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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  September 26, 2017 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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tonight at six... labour plans for power. it says it's ready to deal with whatever is thrown at it — even a run on the pound. and what if there is a run on the pound? the shadow chancellor was speaking to activists. today, the labour leader backs him, saying it's right to be prepared. john is right to look at all these scenarios, because if we are going to move into government, we need to know; a — what we are going to do... labour says it's preparing for an "assault" by opponents in the city and beyond. we'll have more details. also tonight... having their say — the women who took an epilepsy drug that ended up harming their children. they call for new warnings about the medicine. england all—rounder ben stokes arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. the ashes squad is announced tomorrow. admiring my stone cladding, are you?
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it certainly eye—catching. liz dawn — coronation street's vera — dies at the age of 77. tributes pour in from her fans and fellow actors. she was a very strong character, and a very lovable character, and one of the main... what do we call, the classic characters of coronation street. before and after — 15 years in a vegetative state. now doctors use an implant to restore a patient‘s consciousness. and coming up in sportsday on bbc news... pep guardiola says manchester city will still find it hard to get through their champions league group, despite their rich vein of form. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six.
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the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has said it's right for the party to be planning for every eventuality if it gets into power — including a possible run on the pound. it follows comments from his shadow chancellor last night that his team were preparing for a range of scenarios, including a potential adverse reaction from the markets. mr corbyn, speaking to the bbc, denied that his plans for the economy might scare business away. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports from the party conference in brighton. they want radical. they want him. but what would it take next time for the whole country to choosejeremy corbyn as our prime minister? would he be more radical or less? what do you think it is that will lead you to victory? is it to be more radical or to to victory? is it to be more radical orto dig into to victory? is it to be more radical or to dig into the manifesto you put forward in june? or to dig into the manifesto you put forward in june? i think it's
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actually our manifesto that sets out the parameters of what we are trying to do, which is challenge inequality and injustice, and the first time in many decades, a political party is putting forward something that does seriously challenge levels of inequality and injustice within our society. but listen to what his closest ally thinks the consequences just might possibly be. what happens if there is such and such a reaction? what if there is a run on the pound? what happens if there is this concept of capital flight? your shadow chancellor suggested last night that however unlikely, because of the scale of the changes you might want to make, you might have to prepare for a run prepare for the prospect of people taking money out of this country? john is right to look at these scenarios. if you're going to move into government, we need to know what you're going to do, and that is set out in the ma nifesto do, and that is set out in the manifesto and we are putting more detail into that. that's what the
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conference is about. but also look at all the possible scenarios we might face. that's a realistic scenario, there would be a run on the pound ? scenario, there would be a run on the pound? there has been a run on the pound? there has been a run on the pound? there has been a run on the pound in the last two years. effectively. he was suggesting, however unlikely, as he said, people might want to take money out of britain if you were elected. why do you think people would do that?|j would you think people would do that?” would hope they would recognise that we wa nt would hope they would recognise that we wantan would hope they would recognise that we want an investment led economy. that we are going to increase taxation to corporations and the very wealthy in order to invest in the education of our children, invest in improvements in health care. as a potential prime minister, do you worry that might scare business away? no, it's not going to scare people away. john mcdonnell also said you might have to be prepared for what happens when or if they come for us. who are they?” think they are peoplejohn probably
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doesn't like! he would be your chancellor, your strong political ally, and you have worked with him for decades. it sounds like you are preparing for people who might come and attack you. isn't leading the country bringing people together? and attack you. isn't leading the country bringing people together7m is about bringing people together but it's about changing the terms the agenda. now well used to the photo opportunity, there is no questionjeremy corbyn has changed the terms of labour's conversation. nationalisation, taking all pfi projects into public hands, funding foran nhs projects into public hands, funding for an nhs winter crisis and hundreds of extra billions of borrowing and higher taxes for the rich. but how has it changed him? this is your third conference as leader. a very different environment. has it changed you? i'm even busier than i have have been. i've always been pretty busy in my life. your critics say is your party is now behind you off because of the
