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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 27, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. making his pitch for prime minister. jeremy corbyn declares labour are on the threshold of power. in his closing speech at the party's conference in brighton later, mr corbyn will warn government ministers to pull themselves together or make way for labour. also this morning: good morning, it's wednesday the 27th of september. also this morning: fears for thousands of jobs in northern ireland as the aerospace firm bombardier loses a major trade dispute in the us. a new blood test for heart attacks. doctors say it could free up hospital beds and save the nhs millions of pounds each year. good morning. by the end of this week rule changes will mean we can
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produce as much sugar as we want in factories like these from sugar beet grown here in the uk. i'll be looking at what that means for prizes and the 10,000 odd people who work in the industry. in sport, ben stokes is expected to be named in the ashes squad this morning despite his arrest for suspected actual bodily harm after a night out in bristol. the new take that musical made its premiere last night. so who better to review it than the women who gave birth to the band 7 it was like travelling back about 20 yea rs it was like travelling back about 20 years now. i was thinking, i thought i'd put all that behind me, i've had therapy and a lot and it's just back ain! that was rob lee's, and! daschle robbie's mum —— rob lee's mum. a dull start with low cloud and patchy fog giving way to sunny spells —— rob lee's mum. a change, windy
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conditions and rain slowly edging in but some of that will be heavy. more in15 but some of that will be heavy. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. ready for government and on the threshold of power, that's whatjeremy corybn is expected to tell delegates later about the state of the labour party as their annual conference comes to an end. in early previews of his speech seen by the bbc, mr corbyn will take aim at the conservatives handling of brexit negotiations, calling on ministers to pull themselves together or make way. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. this is the government in waiting, 0k? is this britain's next prime minister? is this the country's next set of senior ministers? they clearly think so and they want you to believe it too. in his big speech today, the labour leader will say his party is on the threshold of power. the labour leadership spent this conference trying to show its a
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government in waiting. jeremy corbyn is clearly widely adored among party members, but if he really is to become the next prime minister, his big speech will need to appeal far beyond the conference hall to voters right across the country. what does jeremy corbyn need to do to appeal to voters beyond labour? he needs to continue doing what he's doing to inspire the members, of which there are over half a million now, to go out and do it on his behalf. are over half a million now, to go out and do it on his behalflj are over half a million now, to go out and do it on his behalf. i would say keep plugging away at the same message, it's come across really well in the country, we got 40% of the vote in the general election?” think germany has done a fantastic job of getting people not normally interested in politics interested in politics, especially young people, i think more of what is already doing will put us in a better position come the next general election. the party might be united in its desire to get into government but it's deeply divided on brexit and questions remain about how labour
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would pay for some of its big spending promises. jeremy corbyn will need to find the answers if he's to win over more voters. eleanor garnier, bbc news, brighton. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us now now from brighton. we've heard jeremy corbyn thinks his party are ready for government, what else might we hear today? good morning. ithink good morning. i think the tone is going to be overall optimistic and upbeat. most of the delegates here are going to be on his side but also it's going to be very much an attack on the government as well, something to rally the troops. he's going to denounce the example what he called brexit bungling. that might get more attention on his own brexit policies because as eleanor said, that's one of the issues on which labour is divided, those divisions at your 2a hours of the conference from the other policies they wanted to get across in brighton. they will attack the government i think in pretty stark terms when it comes to
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g re nfell tower, stark terms when it comes to grenfell tower, he will say that is a symbol of a degraded regime. he won't be mincing his words there. he wa nts to won't be mincing his words there. he wants to give the impression that as a party ay ay allegedly ready for government, and they can face the challenges of the future. he will be talking about the challenges of automation, could robots put us out ofajob? he automation, could robots put us out of a job? he will be trying to look forward to say labour can meet those challenges but with readiness for government comes greater scrutiny. i believe that's begun here but will get a lot more between now and the next election. atjust after 8am we'll be speaking to the shadow education secretary angela rayner about that big speech from jeremy corbyn. one of northern ireland's largest employers, the aerospace firm bombardier, faces paying huge tariffs on its exports to the us, after losing the first stage of an international trade dispute. the us department of commerce upheld a complaint by bombardier‘s rival, boeing, that the firm unfairly benefited from state aid. there are concerns it could putjobs under threat in belfast and beyond, as the bbc‘s business editor simonjack reports. jobs at northern ireland's biggest
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manufacturing employer are under threat as the us government agreed with boeing that bombardier used government subsidies to sell planes to delta airlines at less than it cost to make them. the next phase of the process is to examine the facts and to determine whether or not boeing has been harmed. now, we know that boeing didn't participate on the delta order, they abandoned that market years ago so it's hard to see how there could be any harm.“ upheld, sanctions could ultimately include heavy tariffs on planes sold in the us. that could jeopardise the future of a plant that makes a massive contribution to the northern irish economy. last year it paid £158 million in wages. it accounts for over 8% of all northern ireland's exports and it sources parts and services from 800 companies in the uk and ireland. the
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whole future of this plant here in belfast is designed around the success of a plane onto which these wings will be attached, so any threat to the c series plane programme is a direct threat, potentially thousands of jobs programme is a direct threat, potentially thousands ofjobs here in belfast. aerospacejobs are pressures and political. boeing's complaint has been cheered on by president trump. meanwhile theresa may relies on northern ireland mps for her slender commons majority, which helped push the top deck out the agenda on her recent trip to canada and the us. this isjust round one of this fight. a further ruling is due in february of next year but this preliminary victory for boeing will cast a shadow over international trade relations and northern ireland's biggest manufacturing plant. simon jack, northern ireland's biggest manufacturing plant. simonjack, bbc news, belfast. women in saudi arabia will soon be allowed to drive for the first time in the nation's history. long seen
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by rights activists as a symbol of repression of women, the move follows a long campaign for change. saudi arabia is the only country in the world where women are not allowed to drive, some have been jailed for defying the ban. measles have been eliminated in the uk for the first time, say global health leaders. the world health organization said elimination can be verified once a country has sustained interruption of endemic transmission for at least 36 months. the uk nearly achieved this in the 19905 but the mmr scandal saw vaccination rates plunge. health officials said rates have now reached the recommended 95% coverage level in five—year—olds. a blood test that could diagnose heart attacks within 20 minutes could be rolled out on the nhs within five years. the test builds on an existing procedure that looks for protein in the blood, a strong indicator a heart attack has taken place. researchers say it could save the health service millions of pounds and free up thousands of beds. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. spotting a major heart attack is relatively straightforward. an electrocardiogram, or ecg,
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can detect unusual electrical activity in the heart. but telling the difference between a smaller heart attack, which can also prove fatal, and simple chest pain is sometimes trickier. currently, doctors carry out a blood test for a protein called troponin, which is released if the heart is damaged. a busy accident and emergency department may carry out more than 7,000 of these tests each year. as many as two thirds of patients admitted with chest pain turn out not to have suffered a heart attack, but researchers say up to 85% of people stay in hospital while further tests are carried out to rule out a heart attack. now a new test designed to detect a different protein, called cardiac myosin—binding protein c, delivers faster, more accurate results with benefits for patients and for hospitals. it might allow the accident and emergency doctors to rule out a heart attack, and be able to send more patients home who are actually
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not having a heart attack, without exposing them to unnecessary treatments, and perhaps further invasive tests. researchers say this new, more accurate test could save money and free up scarce hospital beds. but more work is needed before this new technique replaces existing treatments, so it will be some years before we see it in our hospitals. dominic hughes, bbc news. the taxi company uber is appealing a ruling that its drivers are workers, not self—employed, and are therefore entitled to a range of benefits, including paid holidays and the national minimum wage. it comes less than a week after the firm was told its london licence will not be renewed for failing to report serious criminal offences and carry out background checks on drivers. the case being heard today is being seen as critical to the rights of people working in the so called gig economy. our legal affairs correspondent
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clive coleman reports. last year, uber driverjames farrah won a landmark legal case when an employment tribunal ruled he was a worker and not, as uber had argued, running his own business.” worker and not, as uber had argued, running his own business. i don't control the fair. if i take a different route other than the one i've been given i will be penalised. 0n performers managed through a rating system, if i hit jr j; i'm out on a job. the ruling threatens to hit the operating costs of companies like private hire and delivery firms using people who work on demand and uber has appealed it, claiming it was wrong in law. with over1 million people now working in the so—called gig economy, the uber appeal is seen as critical in determining whether they're classified as owning their own small
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business or as workers who are entitled to rights such as the national medal wage and paid holidays. but uber is adamant its drivers are independent contractors and not workers. drivers tell us overwhelmingly they want to be independent contractors. we did a recent poll of all uber drivers and 80% bus they would rather be an independent contractor than a worker. word james jo farrar independent contractor than a worker. word jamesjo farrar no longer drives for uber but he's eagerly awaiting the outcome of the day's appeal, which should make the rights of those working in the gig economy a lot clearer. clive coleman, bbc news. doctors have removed a tiny toy traffic cone from a patient‘s lung a0 years after he accidentally inhaled it. the 47—year—old man had been suffering from a cough for a year and medics suspected he had a tumour. but luckily it wasn't that sinister instead it was his long—lost playmobil traffic cone he received on his seventh birthday. how can you inhale a cone like that?
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it is quite... swallowing i can see, maybe you put it in your mouth but in hailing it! apparently it embedded itself in his lung and his lung wrapped around it and incorporated it into his body. good to see the original cone as well. nice to see that, a nice memento! we are talking about and lots of the papers are talking about ben stokes, england all—rounder, widely regarded asa england all—rounder, widely regarded
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as a contenderfor the england all—rounder, widely regarded as a contender for the title of best england all—rounder ever but he seems increasingly to be getting into trouble off the pitch and he's been arrested in bristol after a fracas outside a bristol might club after england beat the west indies over the weekend. his vice captain, will he be sacked? —— he is. he's facing charges of actual bodily harm after a man has facial injuries. interestingly the ashes squad for the christmas tour of australia is announced later this morning. you would expect him to go, but, if he can't control himself in england, how is he going to cope with all the goading and pressure of an ashes tourin goading and pressure of an ashes tour in australia? england's ashes squad will be named at ten o'clock this morning and ben stokes is expected to be included, despite being arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. stokes was involved in an incident in bristol the early hours of monday morning, following the one—day side's win over west indies. harry kane said it was "a very proud night", as he scored a hat trick at cypriot side apoel nicosia to make it two wins in two for spurs
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in the champions league, that's 11 goals for kane so far this month. manchester city also won against shakhtar donetsk. but it was a frustrating evening's work for liverpool, who were held to a 1—1 draw at spartak moscow. coutinho scored their only goal to leave them with only two points from their first two group games. and six time olympic champion jason kenny has revealed he secretly retired after rio 2016, but has now reversed the decision. he says taking a year off and becoming a father has breathed new life into him. he now aims to overtake sir chris hoy and win a seventh olympic gold in toyko in 2020. it's funny, for most people having a baby doesn't breathe new life into them. but forjason kenny it has worked and he will carry on until the next 0lympics. he is different. that's probably an
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understatement! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. this morning it is breezy, or windy, depending on where you are. there's low cloud around and fog, especially in the east and the south—east of the country. for many of us today it will be largely dry. some of us already have rain and some will have rain later as we go through the day or indeed through the course of the night. this morning we've got this low cloud around. the patchy mist and fog. it will slowly the morning, some of it not until lunchtime will stop in central and eastern parts it will brighten up. in south—west england, wales and northern ireland with the rain coming in where it sets you will have it for the day and it will be windy around it, which will press the temperature. looking at scotland at apm, a lot of dry weather. the rain coming in across the island beaut and across
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other areas. the northern england we have a dry afternoon with sunny spells developing, as we have in the midlands, east anglia. london getting up to about 21 celsius. further west towards the isle of wight with the sunny spells, but the dorset we have showers ahead of the rain you can see coming in across south—west england and also across parts of wales and northern ireland. some of this rain will be heavy and it will be windy around it as well. asa it will be windy around it as well. as a result it will feel chilly. northern ireland has highs of 15— 16. 0vernight the same set of rain will accelerate as it pushes north—eastwards, crossing the rest of the uk through the night. a lot of the uk through the night. a lot of low cloud and hill fog within it. behind it we have patchy mist and fog. it won't be especially cold in prospect either. so tomorrow morning we start off with a weather front
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still in some eastern areas, still producing a lot of cloud and drizzle. it will clear most of the country, however will linger longest in the far north—east of scotland, where we have wet and windy conditions for much of the day. it will be a fine and beautiful day for most of us, with some pleasant and warm sunshine. in the light breezes it will feel rather nice. later in the day the cloud thickens in northern ireland, heralding the arrival of the next weather front, which will do the same and bring wet and windy weather from the west, crossing eastwards as we go through the day. so by the time we get to friday we are looking at temperatures up to around about 19 celsius. so over the next couple of days we have rain on the cards. depending on where you are you will either get it through the day or through the night. thanks very much. it does look rather dramatic down there. but have a look at the papers. the front pages first. we've got the telegraph.
