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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 27, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at 3pm: after an enthusiastic welcome in the conference hall, jeremy corbyn tells supporters in brighton that, despite the election loss, labour stands on the threshold of power. yes, we didn't do quite well enough and we remain in opposition for now. but we have become a government in waiting. a man has died after armed police open fire on a car near bristol. the government warns boeing its behaviour in a trade dispute that threatens thousands ofjobs in northern ireland could jeopardise future contracts. also in the next hour, more misery for ryanair passengers. the airline says it's cancelling an extra 18,000 flights in a move that will affect another 400,000 travellers. measles has effectively been eliminated in the uk for the first time, according to the world health
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organisation. and the smoking volcano on the island of bali, tens of thousands flee their homes amid fears it will erupt for the first time in more than 50 years. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. jeremy corbyn has told delegates at his party conference that labour is "ready for government" and "on the threshold of power". in a rousing speech in brighton, the labour leader said his party is ready to tackle inequality and rebuild the nhs. he also promised sweeping changes to social housing and tenants‘ rights if he wins power. our political correspondent iain watson reports. he's getting quite used to the adulation, though he doesn't yet have a grip on power. but he says labour is a government in waiting. waiting is exactly what his supporters were prepared to do, queueing up to hear his speech. helpfully, he had a copy with him.
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applause but there's little doubt that he's changed his party — his task today was to convince more sceptical voters that he really can change the country. we are ready, and the tories are clearly not. they're certainly not strong, and they are definitely not stable. he said the loss of a conservative majority had led to a series of u—turns, and as he listed them, supporters cheered each one. and he called for one more — the abolition of tuition fees. labour was the party of unity, bringing generations and communities together rather than pitting young and old against each other, which is what the tories did. labour's own divisions with the eu rose this week, butjeremy corbyn attacked what he called the conservatives‘ brexit bungling.
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so i have a simple message to the cabinet — for britain's sake, pull yourself together or make way. labour is the only party that can bring together those who voted leave and those who backed remain, and unite the country for a future beyond brexit. but his criticism of the conservatives became even harsher when he mentioned the tragedy of grenfell tower. the disdain for the powerless and the poor made our society more brutal and less caring. now that degraded regime has a tragic monument. the chilling wreckage of g re nfell tower. monument. the chilling wreckage of grenfell tower. a horrifying fire in which dozens perished and entirely
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avoidable human disaster. he launched a review of social housing. and he pledged to make private renting more affordable, too. rent controls exist in many cities across the world, and i want our cities to have that as well, and tenants to have those protections. it's easy to get applause at a speech at a conference when you mention the emergency services. jeremy corbyn linked his praise to pgy- jeremy corbyn linked his praise to pay. everyone praises them. everyone praises them, but it's labour that values them and is prepared to give them the pay rise they deserve and protect the services they provide. jeremy corbyn claims he is moving the political mainstream to the left, but he warned delegates that more work was needed if the party to put its ideas into action. i hope we have left our own divisions behind. but we must make our
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unity practical. we know that we are campaign ready. we must be government ready, too. a standing ovation was always guaranteed, but as jeremy corbyn aspires to government, his policies will now have to stand up to greater scrutiny. let's return to the labour party conference in brighton and our chief political correspondent vicki young. he certainly had the town rocking? there has been a sense of a festival. full of optimism, the people in the crowd, young and old that he particularly attracts. a lot of talk about the personal following that he seems to have and when he walked out to make that speech, at one point i was thinking, they are not going to let him speak because they were so enthused and chanting. we will have a listen to the reception he got before he started speaking. applause
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#0h applause # oh jeremy corbyn. # oh jeremy corbyn. #jeremy # oh jeremy corbyn. # jeremy corbyn‘s jeremy corbyn. # jeremy corbyn‘s jeremy corbyn. #jeremy # jeremy corbyn‘s jeremy corbyn. # jeremy corbyn‘s jeremy corbyn. # jeremy corbyn‘s jeremy corbyn. sounding almost like a football crowd there greeting him and of course, all the way through that long speech, you know, a lot of applause. so not really a surprise that they loved what he had to say. the question though is whether jeremy corbyn is right and that the centre ground is moving and moving towards him and his policies. let's discuss this more. i'm joined by lucy fisher from the times and george eastman from the new statesman. do you think there is concern that it blinds people to any criticism of him? there is that concern. criticism of him? there is that concern. but it has been interesting that people have started seeing the names of the front bench. emily
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thornbury and john mcdonnell had his name chanted. there is a sense in which the personality cult might be diversifying a little bit, but jeremy corbyn, his personal appeal does mean that perhaps some of his supporters are softer on him on some of the things like the anti—semitism i’ow of the things like the anti—semitism row that threatened to overshadow the conference. they forgive him because they see him as a genuine figure and don't believe he would condone such abuse. the anti—semitism row, but they have got anti—semitism row, but they have got a lot of their policies across haven't they? do you think they will be pleased with how it has gone? they will be very pleased. the co nfe re nce they will be very pleased. the conference had two main aims. the first is to show the party is united around jeremy corbyn's leadership in contrast to the first two years and thenl contrast to the first two years and then i think to create a sense of a party that has power within its reach and that would relish the chance to govern and to introduce policies very different from those the conservatives had advocated and i thinkjeremy corbyn's speech got
