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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 28, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, it is thursday 28 september. ryanair is threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights. the move by the air regulator follows the cancellation of thousands more flights, affecting tens of thousands of people. also this morning: run. hide. tell. a new campaign to warn children not to put themselves in danger by filming terror attacks. the founder of playboy magazine, hugh hefner, has died aged 91. it is 18 months until we are expected to leave the european
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union, soi expected to leave the european union, so i am looking at how it could impact different areas of our life. today i am looking at travel, so life. today i am looking at travel, soiam life. today i am looking at travel, so i am out of aviation centre where they train up pilots. —— at an aviation centre. in sport: it was a successful night for the british teams in the champions league. chelsea grabbed a dramatic victory against atletico madrid. there were also wins for manchester united and celtic. and carol has the weather. good morning, from the roof of broadcasting house in london. the rain in the east now slowly moving away. there is also some drizzle but it will linger across the north—east. in the west, a different story. the fog will lift, we will see some sunshine, and a few showers. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning, first our main story: ryanair has been threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights, after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched enforcement action against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption. it is the first step towards court action, as sarah corker reports. it has been a turbulent few weeks for europe's biggest airline. ryanair blames its cancellation chaos on messing up
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pilot holiday rosters. but the civil aviation authority has accused the no—frills carrier of persistently misleading passengers. it said ryanair was wrong to claim it did not have to re—route affected passengers on rival airlines. and this second raft of cancellations relations will affect 18,000 flights. disru pting another 400,000 passengers. the airline says it will place 25 fewer planes, to cut the risk of further cancellations. and more than 30 routes will be suspended, including popular tourist routes like london stansted to edinburgh and glasgow. and, earlier this month, the airline cancelled up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. it has also dropped its plan to buy the italian carrier alitalia.
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the company insists it has no pilot shortage. passengers are being offered a full refund and vouchers of up to 80 euros, while ryanair could end up in court. sarah corker, bbc news. simon calder is the independent‘s travel editor. he joins us now from cambridge airport. simon, this is a significant move from the aviation regulator. good morning. we will see step in a simulator, as we talk about travel later on in relation to exit. at this issue with ryanair, how significant is it, with the civil aviation authority's comments? —— brexit. well, when the regulator says you have persistently misleading passengers, things are getting very serious indeed. this all began to weeks ago when ryanair began abrupt the cancelling flights, culminating yesterday in the airline sending out e—mails to 400,000 passengers booked to travel between
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now and the end of march saying sorry, your flight has now and the end of march saying sorry, yourflight has been cancelled. and as a result of that, the aviation regulator, the cia, said, look, you really have to tell people what their rights. you have cancelled their flights, you people what their rights. you have cancelled theirflights, you have people what their rights. you have cancelled their flights, you have to tell them they have three options —— civil aviation authority. they can have a refund, they can have a different light on ryanair, or crucially, they can have a flight on another airline. and the thousands of people, particularly booked between edinburgh and glasgow and sta nsted or belfast between edinburgh and glasgow and stansted or belfast and gatwick, switching to easyjet is the obvious option, and they simply were not told about that. they were just told you really get another flight on ryanairora refund. you really get another flight on ryanair or a refund. now, you really get another flight on ryanair ora refund. now, the you really get another flight on ryanair or a refund. now, the civil aviation authority says, right, we are going to start taking legal action, which could mean massive fines and restrictions on ryanair flying. it will not get that far. ryanair says they are in correspondence with the regulator about their concerns, and the
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ryanair website already shows all three options for passengers. thank you very much for your time this morning. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do in the event of a uk terror attack, and are also warning eyewitnesses to flee the scene rather than trying to film atrocities on mobile phones. the call follows a number of attacks in the uk this year, including the manchester arena bombing, which targeted people at a pop concert. andy moore reports. i've trained in taekwondo for 16 years. the new video, aimed specifically at young people, features some famous faces, with a message that police hope is becoming familiar to the public. do you know what i'd do, in a knife or gun terror attack? i'd run... hide... tell. this campaign has been launched against a backdrop of a wave of terror attacks, including the manchester arena bomb, where many young people were killed and injured. their message is to run if you can, hide if you can't, and tell police about the threat as soon as it is safe to do so.