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the front—page talks about ben stokes and his arrest and also jeremy corbyn, who will make his speech later. they picked up on this idea of robots and talking about whether or not automation is a threat to workers. the front—page the daily mail. also aboutjeremy the front—page the daily mail. also about jeremy corbyn's speech. the front—page the daily mail. also aboutjeremy corbyn's speech. this is the headline. they sayjeremy corbyn was forced to deny that labour had become the new nasty party. virtually every paper has a different line from that speech. this is something else that is being talked about. jeremy corbyn to talk today about the growing row regarding anti—semitism. and they are of course preparing for a run on the pound. there could be a bill of £59 billion for retired eu officials. and the tributes continue on the front page of the mirror for liz
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dawn. that's on the front of the express as well. shape up orship express as well. shape up or ship out, that's what jeremy corbyn will apparently say to the conservatives later today. this isa the conservatives later today. this is a director of the young vic in london. as you said, lots of the papers about ben stokes. in the telegraph there's a piece about the former english captain, giving him some measured advice, saying, look, it's all well and good being good on the pitch but you have to take control of what you are doing off the pitch. if anyone is going to your career it will be used. this is in australia he will be goaded from the moment he arrives. it will have to stay and read books if he is picked to play in the ashes. did you say read books? yes, what a wonderful idea! this is a 16—year—old british guy, a golfer,
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who has been named after tiger woods. he is called robin tiger williams. his father to that name because it was the year tiger won all four and majors in a row. he said he also could have been named after sachin tendulkar because that's his dad's other hero. he will be playing at the british masters later on this month. 0ne later on this month. one to look out for? yet he says he will win the open by 2020. did you know there is a journal which is all about... it's a medical journal, called pain, and it is about placebos. done more work on whether they work. a test that lots of people and one of the tests they did is psychologists found people can hold their arms against a searing hot rod for a long time, if they apply a cream that they know to
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be fake. so an analgesic cream. so it is marked up as fake cream, they put it on and then they can hold their arms there longer with the knowledge that it doesn't make a difference. so placebos work even if you know they won't work. who signs up to have their arm held toa who signs up to have their arm held to a searing hot rod? i don't know! it's a row that has rumbled on for years but will finally be decided by the government this week — who should foot the huge bill for the back pay owed to carers who did not receive the minimum wage for looking after patients overnight? it's likely the total will run into hundreds of millions of pounds, and care providers say if they are forced to pay, many care homes and agencies will go bankrupt, as tim muffett reports. and then we sit down and hear all of the news... this woman requires co nsta nt the news... this woman requires constant care day and night. she has
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a learning disability and is partially sighted. if you don't do the shopping you won't have any food! she is set for life because of the excellent care she has now. her mother died five years ago. today she is visiting her dad in south wales, close to the small care home where she lives. she seems quite well at night but sometimes she wa kes. well at night but sometimes she wakes. she can't turn herself over the she needs two carers to turn her over. the 24—hour care is fundamental to ensure that she is safe and for her care and well—being. safe and for her care and well-being. come on. but he fears his daughter's care home might have to close. like many it could face a huge bill. when the minimum wage was introduced in 1999, any overnight ca re rs we re introduced in 1999, any overnight carers were exempt. the view was that although they were on call at night shift might include a few hours sleep, so employers could pay
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them a lower rate. but following a court ruling, employers can no longer pay as flat overnight fee on a typically around £30. instead overnight carers must now received a national living wage, a minimum of £7.50 for those care providers. some say the ramifications are huge. the bill for that pay across the sector for learning disabilities would be something like £400 million if it had to be paid. and in that case a large number of providers, some of them charities, would simply go out of business. do you accept that that needs to happen? carers themselves needs to happen? carers themselves need to be paid this minimum wage? absolutely. we are fully supportive of the payment of the national minimum wage, but this is a problem that the government is making. minimum wage, but this is a problem that the government is makingm minimum wage, but this is a problem that the government is making. it is not affordable for the sector. it is thought more than 170,000 people rely on overnight carers in the uk.
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some like andrew will do the job but will still be entitled to back payments. i want the truth to come out about how they have been paying us, or should i say not paying us. of course i want the money. they have caused myself and i'm sure other carers right across the uk extreme hardship. i've had to go without food for days to get me to the end of the month. my employer was well aware of this and didn't appear to have any concerns that when i was caring for another human being. the department of health said ina being. the department of health said in a statement that it is working closely with representatives in the social care sector to try and minimise any impact on provision. it said it hopes to provide further clarity in the coming days. it is a uk wide issue, although in scotland less backpay is due because overnight carer wages were topped up
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in 2015. i can't even consider what the consequences would be for my daughter and indeed for many thousands like her if the government was not the resource this. it is crucial. that's a very interesting case. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: sean's asking if the lifting of eu restrictions on sugar beet production could prove to be sweet news for shoppers here in the uk. it is really very interesting. how much we make in the uk. factories like this one in the east midlands are making tons of sugar every year. but it's not from sugarcane, that we are used to seeing, it's from sugarbeet that's grown. piles of this stuff is being delivered this morning. let me grab one. we've got pretty good conditions in the uk. nice and damper. it is a route that
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is grown here and we turn that into sugar that you might have a spoonful of in your tea in the morning. but by the end of this week it will be a free for all. there are currently restrictions on how much of this stuff we can grow and everyone around the eu can grow and what niceties. but come saturday that will be out the window. what will happen to price if we make loads of it? it may go down. that's what we will look at. prices for customers, workers, the people who make it. before that, time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a bbc london investigation has found the grenfell tower tragedy has led to nationwide demand for sprinkler systems, which is outstripping supply. 30 companies spoken to by researchers say they've seen a surge in enquiries and nine have a waiting list of up to two months. a fire safety expert, who was once contracted
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by kensington and chelsea council to work on grenfell tower, has said sprinklers would have stopped the blaze spreading. no one has ever died in a fire with a sprinkler system in a household, soi a sprinkler system in a household, so i think the proof is in the pudding really. iwould have so i think the proof is in the pudding really. i would have liked to have said that they would have survived. the wife of lord lucan has been found dead at her home in westminster. lady lucan, whose husband went missing following the murder of the family nanny more than four decades ago, was 80—years—old. her death is not being treated as suspicious. the extent of homelessness in the capital is far greater than those we know are sleeping rough, according to a new report by the london assembly. it found that as many as 12,500 are hidden homeless, squatting or sleeping on public transport at night. that's 13 times as many as those who are visibly homeless.
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let's have a look at the travel situation now. it's all looking good on the tube so far, apart from those ongoing works on the 0verground. it's closed between gospel oak and barking. now because of the foggy conditions, that could slow things down on the roads, but it also means there's no woolwich ferry. this is how it looks at the south terminal. and in acton, bollo bridge road is still shut for repairs to a burst water main. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another mild, murky and misty start of the day. widespread mist and a couple of fog patches, but similar to yesterday it will brighten up a little later. the breeze perhaps little bit stronger than yesterday, so that will help the midst lift perhaps a little faster. it won't linger as long. by the skies and sunny spells. hazy sunshine. temperatures warm, 21 celsius by the afternoon. 0vernight we have the change. the cold front brings heavy and persistent rain for
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a time. clearing by dawn, but in its wa ke a time. clearing by dawn, but in its wake again some rather dense mist and fog. a mild night as well. 15— 16 in towns and cities. so a misty, murky and faulty start tomorrow morning. it will lift the brighter skies, turning out to be a decent day. a touch fresher with a south—westerly breeze. the maximum is still warm at 20 celsius. the state—owned out 0k and on friday another cold front sweeps through again. a band of rain covering all parts at some point on friday. clearing away, leaving a brighter day the saturday, had to be drier. a couple of showers around and more rain and a bit of a breeze building as we head into sunday. there's more from us in half an hour. plenty more too on our website at the usual address or on bbc radio london. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning:
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as he attempts to become the first solo person to cross antarctica, ben saunders will be here to tell us how he's making the trip in memory of his friend, who died just three days before the finish line. we'll be joining strictlyjudge darcey bussell as she puts an exercise class through their paces and tries to get us all moving about more. and after 9am, war and peace actress tuppence middleton will tell us about her latest role in sci—fi drama the commuter. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. jeremy corbyn will close the labour conference in brighton this lunchtime by telling delegates that the party is on the threshold of power and is ready for government. he will say labour's performance injune's general election put the tories on notice, adding that the government's handling of the brexit negotiations are not in the national interest. thousands ofjobs could be under threat in northern ireland and beyond after the aerospace firm bombardier lost the first stage
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of an international trade dispute. the us department of commerce upheld a complaint by bombardier‘s rival, boeing, that the firm unfairly benefited from state aid. bombardier says the case is far from over. women in saudi arabia will soon be allowed to drive for the first time in the nation's history. long seen by rights activists as a symbol of the country's repression of women, the move follows a long campaign for change. saudi arabia is the only country in the world where women are not allowed to drive, some have been jailed for defying the ban. the taxi company uber is appealing a ruling that its drivers are workers, not self—employed, and are therefore entitled to a range of benefits including paid holidays and the national minimum wage. it comes less than a week after the firm was told its london licence will not be renewed for failing to report serious criminal offences and carry out background checks on drivers. the case being heard today is being seen as critical to the rights of people working in the so—called gig economy. uber argued that it was a technology
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firm, not a transport business, and that its drivers were self—employed contractors. we'll talk to one of those drivers a bit later. a new blood test that speeds up the diagnosis of heart attacks could save the nhs millions of pounds each year, according to researchers. a team from king's college london says the test could free up hospital beds if it was rolled out nationally. about two thirds of those who go to a&e with chest pains have not had a heart attack. kat has all the sport. starting with ben stokes, who is in the papers after appearing to have been involved in an incident outside a nightclub in bristol after england beat the west indies over the weekend. the england and wales cricket board has insisted the men's squad for the winter ashes tour to australia will be picked on form and fitness following ben stokes's arrest on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm.