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advances at the election. do you think you have won the ultimate inside the labour party?” think you have won the ultimate inside the labour party? i stood as leader challenge the concepts of austerity and economic injustice and inequality in this country. i was proud to stand and pleased to be elected. you have won the argument in the labour party. the argument in the party has been about our role as a party and rejuvenating our economy and society. it's really exciting. exciting for him, exciting for many here. yet even senior labour figures harboured doubts, is this a powerful fad, or really the government of the future? laura is at the conference in brighton for us now. how do we read this? it could be a hint of how radical labour is planning to be. let's be clear, the labour leadership is not saying they would like to see a run on the pound, nothing like it. but what is
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absolutely clear is the scale of the changes they want to make to the country and the pushback they think they would get if they were to enter downing street. it might be so dramatic that they ought to be planning for all kinds of consequences. it was perhaps a bit surprise in to hear them sounding relatively casual about that prospect, but it is also politically so important because it's a huge reminder of how different they are to the labour party that has gone before. remember, new labourvote the party's way back to power after the party's way back to power after the wilderness of the 805, by carefully putting together what they believed was the right kind of economic model. being small c conservative, if you like. making careful promises about spending and borrowing. jeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell have a completely different economic model, a com pletely different economic model, a completely different way of managing money in the country. it's remarkable this week, tony blair and
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gordon brown came here to this conference centre time and time again. but this year it feels like they are notjust long gone, they are hardly even a distant memory. laura, thank you. women from across europe, whose children were harmed during pregnancy by an epilepsy drug they were taking, have been giving evidence at a public hearing in london. the drug — sodium valproate — alleviates the symptoms of epilepsy but has up to a 40% risk of causing autism and learning difficulties in unborn children. 20,000 children are estimated to be affected in the uk alone. our health correspondent sophie hutchin5on reports. annie i5 annie isju5t two annie is just two years old. she annie isju5t two years old. she has autism caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate, her mother took when she was pregnant. antonia says no one ever told her of the risks.” was no one ever told her of the risks.” wa5 heartbroken. because no one has really heard of the syndrome. and when i mention it to any health
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professionals, they don't actually know what it is. i have to tell them. making a difference! to date women from switzerland, belgium, france, ireland and the uk, met in london to give evidence to the uk medicines agency. some have campaigned for almost 20 years about the dangers of sodium valproate and say they are relieved somebody is finally listening. my son is 30, and to say that i have been counting the minutes until today is an understatement. she spoke emotionally at the hearing.” understatement. she spoke emotionally at the hearing. i have been mourning my children since the day they came into my life. and i am determined to not let this injustice happened to other families. these are some of the estimated tens of thousands of children harmed by sodium valproate acro55 thousands of children harmed by sodium valproate across the world. the european watchdog wants to know if warnings about the drug are now
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reaching women. it carries a 10% ri5k reaching women. it carries a 10% risk of physical abnormalities and up risk of physical abnormalities and up to risk of physical abnormalities and uptoa risk of physical abnormalities and up to a 40% risk of autism and learning disabilities for babies in the womb. what is striking i5 learning disabilities for babies in the womb. what is striking is the lack of consistency even now in each country. in britain there are written warnings on the outside of packets. in france, in contrast, there is this unmistakable symbol. but in ireland, women say they are still being given these powerful pill5 still being given these powerful pills in plastic bags.” still being given these powerful pills in plastic bags. i represent a french victims. one of those who gave evidence today was this french mother, whose two children have been harmed. i met her in paris. thi5 mother, whose two children have been harmed. i met her in paris. this is the drug that has harmed her? yes, this was the drug i took in pregnancy. she has spearheaded a camp infora pregnancy. she has spearheaded a camp in for a compensation fund from the french government and i5 camp in for a compensation fund from the french government and is one of 1200 families 5uing the french government and is one of 1200 families suing the french company. there is no information
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about the risk and they don't inform me about that. this afternoon the company said they had acted re5pon5ibly. company said they had acted responsibly. we have always provided the most up—to—date scientific information with the approval of the health authorities. the advice for patients is not to stop taking valproate without consulting a doctor. the european watchdog will report in december whether more needs to be done to prevent children like annie from being harmed. sophie hutchin5on, bbc news. the coronation street actre55 liz dawn, who played the character vera duckworth for more than 30 years, has died. she was 77. she first appeared on the long running soap in 197a. herfamily said she had been, "the love, light and inspiration" in their lives. judith moritz looks back on her life and career. to many they were coronation street.