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after the parsons green attack on the tube in london, some people stopped to film a partially exploded device that was still on fire. police are taking this opportunity to remind everyone that their first priority is their own safety. they should move rapidly away from danger. hello, you're through to the nspcc hotline. .. the nspcc is also involved in this campaign. they have been contacted by 300 young people worried about terrorism since april. police are hoping this new message will be taught in schools and colleges to all ii—i6—year—olds. remember: run. hide. tell. we will be getting some advice from the nspcc and the met police at about 7:10am. hugh hefner, founder of the international adult magazine playboy, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises said he passed away peacefully at home, from natural causes. simonjones looks back at his life. he was the man who vowed never to
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grow up. credited with ushering in the 1960s sexual revolution, bunny girls, nightclubs, a corporatejet called big bunny, all made possible by playboy magazine. its first issue featured marilyn monroe as its ce ntrefold. featured marilyn monroe as its centrefold. it was an instant hit. by centrefold. it was an instant hit. by the 1970s, centrefold. it was an instant hit. by the 19705, 700 centrefold. it was an instant hit. by the 1970s, 700 people a month we re by the 1970s, 700 people a month were buying playboy. mr hefner, i suppose you are the world's most famous hedonist. are you a happy man? oh yes, never more happy than now. he lived a lifestyle portrayed in the magazine. he was by at the age of 86 he married his third wife, crystal harris, a playboy playmate and 60 years his junior. he fascinated, shocked and
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entertained in equal measure. he died at the playboy mansion in los angeles, surrounded by friends. his son said he defined the lifestyle and ethos at the heart of the playboy brand. the body that was responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council. the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council's track record of rehousing survivors. 20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation, and a further 52 have accepted offers in principle. theresa may will defend the free market economy later, a day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a crisis of legitimacy. the prime minister will put forward her arguments in a speech to mark the 20th anniversary of the independence of the bank of england. the children's charity unicef uk says orphaned refugee children
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with relatives in britain should to be able to come here to live with theirfamilies. it says bringing them directly to the uk would make them less likely to set out on perilous journeys to other parts of europe, and would stop them being exploited by criminal gangs. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. the perilous route to europe for thousands of refugees. amongst them, children travelling on their own, hoping to eventually reach relatives in the uk. as an ambassador for the children's charity unicef, the actor michael sheen has met many families from syria, displaced by the war there. unicef is campaigning for unaccompanied under—18s with family in the uk to be able to come here directly. at the moment, you can't apply to be reunited with your grandparents or older siblings, or aunts and uncles, unless you are already
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in europe. so what that's doing is it's making young, unaccompanied children have to take that incredibly dangerous journey to get to europe, just to have a chance to be with the only family they have. 0mar, a syrian refugee whose identity we are protecting, is getting messages from his teenage brother, still trapped in their home country. he wants to bring him here directly, and fears for the teenager's future if he stays in syria. he faces the risk of being recruited and drafted by different factions. so everyone is trying to recruit these young people. the home office says its approach is to resettle children and their families directly from conflict regions, and that unaccompanied children may be eligible to come to the uk under the vulnerable children's resettlement scheme. is it made to leave the radio on the
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your dog when you leave the house? do you? yes, it can happen sometimes, mainly because i forget to turn it off. almost half of owners survey said they felt sad when they say goodbye and close the door to their pet when they go off to work or whatever, and they have to work or whatever, and they have to leave them at home alone, so they leave the radio one. a third of owners choose to keep the tv on, a p pa re ntly owners choose to keep the tv on, apparently that dog there seemed to enjoy it, and the third say they present their 4—legged friend with a treat as they are walking out the door. that tells us that dog owners ca re door. that tells us that dog owners care about their dogs.|j door. that tells us that dog owners care about their dogs. i thought they couldn't see television. isn't there that whole myth that they cannot see in two dimensions?” would say a large chunk of our audience may be dogs after all. no offence! it must be playing absolute havoc with viewing figures or listening figures for the radio.