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stokes is expected to be included when the squad is announced later this morning. he was involved in an incident in a bristol night club after helping the one day side to victory against west indies on sunday. the all—rounder has been dropped though for this afternoon's one dayer at the oval. 0ne one thing as a group we are very strong at is sticking together as a side and working together as a team. certainly in the past the best thing we've been able to do is to focus on our cricket and i think this insta nce our cricket and i think this instance is no different. there is a little bit of distraction outside the team and there's the potential to affect the game tomorrow, but not letting that happen is probably something that we can strive to do. the lancashire spinner sophie ecclestone has been named in the england women's squad for their ashes starting next month. she replaces beth langston in the only change to the 15 that won the world cup this summer. it'll be the first time that captain heather knight has led her side into an ashes series. it's a tough place to tour in terms
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of every aussie sort of reminds you that the whole country's against you and it's a hot place to play but it's also a brilliant place to play. it's a really brilliant place to play cricket and will encourage the girls to impose the tour and the challenges that come with it. harry kane said it was a very proud night as his hat trick against cyriot side apoel nicosia made it two wins in two for tottenham in the champions league. after failing to score throughout august, kane has more than made up for it this month, netting 11 goals so far, five of them for spurs in europe. yeah, something i'm very proud of, you know? to score a hat—trick in any game let alone the champions league is amazing, so i'm very proud of that and proud to get the three points as well and we'll go into the next game full of confidence. liverpool managerjurgen klopp said his side needed to be more clinical, after they could only draw 1—1 at spartak moscow. liverpool were the better side but went behind, before filip coutinho equalised. that's two draws from their first two games. it was a very intense game and i was
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happy because for me it's not about the names, it's really about how we can perform and in a lot of moments we performed as good as possible and ina lot we performed as good as possible and in a lot of moments not. we have to keep on working, that's how it is. kevin de bruyne scored a terrific goal for manchester city in their 2—0 win at home to shakhtar donetsk, that leaves them on maxiumum points. tonight chelsea, manchester united and celtic are all in action. cardiff city have replaced leeds at the top of the championship after beating them 3—1. kenneth zohore scored twice for cardiff. leeds had captain liam cooper sent off. he was ready to settle at six 0lympic golds but british track cyclist jason kenny says he's changed his mind about retiring. he revealed he'd secretly decided to call it a day after rio,
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but he said a year off and becoming a father had breathed new life into him and he now intends to compete at tokyo 2020 and try to overtake sir chris hoy by winning a seventh 0lympic title. i slowly changed over time. like i say, i thought it was natured, i was just getting older, you know? looking back i think i was co nsta ntly looking back i think i was constantly flattened by training and it's not until you relax and spring back to your natural state, i feel like i'm about 18 now, although i do click a bit more these days. he is so understated, of all the people that would secretly retire you would say it is jason kenney. good to see him sticking around. bit of rest goes a long way. rest with a newborn baby, he's doing very well! we will be talking about rest later, we will be talking about sleep. we think about it from the moment we get into work to the
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moment we get into work to the moment we get into work to the moment we leave! we will talk about what happens to our bodies when we sleep. it can be a cure all for so many things as well! don't tell me! asking for a straw in your drink might seem like an innocent enough request, but from this week it might be met with a frown in wetherspoon's pubs across the uk. after staff raised concerns about the amount of straws going in the bin, it will stop putting them in drinks unless requested, and from next year it will replace plastic straws with paper ones. each yearjd wetherspoon hands out 70 million plastic straws. most are used once but they can take hundreds of years to decompose. that's why it is banning them in its 900 pubs across the uk. plastic straws are one of the most common items of rubbish found on beaches around the world. last year, over 400,000 were found in just one day. making a significant contribution to the eight million tons of plastic making its way into the sea each year. gareth jones is from emerge recycling, hejoins us now. good morning. it sounds like an
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innocent and nothing to have a straw in yourdrink but innocent and nothing to have a straw in your drink but does it have a really serious impact? from a business perspective it generates a lot of waste. you see the figures there, they're pretty mind—boggling, they don't seem like a lot but it certainly stacks up when you look across the whole of the uk. seems like a producible answer, you have paper ones? is that... is it as simple as that, is that a good thing? that is an option. there are companies out there who are looking to deal with things like plant cellulose, so straws that will break down in the environment a lot quicker. the current plastic straw‘s problem is it can take up to 500 yea rs problem is it can take up to 500 years to break down. we're watching pictures of a recycling centre here andi pictures of a recycling centre here and i understand they are particularly difficult to recycle. do you know the reasons why? u nfortu nately do you know the reasons why? unfortunately only about a third of
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the plastic in the uk is recycled, the plastic in the uk is recycled, the rest of it ends up going to landfill. it's mainly because people don't sort segregate properly so it ends up home in gold with a lot of other things and then these picking stations or factories that try to ta ke stations or factories that try to take the material out of the mainstream can't do it. —— co—mingled. so it ends up in landfill unfortunately. plastic is a habit, we are in the habit of having it, a plastic straw in a drink, one of those things that takes a while for people to get used to the idea of not having one. it is like plastic bags. we all got used to having plastic bags given to us willy—nilly. i think the same with straws. if you want one, ask for one, if you don't then it is one less thing to put in the bin at the end of the day. this is the one pub chain, others have done it, but would you like to see this rolled out nationwide, would it make a difference? if everyone in the uk did their bit towards the waste
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management problem then we would make substantial strides. we are doing quite well, but, like i said, with only a third of the plastic in the uk that we use being recycled, that's an awful lot of plastic going into landfill. so it's going to come back and bite us eventually.” remember all straws were paper when i was little, plastic ones didn't exist, they really didn't. i was thinking about it then, all straws we re thinking about it then, all straws were paper. plastic obviously took over com pletely were paper. plastic obviously took over completely because presumably it was cheaper or easier? there's been a boom in products recently where it's easier to make stuff out of plastic so production has caught up of plastic so production has caught up with us really. thank you very much indeed, gareth jones up with us really. thank you very much indeed, garethjones from emerge recycling. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: jeremy corbyn will close
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the labour party conference in brighton later by telling delegates they're on the jeremy corbyn will close the labour party conference in brighton later by telling delegates they're on the "threshold of power". bombardier, one of northern ireland's largest employers, faces paying huge tariffs on its exports to the us, after losing the first stage of an international trade dispute. let's have a look at the weather with carol on the balcony. it is much darker in the mornings at the moment. absolutely. in the summer when i go to work it is daylight, in the autumn, much darker. you can see behind me there's a lot of cloud. this morning there's a bit of low cloud around and patchy fog and some mist, that will lift and for most of us mist, that will lift and for most of us it will be a largely dry day. already we have some rain starting to show its hand coming into the west of northern ireland and south—west england. that rain will continue to go slowly east through
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the day. song of us won't see it in the day. song of us won't see it in the later tonight. this morning all the later tonight. this morning all the low cloud, mist and fog will slowly lift, some of it will take its time, maybe until mid—morning or lunchtime but it will lift in central and eastern areas and we will see sunny spells developing. in the west we have the rain continuing to come across south—west england, wales and northern ireland and when you got it you'll have it for the day. in scotland we will see some of the rain getting in across argyll, bute, dumfries and galloway but for most of scotland it will be dry and fine. the same in northern england, dry and fine with sunny spells and that prevails across the midlands, the south—east and east anglia with highs today of 21 in london when the sun comes out. drifting towards the west, there will be some showers in dorset for example ahead of the band of rain but you can see where the rain is in south—west england, through wales and into northern ireland and some of that will be heavy and it will peg back the
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temperature is a touch. in belfast, our top temperature today will be 15. -- our top temperature today will be 15. —— temperatures. through the evening and overnight the band of rain accelerates as it continues to move rain accelerates as it continues to m ove a cross rain accelerates as it continues to move across the rest of the uk. still some heavy bursts in it and windy around it. behind it we start to see a clearing so we could see some patchy mist and fog forming. but it's not going to be a cold night, most staying in double figures. tomorrow we start with the re m na nts of figures. tomorrow we start with the remnants of the weather front across eastern areas producing some cloud and drizzle. the rain continuing across the northern isles for much of the day and here it will be windy too. high pressure then builds across us, so a fine day across most of the uk away from the northern isles with sunny skies and highs of 19 or20. isles with sunny skies and highs of 19 or 20. later in the day once again another weather front starts to show its hand across the west, so we'll see some more rain coming in and that rain during friday will move from west to east. quite blustery around it as well and our
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temperature range by then up to 19 celsius. 0ver temperature range by then up to 19 celsius. over the next few days, the weather is certainly changeable. at times, dry with sunshine and feeling pleasa nt times, dry with sunshine and feeling pleasant with temperatures above average with the sunshine but at other times we will see some rain as well. thanks very much, the sunrise now looks rather lovely. at the end of this week restrictions on sugar produced across the eu will be lifted. we've sent sean to newark to find out if it means a sugar rush for the industry here. iam thinking i am thinking that's a sugarbeet? this is! grown in the uk. this has all of the stalks still on. this is what we are talking about, because this is where the rules are changing. when you look in a factory like this, the british sugar factory in east midlands, they are making lots of sugar out of beets like that. but we consume loads of sugar,
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2 million tons every year. when you compare that to 2008, similar levels. but where is the sugar coming from? 60% is from beets grown in the uk. not anywhere else. the rest of the 15% is from the eu, beets grown around the eu, and those rules are changing, meaning it will bea rules are changing, meaning it will be a free for all. the other 25% is sugarcane, the bamboo staff. that's what is important and another thing. at this morning we are talking about aqua three. when we are talking about sugarbeet is —— talking about beets. previously there were restrictions on where they could be grown. that's going to change. a big change on saturday for the industry. you make sugar out of sugarbeet is. from saturday, make as much as you want. what's the big difference for you? the big difference is we can
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sell what we make. two years ago we had a big crop and i wasn't allowed to sell 400,000 tons of sugar. customers wanted to buy from me, we have a great product and our efficient but i wasn't allowed to sell it because of eu rules. we have two story for two years. now we've had fantastic weather and a good crop and i can now sell that to the uk, europe and the world market. the we've become an exporter and we can grow. we've got carlos as well with us grow. we've got carlos as well with us this morning. you keep an eye on the prices of a lot of things, including sugar. sugarbeet growers in the uk will have to get used to prices changing quite a lot, if all ofa prices changing quite a lot, if all of a sudden people can grow and sell as much as they can. the sugar policy has quite a few elements. 0ne was importing restrictions and win prizes. with the policy change, the quotas are going to go away. so on the bright side they can produce as
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much as they want, however they may suffer a bit of volatility from now on. and are the rest of the eu opt for this? do they see this as an opportunity to get into a market that maybe written is good at? yes, tasers like france, germany, the netherlands, they are all increasing production —— places like. netherlands, they are all increasing production -- places like. what is it? i'm just trying to grab one of these. what is it about a beets like this that britain... we employ nearly 10,000 people in this industry. how do you turn this into sugar? we have done fantastic work with ourfarmers. we have some sugar? we have done fantastic work with our farmers. we have some of the highest yields. for every acre we make more than canefields in brazil. the farmers are very good. we've got good factories and have invested over £2 million in five yea rs. invested over £2 million in five years. it is far more than sugar. we wash the sword aloft and we sell it to landscapers, so we landscaped
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0lympic park from soil from this beats and we generate electricity, enough to power a city the size of peter brock. we also generate ethanol from sugar —— peterborough. we have a big pilot sugar here. when a similarthing we have a big pilot sugar here. when a similar thing happened to milk a few years ago, the milk industry in the european union could then make as much as it wanted and so the price of milk fell and many farmers went out of business. is there a risk of that happening? our farmers have a choice of what to grow. we can have a choice of what to grow. we ca n flex have a choice of what to grow. we can flex up and down much more than dairy. we prepared for this for the past few decades. we've invested in efficiency and we are now one of the most efficient producers in the world, so we are able to compete. i think that's different from what happened in the dairy sector, so we've learnt a lot of lessons. before we go, for consumers, good we see a price change? it will be more
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volatile, that's the shore. whether customers will benefit or not, i think they probably will. the prices will probably lower. but for consumers the price of sugar is only very cheap, we are talking a few. thank you very much. that is interesting. 0nly thank you very much. that is interesting. only a few pennies' change when it comes to sugar, but volatility will be the difference. we might see sugar prices over the yea rs we might see sugar prices over the years ahead changing more than we are used to, with this new rules. there is so much i have learnt in those interviews. i want to know whether the sugar from sugar beet tastes a ny whether the sugar from sugar beet tastes any different. no. next? that's brilliant. i wanted you to ask the experts, but never mind. have you done a taste test? i'm all over the! great, thanks. that's put me in my place... he knows the answer and it's no.
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lovely working with you! who do you rely on for an honest appraisalfor what you who do you rely on for an honest appraisal for what you do? sean or your appraisal for what you do? sean oryourmum? it is always nerve racking when the critics get a look at your new show. take that had five extra special guests to impress at the launch of their latest musical last night — their mums! 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson was there to meet up with gary, mark and howard from the band, but he couldn't resist getting the verdict from their number one fans. take that onstage for a special encore at the first night of the band. —— the press night. you've gotta be strong enough to walk on through the night... the musical uses take that's songs. five
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members of the boy band in the show we re members of the boy band in the show were chosen on bbc 0ne's let it shine. take that are the musical‘s coproducers so they arrived for the big night nice and early. you guys famously saying these songs. how does it feel to watch five guys at the start of their career singing your songs? brilliant. really lovely. in fact, the whole cast, with the working with these guys for a couple of years, so that all become family. it's a bit weird because web showtime is 7:30pm and you get the guys five minutes before showtime and we pop out the popcorn and go and sit in chairs. we feel a bit redundant! on the red carpet, the hosts of let it shine. said he was never boy band material.” the hosts of let it shine. said he was never boy band material. i can't sing or dance. i would never have attempted that. you never fancied
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auditioning for boyzone? no, no one wa nted auditioning for boyzone? no, no one wanted to do that! how proud are you of ta ke wanted to do that! how proud are you of take that? it is over 20 years, i can't believe it! it's a celebration of female sand and, showing the relationship between a few women over many yea rs. relationship between a few women over many years. the music is a soundtrack to their lives. they simply sing take that's songs. it went down very well with the audience. those ladies me are the five take that mums. they were never exact the going to give the most object you've review but agreed to speak to us afterwards. i am marge, gary's mum. i am mary. i am jan. i am jenny, jason's mother.” gary's mum. i am mary. i am jan. i am jenny, jason's mother. i am kathleen.
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how was that for you? like a travelling back about 20 years. i am thinking, i thought i put all of that behind me. i've done all of my therapy. i was back again. amazing how they all gelled. they were so good. really good. iwas how they all gelled. they were so good. really good. i was thinking, but my goodness me!” good. really good. i was thinking, but my goodness me! i am blown away by it. i've seen it quite a few times now and itjust gets better. you wish they were back together, as a band it was so touching. you wish they were back together, as a band. it was so touching. the band tours the uk right through until next summer, although it could have some unexpected condition. there are five mums and who knows? we might go on the road ourselves, you never know! well, there you go. i love seeing the mums. maybe they'll do their own thing!
