been giving evidence to a public hearing in central london. the coronation street actress liz dawn, known to millions for her role as vera duckworth in the soap, has died. she was 77. the star played the role for more than 30 years. let‘s get the sport, with with hugh woozencroft.
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good afternoon, ben stokes will not be available for the fourth one—day match against the west indies tomorrow because he was arrested following an incident in bristol in the early hours of yesterday morning. he missed training today along with alex hales who is helping police with enquiries. the squad to tour australia this winter will be announced tomorrow. ben and alex will not be available tomorrow for the one—day international against the one—day international against the west indies. ben was arrested in the west indies. ben was arrested in the early hours following an incident in bristol and he was held overnight and leased under investigation without charge. he will notjoin the team in london. alex hales was with him on sunday night, he did not train, he returned voluntarily to bristol today to help
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police with enquiries. we understand we can‘t offer any further details on this at this point but we will provide updates when we have them. how does it affect the players chances abbasi selection? the selectors have been instructed to selectors have been instructed to select the ashes squad based on form and fitness as they usually would. jason kenny has revealed he secretly retired after rio 2016 but has now decided to reverse his decision. the six time gold medallist said he walked away from track cycling because the sport had taken its toll on him physically and mentally. but he now says a year off and becoming a father has helped change his mind. i ended up training againjust because i enjoy doing it and then i got to the point where, we have a gym set up home because laura intends coming back and ijust
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thought i might try a bit of a comeback myself, if she can do it why can‘t i? i felt truly refreshed, did afew why can‘t i? i felt truly refreshed, did a few efforts and they were not amazing but i felt like i did lead andi amazing but i felt like i did lead and i was 18 and i never thought that comeback. i think it was because i was a bit flattened by training and having that year out kind of breathe new life into me. gets the second set of group matches in the champions league tonight, spurs in action, as are liverpool and manchester city, they will be taking on shakhtar donetsk. kyle walker believes nothing can stop the premier league leaders at the moment and he‘s enjoying his first season under pep guardiola. he's always giving words of encouragement and i think the standard of players and the teams he‘s managed in the past speaks volumes. it‘s a good motivation, the calibre of manager he is and hopefully we can keep
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performing as we are doing. he a lwa ys performing as we are doing. he always wa nts performing as we are doing. he always wants more from us which i think is good, to keep pushing us. and sad news, former chairman of newcastle united freddy shepherd has died, he served as the vice—chairman and then chairman of the club from 1991 until 2007 which included the period they finished premier league runners—up under kevin keegan. he was instrumental in bringing alan shearer to the club. key was the one that made it happen. he was the one that made it happen. he was the one that was twisting my arm to come back home. if it wasn‘t for him i would have come back to newcastle. he loved his football, he loved newcastle united. when he was chairman he was desperate for us to do well, it was his life. he loved every single minute of it. there will be a lot of sad people around today. that's all the sport for now,
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more in sportsday at 630. more on the review into the safety of the epilepsy drug, valproate. it‘s estimated that thousands of children across europe were born with physical and mental problems after being exposed to the drug in the womb. a public hearing has been taking place in london today, with evidence from parents, charities and the drug manufacturers. with me is clare pelham, chief executive of the epilepsy society, who has been campaigning for clearer guidance on the use of this drug. thank you for coming in, we will be with you in a moment. and in our salford studio i‘m joined by sam scott—edgar, who is one of 20,000 parents in the uk who blame the epilepsy drug valproate for harming their child in the womb. it is very good of you to join us today, thank you very much, could you tell viewers what your
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experience has been? well... when i was 1a i found out i had epilepsy andi was 1a i found out i had epilepsy and i was put on valproate thinking it was a safe drug. when i decided to get pregnant when i was 22 they advised me it was safe to take whilst i was pregnant. i went to several gp‘s and my neurologist and they were happy for me to proceed with planning my pregnancy. and i did. i ended up having my daughter and she has so many problems and it makes me so upset and so angry that the information wasn‘t in place and nobody, nobody is accountable for these issues. lots of viewers, they will sympathise because it‘s a
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terrible position to be in. what if somebody said where you made available of any of the risks, what‘s the answer to that? available of any of the risks, what's the answer to that? when i went to my neurologist and looking on the leaflet you get with the drugs, in 2003 it was aware that, that valproate would cause spina bifida and down‘s syndrome and those we re bifida and down‘s syndrome and those were the only two things on the leaflet. when i went to my neurologist she explained the same two things, spina bifida and down‘s syndrome but they also said it could be scanned for in ultrasounds so there are no other risks apart from these two things so i would have a choice whether to keep the child or not. and that set your minds... et mind at ease. we have a lovely image