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they should be included. we do have animals watching this. people send pictures in. maybe the tv has been left on to entertain hundreds of dogs across the country, who knows? so some of the front and back pages. a story which has been rumbling along for a few days. it has, all about then stokes and this incident outside a bristol nightclub, after which he was arrested. 0ne outside a bristol nightclub, after which he was arrested. one of the papers has managed to get hold of a video which they say is a video of the incident. we do not know for sure. the person in the video looks a bit like ben stokes. could it be? we just a bit like ben stokes. could it be? wejust don't a bit like ben stokes. could it be? we just don't know. lots of pictures in the papers this morning and online. unverified footage has emerged this morning of what appears to be england all—rounder ben stokes involved in a brawl outside a bristol nightclub. a police investigation is ongoing into the incident, which took place after england's win in the third one—day international against the west indies. stokes has been included in a test squad to play australia in an ashes series later this year.
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well, on the pitch, england sealed the one—day series against the west indies with a win on the duckworth—lewis method at the oval. moeen ali scored late runs to take england ahead of the par score when the rain came. they lead the series 3—0, with one more to play. chelsea snatched a 2—1 victory with the last kick of the game in their champions league group match at atletico madrid. and there were victories for the other two british clubs in europe last night, as well, with celtic and manchester united also winning away from home. and the top tier of the women's super league will be for full—time clubs only from the start of next season, after the fa approved changes to the licensing system. the league will have between eight and 14 sides. but all clubs, including those currently in it, will have to apply for their places. so some wholescale changes for women's football. and that is on many of the inside pages, as well. the sun will take you through a
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literally low by blow account of that video. varady is on the daily mail, some grabs from this video which has emerged, allegedly showing ben stokes in that role outside a bristol nightclub. ian reaction to that, england have been discussing the possibility of maybe having cu rfews in place the possibility of maybe having curfews in place during that ashes tourfor curfews in place during that ashes tour for which curfews in place during that ashes tourfor which ben stokes has been picked. trevor bayliss has said normally he lets his players get on with it. they are adults, they should be able to manage themselves. there is an investigation into what happened, and they are looking into whether or not curfews should be in place, which is a bit of a shame, isn't it? big six clubs are saying, there is this new tv deal worth billions and billions of pounds, the big six clubs in the premier league, the two manchester sites, arsenal, liverpool, and tottenham, say we are the big guys and we deserve more of the big guys and we deserve more of the money than all of the other
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ones. at the moment it is split between all 20 teams in the premier league. they are saying that we want more, and there is a row going on in the premier league. the main story. the ryanair debacle. they racked the plans of 400 passengers. “— they racked the plans of 400 passengers. —— wrecked. they say 80,000 flights will be grounded this winter. we have looked atjeremy corbyn's speech yesterday. he was pointing directly at the cameras in this photo. theresa may will speak today. she will react tojeremy corbyn's claims capitalism is in crisis. she will say it is the greatest agent of collective human process ever created. and a legal storm for ryanair. that picture.