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that the tantalising prospect. we will be talking about sleep later. we do talk about it quite a lot on this programme. we are talking to an expert who has been looking into sleep and he can tell us really how important it is because when we are sleeping our brains are healing as in lots of different ways. the theory is it's a fantastic tool for many things. so sleep that and you will be better. it sounds logical, but a lot of people struggle with this. if you have stories related to your sleep patterns, let us note this morning. still to come this morning: we will speak to the novel which was on the author's mind for 30 years, based on the week when neville chamberlain met adolf hitler in a bid to avert world war two. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london
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news, i'm sonja jessup. a bbc london investigation has found the grenfell tower tragedy has led to nationwide demand for sprinkler systems, which is outstripping supply. 30 companies spoken to by researchers say they've seen a surge in enquiries and nine have a waiting list of up to two months. a fire safety expert, who was once contracted by kensington and chelsea council to work on grenfell tower, has said sprinklers would have stopped the blaze spreading. no one has ever died in a fire with a sprinkler system in a household, so i think the proof is in the pudding really. i would have liked to have said that they would have survived. the wife of lord lucan has been found dead at her home in westminster. lady lucan, whose husband went missing following the murder of the family nanny more than four decades ago, was 80—years—old.
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her death is not being treated as suspicious. the extent of homelessness in the capital is far greater than those we know are sleeping rough, according to a new report by the london assembly. it found that as many as 12,500 are hidden homeless, squatting or sleeping on public transport at night. that's 13 times as many as those who are visibly homeless. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it's all looking good on the tube so far, apart from those ongoing works on the 0verground. it's closed between gospel oak and barking. now, because of the foggy conditions, city airport has some cancellations this morning. best to check before you travel. the fog could also slow things down on the roads. there's no woolwich ferry. this is how it looks at the south terminal. and in acton, bollo bridge road is still shut for repairs to a burst water main. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another mild, murky and misty start to the day.
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widespread mist and one or two fog patches, but similar to yesterday will brighten up a little later. the breeze perhaps a little bit stronger than yesterday, so that will help the mist lift perhaps a little faster. it won't linger as long. brighter skies and sunny spells. hazy sunshine. temperatures again warm, 21 celsius by the afternoon. 0vernight tonight we see the change. a cold front sweeps across us, brings heavy and persistent rain for a time. clearing by dawn, but in its wake again some rather dense mist and fog. a mild night as well. 15—16 celsius in towns and cities. so a misty, murky and foggy start again tomorrow morning. but it will lift to brighter skies, turning out to be a decent day. a touch fresher with a south—westerly breeze. the maximum is still warm at 20 celsius. so thursday turns out 0k and on friday another cold front sweeps through again. a band of rain covering all parts
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at some point on friday. clearing away, leaving a brighter day for saturday, perhaps a bit drier. a couple of showers around and more rain and a bit of a breeze building as we head into sunday. there's more from us in half an hour. plenty more too on our website. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. making his pitch for prime minister. jeremy corbyn declares labour are on the threshold of power. in his closing speech at the party's
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conference in brighton later, mr corbyn will warn government ministers to pull themselves together or make way for labour. good morning, it's wednesday the 27th of september. also this morning: fears for thousands of jobs in northern ireland as the aerospace firm bombardier loses a major trade dispute in the us. a new blood test for heart attacks. doctors say it could free up hospital beds and save the nhs millions of pounds each year. good morning. by the end of this week rule changes will mean we can produce as much sugar as we want from all the millions of beats we grow in the uk. i will look at what
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that means for prices and the 10,000 or so workers in the industry. in sport, ben stokes is expected to be named in the ashes squad this morning despite his arrest for suspected actual bodily harm after a night out in bristol. the new take that musical made its premiere last night. so who better to review it than the women who gave birth to the band ? it was like travelling back about 20 years now. i was thinking, i thought i'd put all that behind me, i'd had me therapy and the lot and it's just back again! and carol has the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london. today in central, eastern and northern areas a dull start, a lot of low cloud, mist and fog, that will give way to sunny spells. in the west we have rain coming in and when it comes in it will set in for much of the day and it will also be windy. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. ready for government and on the threshold of power, that's whatjeremy corybn is expected to tell delegates later about the state of the labour party
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as their annual conference comes to an end. in early previews of his speech seen by the bbc, mr corbyn will take aim at the conservatives handling of brexit negotiations, calling on ministers to pull themselves together or make way. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. this is the government in waiting, 0k? is this britain's next prime minister? is this the country's next set of senior ministers? they clearly think so and they want you to believe it too. in his big speech today, the labour leader will say his party is on the threshold of power. the labour leadership spent this conference trying to show its a government in waiting. jeremy corbyn is clearly widely adored among party members, but if he really is to become the next prime minister, his big speech will need to appeal far beyond the conference hall to voters right across the country. what doesjeremy corbyn need to do to appeal to voters beyond labour? he needs to continue doing what he's
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doing to inspire the members, of which there are over half a million now, to go out and do it on his behalf. i would say keep plugging away at the same message, it's come across really well in the country, we got 40% of the vote in the general election. i thinkjeremy's already done a fantasticjob of getting people not normally interested in politics actually interested in politics, especially young people, i think more of what is already doing will put us in a better position come the next general election. the party might be united in its desire to get into government but it's deeply divided on brexit and questions remain about how labour would pay for some of its big spending promises. jeremy corbyn will need to find the answers if he's to win over more voters. eleanor garnier, bbc news, brighton. 0ur political correspondent iain watsonjoins us now from brighton. 0verlooking
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overlooking the beach. good morning. tell us, feels like there's a sense of euphoria if you like within the room, which makes the speech today all the more important in terms of who he is speaking to, those already supporting him or whether the message is going further afield.” think that's interesting actually, charlie, because as you say, there will be euphoria in the room. largely labour has been united this week and certainly after facing two previously bishop contestsjeremy corbyn now feels firmly in charge of his own party —— previous leadership. he will play to his own audience, saying the things they wa nt to audience, saying the things they want to hear, lifting the public sector pay cap with some harsh attacks on the conservatives. he will denounce their brexit bungling, even though that was the most of i see the issue for labour in brighton over whether britain should remain inside the single market —— most divisive. tough language when it comes to grenfell tower, talking
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about that being a symbol of a degraded regime. a strong attack on theresa may. what he will also try to do is, as you said, get beyond the conference hall, to say labour is ready to take on the challenges of the future. for example, what happens with increased automation, will robots take ourjobs, is there a need for lifelong learning so people can constantly retrain? there's a vision for the future but basically he will be focusing on his opponents inside the labour party and inside parliament too. atjust after 8am we'll be speaking to the shadow education secretary angela rayner about that big speech from jeremy corbyn. one of northern ireland's largest employers, the aerospace firm bombardier, faces paying huge tariffs on its exports to the us, after losing the first stage of an international trade dispute. the us department of commerce upheld a complaint by bombardier‘s rival, boeing, that the firm unfairly benefited from state aid. there are concerns it could putjobs under threat in belfast and beyond, as the bbc‘s business editor simonjack reports.
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jobs at northern ireland's biggest manufacturing employer are under threat as the us government agreed with boeing that bombardier used government subsidies to sell planes to delta airlines at less thanit cost to make them. the next phase of the process is to examine the facts and to determine whether or not boeing has been harmed. now, we know that boeing didn't participate on the delta order, they abandoned that market years ago, so it's hard to see how there could be any harm. if upheld, sanctions could ultimately include heavy tariffs on planes sold in the us. that could jeopardise the future of a plant that makes a massive contribution to the northern irish economy. last year it paid £158 million in wages. it accounts for over 8% of all northern ireland's exports and it sources parts and services from 800 companies in the uk and ireland. the whole future of this plant here in belfast is designed around the success of the plane
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onto which these wings will be attached, so any threat to the c—series plane programme is a direct threat to potentially thousands ofjobs here in belfast. aerospacejobs are pressures and political. boeing's complaint has been cheered on by president trump. meanwhile, theresa may relies on northern ireland mps for her slender commons majority, which helped push the top deck out the agenda on her recent trip to canada and the us. this is just round one of this fight. a further ruling is due in february of next year, but this preliminary victory for boeing will cast a shadow over international trade relations and northern ireland's biggest manufacturing plant. simonjack, bbc news, belfast. women in saudi arabia will soon be allowed to drive for the first time in the nation's history. long seen by rights activists as a symbol of repression of women, the move follows a long campaign for change. saudi arabia is the only country in the world where women are not allowed to drive, some have been
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jailed for defying the ban. measles have been eliminated in the uk for the first time, say global health leaders. the world health organization said elimination can be verified once a country has sustained interruption of endemic transmission for at least 36 months. the uk nearly achieved this in the 19905 but the mmr scandal saw vaccination rates plunge. health officials said rates have now reached the recommended 95% coverage level in five—year—olds. a blood test that could diagnose heart attacks within 20 minutes could be rolled out on the nhs within five years. the test builds on an existing procedure that looks for protein in the blood, a strong indicator a heart attack has taken place. researchers say it could save the health service millions of pounds and free up thousands of beds. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. spotting a major heart attack is relatively straightforward. an electrocardiogram, or ecg, can detect unusual electrical activity in the heart. but telling the difference between a smaller heart attack, which can also prove fatal, and simple chest pain is sometimes trickier. currently, doctors carry out a blood test for a protein called troponin, which is released if
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the heart is damaged. a busy accident and emergency department may carry out more than 7,000 of these tests each year. as many as two thirds of patients admitted with chest pain turn out not to have suffered a heart attack, but researchers say up to 85% of people stay in hospital while further tests are carried out to rule out a heart attack. now a new test designed to detect a different protein, called cardiac myosin—binding protein c, delivers faster, more accurate results with benefits for patients and for hospitals. it might allow the accident and emergency doctors to rule out a heart attack, and be able to send more patients home who are actually not having a heart attack, without exposing them to unnecessary treatments, and perhaps further invasive tests. researchers say this new, more accurate test could save money
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and free up scarce hospital beds. but more work is needed before this new technique replaces existing treatments, so it will be some years before we see it in our hospitals. dominic hughes, bbc news. doctors have removed a tiny toy traffic cone from a patient‘s lung 40 years after he accidentally inhaled it. we can see it 40 years on. here it is. the 47—year—old man had been suffering from a cough for a year and medics suspected he had a tumour. he did an x—ray. luckily it wasn't that sinister instead it was his long—lost playmobil traffic cone he received on his seventh birthday. he had obviously inhaled it. the one you saw at the beginning, the image, thatis you saw at the beginning, the image, that is the cone that came out of
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his lung. extraordinary story but all is well now. and his cough has gone! uber is back in the news today, this time over a row with its drivers. they want to be classed as employees 55:91? ..:e-.!-.é-.: as. l—‘a: but uber will appeal that decision today. let's talk now to the driver who won that tribunal, james farrar, and to doctor liz 0liver, who's a lecturer in employment law at leeds university business school. good morning to you both, thanks for joining us. james, first of all, you're having to go to court again, why did you choose to go to court in the first place, what were your main concerns? uber has a business model that tries to aid a social network like it's a software company and it ignores the reality on the ground and the reality on the ground is it has oversubscribed, oversupplied the market with drivers. that means very reduced earnings, you're carrying all the cost. the only variable a
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driver is left with is to work more hours so drivers are working 80, 90, 100 hours a week for £5 an hour and that needed to stop. that's why we challenged this. with minimum wage it means for every hour you are logged onto the uber platform they must pay minimum wage and must allow holiday a cruel and that will allow greater stability to the market and it will reduce suffering for a lot of people so it's truly important. it's not just important of people so it's truly important. it's notjust important for us but all workers. we haven't had much support from the government or even the city of london with transport for london on this. if we don't challenge this, our children are going to be working in an uber style environment, they will have very little security because this model has undermined the rights for us and workers. from a personal point of view, when you were working for them, what was it like? did you really have to work extra hours?”