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that message across today. the charge that's often been used against him in the past is that he isa against him in the past is that he is a protest leader. he is not concerned about winning power in the country, he wants to win power within the party and i think today he did sound more like a prime minister in waiting than he ever has before. do you think housing was the main policy, eye—catching policy out of the speech? the new pledge to introduce rent controls and to impose a tax on land held by developers. it's not that they don't choose to develop, the use it or lose it and it is a very canny move because we have seen a lot of labour support has come from youth, but it is getting, older people are getting involved and i think that housing crisis, something that affects many people in their 20s and 30s, it is a great concern for the parents and grandparents of people that can't get on to the housing ladder or can't move up that ladder. that was the message that jeremy corbyn wanted the public to take home today and people watching it on tv. there
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isa and people watching it on tv. there is a little bit of disquiet from some labour mps. they have been on the fringes of this conference, haven't they? there is concern that there is over optimism, they need 60 seats in order to get a majority of one, they will be realistic and put forward policies which are going to attract people who voted tory last time around. absolutely. they are 64 seats short of a commons majority and history shows that the tories do have an amazing capacity too regenerate themselves. the next election could be several years away. of course, they're showing little sign of doing that at the moment and that will be the test for them at their conference. it is hard to see brexit not fracturing the tories and having very negative economic effects, but of course the big challenge for labour is keeping themselves united over brexit. there are some mps who feel that labour's sta nce are some mps who feel that labour's stance are too europhile and there are others who feel it is too
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eurosceptic. brexit was not debated. the debate over whether labour should back free movement, but that issue will resurge once parliament returns. you know, everyone will move back to westminster in a few weeks and of course, that's the point where brexit does dominate everything and really despite the eye—catching policies that labour are coming up with, it will be their response to what the conservatives are doing over brexit won't it that will decide what happens in politics over the next few years? in the corridors outside the conference hall people have been discussing the question of whether labour has to come down on one side or the other on these divisive issues of free movement and membership of the single market and credit union. i don't think they need to do that... they can sit and watch. they can set a high barwanting they can sit and watch. they can set a high bar wanting the benefits of these things without having any commitment to the eu, setting tests for the the conservatives and the conservatives fail. critics may say
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while it maybe a wise move for party unity, it is not necessarily in the national interest for labour not to be setting out their own vision of what a brexit should look like. how much do you think the leadership will be concerned about the row over anti—semitism? will be concerned about the row over anti—semitism ? the will be concerned about the row over anti—semitism? the idea that they are not taking it seriously and the online abuse that some suffered from? jeremy corbyn did speak out today about not accepting the way you treat people, but he didn't talk specifically about it? that's where there is division within the party. some feel thatjeremy there is division within the party. some feel that jeremy corbyn needs to be more explicit in his condemnation of that. the party would say we have seen new rules agreed at this conference on tackling anti—semitism and other forms of abuse, but i think having negative vibes around the party is never a good thing and certainly, labour support among jewish supporters was very low at the last election and it is not the message of hope and optimism that you want to travel, on the other hand, at all
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political conferences there are always unpleasant comments made at fringe events and jeremy corbyn's team feel some of his opponents seek to blame him for things which are beyond his control. when he says the centre shifts and it can be anywhere and it is moving towards him and towards labour and their set of radical policies and a bigger role for the state in all walks of life. it is impossible to answer, i know, but i'm going to ask you anyway. do you think that's the case, the centre ground is not where pundits and others thought that it was?m isa and others thought that it was?m is a moveable concept. we are talking about concepts such as nationalisation of public utility companies after labour pledged to bring water companies, railways and energy companies back under public control in their manifesto. the fact that people are discussing that on the bbc across the land means that it is now within the acceptable bounds of policy. it is plausible since labour did better than
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expected in the general election. i think we have to take the party more seriously than the media as a hole collectively did before hand. seriously than the media as a hole collectively did beforehand. george, do you agree? the public on some of theissues do you agree? the public on some of the issues have been on the left or rather at odds with conservative policies for a while, under ed miliband, there was high public support for the renationalisation of the railways and for higher taxation of the rich, for greater market regulation, but labour didn't perform well at that election. i think a lot of people thought will jeremy corbyn be seen as a prime minister? i think the big question now is to what extent was the 2017 result a backlash against the conservatives and people weren't sure whether labour or were voting in the belief that labour wouldn't be in government. next time labour will be under greater scrutiny, they will be under greater scrutiny, they will be under greater scrutiny, they will be seen as contender for power from the start. at this conference labour have improved themselves in being seen not just labour have improved themselves in being seen notjust as labour have improved themselves in being seen not just as an labour have improved themselves in being seen notjust as an opposition party, but as a credible alternative government. thank you very much.