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almost everyone has used this picture. the lead story is about theresa may. the us is putting high ta riffs theresa may. the us is putting high tariffs on bombardier, uk built a i rcrafts. tariffs on bombardier, uk built aircrafts. there is a suggestion there is a trade war with the us. aircrafts. there is a suggestion there is a trade war with the use is time to get the weather. carol is in london on top of the broadcasting house. you look great but the weather looks miserable. good morning. it has been raining for many parts of the country overnight. if you are travelling, take care. there is surface water and spray on the roads. through the day that rain will is. —— ease. there will be some
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showers. scotland, nine o'clock. not the current time. a grey start. brightening up. the rain in the northern isles will stay today, tonight, and tomorrow. scotland, some sunny spells. north—west england. sunshine. weather fronts bringing cloud and rain and drizzle. murky conditions. slowly pulling away. the south—east. things improving. the midlands, the east midlands, cloud, west midlands, sunshine. wales, patchy fog. that will give way to sunshine as well. northern ireland, a similar story as well. variable cloud brightening up with some sunshine. through the course of the day, slowly, losing the weather front in the east. it will clear mid—morning for many,
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others, lunchtime. it will remain wet in the final north—east of scotland. in terms of temperatures, up scotland. in terms of temperatures, up to 19—20. late in the afternoon, clouding in northern ireland, turning hazy. the next weather front. through the evening and overnight, what you will find is the weather front will come in from the west. it will go east. the wind will strengthen around it. producing rain. it will not be a cold tonight. we pick up the rain from west to east. as it clears from the west, once again, brightening up. showers developing. some of them in the north—west, scotland in particular, tending to have the odd rumble of thunder mixed in. temperatures in the high teens at best. saturday. it will start with a dry note. sunshine
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around. a few showers in the west. the odd rumble of thunder in the north—west. then another front coming in from the west. that will bring wet and windy weather for many on sunday. at this stage, thunder is not looking good unless you like it wet and windy. it is looking good on saturday. thank you very much. see you soon. don't get wet. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: ryanair has hit more turbulence, with the regulator now threatening legal action following hundreds of thousands of extra cancellations. celebrities have taken part in a video message warning children not to put themselves in danger by filming terror attacks. this is something we enjoy on brea kfast,
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this is something we enjoy on breakfast, a big oversized prop in case you don't understand the story. here it is. there's no mistaking what this huge maroon document is. it's a breakfast—sized passport! why's it here? well, there are now 18 months until we leave the eu. today, a new bbc news series begins to look at the key issues that will affect all of us. the passport probably gives it away, but we're starting with travel. steph is at cambridge airport for us this morning. good morning. good morning. look at this. i am good morning. good morning. look at this. iam inside good morning. good morning. look at this. i am inside the cockpit of a plane. don't worry. it is not a real one. it is a training centre. they trained the pilots in here. explain what we have. this is a boeing 737. we are flying over the alps in austria. there are so many buttons!
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how do you even know where to start? that is why pilots spent 18 months learning how to fly before even getting into a simulator to get to airline level. there is a lot you need to understand.” airline level. there is a lot you need to understand. i need to ask you more through the morning so sit tight. | you more through the morning so sit tight. i will have a go at flying it. fortunately it is not real. as you said, we are here because we are talking about all the different areas impacted by leaving the european union. today i am looking at travel. i went to the airport to find out what it could mean. #come fly with me, let's fly, let's
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fly away#! travelling to any of the 27 eu countries is fairly straightforward at the moment. the british government has said it wants to keep it that way so eu citizens can come here without needing a visa and hopefully they will do the same thing for us. thank you very much. dubai. there are actually quite a lot of countries where you don't need a visa before you get there. 0ver need a visa before you get there. over 170 need a visa before you get there. 0ver170 in total, including eu countries. the government wants to keep that free flow of tourists in and out. now, if you are anything like me, you will love a bit of duty—free shopping because you are not paying taxes. some shops will give you a discount is no matter where you are going, but on the whole, duty—free only applies when you are leaving the european union. so that might be something that could change. now, let's talk