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of you and your daughter we are looking at now. i will bring clay m, looking at now. i will bring clay in, some of the comments online are quite direct and see if people are aware of risks of this kind why is this drug being prescribed and offered to people? what‘s the answer? it's one of the most widely prescribed drugs for women with epilepsy and that's because it's very effective in controlling seizures. these are risks which relate to pregnancy. if you're not planning to start a family then it's usually a safe drug free to take and for a few women it's the only drug they can take which effectively controls their seizures and gives them any quality of life. so the issue is, you will tell me, but surely one of the issues is the extent to which people are explained properly what the nature of the rest is? absolutely right, that's put your finger on is? absolutely right, that's put yourfingeron it, is? absolutely right, that's put your finger on it, women should have the opportunity to make an informed choice about whether to start or
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continue a pregnancy when they are taking this drug and at the moment they don't. we know that they don't because they epilepsy society together with epilepsy action and john epilepsy have conducted two surveys so we john epilepsy have conducted two surveys so we could get continuity of data and 20% of the women currently taking this drug who responded have never had a conversation with their doctor of the risks during pregnancy. why is that? it's hard to say, we think partly because all the guidelines in place are voluntary and that is why we are calling onjeremy hunt, it's time to stop with the voluntary and the maze to do and are recommended and time to make this mandatory. all of those factors which four people would seem to be the conditions you mentioned yourself and there are others, what do you want out of this
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latest hearing and the review?” would like the information to be out there. for more people to know the risks. since the media has been covering the story the past few days there‘s been a lot more parents coming out of the woodwork which have not been aware of this drug causing problems in pregnancy. pregnant women coming out of the woodwork because they have never heard of it before so there needs to be, information needs to be out there and doctors need to know more information than they need to know the effects on these children because at the end of the day these children have to live with what life has given them and it wasn‘t their fault and it‘s not the parents fault either really. my daughter has gone through so much pain, she has had 12 surgeries and every surgery is pain for her. these children should not
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have to go through so much pain in their life when it been avoided. can i ask how old your daughter is? she is 1a. i ask how old your daughter is? she is 14. we just saw another nice picture. how is she coping? because she has the mental age of a 3—4 —year—old she does not understand but she feels the pain of the operations she‘s had to go through. she doesn‘t understand but i feel the pain more than she does. it hurts inside of me watching her cry and, when the blood is coming from famouth are when she‘s had, when she‘s had needles in are, and she‘s screaming because she doesn‘t want that, it is heartbreaking but she gets on with it and forgets about it. but that‘s because she doesn‘t fully understand anything. thank
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you. that‘s the distressing thing isn‘t it? having heard that evidence that you can understand the outcome of this review really does need to be pretty clear. the review should be pretty clear. the review should be clear but actuallyjeremy hunt could stop this tomorrow. we are familiar when we get a repeat prescription with the process, the receptionist asked the need to come and see the doctor, we're just asking jeremy hunt to say to doctors please do not renew a prescription of this drug to women of child—bearing age without a face—to—face conversation. it would cost nothing and he could do it tomorrow. we will see what happens, thank you very much joining the programme, both of you. a palestinian worker has killed three israeli security officers and wounded another at the entrance to a settlement in
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the occupied west bank. he opened fire after being ordered to stop, and was then shot dead. the attack happened as us envoy, jason greenblatt, who is trying to relaunch israeli—palestinian peace talks, arrived injerusalem. a man who was caught on camera torturing and killing a vulnerable gay man in his own home has been jailed for life. jason marshall posed as an m15 agent before smothering 58—year—old peter fasoli to death in 2013. he‘s starting a life sentence of at least 39 years for the murder. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: jeremy corbyn tells the bbc that his shadow chancellor was right to point out that a labour government should be ready for all eventualities, including a run on the pound. in downing street theresa may and the eu‘s donald tusk discuss brexit — he says there‘s been no real progress, but there has been a change of approach. victims of the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s win a ruling, allowing them to try to claim damages.
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the leaders of a us congressional committee have demanded details of everyone in the trump administration who has used private e—mail accounts to discuss government business. during his election campaign, donald trump repeatedly called for the imprisonment of his rival hillary clinton for using her personal email when she was secretary of state. our correspondent richard galpin reports. jared kushner, stephen miller, steve bannon and reince priebus — the biggest names to have reportedly used private e—mail accounts while working in the trump administration. mr kushner one of the most powerful advisers in the white house allegedly using a private account to send or receive 100 work—related e—mails in the months after after mr trump became president. ivanka trump, the president‘s daughter, is also implicated.