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plenty to talk about in the speech from jeremy corbyn and of course, as this conference draws to a close, eve ryo ne this conference draws to a close, everyone will start looking ahead to next week at the conservatives. vicki young there in brighton. a man has died after armed police opened fire on a car near bristol. the shooting happened just off a junction of the m5 near portishead. police say the shooting is not terror related. jon kay reports. intense police activity on a road that normally carries commuter traffic onto the m5 and into bristol. with what appeared to be bullet holes in a car window. it was during rush hour this morning at 9.30am, that eyewitnesses say marked and unmarked police vehicles surrounded a red saloon car here, and that a number of shots were fired. i came up to officers on the dual carriageway this morning, stopping the traffic. at first, i thought that it was someone getting turned around, or something in the road.
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i looked down, i looked up, there were five or six shots fired, and officers standing there, the window was all smashed, and they dragged him from the vehicle. as i drove back later, i could see there was a helicopter that had landed and the road was completely closed off by then. avon and somerset police say this is a fast moving incident, which has now been referred to the independent police complaints commission. eyewitnesses say paramedic teams were on the scene within minutes with the air ambulance landing nearby. this afternoon police investigators, including forensic teams are analysing the road, drivers have been told to avoid the area. that was jon kay. our reporter sally challoner can join us live from the scene now. sincejon kay since jon kay filed that sincejon kay filed that report since jon kay filed that report the police confirmed that this isn't a terror related incident, but we
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don't know anymore details about what kind of incident it is. they have put the big barriers up so we can't see anymore what's going on, but we know that the police are still there. the investigations unit and forensic units are still there. that red car at the centre of all this is also still there. most of the information we've been getting has come from the eyewitnesses who have heard gunshots or seen something on their way to work this morning. the police asjon said have been quiet about this and of course, as he said, this is now gone to the police complaints commission as is normal when there is any firearms, police firearms involved. in the meantime the road is still shut. this is a busy commuter route. it will stay shut for the rest of the day probably causing big problems right around bristol, but we'll keep you up—to—date on any more developments as we get them. sally, thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news:
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jeremy corbyn tells his party conference that labour are ready for government. a man died after armed police opened fire on a carjust off the m5 at portishead near bristol. the government warns boeing its behaviour in a trade dispute that threatens thousands ofjobs in northern ireland could jeopardise future contracts. in sport, despite an ongoing police investigation and a hand fracture, ben stokes is named in a i6—man squad for the ashes tour to australia. no australia. n o sto kes australia. no stokes in action for england today as lewis reaches three figures for the west indies in the fourth one day international at the oval. and britain's kyle edmund is out of the open after losing in three sets in the second round. we will have more on those stories coming up at 3.30pm. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has warned
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boeing that future defence contracts with the american aerospace company could be jeopardised because of a trade dispute over its rival bombardier — the biggest employer in northern ireland. the united states has opted to impose a huge tax on jets being made by bombardier after boeing claimed they were receiving unfair state subsidies from the uk and canada. our ireland correspondent chris page reports from belfast. workers in northern ireland are caught up in a north american trade dispute, and just before midnight, they received worrying news from washington. the us department of commerce has ruled that importers of this plane, the bombadier c—series will pay tariffs of 220%. delta airlines placed an order last year for 125 of the jets. but boeing complained that financial help from the british and canadian governments has enabled bombadier to sell the c—series for less than the cost to build. bombadier says the ruling is absurd. it's disappointing, but we know that the next phase of the process is to examine the facts, and to determine whether or not boeing has been harmed.