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the duckworths. jack and vera. the perm, the gravelly voice, funny and fiery. she was eight coronation st fixture for more than 30 years. you'll laugh on the other side of your face! liz dawn made vera her own, but the actress who began life in leeds a5 sylvia butterfield first worked in a variety of otherjobs, from cinema usher it to shoe 5ales girl before getting her break as a nightclub singer. the money were good. i had three children of school age. i actually really did it for money to sing at the weekend. age. i actually really did it for money to sing at the weekendm meant that she was believable. an authentic character on the cobbles. liz had lived a life before coronation street, singing and having children and being a mother and wife. she had left this life. she brought all that to her character because she was such a
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beautiful human being. aren't you going to carry her over the threshold? liz dawn created one of the 5oap'5 famou5 female icon5, up there alongside hilda 0gden, in a sharples and bet lynch. a5 ken barlow, bill roach wa5 sharples and bet lynch. a5 ken barlow, bill roach was her co—5tar for three decades. i wouldn't call hera for three decades. i wouldn't call her a strong woman in that sense, but she was a very strong character and a very lovable character. and one of the main... what do we call, the classic characters of coronation street. she was definitely one of those. a legend? a legend in deed. admiring my stone cladding, aru? certainly eye—catching. admiring my stone cladding, aru? certainly eye-catching. her personality is still written large in the fabric of the street, the gari5h blue and stone cladding at number nine, her edition in 1989 to the horror of her neighbours. but
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still here as a legacy today. you've never loved anybody else. i've never loved anybody else. shall i go get your slippers? as jack and vera duckworth liz dawn and bill tarmey we re duckworth liz dawn and bill tarmey were a true double act, making them a firm favourite with coronation street fa n5 a firm favourite with coronation street fans like michael adams, who writes a blog about the subs. the comedy scenes with bill tarmey, who played jack, they had great comic timing. i always render laughing stock what liz dawn's family say they are bereft. her colleagues say 5he they are bereft. her colleagues say she will always be a true coronation street legend. the actress liz dawn, who has died at the age of 77. the president of the eu council says there hasn't been sufficient progress at the brexit talks for negotiators to move on to discussing britain's future relations with the eu. donald tu5k, who met theresa may in downing street today, was speaking as a fourth round of negotiations were under way in brussels. if you ask me, and if today member states ask me, i would say there is no
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sufficient progress yet. but we will work on it. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, is in downing street. thi5 this doesn't bode well for those talk5. david davis was hoping for a breakthrough. on the face of it, it doesn't. the whole point of the speech from the prime minister in florence last week on brexit was to try to act as a lubricant for the talks that are grinding on in brussels with frustration on both sides about a lack of progress. donald tusk is one of the big hitters in brussels and he said he welcomed what he saw as the constructive tone of the prime minister. but crucially, he said there hadn't been sufficient progress in the talks. that really matters because until the eu determines there has been sufficient progress on the current
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negotiations, they say they can't beat movement on to the future trading relationship. so did mrs may's words in italy last week do the business? a bit, yes, but perhaps not enough yet from her perspective. they will not be worried about that yet, or surprised at what donald tusk said, but they will hope to be able to point to progress on thursday at the end of the current round of negotiations. the time is 6.16pm. our top story this evening: the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says it's right that the party prepares for every eventuality, including a potential run on the pound if it wins power. still to come: why six—time olympic gold medallist jason kenny is going for gold again. coming up in sportsday on bbc news: a new study calls for a ban on rugby tackling at schools in order to protect childrean. world rugby says the report is "extreme and alarmist." a man who'd been in a vegetative
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state for 15 years has begun to show signs of consciousness thanks to an experimental therapy. the pioneering treatment involved implanting a nerve simulator in his chest. within a month, he was able to respond to simple instructions, turn his head and even follow an object with his eyes. experts say the results are potentially very exciting, but say more research is needed. 0ur medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. for 15 years the patient in france had been completely unaware of the world around him following a car accident and severe brain injury, until a medical team in lyon restored some consciousness. they did it by stimulating the vegus nerve which connects the brain to other organs. surgeons implanted a nerve stimulator in the man's chest
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and this was linked by a wire to the vagus nerve in the neck and then an electrical pulse was introduced. after treatment, the team report that the patient could follow an object with his eyes and slowly turn his head when asked, though he remains largely paralysed and unable to talk. now the image on the right shows, three months after stimulation, there is more activity in the key brain areas there than before the implant was inserted. and this is a before and after reading of electrical activity in the brain. again, on the right, the warmer colours here show greater connections at the back of the brain. this team in birmingham measure the brain activity of healthy volunteers. so we're just putting gel into the electrodes. and in patients with severe brain injuries, they say the french research is intriguing.