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and all this after donald trump and his team had made the use of private e—mail accounts by his rival hillary clinton a huge issue during last year‘s election campaign. hillary set up an illegal server for the obvious purpose of shielding her criminal conduct from public disclosure and exposure. lock herup! his supporters shouting "lock her up" became a familiar chant on the campaign trail. but now it‘s mr trump‘s team in the white house which is under fire. the administration is trying to play down the scale of what has happened. this will continue to come out. the white house will say it is accurate
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and the story will push a bit further, we are also going to continue to see how the house oversight committee handles this and we have seen by parts and members of that committee in the last 24 hours requesting more information about that. hillary clinton has accused the trump demonstration of the height of hypocrisy. richard galpin, bbc news. the attitude of older generations toward young people is that they‘re lazy and social media obsessed. that‘s according to a survey into the perception of generation z — those aged between 16 and 22. the young people who took part in the survey, which was commissioned by bbc newsbeat, said it wasn‘t entirely true, with almost four in ten of them describing themselves as hard working. generation z are also more optimistic about their future compared to other generations, with 25% saying they‘ll
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have a better life than those older than them. a kind of social compact that we have in society and the economy. today, teenagers are often told they‘ll struggle for work and should give up on the hope of ever owning their own home, but a survey by ipsos mori which spoke to 1,000 16—to—22—year—olds and 2,000 from older generations suggests a quarter of generation z are optimistic about their future. i spoke to this group in birmingham. success, ithink, is measured in a different way for our generation. it is almost like if you are able to make a living or survive off something that you want to do and you enjoy, i think that is labelled as success. the older generation not being optimistic toward us, what kind of effect does that have on the younger generation? like, if you are constantly told you are the doomed generation, you're not going to do very well, what kind of message or energy is that passing towards you? austerity has been a big part of this generation‘s upbringing. in spite of this, though,
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they are accused of being lazy. i think people stereotype and think teenagers in 2017 are lazy or always on the phone, but if you look and go to colleges, the people who want to succeed will succeed and if some people, bothered to work, i mean, that is their loss. one of the biggest differences between generation z and those that came before it is the changing attitude towards sexuality. two—thirds of 16—to—22—year—olds say they are only attracted to people of the opposite sex. that‘s a big drop when compared to the 88% of baby boomers. i think our generation genuinelyjust does not care. they don‘t see couples and go, that‘s a straight couple, that‘s a gay couple, we just think, that‘s a couple, those two people are in love and it doesn‘t matter. no one cares. it's like, you just want to be who you are. if someone's happy, who cares? there is some agreement on the issues that are most important to britain, though, with all generations putting the nhs and making the economy work after brexit top of their list. and you can watch that special live debate tonight, as an audience of 16 to 22—year—olds discuss whether the world has got ‘generation z‘ wrong.
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that‘s newsbeat debates: generation misunderstood ? at 9pm on the bbc news channel and radio 1. the technology company dyson has has revealed plans to build an electric car. the firm, which is famous for its vacuum cleaners, will develop the battery powered vehicle at its headquarters in wiltshire and plans to launch it in 2020. our transport correspondent richard westcott is here. how did this come out? basically they were forced to admit it because it‘s been rumoured for years, they said it was getting difficult talking to contractors because they we re talking to contractors because they were saying we are working on something but we cannot tell you who we are and the contractors are saying we cannot talk to you unless you tell us who we are and you sign secrecy agreements and so on and so on. all they wanted was tyres to test but they could not get to the
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point where they could open up to the manufacturers. they just point where they could open up to the manufacturers. theyjust said life is just easier if they come out and admit it, veretout and a half yea rs and admit it, veretout and a half years they have been working on an electric car. that sound like a long time, there are other people in the field, who advanced is it? they have got the motor are sorted, the build mortars, that‘s what they do, all their equipment relies on them. they are working on the battery, they are working on two options, the ones we have at the moment are liquid and he says the solid—state batteries are quicker to charge, they are safer, better to recycle so they have been developing that. but there is no chassis and no design yet. he says he wanted to be radical because that‘s what they do, they like designing radical cars. they have not been working with anyone else, not been working with anyone else, no other car manufacturers at all. they have poached staff from other companies but fundamentally they have been working like secret
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squirrel ina have been working like secret squirrel in a little lab. they have bought an old raf base where they will develop the car and they will decide where to build it. might be the uk but it might be elsewhere. it's the uk but it might be elsewhere. it‘s interesting in terms of what they are trying to aim for, the big challenge for other firms involved in this technology has been a battery which is powerful and delivers lots of power but also range. and the range has been a big challenge for others so that they say anything about it? no, reportedly you get better range with solid state. charging is interesting, we are talking about electric cars, all these car companies throwing money at electric ca rs companies throwing money at electric cars but how i you companies throwing money at electric cars but 55:713u in t'féf" , companies throwing money at electric 51: ,. .... .... _ housing. there, emerged—timing he‘s at said he doaid he the. . , doaid he the. ,
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fl '% money. look fl '% money . look . charging have the money to look at charging structure, quick charging, not the kind of electricity we have at the moment. they hope to have the car out... 2020, 2021, no price yet, he said it would be cheap but if you wa nted said it would be cheap but if you wanted you could call him up right now and put down a deposit but he won‘t say how much.
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