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did, 91 hours was the peak i ever worked. nobody at uber told me to stop. it was very... it's very common for people. for me what started this was i was assaulted on thejob one time started this was i was assaulted on the job one time and similar to what uber has been accused of in london, license under threat, it took ten weeks for uber to co—operate with the police. i had to chase them and the police. i had to chase them and the police. i had to chase them and the police bid to identify the passenger who assaulted me and that's when i realised i'm on my own —— police bid. there's no duty of ca re —— police bid. there's no duty of care because we are self—employed and we carry all the risk and there's no incentive for them to ta ke there's no incentive for them to take care of people, certainly not us. let's pick up on some of the wider issues, liz, picked up on the classification is of a worker as opposed to a self—employed person —— pic. the case involves uber but it can apply to a lot of other people's working situation. that's right. the key state as we are discussing is
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the worker status. when it comes to employment law, there is really important forms a contract can take. 0ne important forms a contract can take. one is an employment contract where the person is an employee and then they have access to all of the rights. the other is a worker status, which is a bit more like employees like, you access some aspects of employment law but not all, and the other is self—employed, which, as the driver said, you are on your own which, as the driver said, you are on yourown in which, as the driver said, you are on your own in that kind of situation. the worker classification you talk about, you're calling it macro a two but there are things that are defined in terms of sick pay and other day pay —— calling it employer light. when it came to minimum wage and working time... the application of the working time regulations, which has limits on the amount of weekly working time, but also gives access to paid holiday as
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well. uber has had lots of things. lawyers say the judges misunderstood and failed to apply basic intervals of agency law and uber also says in a statement that all taxi employment drivers have been self—employed for decades. with uber, drivers have more control and a totally free to use if, when and where they drive, with no shifts or minimum hours. so i suppose it comes down to this problem about who decides what kind of employee you are or you aren't. that's exactly right. the key issue for the employment tribunal was whether the paper contract matches up whether the paper contract matches up to the reality of the working relationship. so does the way the arrangements were presented by uber match what the experience is in practice? james, when you hear, and
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we've played the click this morning, and uber spokesperson says 80% of their drivers like the system as it was. as someone who has fought the case against them and won, what do you think? we are always presented with this dichotomy between flexibility and fairness. we just say there should be both. as has just been explained, if not an issue of opinion polling here or popularity poll, thejudge of opinion polling here or popularity poll, the judge examined the situation and came to the conclusion of the way it houthi runs their business we are entitled to those rights —— uber runs. we are suggesting you can work the way you wa nt suggesting you can work the way you want now but all we are giving you is holiday pay and the minimum wage. of course everyone would agree to that. i would agree with you, they have changed their position. in 2040 they said they were different and they said they were different and
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the legacy minicab operators were exploitative —— 2014. it now shows they are just like other minicab drivers. uber is also being looked at over their licence. lots of people would really like to be uber runs. still exist in london. what's your view? we agree. the tuc said said it was a big victory for worker rights. we disagree. there are 40,000 people whose livelihoods depend on uber at the moment. we've said to the mayor, he must make worker rights commission of the licences. 0f worker rights commission of the licences. of the reasons he has put forward and tfl have put forward, he has not put worker rights on the table. the mp said it is time for the mayor and transport for london
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to an sweated labour in the licence transportation system. very interesting. thank you very much for talking to us. thank you for discussing that with us. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house, in london. there's a lot of cloud around and it is quite easy. for many parts of the uk we are starting off on a great note. a lot of low cloud and patchy mist and fog, but a lot of that will lift and for many today it will be largely dry. i say many of us because not all of us will have that scenario. rain is coming in from the west and when it arrives in the west it will be with us for much of the day and some of it will be heavy. we start off with a low cloud, patchy mist and fog across northern, central and eastern areas. slowly that will lift in the morning. some of it may be stubborn. when it clears we will have bright or sunny
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skies and a gentle breeze. in the sunshine it will feel pleasant. in the west we have rain coming in south—west england, wales and northern ireland. some of that will be heavy and it will be windy. by the afternoon some of that will get into parts, but most of scotland will be dry. northern england has sunny spells as well and feeling pleasa nt sunny spells as well and feeling pleasant and. for the midlands and east anglia and the south—east a lot of dry weather. the sun coming out when we lose the cloud. 21 is what we can expect in london. further west we run back into the band of rain, getting into west dorset, and southwest england and wales. if you are under it it will feel cooler. the centre northern ireland. again, temperatures up to about 15, maybe 16 in the —— belfast. 0vernight the rain accelerates as it continues across the rest of the uk. still
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heavy burst in it and still windy around it as well. behind it you will notice some clearing in the skies. not an especially cold night. most of us staying in double figure is, but they will be low cloud around the screen. tomorrow we start with a lot of cloud in east and north of the country, the north—east, and drizzle. we still have wet and windy conditions on the northern isles for much of the day, but everywhere else under high pressure will brighten up with some sunshine and once again in the sunshine and once again in the sunshine and once again in the sunshine a gentle breeze and feeling pleasa nt sunshine a gentle breeze and feeling pleasant for this stage in september. but later in the day the cloud will pick up towards the west, heralding the arrival of the next band of rain, and again windy conditions. the friday that crosses from west to east, so all of us will have rain through friday and attended the range by then will be roughly 14 in the northern isles to maybe 19 as we push down towards the south. so in the next few days at some stage all of us will see
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sunshine and all of us will have some rain, so it is quite changeable and even more so as we head into the latter pa rt and even more so as we head into the latter part of the weekend and early pa rt latter part of the weekend and early part of next week. thanks very much. the frozen frontiers of antarctica are some of earth's most challenging and brutal environments, but not content with successfully crossing it with a team. explorer ben saunders is heading out there again, this time alone. at the start of november ben will attempt an unsupported and unassisted crossing to the south pole as he retraces the steps of his close friend lieutenant colonel henry worsley, who died last year attempting the same expedition. ben is here. it is quite an undertaking and that's an understatement. it has taken a lot of organising, lots of training. it is literally a few weeks away. why would you want to do this? crikey! this is something i've been doing for a while. it is my 11th big expedition. when i came
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back from antarctica in 2014 i felt for a while like i had scratched the itch and i felt content. you mentioned the motivation was henry. the motivation on this trip is a little bit different. it is still an interesting challenge. no one has made it across antarctica on the road without being helped with resupply is of food. —— resupplies. so that is an intriguing goal. you mentioned henry and you mentioned him before. the risks are very real in these expeditions. modern technologies can do some things, it can't remove risk. tell us about what happens to him and what the impact of his death has been. some people would be thinking if you've lost a close friend on an expedition that might be a reason not to do any more. henry failed at some point. he was there for about ten weeks and in
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january last year he called for help, essentially for a pickup flight. help, essentially for a pickup flight. he was evacuated, taken to hospital in chilly. —— in chile. i thought he was home and dry and had made the right call. 34 hours later he was dead in hospital of peritonitis, and abdominal infection. it was a huge shock, that was my first reaction. absolute disbelief. and then after that, personally, didn't want anything to do with antarctica ever again. as time began to pass i started thinking, and more people were talking about doing this journey, i started thinking, is a chance for me to use the skills and experience i got perhaps to honour him and the friendship by carrying on the work he did. so not only did he almost
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finished, he was within a hair's reith, said he got right across the continent, but he raced nearly £500,000, so that's a big call this time. give us a scale. how many miles a day will you be doing? what kind of supplies the unique? miles a day will you be doing? what kind of supplies the unique7m about 1000 miles? that's the entire distance. the average distance per day varies. this led his heaviest at the start, you get a little bit quicker every day as you burn fuel. so an average of about 60 miles per day, 16— 17. —— 60. so an average of about 60 miles per day, 16-17. -- 60. for those of us who haven't been to these places and being to those extremes of temperatures, how best can you describe the cold? those days when it is staggeringly cold, how best can you put that into some sort of sense for us? it's very hard to describe. the lowest ambient temperatures we measured on the last
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trip was —40. i like to think it's a bit like being in space. clearly i wouldn't have anything to compare it to what it feels like being an astronaut. everything is covered up. you are covered in clothing, but you have goggles, facemasks, everything is covered up. there's not a single square inch of skin that is exposed. so everything is covered and to me that's part of what makes this trip so exciting. you are in place where without the right clothing you wouldn't last very long at all, and yet to be able to exist and operate for a while... and then you get a tent to sleep the night. these are your boots. tell us a little bit. we can see pictures of the walking and it is obviously intensely beautiful. what are you thinking when you are doing that, or are you not? it varies enormously. if things are
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going well, you daydream about ideas for future trips. if things are going badly or if things are tough, which is most of the time, normally i curse myself ever thinking this was a good idea and probably planning for life on a beach or somewhere. there's a lot of time to think and! somewhere. there's a lot of time to think and i am genuinely am plugged, off—line. i have a satellite, i can use it on even in, but i am off—line. use it on even in, but i am off-line. when you announce you are going on a trip, reaction from family? for my mum, she is resigned. not especially surprised. my mom has had the hardest deal. she's been following on since i was 23. i got engaged this summer, so that's a new challenge. i am dodging a couple of
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months of wedding planning. engaged before or after you announced the trip? before. end of the summer. we will get married next summer. and you brought us one of your maps. my favourite thing is there's obviously not much on it. i may as well have a big piece of a three white paper. —— a3, good luck! keep in touch. i've got a website, it will all be online. i need to plot my progress! thank you very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a bbc london investigation has found the grenfell tower tragedy has led to nationwide demand for sprinkler systems, which is outstripping supply. 30 companies spoken to by researchers say they've seen a surge in enquiries and nine
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have a waiting list of up to two months. a fire safety expert, who was once contracted by kensington and chelsea council to work on grenfell tower, has said sprinklers would have stopped the blaze spreading. there's no one ever died in a fire with a sprinkler system in a household, so i think the proof is in the pudding really. i would have liked to have said that they would have survived. the wife of lord lucan has been found dead at her home in westminster. lady lucan, whose husband went missing following the murder of the family nanny more than four decades ago, was 80—years—old. her death is not being treated as suspicious. the extent of homelessness in the capital is far greater than those we know are sleeping rough, according to a new report by the london assembly. it found that as many as 12,500 are hidden homeless, squatting or sleeping on public transport at night. that's 13 times as many as those
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who are visibly homeless. it's all looking good on the tube so far, apart from those ongoing works on the 0verground. it's closed between gospel oak and barking. now because of the foggy conditions, city airport has some cancellations this morning. the good news is the woolwich ferry is now running. here's how it looks in whitechapel. the a11 pretty busy heading into town. there was an accident earlier, on top of the usual rush hour delays. and in acton, bollo bridge road is still shut for repairs to a burst water main. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another mild, murky and misty start to the day. widespread mist and one or two fog patches, but similar to yesterday it will brighten up a little later. the breeze perhaps a little bit stronger than yesterday, so that will help the mist lift perhaps a little faster. it won't linger as long. brighter skies and sunny spells. hazy sunshine. temperatures again warm,
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21 celsius by the afternoon. 0vernight tonight we see the change. a cold front sweeps across us, brings heavy and persistent rain for a time. clearing by dawn, but in its wake again some rather dense mist and fog. a mild night as well. 15—16 celsius in towns and cities. so a misty, murky and foggy start again tomorrow morning. but it will lift to brighter skies, turning out to be a decent day. a touch fresher with a south—westerly breeze. the maximum is still warm at 20 celsius. so thursday turns out 0k and on friday another cold front sweeps through again. a band of rain covering all parts at some point on friday. clearing away, leaving a brighter day for saturday, perhaps a bit drier. a couple of showers around and more rain and a bit of a breeze building as we head into sunday. there's more from us in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: jeremy corbyn will close the labour conference in brighton this lunchtime by telling delegates that the party is on the threshold of power and is ready for government. he will say labour's performance injune's general election put the tories on notice, adding that the government's handling of the brexit negotiations are not in the national interest. thousands ofjobs could be under threat in northern ireland and beyond after the aerospace firm bombardier lost the first stage of an international trade dispute. the us department of commerce upheld a complaint by bombardier‘s rival, boeing, that the firm unfairly benefited from state aid. bombardier says the case is far from over. in the last half an hour the british government urged all parties to
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reach a credible resolution. women in saudi arabia will soon be allowed to drive for the first time in the nation's history. long seen by rights activists as a symbol of the country's repression of women, the move follows a long campaign for change. saudi arabia is the only country in the world where women are not allowed to drive, some have been jailed for defying the ban. measles has been eliminated in the uk for the first time, say global health leaders. the world health organization said elimination can be verified once a country has sustained interruption of endemic transmission for at least 36 months. the uk nearly achieved this in the 19905 but the mmr scandal 5aw vaccination rate5 plunge. health officials said rates have now reached the recommended 95% coverage level in five—year—olds. if you've ever struggled to put down everything you want to say on twitter then you may be pleased to hear that the social media site has announced it is considering doubling its famous 140—character limit. a small number of users are taking part in a trial allowing longer tweets of up to 280 characters. twitter said it was aiming to address a major cause of frustration for some of its more than 300 million active users. kat has all the sport.