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now, we know boeing didn't participate on the delta order, they abandoned that market years ago, so it's hard to see how there could be any harm. if the planes achieve the expected demand, it means a lot of employment in ulster. there's been a long history aircraft manufacturing on this site, and selling the planes made here has often been critical to northern ireland's economy. bombadier board short brothers almost 40 years ago. last year, it paid £158 million in wages, and accounts for over 8% of all of northern ireland's exports. and its source parts and services from 800 companies in the uk and ireland. bombadier has more than 4,000 employees here, around a quarter of them work on flagship c—series project. the wings for the plane are made in this factory. the prime minister has raised the issue with president trump in the last few weeks. the defence secretary on a visit to belfast today had a strong warning for boeing. this is not the kind of behaviour
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we expect from a long—term partner, and i've made that very clear to boeing when i met them earlier in the summer. and i've also made very clear to the new united states ambassador in london, this is not behaviour we respect this is not behaviour we expect of boeing, and could indeed jeopardise our future relationship with boeing. although the ruling in america has caused huge concern, it is a preliminary decision. us trade authorities will give theirfinal verdict early next year. davy thompson is the co—ordinator for northern ireland at the trade union unite and is himself a former bombardier employee. he's in our belfast newsroom. good afternoon to you. good afternoon. i'm going to read what i have just seen on the reuters news agency. they say that boeing uk claim any threat to bombardier is due to the weakness of its product in the market place. what's your reaction to that? well, let's speak
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in terms of orders, everybody has been aware of that for sometime. this has been a hostile attack by boeing ina this has been a hostile attack by boeing in a market they are not bidding for work in. so when sir michael fallon threatens boeing in the way he has, that's something you would welcome, is it? we have been calling for it for sometime. we're glad to see that both michael fallon and the prime minister today has been a bit stronger. a bit too late, but stronger in their words. a bit too late because you saw this coming? well, we have seen this here coming? well, we have seen this here coming for the last few months. has been pressed upon the british government that they needed to step in and put as much leverage in terms of boeing to resolve this issue to get boeing around the table speaking to people, but we believe that should have been done weeks ago and not the day after the decision.“ this was the other way around, would you have sympathy with a british company saying hang on a minute, it is not fair that another country is getting sub sidity? this sub sidity
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is in the form of repayment loans. all companies in the aerospace markets do and will continue in the future to get subsidies and boeing and airbus have been in struckles with wto for the last 15 years claiming illegal subsidies against each other. when you look at boeing and bombardier, they are not really comparing like for like. why are they hell bent or taking this so far? we see this as a dispute with the united states administration and the united states administration and the canadian administration and u nfortu nately the canadian administration and unfortunately bombardier has been caught up. this is the first dispute to go outside wto, we are confident that any subsidies looked at within wto would fit within the regulations. any trouble for a company like bombardier has repercussions? it is massive repercussions? it is massive repercussions for the whole of northern ireland, just the industry would be decimated in term of aerospace. the uk has a massive supply chain. the rest of ireland
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has a massive supply chain. so, it just doesn't impact on belfast as some people have suggested. this impacts across northern ireland, the republic of ireland, and the uk as a whole. we could be in for a long drawn out and messy process, couldn't we? we could be, but unfortunately the way the itc works if you were to deliver a plane to america today, you would have to pay the penalty. it seems unjustified that you have no natural justice in terms of an appeal before any penalties are levied against you, but unfortunately that's the way it works. the cost of the plane yesterday and the difference with the cost today? well, the difference yesterday and today is a 220% levy put into any planes going into the us. it doesn't affect the rest of the markets across the globe and hopefully bombardier can pick up more orders. we are aware that they are in talks with a lot of companies at this moment in time about taking it on because the plane has proved it on because the plane has proved it is worth in terms of how well it is doing in full efficiencies and
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environmental issues, so it is proach and it is worthwhile and really the technology that's in belfast is second to none throughout the world. davey, thank you very much. david thompson, thank you very much indeed for your time. thank you. ryanair has announced that it will extend its current daily flight cancellations until next march. europe's biggest airline had already cancelled as many as 50 flights a day throughout the end of september and into october after the airline's boss, michael o'leary, admitted a "significant management failure" in scheduling pilots' leave. ryanair has announced that it will extend its current daily flight we're now hearing the cancellations will go on into next year. well, our correspondent, simon gompertz has been following the latest developments. if you talk to ryanair this is them solving their problem, they say they will eliminate all risk of further flight will eliminate all risk of further flight cancellations. by cancelling the flights? if you look at it from the flights? if you look at it from the passengers point of view, it is