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i think this is a very exciting result. we have to be very cautious in the way that we interpret it, as it is only data from one patient, but i think it highlights the potential for future therapies for disorders of consciousness. what we need is a large group of patients with this stimulations so that we can work out exactly how it's working. cathy rentzenbrink‘s brother matty spent years in a vegetative state, he died after a judge agreed with the family that his feeding tubes should be withdrawn. she says this research may raise false hopes. the debate will be muddied because everybody reading the headlines will say — oh, doctors have woken someone up. whereas actually, to say that's someone's been in a vegetative state and now minimally conscious, well a lot people thinking being minimally conscious is worse.
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this research raises ethical issues about the longer term care of vegetative patients. last week a judge in london ruled that legal permission is no longer required to withdraw feeding tubes when doctors and relatives agree. a decision that is likely to be challenged. fergus walsh, bbc news. a 28—year—old man has been remanded in custody after appearing in court charged with stabbing a muslim surgeon outside a mosque. ian anthony rook was charged with causing grievous bodily harm and possession of an offensive weapon. consultant nasser kurdy was attacked from behind as he walked to altrincham islamic centre in hale, cheshire, just before 6.00pm on sunday. three men who were arrested by detectives investigating the parson's green terrorist attack have been released and will face no further action. the three, in their twenties and thirties, were detained in newport and cardiff. it means that of the seven people arrested as part of the investigation, six have now been released and one has been charged with attempted murder. surviving victims of blood contamination and the families
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of those that have died have won the right to seek compensation in the high court. the case concerns imported blood—clotting products which caused haemophiliacs and others to be infected with hiv and hepatitis in the 19705 and ‘805. at least 2,400 nhs patients died as a result of contamination. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, is at the high court. this has been a long fight, just how significant is it? lawyers for the claimant say it's highly significant. they tried a legal action here back in the 19805, it didn't get anywhere. they had to sign agreements then not to make further legal claims. they have alleged there was a cover—up, that documents were witheld from the court, that evidence was held back by the department of health. that's why a new legal hearing is required. the government's lawyers in court today said it wasn't necessary because theresa may's already announced a couple of months ago a full public inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal. but the victims say they are not sure
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exactly what that will consider. they want a judge to look at everything in their case so they we re everything in their case so they were given leave to take it forward asa were given leave to take it forward as a class action to be heard in the new year, here at the high court, in front of a judge, with 500 claimants signed up to it in what has always been said to be the worst disaster in the history of nhs. patients given contaminated blood and contracting hiv and hepatitis c. hugh, thank you very much. england cricketer ben stokes has been arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after an incident at a nightclub in bristol in the early hours of monday morning. the all—rounder has since been released, but is under investigation and won't be available for england's one day match against the west indies tomorrow, the same day that england's ashes squad is set to be announced. joe wilson reports. this is the most talented all—round cricketer in england, and maybe in the world. ben stokes can win matches when he bowls, and wins matches when he bats. his fame is global. in india, where cricket really matters and really pays,
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children in delhi want to be him. in the early hours of monday morning, ben stokes was in this area of bristol after england had played a match in the city. stokes is under investigation for causing actual bodily harm. ben was arrested in the early hours of monday morning, 25th september, following an incident in bristol. he was held overnight and released under investigation without charge late on monday. well, west indies are training here ahead of their match against england at the oval tomorrow, but before that game begins there is a major announcement. right here, england will name their squad to play australia in the ashes. now they say they will pick players on the normal basis, of form and fitness, therefore we can assume ben stokes will be in the squad. ben stokes is a man in demand, talented, well—paid, you will see his face on posters at the oval, one of the team's most marketable figures. well—known to possess a passionate
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temperament that can, at best, compliment his talent. england will be desperate not to lose ben stokes, but his immediate future is in the hands of the police. joe wilson, bbc news, at the oval. the actor tony booth has died at the age of 85. well if you're brought up to steal before you can eat, it becomes a part of your education, right? no, not right. he was best known for his role as mike in the bbc sitcom ‘till death us do part. in a a0 year career in film and television, he was also a political campaigner and father of tony blair's wife, cherie booth. tony booth, who's died at the age of 85. you might think that six olympic gold medals is enough. well so did cyclistjason kenny, who says that after winning again at the rio games he'd decided to walk away from the sport.