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lots of talk in the papers this morning about ben stokes and what may or may not have happened in bristol over the last couple of days. all we know is he was arrested following an incident outside a nightclub. following an incident outside a nig htclu b. lots following an incident outside a nightclub. lots of talk in the papers but all of this news breaking on the day the ashes squad for the christmas tour of australia is announced. the england and wales cricket board has insisted the squad for the winter ashes tour to australia will be picked on "form and fitness" alone. stokes is expected to be included when the party is named this morning, despite his arrest on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm following an incident at a bristol night club in the early hours of monday morning. he won't be playing in today's one—day match against west indies. one thing as a group we are very strong at is sticking together as a side and working together as a team. certainly in the past the best thing we've been able to do is to focus
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on our cricket and i think this instance is no different. there is a little bit of distraction outside the team and there's the potential to affect the game tomorrow, but not letting that happen is probably something that we can strive to do. england have included 18—year—old spinner sophie ecclestone in their squad for the women's ashes. she replaces beth langston in the only change from the side that won the world cup. heather knight's team will be looking to regain the ashes when the series begins on 22 october. it's a tough place to tour in terms of every aussie sort of reminds you that the whole country's against you and it's a hot place to play but it's also a brilliant place to play. it's a really brilliant place to play cricket and will encourage the girls to embrace the tour and the challenges that come with it. harry kane said it was a very proud night as his hat trick against cyriot side apoel nicosia made it two wins in two
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for tottenham in the champions league. after failing to score throughout august, kane has more than made up for it this month, netting 11 goals so far, five of them for spurs in europe. yeah, something i'm very proud of, you know? to score a hat—trick in any game let alone the champions league is amazing, so i'm very proud of that and proud to get the three points as well and we'll go into the next game full of confidence. liverpool managerjurgen klopp said his side needed to be more clinical, after they could only draw 1—1 at spartak moscow. liverpool were the better side but went behind, before filip coutinho equalised. that's two draws from their first two games. it was a very intense game and i was happy because for me it's not about the names, it's really about how we can perform and in a lot of moments we performed as good as possible and in a lot of moments not. we have to keep on working, that's how it is.
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kevin de bruyne scored a terrific goal for manchester city in their 2—0 win at home to shakhtar donetsk, that leaves them on maxiumum points. tonight chelsea, manchester united and celtic are all in action. cardiff city have replaced leeds at the top of the championship after beating them 3—1. kenneth zohore scored twice for cardiff. leeds had captain liam cooper sent off. he was ready to settle at six 0lympic golds but british track cyclist jason kenny says he's changed his mind about retiring. he revealed he'd secretly decided to call it a day after rio, but he said a year off and becoming a father had breathed new life into him and he now intends to compete at tokyo 2020 and try to overtake sir chris hoy by winning a seventh 0lympic title. i slowly changed over time. like i say, i thought it was natured, i was just getting older, you know? looking back i think i was constantly flattened by training and it's not until you relax and spring back to your natural state,
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ifeel like i'm about 18 now, although i do click a bit more these days. sometimes you just need a break, don't you? a holiday. you think if he did go it might not be seven because he wins so many. and two more medals of any colour to overta ke more medals of any colour to overtake sir bradley wiggins. you wouldn't bet against it. you wouldn't. he's got that mind of steel, jason kenney. seems myefo, mild mannered and gentle but inside he is by. in the 19705 and ‘805, blood plasma contaminated with hepatitis c and hiv was given to thousands of patients on the nhs in what has been described as the biggest treatment disaster in the history of the health service. yesterday, 500 victims of that scandal won the right to ask for compensation, something steve dymond, who was infected with hepatitis c, and his wife su have been denied until now.
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it's taken almost four decades. more than 4,500 people contracted hepatitis c and hiv through contaminated blood products supplied by the nhs. a two—year privately—funded independent inquiry called the use of contaminated blood products to treat patients with haemophilia a horrific human tragedy. last year, the house of commons passes a motion calling the scandal one of the biggest treatment disasters in the history of the nhs. then on the 11th ofjuly, theresa may announced a public inquiry into the scandal. and yesterday 500 victims of the contaminated blood scandal won the right to launch a high court action to seek damages. let's talk to someone who has been through all of this, steve diamond, who was given contaminated blood and his wife, su. that gives us a sense of what's going on but from your point of view, when did you know something had gone awry? i think i knew when i
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was treated with concentrated factor eight fora tiny was treated with concentrated factor eight for a tiny injury, didn't really merit it, i had to go to a nonspecialist a&e and they used stock that hadn't been heat—treated that was therefore emergencies, like for example a road accident, and shouldn't have been used on minor industry. i phoned them and they said they never should have used that and that those i know was contaminated with hiv and probably hepatitis c as well. i didn't go on to develop hiv but i've lived with hepatitis c for 40 years, which has pretty much devastated my life. tell us more pretty much devastated my life. tell us more about this, you said it began from the most routine of situations, something that could have happened to anyone. absolutely. because steve is a mild haemophiliacs he only needs treatment for injuries or medical procedures. he has never had any condition that required the
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treatments. so, for example, they decided his wisdom teeth had to go for some reason and he's not alone among the mild haemophiliacs who lost their wisdom teeth and probably got infected with hepatitis c for that and there's some suspicion that wasn't just an accident, that and there's some suspicion that wasn'tjust an accident, was systematic. the other problem was that we were told he was at risk of hiv. in the mid—19 805 when the gay plague drama was at its most intense, we waited 18 months for him to be tested clear because there was a dispute between the americans and the french over the patent for the new test. at that stage we could have both lost ourjobs because we both work with children, we couldn't tell the family. after he was told he was clear we were given no indication he had hepatitis c. we we re indication he had hepatitis c. we were given no support during the 18
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months or afterwards. we assumed for yea rs months or afterwards. we assumed for years he had some sort of ptsd as a result of the hiv scare. you really get a sense from listening to you both that this has infiltrated your lives for very many years. you talk about a devastating all eyes, steve. you now have the right to try to get compensation. is that... what does that solve for you? the idea and the notion that you have to take your own government to court to secure compensation for something that falls within their zone of responsibility i find truly shameful. compensation can never give back the lost years. it could go some give back the lost years. it could go some way give back the lost years. it could go some way to making up for lost pension rights, lost salary, lost life opportunities, the chance to have children for example. but also a government paying compensation would be a very clear sign of recognition of saying they are
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prepared to pay for mistakes and we'll stop hiding behind x ratio payments, excuses, losing documents and betraying and lying to the haemophiliacs community. su, it is clearly such a personal story for you and the impact it has had, are you and the impact it has had, are you able now to think things can be better? i'm trying to get an idea of the quality of life now. compensation psychologically is clearly important, that's a marker of some kind, but what's it like on a day—to—day basis? that clearly won't change. that's right. what's another misleading thing we've been confronted with is they finally found a treatment which actually was effective against hepatitis c that after a lot of wrangling between the nhs and nice about the cost was made available in 2015. and the
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government, the minister particularly, talked about during us all. steve, after 30 plus years of the infection, his liver is irreparably damaged. he's already had one cancerous lump removed. he's monitored three monthly for cancer, there are other symptoms and side—effects he's monitored for and he's never going to have good health again. i'm trying to think where the positives lie in this story. one is you get possibly the compensation, you get possibly the compensation, you have an admission of some kind. is the other that may be the attention on this, you might think something like this can't happen again. is that the other thing that maybe you can take from it? that would be the thing we all hope for but it's very unclear because the department of health is still not being clear. the department of health were opposing the order yesterday and wanting another three months before it was heard. i think the thing about compensation, it's not just financial security, it's
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not just financial security, it's not just financial security, it's not just feeling that we have not just financial security, it's notjust feeling that we have a right to the money that we would have earned. we're not the only ones who have had good careers completely blown out the water. but also its the statement of what went wrong was in steve's fault, wasn't the fault of the victims who couldn't maintain the sort of role a husband and father normally has. nor was it an accident because there had been warnings coming from the states post—war during the 505 and the world health organization in the 1970s world health organization in the 19705 and action wasn't taken. thanks forjoining us. we are out of time but so insightful to speak to you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: jeremy corbyn will close the labour party conference in brighton later by telling delegates they're on the "threshold of power". a blood test that could diagnose heart attacks within 20 minutes could be rolled out on the nhs within five years, saving the health service millions
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of pounds per year. let's have a look at a picture. people doing things to keep fit. what's that position? it looks like a yoga position. anyway she is giving a dance class. she's going to be live on breakfast, trying to get us be live on breakfast, trying to get us all to do more exercise this morning. it is an early—morning gathering, 7:45am, doing a lot of arm waving. that's not a technical term. i think it's a dance class. it is all about encouraging us to do more exercise. always good. it's always a nerve—wracking experience when the critics get a look at your new show, but take that had five extra special guests to impress at the launch of their latest musical last night
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— their mums! all of the mums! our entertainment correspondent colin paterson was there to meet up with gary, mark and howard from the band, but he couldn't resist getting the verdict from their number one fans. take that onstage for a special encore at the press night of the band. please welcome lulu! # yeah! # you've gotta be strong enough to walk on through the night...# the musical uses take that's songs and five members of the boy band in the show were chosen on bbc one's let it shine. take that are the musical‘s coproducers, so arrived for the big night nice and early. you guys famously sang "some day soon this will all be someone else's dream". how does it feel to watch five guys at the start of their career singing your songs?
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brilliant. really lovely. in fact, the whole cast, we've been working with these guys for a couple of years, so they've all become family. it's a bit weird 'cause showtime's half seven and you get the boys going "five minutes 'til showtime" and then we pick up our popcorn and go and sit in some chairs. usually we go on the stage and we're like, "oh, ok, then". we feel a bit redundant! we do. on the red carpets, the host of let it shine said he was never boy band material. i can't sing or dance. i would never have attempted that. you never fancied auditioning for boyzone? no, have you seen boyzone's audition? yeah, no one wanted to do that! how proud are you of take that? it's kind of really weird. it's 20 something years, i can't believe it! swear it on the band! the band is a celebration of female fandom, following the lives of five school friends over 25 years. the winners of let it shine provide
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the soundtrack to their lives, never speaking, simply singing take that's songs. it's a device that went down very well with the audience. those ladies on the balcony? that's the five take that mums. they were never exactly going to give the most objective review, but had agreed to speak to us afterwards. hello, i'm marge and i'm gary's mum. hello, i am mary and i'm mark's mum. hi, everybody. i'mjan and i'm robbie's mum. hi, i'm jenny and i'm jason's mum. hello, i'm kathleen and i'm howard's mum. and how was that for you? it was like travelling back about 20 years now and i'm thinking, i thought i put all of that behind me. i've done my therapy and the lot and i'm just back again! amazing how they all gelled, you know? it was wonderful. i think we've got to watch out for these boys, in the show. they were so good! really good.