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holidaying. since we voted to leave the eu, the pound has fallen against the eu, the pound has fallen against the europe and the dollar. it is cheaper for tourists coming here, but it is more expensive to go abroad. the currency markets go up and down all the time, let's face it. over 6000 flights leave uk airports every day, more than half of them landing in europe. it is these guys at air—traffic control to make sure this happens safely. at the moment we are part of the eu single aviation market, meaning less red tape. that has helped budgetary lines. they are keen we stay part of this agreement like norway has. but that could mean we have to stick to all of the eu aviation rules, or we could do a separate agreement like switzerland have. now, we love to
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moan about queues. there was a warning earlier this year any changes to passport control after brexit could make waiting times longer after people arrive. the government has not said how it will work yet, which qe will be joined, we might have our own. these are all questions that need to be answered if we are going to have a smooth flight if we are going to have a smooth flight out of the eu. #pack up, let's fly aways#! that gives you a flavour of some of the areas of travel impacted by leaving the european union. we will talk about that more a little bit later on. and we will sit with james. it is fascinating, this. what are the key things you need to be a pilot? you need to be calm under pressure. these days, modern aircraft are
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automated. a lot of the job has changed over the years. it is less about being hands—on, though that is still important, but you need to be a good decision maker, you need situational awareness, and you need to stay really calm in a crisis. and also, these days, it is more about management skills, customer skills, and leadership. yeah. really interesting. thank you. and you will show me how to land later. you will have a go. don't worry. thank you very much. more from me a little bit later on. that is fascinating, it isn't it? we will be back to see her land a plane. i am pleased it is not a real one. still to come. for many it is seen as the gentle man's game, but from today you can be sent off for bad
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behaviour. i did not know that was not the case already. see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. a serious collision at gatwick airport has left the lace. surrey police said the crash just before midnight involved two vehicles. —— delays. this is how it looks on the m23, issues southbound. the a406 northbound is closed. the
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tubes. the number of teenagers in london being hurt with knives has gone up almost a third in the last five years. according to figures obtained by the bbc, there were more than 1,200 injuries to people under 20 last year. despite this, some teenagers believe knife crime is not something to worry about and have instead learned to avoid getting into situations that put them at risk. some people obviously i have had altercations with. after a shift with my friends they will look at me and give me that look. i will not argue with them. they might have a
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knife. there is no point for me to step into that situation because i cannot get out. i will ignore it and get out of the situation. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a thoroughly wet and miserable night. nearly an inch of rain in places through the night. still some to the east of london. pulling away nicely. drying up this morning and becoming more bright as the day moves on, turning into a fine afternoon. mist and murk at the moment. be aware of that as you get out of the door. improving as it moves to the north sea. 20 degrees. tomorrow, we start with yet more rain. moving in through the night. showers through the day tomorrow. a few heavy ones in the afternoon. clearing up in the afternoon. 20. that gives us a fine start to the
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weekend. saturday is the better of the two days. behind me you can see wet weather moving in for sunday. the isobars are starting to pack together, meaning it is getting ever windier. saturday is the better of both. wet and windy later on the day on sunday. feeling autumnal to start the new week. wet and windy weather on monday the plight more from us in half an hour. —— monday. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: they fought for years for justice over his death. now, connor sparrowhawk‘s family have decided to tell his life story, in the hope of highlighting the treatment of people with learning difficulties. you may remember this story we brought you yesterday about the postman who had a toy traffic cone in his lung
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for 40 years. we will find out how he is getting on in about an hour. and france's former first lady carla bruni has a new album. she will be here to tell us about reuniting with the original supermodels, living life as the president's wife, and how she learnt to speak english by listening to the beatles. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights, after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched enforcement action against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption. it is the first step towards court action, as sarah corker reports. it has been a turbulent few weeks for europe's biggest airline. ryanair blames its cancellation chaos on messing up pilot holiday rosters.