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ina swoop, the passengers point of view, it is in a swoop, creating another 400,000 annoyed people because their particular journeys annoyed people because their particularjourneys have been cancelled. it involves suspending 34 routes over this period from november to march. i have been looking at the list and important routes like london to edinburgh, london to glasgow from stansted airport. other flights from edinburgh and glasgow, some from newcastle and a number between different continental european cities. what's going on here? are they looking at the response to their previous announcements and seen people are still booking flights. the reputational damage is not as bad as was feared for them? it is an indication that the problem is slightly more deep seated. you can't solve it by cancelling the 50 flights a day over the six—week period that we are in. it is spilling into the months afterwards. they have got to do something about it. there has been an inkling about this and they need to tell the passengers about it. if not only
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because for financial reasons because for financial reasons because if they give more than two weeks notice, then they're not liable to pay that compensation of about £200 per passenger, per flight, about £200 per passenger, per flight, that european law requires. what they have done to try to soften the blow is to give people vouchers which should cover the cost of an extra flight. you won't only be able to rebook and get your money back if you want to, if you're one of the new 400,000 flights that have been cancelled between november and march, but they are sending you a voucher which will be worth 40 euros for each leg of the flight and they say that's more than the average price of one of their flights so it is like a free flight voucher and the people who are cancelled at the moment, this six—week period to the end of november, they are getting that as well. simon gompertz there. merseyside police are looking for a man who walked into a nursery school this morning, carrying what looked like a gun. the man is believed to have entered the childsplay nursery in the wavertree area of liverpool, before leaving with a second
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man on a motorcycle. detectives say he was looking for another man, who is not a member of staff. measles has been eliminated in the uk for the first time, say global health leaders. in the uk for the first time, the disease was nearly eradicated in the 1990s but the mmr scandal saw vaccination rates plunge. health officials said rates have now reached the recommended 95% coverage level in five—year—olds. let's get more on this story with our world health correspondent tulip mazumdar. how significant is this announcement today? well, it is very significant. it is very positive news. what this means is that we have managed in the uk to stop this disease which is one of the world's biggest killer of children. we have managed to stop it spreading freely which means even if we have cases coming in internationally or there are small outbreaks, they are quickly contained and they don't spread wildly through the population and the key reason for that is vaccination rates. they are high. they have gone up to 95% here in england and that was just announced
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last week. and that would have happened, we would have reached the milestone like you said in the mid—90s had it not for somebody called andrew wakefield a the end of the 90s he published a paper which has been discredited making a link between the mmr jab which protects against measles and autism. he was struck off. the lancetjournal which published that, restract tracted it, however the damage had been done. what we saw were the number of people being vaccinated falling and the number of measles cases rising, but over the last few years, that's improved. there have been lots of information campaigns, people kind of understand that there wasn't any evidence to back that and they have become more comfortable with vaccinating their children. the 95% is really important, once you have vaccinated 95% of the population for measles you achieve herd immunity which means enough people in the
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country are imnieced and they have protection so the disease is less able to spread. less likely, less able, but not impossible. are we saying outbreaks are never going to happen, or highly unlikely? this is the thing with the phrase "elimination" it doesn't mean it is wiped out. for mealsles need to be wiped out. for mealsles need to be wiped out, it would need to be wiped out globally, we have travel and people coming from different countries and they carry diseases with them. last year, for example, in the uk you might remember we had a little spike in measles case around 500 in england, many associated with festivals in england, lots of young people coming together and perhaps there was a gap there in some of the young people being vaccinated, but that was contained. it didn't spread further which is why we can still talk about elimination, but health authorities are saying for that reason, for the fa ct are saying for that reason, for the fact that we are still seeing big outbreaks elsewhere, including in europe, there are big outbreaks, thousands of cases in italy, romania
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and we have seen cases from there affect people here in the uk with travel so because of that, health authorities are saying don't get complacent and they are making the point if you weren't vaccinated when you were younger perhaps at the time of that wakefield scare, that come forward and be vaccinated now, it is not too late because the consequences catching measles, we don't see it in this country, but internationally about 15 people die every hour from measles. this is a good news story and we should be pleased by that. tulip, thank you very much. the headlines are coming up. now, let's get a weather update from sarah keith—lucas. warm and bright weather across many eastern parts. further west, a different story. certainly some late sunshine for eastern scotland and eastern lingle
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and —— england. then the rain pushes into night with some fairly brisk wind. for most of us tomorrow, still mild and frost—free first thing tomorrow. eventually we lose the cloud and rain from eastern parts tomorrow. it will linger for cloud and rain from eastern parts tomorrow. it will lingerfor a cloud and rain from eastern parts tomorrow. it will linger for a while for the northern parts of scotland but for most places, a return to dry and sunny conditions. then as we move through thursday evening, another change with another area of low pressure heading in. the wind is picking up with some rain for northern ireland initially and pushing into scotland, wales and england later in the day on friday. sunshine and showers later on in the day on friday. not as warm as it has been. jeremy corbyn has told the labour party conference that the party is ready for government.