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they are really good. i was thinking, oh my goodness me! i am blown away by it. i've seen it quite a few times now and itjust gets better. you wish they were still together, as a band. it was so touching. the band tours the uk right through until next summer, although it could have some unexpected condition. there's five mums and, i mean, who knows? we might go on the road ourselves, you never know! the mums on the road, how about that? i think that would be brilliant. people would go and see it! carol is out and about this morning. how is it looking? good morning. mixed fortunes today. as you can see in london there is some cloud around, that it is trying to brighten up. temperatures widely
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between 13— 16 at the moment and there's a bit of a breeze. we have low cloud and patchy mist and fog which will lift around lunchtime. for most of us largely dry day. we also have some rain coming in across the south—west. that will become ensconced across south—west england, wales and northern ireland as we go through the day and the wind will also strengthen. through the morning very slowly we will have the low cloud, mist and fog lift. some of it will be stubborn. then we have sunny spells developing. at the same time we've got the wet and windy conditions coming across south—west england, wales and northern ireland. the ruby afternoon it arrives in argyll and bute and galloway. for much of scotland it will be a dry afternoon. the same can be said the northern england. a bright afternoon with bright sunny skies and that will be through the midlands, into
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east anglia and the south—east. temperatures will respond nicely. in the sunshine we have highs of 21, in london. through the isle of wight we still have sunshine, a chow was in dorset. that's just ahead still have sunshine, a chow was in dorset. that'sjust ahead of still have sunshine, a chow was in dorset. that's just ahead of the rain. -- dorset. that's just ahead of the rain. —— showers in dorset. gusty winds with it, especially close to the coast. under the combination it will feel cooler. 15 degrees is the maximum in belfast. as we head through the evening and overnight the rain gathers speed and accelerates the rain gathers speed and a ccele rates a cross the rain gathers speed and accelerates across the rest of the uk. some of it is still heavy. a lot of low cloud, hill fog associated with it as well. the hind at some clea ra nce with it as well. the hind at some clearance in the sky and some patchy mist and fog —— behind it. not especially cold, with the temperatures range staying in double figures. tomorrow we start with a lot of cloud down these coast and some drizzle. we hang on to the wintry conditions in the northern
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isles and then we have high pressure. for most of the uk tomorrow will be at beautiful day, with a lot of sunshine, and temperatures up to 20 celsius. but then later in the day the cloud will be thicker across northern ireland, heralding the arrival of another weather front. that will bring rain and again blustery winds from west to east across the uk during the course of friday. temperature wise on friday we are looking at roughly 40 in the north to highs of about 19 in the south —— 14. saturday is the driest day. it looks quite unsettled on sunday and in the early part of next week. all over the place! thank you. if you had asked me before the programme to describe what a sugar factory looks like, i wouldn't have thought it would look like this! sean is on you work to find out what
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it means. there will be some real changes going out of the window at the weekend. until now there's been quite a big restriction on sugar production in the uk and across the eu. so is beets like these, that we grow in the uk. we are still consuming about 2 million tons of sugar every year. that you might be surprised to know that 60% of is from sugar beet grown in the uk. another 15% is from beet that's grown around the eu, that's where the changes will affect as well. the other 25% is from sugarcane, which people might have thought make up more of the total. so it's all about this stuff we grow in the uk and we will find out how much these changes will find out how much these changes will change things here. good
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morning, jane and carlos. you are a sugar beet farmer. that's right. how is it that we can get so much sugar production here in the uk? it's a combination of the expertise that we have over the years, coupled with the fact that we have got the right climate and soil conditions. and when these changes come in at the end of the week, it will mean there aren't restrictions on how much sugar beet you can grow and how much sugar beet you can grow and how much sugar beet you can grow and how much sugar beet people all round europe can grow and sell. what changes will you have to make to your business? one of the key things to note is that we are probably one of the most efficient growers in the world, so consequently there could be opportunities for us going forward. it should put a good place to be competitive. that's interesting, the inputin competitive. that's interesting, the input ina competitive. that's interesting, the input in a good place to be competitive. when we heard a similar thing in the milk industry go
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through a similar thing, that had a huge effect when the price fell and farmers went out of this mess. could that happen in this industry? it's a very different business. in the case of milk there was a large production. with beet sugar farmers... the market can expand or contract depending on the price. and you aren't just about sugar beet, are you? and if you were there might be more questions about what happens to your business further down the line? i think it is fair to say that i don't think there are any sugarbeet producers in the country that just grow sugar sugarbeet producers in the country thatjust grow sugar beet. we all grow a range of crops, whether they be wheat, barley, oats, a whole range of products. the big question, iamjust range of products. the big question, i am just going to grab one of these because you can see the inside of one of these. the big question this morning has been... i mentioned
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earlier that there is no difference between sugar from sugarcane and sugarfrom sugar between sugar from sugarcane and sugar from sugar beet. is that correct? that's correct. people have been getting in touch saying there isa been getting in touch saying there is a different, especially how it is refined. no, the reality is... you can refine sugar down the various levels. white sugar is the most refined, brown sugar is less refined. but at the end of the day it is the same chemical formulation, so sugar is sugar. great. cleared that one up. thank you. sugar is sugar. the chemical condition is the same, even though you can get a broad range of the shelves. thank you! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a bbc london investigation has found the grenfell tower tragedy has led to nationwide demand for sprinkler systems,
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which is outstripping supply. 30 companies spoken to by researchers say they've seen a surge in enquiries and nine have a waiting list of up to two months. a fire safety expert, who was once contracted by kensington and chelsea council to work on grenfell tower, has said sprinklers would have stopped the blaze spreading. there's no one ever died in a fire with a sprinkler system in a household, so i think the proof is in the pudding really. i would have liked to have said that they would have survived. the wife of lord lucan has been found dead at her home in westminster. lady lucan, whose husband went missing following the murder of the family nanny more than four decades ago, was 80—years—old. her death is not being treated as suspicious. uber is appealing a ruling that its drivers are workers, not self—employed and are therefore entitled to a range of benefits, including paid holidays and the national minimum wage.
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the case is being heard at the high court today, less than a week after the firm was told its london licence will not be renewed. uber insists its drivers like the freedom of being their own boss. running smoothly on the tube so far, apart from those ongoing works on the 0verground. it's closed between gospel oak and barking. now because of the foggy conditions, city airport has some cancellations this morning. and bad news, there's no service on the woolwich ferry again because of the fog. and in acton, bollo bridge road is still shut for repairs to a burst water main. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another mild, murky and misty start to the day. widespread mist and one or two fog patches, but similar to yesterday it will brighten up a little later. the breeze perhaps a little bit stronger than yesterday, so that will help the mist lift perhaps a little faster. it won't linger as long. brighter skies and sunny spells.
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hazy sunshine. temperatures again warm, 21 celsius by the afternoon. overnight tonight we see the change. a cold front sweeps across us, brings heavy and persistent rain for a time. clearing by dawn, but in its wake again some rather dense mist and fog. a mild night as well. 15—16 celsius in towns and cities. so a misty, murky and foggy start again tomorrow morning. but it will lift to brighter skies, turning out to be a decent day. a touch fresher with a south—westerly breeze. the maximum is still warm at 20 celsius. so thursday turns out 0k and on friday another cold front sweeps through again. a band of rain covering all parts at some point on friday. clearing away, leaving a brighter day for saturday, perhaps a bit drier. a couple of showers around and more rain and a bit of a breeze building as we head into sunday. there's more from us in half an hour. plenty more too on our website.
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at the usual address or on bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. making his pitch for prime minister — jeremy corbyn declares labour are on the "threshold of power". in his closing speech at the party's conference in brighton later, mr corbyn will warn government ministers to "pull themselves together" or make way for labour. good morning. it's wednesday, 27th september. also this morning, theresa may says
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she will work to protect thousands ofjobs in northern ireland as the aerospace firm bombardier loses a major trade dispute in the us. uber heads back to court to fight a ruling over workers' rights. at the end of the week rule changes will mean we can produce as much sugar as we want from sugar beet grown in the uk. i'm having a look at what that means for workers and prices. in sport, ben stokes is expected to be named in the ashes squad this morning, despite his arrest after a night out in bristol. the new take that musical made its premiere last night. so who better to review it for us? robbie's mum gives us her verdict. it was like travelling back about 20 yea rs. it was like travelling back about 20 years. i'm thinking, i thought i put
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all that behind me. i have had my therapy and the lot and it's just back again! and carol has the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london. there isa broadcasting house in london. there is a lot of cloud across central and northern and eastern parts of the uk. patchy mist and fog. it will give way to sunny spells later on, but in the west we are looking at windier conditions and rain. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. "ready for government" and "on the threshold of power". that's whatjeremy corbyn will tell delegates later about the state of the labour party, as their annual conference comes to an end. the labour leader will take aim at the conservatives' handling of brexit negotiations, calling on ministers to "pull themselves together or make way". our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. this is the government in waiting. is this britain's next prime minister? is this the country's next set of senior ministers? # 0h jeremy corbyn.# they clearly think so and they want you to believe it too.
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in his big speech today, the labour leader will say his party is on the threshold of power. the labour leadership spent this conference trying to show it's a government in waiting. jeremy corbyn is clearly widely adored among party members, but if he really is to become the next prime minister, his big speech will need to appeal far beyond the conference hall to voters right across the country. what doesjeremy corbyn need to do to appeal to voters beyond labour? he needs to continue doing what he's doing to inspire the members of which there are over 500,000 now to go out and do it on his behalf. i would sayjust keep plugging away at the same message. he has come across really well in the country, we got 40% of the vote in the general election. i thinkjeremy has already done a fantasticjob of getting people who are usually not interested in politics actually interested in politics, especially young people and we have seen that happen.
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so i think a little bit more what he is already doing is going to make us in a much better position come the next general election. the party might be united in its desire to get into government, but it is deeply divided on brexit and questions remain about how labour would pay for some of it's big spending promises. jeremy corbyn will need to find the answers if he's to win over many more voters. our political correspondent iain watsonjoins us now from brighton. what is the tone there? what is jeremy corbyn really going to be saying do you think today? well, yes, i mean it is interesting walking around this conference for the past five days, i have been left in no doubt thatjeremy corbyn has changed this party, but of course, the question for people who aren't here, who aren't bathing him in adulation will be can he change the country? what he has got to do in his speech is reach out and say that
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labour is able to meet the challenges of the future, we will be hearing about life long training and learning so people can be equipped for a changing economy. he will talk about investment in infrastructure, in transport and in housing. but i think his tone will be more tribal playing more to the gallery when it comes to attacking the conservatives who accuse them of bungling over brexit even though that issue caused labour a lot of problems here as well. and when it comes to grenfell tower he will suggest that is a monument to a degraded conservative regime. so strong stuff from jeremy corbyn, but of course, his key message is that labour are ready for government, but with that, apparent readiness will come greater scrutiny. iain watson, thank you very much. in a few minutes we'll be speaking to the shadow education secretary angela rayner about that big speech from jeremy corbyn. thousands ofjobs could be under threat in northern ireland and beyond after the aerospace firm bombardier lost the first stage of an international trade dispute. the us department of commerce upheld a complaint by bombardier‘s rival, boeing, that the firm unfairly
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benefited from state aid. g; thgfigflz buzinegz eflfl‘fiff ' ..... jobs at northern ireland's biggest manufacturing employer are under threat as the us government agreed with boeing that bombardier used government subsidies to sell planes to delta airlines at less than it cost to make them. the next phase of the process is to examine the facts and to determine whether or not boeing has been harmed. now, we know boeing didn't participate on the delta order, they abandoned that market years ago, so it's hard to see how there could be any harm. if upheld, sanctions could ultimately include heavy tariffs on planes sold in the us. that could jeopardise the future of a plant that makes a massive contribution to northern ireland's economy. last year it paid £158 million in wages. it accounts for over 8% of all northern ireland's exports and it sources parts and services from 800 companies in the uk and ireland.
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the whole future of this plant here in belfast is designed around the success of the plane on to which these wings will be attached. so any threat to the c—series plane programme is a direct threat to potentially thousands ofjobs here in belfast. aerospacejobs are precious and political. boeing's complaint has been cheered on by president trump. meanwhile theresa may relies on northern ireland mp5 for her slender commons majority which helped push the subject up the agenda on her recent trip to canada and the us. this is just round one of this fight. a further ruling is due in february of next year. but this preliminary victory for boeing will cast a shadow over international trade relation and northern ireland's biggest manufacturing plant. women in saudi arabia will soon be allowed to drive for the first time in the nation's history.
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long seen by rights activists as a symbol of the country's repression of women, the move follows a long campaign for change. saudi arabia is the only country in the world where women are not allowed to drive. some have been jailed for defying the ban. measles has been eliminated in the uk for the first time, say global health leaders. the disease was nearly eradicated in the 19905 but the mmr scandal saw vaccination rates plunge. health officials said rates have now reached the recommended 95% coverage level in five—year—olds. a blood test that could diagnose heart attacks within 20 minutes could be rolled out on the nhs within five years. researchers say it could save the health service millions of pounds and free up thousands of beds. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. spotting a major heart attack is relatively straightforward. an electrocardiogram or ecg can detect unusual electrical activity in the heart, but telling the difference between a smaller heart attack which can also prove fatal
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and simple chest pain is sometimes trickier. currently doctors carry out a blood test for a protein called troponin which is released if the heart is damaged. a busy accident and emergency department may carry out more than 7,000 of these tests each year. as many as two—thirds of patients admitted with chest pain turn out not to have suffered a heart attack, but researchers say up to 85% of people's stay in hospital while further tests are carried out to rule out a heart attack. now, a new test, designed to detect a different protein, called cardiac myosin binding protein c, delivers faster, more accurate results with benefits for patients and the hospitals. it might allow the accident and emergency doctors to rule out a heart attack and be able to send more patients home who are not having a heart attack without exposing them to unnecessary treatments and perhaps further invasive tests.