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but after a year off, during which time he's become a father, he now says he's aiming to become britain's most successful ever 0lympian at tokyo 2020. he's been speaking to our sports editor, dan roan. for almost a decade jason for almost a decadejason kenny has been cycling sprint seine vagus sayings no british 0lympian winning more gold medals. his six nt rio could have been his last. kenny revealing to me today he's secretly decided to retire after last year's games. ied aide had enough, to be honest. i was happy with my decision to kind of walk away and never come back, really. istarted to kind of walk away and never come back, really. i started looking at other kind ofjobs and things like that i would do with my time. you know, i was serious really. you effectively had retired am you had decided it sounds like? yeah, in my head. i'm glad i didn't announce anything now, to be honest, looking back. he may not have competed since rio he has been busy away from the
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track marrying four time gold medallist laura trot last year and becoming a father earlier this summer. the 29—year—old now feels he's ready to return. i felt like i did when i was 18 again, ifeel refreshed. i thought that had gone. i never thought it would come back iechl thought it was an age thing. i thought i was flattened by training and having that year outjust kind of breathed new life into me really. we got really well set up so that laura could train with the little one at home when she can. ijust thought, you know, if she can come back, why can't i, really? kenny's gold medals in rio saw him ecall sir chris hoy's record and a seventh would see him go—ahead of his former team—mate and become his country's most successful 0lympian. team—mate and become his country's most successful olympian. is it would be amazing after london, when i got on the top ten list. when your name is alongside those at thes guys it's pretty special. to be at the top is obviously really nice. kenny's first step on the path to a fourth 0lympics kenny's first step on the path to a fourth olympics will be here at the
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national velodrome in the annual revolution event injanuary, the quiet man of british sport back in pursuit of more glory. dan roan, bbc news, manchester. time for a look at the weather, here's sarah keith lucas. we have had highs of 21 today, not bad at all. this was taken by one of our weather watchers, blue sky and sunshine around as we head into the evening. showers for east anglia that should fade away quickly. most of us are looking dry tonight. we will see is mist and low cloud and fog forming. quite a murky start to wednesday morning, particularly for central and south—eastern parts of england. mild and frost—free first thing. during the day that mist and fog should clear away fairly quickly. then it's a north—east, south—west split. it it will be fine
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and dry, the west will be wet and windy. the rain in northern ireland could be heavy at times. it will push into wales and the south—west of england during the afternoon. in the sunshine 21 degrees. things are dry at the oval for the one day international. we could see the rain arriving. the rain moving east across all of the country wednesday night into early hours of thursday. there will be misty and foggy patches to follow. is there will be one or two showers to the south—east later in the day on thursday. another decent looking day with a return to sunshine and temperatures between 15—20 degrees. a bit of rain around over the next 24—hours or so, but all in all things are looking mostly dry and settled over the next
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few days. george. thank you very much. that's all from the bbc news at six, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. bernie isjust two bernie is just two years old. she has autism caused by the epilepsy drug sodium valproate her mum took when she was pregnant. hello. this is bbc news, these our our latest headlines: jeremy corbyn says his shadow chancellor is right to point out that a labour government would need to be ready for all eventualities, including a run on the pound. if we're going to move into government we need to know what we're going to do, that's set out in our manifesto and we're putting a lot more detail into that, that's what this conference is about and that's what all the policy developments are about, but also look at all the scenarios that we might face. theresa may and the eu's donald tusk have been discussing brexit at downing street,
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and he says there's been no real progress in the negotiations. victims of the contaminated blood scandal of the 19705 and 19805, have won a court ruling, allowing them to seek damages. women whose children were harmed by the epilepsy drug, sodium valproate, have been giving evidence at a public hearing. they're calling for new warnings, about the medicine.

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