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closing the conference in brighton, he said people's views were changing, leaving his party as the real centre of gravity. a man has died after armed police opened fire on a car near bristol. police say they have informed the independent police complaints commission. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has warned boeing its trade dispute with bombardier could jeopardise future defence contracts with the uk government. ryanair has said it's cancelling an extra 18,000 flights, with another 400,000 travellers set to be affected. time for the sport. good afternoon. we start with the cricket. england are taking on the west indies in the fourth one—day international at the oval, with the west indies needing victory to stay in the series. they are going pretty well at the moment. the west indies are on 270—4. our
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captain has just reached the west indies are on 270—4. our captain hasjust reached his half—century. no ben stokes at the oval today. however he has been included for the upcoming match. plus recalls for hampshire's james vince and yorkshire's garry ballance, however there is no place for fast bowler mark wood.. stokes will remain as vice—captain pending ecb disciplinary proceedings and more tests are due to be carried out on his hand, though he is expected to be fit in time for the first test. he was arrested in the early hours of monday morning on suspicion
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of causing actual bodily harm, following an incident at a bristol nightclub. here's what two former england captains have to say. mesa what you need when you go to australia is to know exactly what is happening. there are issues. everything that could go wrong is pretty much up there. you have to do what we used to do with ian botham. you let these people run, you let them do the best they can. ben has matured a lot in the last few years, as a player and as an ambassador. this incident is a setback. no one is going to deny that. but you want ben stokes, and whether or not you give him the vice captaincy does not matter, he's the sort of character who inspires a side coming
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here is your pivot. they can do extraordinary things. he's the kind of person you want in a dressing room. the top tier of the women's super league will be for top tier clubs only in coming years. all clubs will have to reapply for their places and new sides could come in. top—flight clu bs new sides could come in. top—flight clubs will be required to run academies. the fa is looking into how the new setup could be reprinted. britain's kyle edmund has been knocked out of the chengdu open in the second round by americanjared donaldson. britain's number two had a disastrous start, losing the first set 6—0. but after recovering to win the second set, eventually lost out 6—4 in the decider. just days after announcing he's signed with promoter frank warren, belfast‘s carl frampton's long—awaited homecoming fight has been announced for november. after splitting with long time manager barry mcguigan last month —
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this will be his first fight since losing his wba featherweight title to leo santa cruz injanuary. his opponent in belfast is yet to be announced. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. jeremy corbyn has told delegates at the labour party conference in brighton that the party is standing on the threshold of power. he says the party is ready for government. in a speech lasting more than an hour, he said tory governments had shown themselves to be callous and calculating. he began by hailing the party's unexpectedly good showing in the june general election. we won the largest increase in a labour vote since 1945. and achieved
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labour's best boat for a generation. —— their best vote. we are on the threshold of power. he also faced down critics that said the party had not done enough to stop abuse within party ranks. it is even more important that we all stand together. yes. mac applause there will be times when we disagree, that there can never ever, be any excuse for abuse of anybody i anybody. we are not accepting it and not allowing it. more later. count 100 women it change the world
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ina month? count 100 women it change the world in a month? that is the inspiration for the bbc‘s new programme. women are charged with coming up with innovations for some of the biggest problems facing women today. music millions of women suffer from iodine deficiency, and it is linked to breast cancer and a lot of complications during pregnancy. one
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in five women in the us will be a victim of rape or attempted rape. the beauty of the product lies in the fact that you are not asking them to change anything. so basically it is taking self defence tools, making it safe for the person wearing it, and using technology to make it better. what if you could change the lives of women by coming up with a new idea? this october, bbc‘s 100 women will attempt to change the world. but they need your help. send us your ideas online and join this year's 100 women challenge. and one of those 100 women is with
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me now. she is a lecturer at university college, london. it was in london in 2012 that your story in some sense starts because it is how you responded to a pretty grim moment in your life that has got everybody‘s attention. you were sexually assaulted on and underground train. yes, on my way to work i was on a busy northern line and found myself pushed up against somebody who proceeded to mass debate on me and when i got to work i found that he had a jack voted on me. you decided to do something... a lot of people would say, that was brave. what did you do? it took me a little while. i was getting to grips with what had happened and other abuse that had also happened in public. as a dancer, i decided the
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best thing for me would be to go back to replace it had happened and make some noise. i went back with a massive sign and dampest to take —— andi massive sign and dampest to take —— and i danced in order to get my message across. i and i danced in order to get my message across. i felt great. and i danced in order to get my message across. ifelt great. it felt like i was responding with my body in a place where my body was abused, and it just body in a place where my body was abused, and itjust felt really empowering and from then on i have increasingly broad sexual violence into my work and my campaigning. i've come on to that but when you did that dance, how did women and men react? did anyone to come and talk to you about it? yes, i had loads of support. go on, girl. i am sorry that happened for you. a lot of people shed their own stories. that was moving. a lot of people we re that was moving. a lot of people were also slightly uncomfortable. hopefully not too uncomfortable. i
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am ok with causing a little bit of discomfort if there is a broader progressive issue on the table. there is a much wider issue in terms of harassment. in london, it is everywhere. so how do you hope to change things? there are lots of ways in which we can start to tackle issues of harassment in public. awareness raising is really important as a first step that there is also —— there is also training weekend days with people who are bystanders. how to use what —— how to spot the signs of harassment and intervene. there is also great work being done with the un, working with a company called safety pin who are mapping on a map safe areas where you can report issues. there are also designed solutions we can put in place to design the infrastructure that supports women's