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researchers say this new, more accurate test could save money and free up scarce hospital beds, but more work is needed before this new technique replaces existing treatments so it will be some years before we see it in our hospitals. uber is appealing a ruling that its drivers are workers and not self—employed and they are entitled to paid holidays and the national minimum wage. it comes after a week after the firm was told that its london licence won't be renewed for failing to report serious criminal offences and carrying out background checks on drivers. clive coleman reports. last year, uber driverjames farrar
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won a landmark legal case when an employment tribunal ruled that he was a worker and not, as uber had argued, running his own business. i don't control the fare. if i take a different route other than the one i've been given i will be penalised. i'm performance managed through a rating system, if i hit 4.4 then i'm out on a job. the ruling threatens to hit the operating costs of companies like private hire and delivery firms using people who work on demand and uber has appealed it, claiming it was wrong in law. with over one million people now working in the so—called gig economy, the uber appeal is seen as critical in determining whether they're classified as owning their own small business or as workers who are entitled to rights such as the national minimum wage and paid holidays. but uber is adamant its drivers are independent contractors and not workers. drivers tell us overwhelmingly they
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want to be independent contractors. we did a recent poll of all uber drivers and 80% told us they would rather be an independent contractor than a worker. james farrar no longer drives for uber but he's eagerly awaiting the outcome of the day's appeal, which should make the rights of those working in the gig economy a lot clearer. you're watching bbc breakfast. jeremy corbyn will tell his party faithful at the labour party conference later that his top team is "ready for government". after a week of fanfare and celebration in brighton, mr corbyn will set out his vision for the future. joining us now is the shadow education secretary angela rayner, who addressed conference yesterday. thank you very much for your time this morning. the way this works now, of course, is we get little phrases from the speech which is yet
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to happen, of course, it happens today from mr corbyn, but one of the ones we know he will use is that labour and he ones we know he will use is that labourand he are ones we know he will use is that labour and he are ready for government. you are ready for government. you are ready for government. what's the evidence for that? absolutely. we've had a fantastic conference over the last few days where many of the shadow cabinet have set out their plan for labour's future. yesterday i set out our plan for labour's future. yesterday i set out our planfora labour's future. yesterday i set out our plan for a national education service that will deal with the skills gap in this country and give our young people the opportunities they deserve and jeremy will build upon what the shadow cabinet have said and what many delegates have spoke about at this government's conference, we are a government in waiting and we have a plan for britain which means that everyone can do well and our young people have a great future ahead of them. we will come back to education in a moment if you don't mind. you call ita moment if you don't mind. you call it a fantastic conference. a lot of people have been saying there has been a lot of whooping and the cult of corbyn going on and the danger of that you get lost in the moment.
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you're all in the room, you're excited, jeremy corbyn comes on stage, and he can say pretty much anything, but that doesn't get you anywhere when it comes to the polls, when it comes to people voting because you are lost along with many of your colleagues there in the moment? well, what we're excited about is the prospect of being able to unleash and unharness some of the potential that our country is lagging behind at the moment because of the conservative policies so we're excited about britain's future and what we can do to enable people to get on in their lives and you're right, it's not about us just patting each other on the back, its about making sure that we're confident outward looking and how we can make sure that everybody can reach their full potential in britain and! reach their full potential in britain and i think that we've demonstrated that and thatjeremy will show that he is a prime minister in waiting. in quite the contrast to what theresa may has done to the conservative party and
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their conference next week will be a beauty parade of whoever wants to be the next leader of the conservative party. they are weak and wobbly and in disarray and we've got a plan for britain and! in disarray and we've got a plan for britain and i can't help being excited about creating a national education service that will unlock people's potential and you know make sure that our economy does well. in the theme of the euphoria of the moment, some people are saying that your colleagues are playing to an easy crowd to get aggressive thunder at the moment. the comments have raised a lot of attention, talking about prince harry at a meeting saying he can't actually fly a helicopter, he tried to pass the exa m helicopter, he tried to pass the exam for that, couldn't get through it so he just sits there going, vroom, it so he just sits there going, vroom , vroom. it so he just sits there going, vroom, vroom. what do you think about those comments? if you look at what he has done in terms of the
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games in toronto for the veterans at highlighting the need is to celebrate people's i actually think we should concentrate more on the contribution they make. i'm much more interested in that. we have different views in the labour party, as many people watching this programme well have about the royals, but i think prince william and prince harry have made the royal family more trendy again, so i think there is a role for them, they are pa rt there is a role for them, they are part of the staple british diet, and the conference, we have never had a more united conference and more outward facing conference, so i think people who have been here have an energy about them, and people who will hearjeremy corbyn's speech later today will show that he is the prime minister in waiting and we have a plan for britain to everyone.
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you use the phrase cradle to grave on education. does that include tuition fees? absolutely. our cradle to grave free at the point of use was deliberately mirrored on our greatest legacy that we delivered to the uk people, and that is our national health service, so i believe health, education and housing are vitally important issues to ensure that everyone can do well in our country, and at the moment, thatis in our country, and at the moment, that is not the case. our natural national education service will put younger people and all the people at the heart of the british economy, and it means businesses can thrive as well, because we know the economy of the future will need people to interchange in theirjobs and rhys gill, and the national education service will deliver for those businesses... my question was about the tuition fees, university tuition fees. i was just the tuition fees, university tuition fees. i wasjust about to say, yes,
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we will abolish university tuition fees. you said there will be no tuition fees? let me be absolutely clear, charlie. we will abolish tuition fees. the next labour government will abolish tuition fees. we have been absolutely clear on that all the way through the last election and i'm saying it now that we will do that. but tuition fees is only one element... how much will it cost? we said that it is £9.5 billion the tuition fees, and we said we would bring back maintenance gra nts said we would bring back maintenance grants as well, which is £1.7 billion, and we set out our costed ma nifesto billion, and we set out our costed manifesto and we said that it is not necessarily about the cost, it is the cost of not doing that. we need skilled workers for the economy of the future, and unless we invest in young people now and ensure we have that, britain is not going to prosper, especially as we leave the
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european union. many people including those in industry will agree with you about the skills issue, but i want to bring you back to the cost. a lot of people are asking the question, who will pay? who will pay more under labour? who is well paid? have you got a number for me about what salary it is at which point you are going to pay more under labour to fulfil these huge promises you have in terms of health and education? what is the number at which point someone is going to be in your line of sight to pay more tax? our national education service was funded by us reversing the tax giveaways that were given to corporations, actually, so it wasn't individuals that were paying that. but we also felt that a lot of industry and businesses were saying to us that young people and our economy doesn't have the skill set that we need, so we talk about leaving the european union, controls on immigration. if we don't start
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giving our young people those skills, the economy cannot prosper. is it possible for you to give me a number... charlie, i have just said... i apologise for speaking over you. it seems to be a problem for you to say a salary at which point you will pay more tax under labour. it stands to reason that this money can'tjust come from increases in corporation tax. somebody is going to pay. increases in corporation tax. somebody is going to paym increases in corporation tax. somebody is going to pay. it can, andi somebody is going to pay. it can, and i have said that. our national education service was funded by the tax giveaways that the conservatives, they have prioritised giving tax giveaways, where we are saying our public services are at crisis point because we are not investing in them and not investing in ouryoung investing in them and not investing in our young people, and we pay more. the agency costs now the teachers and the national health service because we are having to bring in workers from overseas because we are not training young people up and giving them those skills that we require them to have.
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so we cannot afford to not do this. many students don't pay back the loa ns many students don't pay back the loans as well, so the whole system is unsustainable currently. it is a moral obligation on all of us to ensure that everybody reaches their full potential, and businesses will buy their investment, reap the rewards of having the skilled workforce they can tap into. thank you very much for your time this morning. speaking to us from brighton where jeremy corbyn morning. speaking to us from brighton wherejeremy corbyn will be making his speech to conference a little later on today. you are watching breakfast. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. she's on the roof at new broadcasting house. good morning. this morning there is a lot of low cloud around, patchy mist and fog as well, and slowly that will lift leaving many of us with a largely dry day. i say many of us because we have some rain already which will steadily come through the west as we go through the course of the day. slowly across
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the course of the day. slowly across the north and central and eastern areas, the clyde will break, and the sun will come out, whereas in the west and south—west, wales and northern ireland, we are looking at some rain, and that rain will be heavy. when it sets in, you will haveit heavy. when it sets in, you will have it for much of the day. it will be accompanied by quite gusty winds, whereas if you are over in the east, in the sunshine, in light breezes, are high in london of up to 21, so that will feel quite pleasant. through the evening and overnight, that band of rain will continue to journey steadily towards the east and north—east. a lot of low cloud ahead of it, and backline it, some clearing of the sky. it won't be a cold night, so it would be a cold start to the day, tomorrow we will have the reigning eastern areas, drizzly across the east code, it clears from the east and then all of us will enjoy a dry day with a fair bit of sunshine and highs of up to
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20 celsius. carol, thank you very much. we are looking at the images a moment ago a lot of people out in the park, the weather is pretty good, getting some exercise, because it is national fitness day. it can be hard to find the motivation to exercise, especially as the nights get shorter. or you build it so you have to exercise to get somewhere. a lot of people say, just walk faster, go on a bicycle, so you are incorporated rather than see it as a chore you have to do. i know you don't like this statistic. most of us spend more time sitting on the loo than doing exercise. you want to repeat that one small? no! one of those trying to get us to move more is the strictlyjudge and former ballet
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dancer darcey bussell. darcey, you've just been enthusiastically leading a dance class. how do you persuade people to exercise who don't feel like it? the easiest thing is basically turn the music up really loud, anything that is your favourite tune, anything that gets you dancing round the kitchen, and also put on a pair of trainers that give you an extra spring, that makes life a lot easier as well. but it is getting out, get outdoors, enjoy the surroundings, play the music, that is what i recommend. and we can see people behind you doing that. historically you are an athlete, top ballerina. how did exercise and how does it make you feel? well, the best thing about being active is the end of the gives you. it makes you feel good, it makes you feel happy. theyjust left you for the rest of the week. everything seems easier after you
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have been active, and i have proved that from when i retired, i couldn't work out why couldn't get up and go and had no energy, and this li wen you are active, it gives you more energy. people thinks it gives you more tired, but it gives you energy. darcy, it is charlie here in the studio. i am equating more with the people to the left behind you than the ones on the right, because it can bea the ones on the right, because it can be a bit intimidating, with the greatest respect, some obviously more accustomed to doing this than others. none of these guys behind me have ever done this class, they are just doing a 19505 rock and roll. they are inspired by the music, they are having a great time. you don't have to worry about getting it right, getting it wrong. it isjust enjoying the moment, being together, group exercises fabulous, and a lot offun, and group exercises fabulous, and a lot of fun, and you can do it with
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friends. and you shouldn't be intimidated by the moves, because the moves are really easy. and we can't talk to you without talking a little bit about strictly. they did well on saturday. we want to talk to about debbie mcgee, because she was enjoying the wasn't she? my goodness, wasn't she gorgeous? what a lovely surprise to see somebody with so much ability, she is so flexible and she is obviously an incredibly fast learner, which made it so enjoyable for her. she has been dying to get on the dance floor for a very long time, and it is wonderful to see. for a very long time, and it is wonderfulto see. can for a very long time, and it is wonderful to see. can you give us any top tips of couples you thought we re any top tips of couples you thought were particularly good apart from debbie? i don't know. there is a lot of talent out there, it is such early days yet. i've got a lot of promise with giovanni, i think they will wow us every week if they don't speak too soon. there is a lot going
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on, lovely aston with ginette, they are on fire. i can't list all the good couples right now, because i just want to join in the dance fitness behind me! going to join in, and thank you for coping with not being able to hear us very well. and thank you for coping with not being able to hear us very weltm is rather busy here! is my shouting at you? yes! some of those people behind are probably very believed we are now off them and they can stop! maybe i'm assuming too much. coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. here on breakfast, we'll be talking to the best—selling author robert harris. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. we are going to see an east—west split across eastern areas while it is misty and murky, there will be bright spells. towards the west is where we're going to see
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rain spreading in. it is courtesy of this area of low pressure. it is moving in towards western areas as we speak. the winds are picking up. so quite breezy conditions as the rain spreads into northern ireland through west wales and the south—west of england through this morning and by this afternoon, continuing to spread east ward into central and southern parts of england as well. towards the east, it is looking fine and dry this afternoon. temperatures in london about 21 celsius. that rain will be heavy at times across south—west england and across west wales. temperatures here more like 15 or 16 celsius. much of northern england still probably dry. dry for much of scotla nd still probably dry. dry for much of scotland as well. any mist and low cloud tending to clear. there will be sunny spells and feeling warm especially in the far north of scotland. in northern ireland a wet afternoon to come here. this weather front will continue to march eastwards. so for the evening rush hour, turning wet across scotland,
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north—west england and through the midlands, but by the early hours of thursday morning that rain will have continued to move, just confined towards eastern areas. again it could be a little bit murky across the east, but further west with clearer skies, turning a tad chillier. temperatures down to ten or 11 celsius. during thursday a cloudy start. a bit of drizzle first thing in the east, but it will clear. it may stay across the far south—east of scotland. for most of us on thursday, not a bad day with sunshine. and still very pleasant for the time of year. maximum temperatures up to about 16 to 20 celsius. that's it from me. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and sally bundock. not such "plane" sailing —
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bombardier gets hit with major us tariffs in its trade dispute with boeing. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 27th september. thousands ofjobs in the uk and canada are left hanging in the balance as the us proposes a 220% tariff on bombardier planes. also in the programme, keeping the french economy moving. emmanuel macron's government lay out it's first ever budget.

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