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safety. give as an example. an obvious one is the levels of lighting. when you're talking about safety, especially for women in places, a key issue is a feeling of safety, not just the actual safety statistics so if we can make women feel safer by providing good signage to where they can get help and support to making sure there are no dark spaces, and also to make sure that when we overcrowd public spaces, we understand how we are doing that and if we can reduce the amount of overcrowding that is another thing to increase safety. amount of overcrowding that is another thing to increase safetylj wish another thing to increase safety.” wish you well be the campaign. congratulations on being one of the 100 women. i am delighted. good luck. a reminder there is much more from that series. it is on our website. ina
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in a moment, a summary of the business news, but first i headlines. jeremy corbyn tells his party conference that labour is now the political mainstream and is ready for government. a man has died after armed police opened fire on a carjust off the m5 near portishead in bristol. the government warns bowing its behaviour in a trade dispute threatening jobs in northern ireland could jeopardise future contracts. —— the government wants the company burying. in the business news: more agony for ryanair passengers. the company says it's going to cancel yet more flights in a move that will affect 40,000 customers. earlier this month, the company cancelled up to 50 flights a day after admitting to "messing up" the holiday rotas for pilots. three million people in final salary pension schemes only have a 50/50 chance of getting the pay—outs they were promised. that's according to the pensions and lifetime savings association. high—profile cases, like the collapse of bhs, have raised concerns
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about the future of workplace pensions. the uk's final salary schemes have a total deficit of £400 billion. uber is in the employment appeal tribunal today to argue that their drivers are self employed — rather than employed by the company. do you fancy flying in a plane powered by electric batteries? easyj et powered by electric batteries? easyjet is looking at a prototype. it will be developed by an american firm. our guestjoins me now. when i first heard about this, it sounded quite futuristic. is it really practical? it is practical. we will
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have to see quite a big development in battery technology. it very much depends on that but that is one of the areas where an enormous amount of research and research investment is going into. that is really all thatis is going into. that is really all that is holding us back. we have electric motors that are so powerful, tiny little things, a tiny fraction of the size of a jet engine or petrol engine, so those are much smaller. the control systems that utilise that power are very advanced. the only drawback at the moment is batteries, and that technology is advancing very quickly. when you say the only drawback is batteries, do you mean having to change the batteries frequently? there are experimental planes flying around now, or actually production light aircraft flying around now, and have been for a few days... two years ago i went to see the first flight across the english channel from kent to calais in an airbus industrie's two seater light aircraft with fans at the
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back. it was purely electric and flew for an hour and a half without any trouble. the pilot was very pleased with it, it was a smooth ride. i was pleased not tojoin him and to watch from the safety of the ground. there is a lot less to go wrong with an electric aircraft than the aircraft we use now. they are mechanically much simpler. so there is an enormous amount of advantages, chiefly noise. i could not hear that plane take off only the wind. do you think it will take a bit of persuasion to persuade luddites such as myself to think these things are safe when they come along? must at one of the things i have had long discussions with every nautical engineers on both our temper and airbus, is this it is a combination of things. —— both at boeing and airbus. once a plane has reached cruising altitude you use
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electricity and it does not use very much. it can go an enormous distance without using much energy. you reclaim that energy as the plane coming is —— is coming back into ground. it will generate electricity and recharge the battery. another company is looking at getting aircraft to take off using electricity. it is in the very early days at the moment. thank you. in other business news — full year profits have more than doubled at hotel chocolat — that figure coming in at £11 million pounds. it opened 12 new stores over the year, taking its total to 94. the company behind peppa pig says the release of its first movie is boosting its brand around the world. entertainment one, says the cartoon character's first big screen appearance raked in more than three—and—a—half million twitter is allowing double its
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character limit for some users. the eu has slapped a huge fine of 771 million pounds on european truckmaker scania, accusing the firm of colluding to fix prices and avoid the costs of stricter pollution rules. the eu antitrust regulators ruled that scania, owned by volkswagen, and five other truckmakers colluded for 14 years. it has been a positive day around the world on the markets. bank stocks have been doing well here, especially those operating in us. the pound has eased against the euro and the dollar. that makes it easier for british companies selling abroad, so their shares are going up. that's all the business news.
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more than 75,000 people have now been moved from their homes on the indonesian island of bali, as a volcano there threatens to erupt for the first time in more than 50 years. a 12—kilometre exclusion zone is now in force around mount agung, after more than 500 tremors were detected on monday. our correspondent hywel griffith reports from bali. forced to flee their homes, these are just some of the 80,000 balinese people waiting for nature to take its course. nobody can tell them if or when an eruption will come, but the risk is just too great for them to remain in their villages. the wait creates fear and frustration. translation: i am bored spending days and days here. at home, i can work, i have my cows and chickens to take care of. it hurts that my home has been abandoned. this sports centre is just one of nearly 400,000 evacuation centres around the island. people are making use of gym mats mattresses, whatever they can find to be comfortable.
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they could be in for a long wait — nobody knows if an eruption comes whether it will take hours, days, or maybe even weeks. mount agung is a sacred site for the balinese — people face towards it as they pray — but the threat of an eruption risks ending lives and livelihoods. translation: i am scared, really scared, as the volcano is going to erupt. i am still waiting for the latest news from the government. i am a construction worker. because of the news that said the volcano will erupt, the head of our construction site said to shut down and didn't tell us when to start again, so i am unemployed. for others on the island, volcanic activity is keeping them busy. hundreds of earthquakes have been measured each day. today brought the strongest yet. but experts can only say the eruption is imminent. while one part of the island is in natural disaster mode, another tries to continue as normal. tourist flights are still arriving.
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without them, bali would lose its biggest industry. and so everyone is braced for what the next days will bring. women in saudi arabia will be allowed to drive legally for the first time from next year. the gulf kingdom is the only country in the world that has, until now, forbidden women from driving. those who defied the law risked being arrested or fined. after years of campaigning, the law will be changed next june, after a decree from the country's king. our guest is with me now. this is the good news it appears to be?m is one small step for women in saudi arabia. they have many more rights to fight for, but it is a start. the practicalities are still being worked out. we're not sure whether
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this means a woman can still get into a this means a woman can still get intoa carand this means a woman can still get into a car and drive. might she still need a man next to her? they have not released details. we do not know whether you have to have a male sitting next to you in the car or not. i'm hoping that will not be the case. how big a deal is this for women in saudi arabia? it is big deal because women have been campaigning for years that this and women obviously were in saudi arabia is unique in the world in not being allowed to drive. this will open up so many opportunities for women. not in the near future, so many opportunities for women. not in the nearfuture, perhaps, but definitely in the medium term, because how can women participate fully in the workforce if they are not able to transport themselves there, for example. why is this happening now? it is an interesting time for the crown prince of saudi arabia because he is being groomed to ta ke arabia because he is being groomed
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to take over from his father, the current king. this is one thing that will support king salman's future strategy. women need to be in the workplace and for that to happen, they need to be able to transport themselves to the workplace. when you say they need to diversify the economy, they know the oil is running out? yes, they are aware of that. there has been a programme by the saudi government to educate saudi nationals abroad so that they can come back in saudi arabia and contribute to the economy, but without women, their vision will not be realistic. what else needs to be on the list of things that need to change? obviously, participation in public life is not just change? obviously, participation in public life is notjust about work. as we know from, say, the uk after
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the second world war, the participation of women in factories because men were busy fighting open up because men were busy fighting open up space for women to participate more fully in political life, so hopefully this kind of trajectory can happen in saudi arabia in the not too distant future and these wider rights of what is needed. good to have some good news. absolutely, we have had a lot of bad news from saudi arabia but i can tell you one thing. despite the image of saudi arabia ina thing. despite the image of saudi arabia in a country in which eve ryo ne arabia in a country in which everyone is conservative, actually beaten people want more rights and wa nt to beaten people want more rights and want to participate in public life and to be heard. thank you. sarah keith—lucas has the weather. contrasts west to east across the country. things have been turning wet and windy from the west. a bit of blue sky and fairweather
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cloud around. here is the satellite image. clear skies in stevenage but contrast that with bill from crew, the second picture comes from. we have that grey cloud. it will clear off in have that grey cloud. it will clear offina have that grey cloud. it will clear off in a few hours. this band in the west with its suddenly strengthening breeze, strong at times. further east across the country, if you more hours of sunshine to be enjoyed before the arrival of the rain. it will push into the western isles of scotland, dumfries and galloway and still across northern ireland at 6pm. also raining across cumbria and lancashire but to the east of the pennines, drier and brighter weather into the evening hours. across wales and south—west england, still wet weather to be seen through the shower this evening. as we move further east, largely dried for the likes of the london region, east anglia and other areas. warm for
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this time of year. interviews evening, the rain pushes east. we will all see some wet weather in the early hours of thursday morning. that will be followed by clearer skies moving in from the west. we could have some frost patches —— mist patches. no frost. cloud and outbreaks of rain in the east still, just lingering in the northern scotland. elsewhere in the country every jot of northern scotland. elsewhere in the country everyjot of higher pressure bringing a drier story. —— a band higher pressure. it will feel a much better day in the west. then this area of low pressure pushes into the north—west later on friday, with its trailing by the front which will bring some ad breaks of rain from west to east across the country, followed by a mix of sunshine and showers. not quite as warm as it has
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been. through the weekend, things are set to stay pretty mild. it looks like we could have some increasingly unsettled, wet and windy weather as we work through the weekend. the forecast for the weekend. the forecast for the weekend and beyond still a bit u nsettled, weekend and beyond still a bit unsettled, so keep up to day. this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at 4pm: #oh # oh jeremy corbyn. # oh jeremy corbyn. #jeremy # oh jeremy corbyn. # jeremy corbyn's, jeremy corbyn. after an enthusiastic welcome in the conference hall, jeremy corbyn tells supporters in brighton that — despite the election loss — labour stands on the threshold of power. yes, we didn't do quite well enough and we remain in opposition for now, but we've become a government in waiting. a man has died after armed police
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opened fire on a car at portishead near bristol. the government warns boeing its behaviour in a trade dispute that threatens thousands ofjobs in northern ireland could jeopardise future contracts. also in the next hour, more misery for ryanair passengers. the airline says it's cancelling an extra 18,000 flights in a move
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