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but the civil aviation authority has accused the no—frills carrier of persistently misleading passengers. it said ryanair was wrong to claim it did not have to reroute customers on rival airlines. the warning came as more cancellations were announced yesterday. and this second raft of cancellations relations will affect 18,000 flights. disru pting another 400,000 passengers. the airline says it will place 25 fewer planes, to cut the risk of further cancellations. and more than 30 routes will be suspended, including popular tourist routes like london stansted to edinburgh and glasgow. and, earlier this month, the airline cancelled up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. it has now also dropped its plan to buy the italian carrier alitalia. the company insists it has no pilot shortage. passengers are being offered a full refund and vouchers of up to 80 euros, while ryanair
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could end up in court. sarah corker, bbc news. children are being warned not to stop and take pictures if they are caught up in a terror attack. the advice is part of a new campaign aimed at young people, following an increased number of attacks in the uk. police also want the safety measures to be introduced in classrooms. it comes after images of the bomb at parsons green were posted online within minutes. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises inc said he passed away peacefully at home, from natural causes. hefner began publishing playboy in his kitchen at home in 1953. it became the largest—selling men's magazine in the world, shifting seven million copies a month at its peak. his son cooper hefner said he would be greatly missed by many. the body that was responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council.
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the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council's track record of rehousing survivors. 20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation, and a further 52 have accepted offers in principle. there is widespread disruption on the m23 near gatwick airport this morning, after a serious collision which left one person dead and others injured. the southbound carriageway is currently closed, leaving long tailbacks. surrey police said the crash, which happened just before midnight, involved two vehicles. it is not yet clear when the lanes will be reopened. president trump has called for the biggest us tax overhaul in three decades. he proposed tax cuts for most americans, but was criticised for suggesting the tax rate for corporations should be lowered from 35% to 20%. democrats say the proposals reward the wealthy, and could add trillions of dollars to the deficit. president trump insisted that working men and women would benefit most. but our country, and our economy, cannot take off like it should,
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unless we dramatically reform america's outdated, complex, and extremely burdensome tax code. it's a relic. got to change it. we have to compete — compete with other countries. let's talk to kat now. we will be talking about ben stokes in a moment. it is the sun which has kept him in the headlines after he was arrested outside a nightclub in bristol on monday night. they have managed to get their hands on a video which they claim shows the brawl in which he was allegedly involved and for which he was arrested, and they say that this shows that he was involved in that,
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but we don't know for sure whether it is. it is not verified. it is all over the papers, all over the internet as well. video footage has emerged that allegedly shows england's ben stokes in a brawl outside a nightclub. the all—rounder was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after an incident in bristol on monday. he was detained overnight and released under investigation, while inquiries continue. despite this, stokes has been selected as vice captain for the england squad's upcoming ashes series in australia. the squad features a potential seven ashes debutants, mixed in with some vast experience. ultimately, it doesn't matter who is on the plane. it is a very special tour to the beyond, and, you know, it is one of those iconic tours. and luckily, you know, in a month's time we can get out there, hopefully get together as a squad and play some very good cricket, and yes, it will be very special. well, england were without stokes for theirfourth one—day international with the west indies at the oval, but they came through, winning by six runs
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on the duckworth—lewis method to seal the series. england were up against it when moeen ali came to the crease, but once again he salvaged their innings, alongside jos buttler. they scored quickly to take england six runs ahead of the par score when the rain came. england go 3—0 up in the series, with one more match to play. the nature, and everything we do, and everything we enjoy, is about playing cricket. so to get away from the distraction and produced a performance like this, you know, the proof is in the pudding. the guys we re proof is in the pudding. the guys were focused coming into the game, and focused on winning the series, so very proud today. there is lots of talk today about cricketers playing badly on the pitch. there has been a massive rise in the number of matches cancelled because of fights. we didn't know that you could not be
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sent off as a creator. apparently the only option is to say this has all got out of hand, we are abandoning the game, and it is cancelled. and there is no regulation on the size of the bat?” don't know if there is no regulation, at they will say, look, this is how big it can be. we will talk to one of the changers of the rules, and apparently you raise your arm and flap at up and down. in the 93rd minute, with the very last kick of the game, chelsea scored to win 2—1 at atletico madrid. michy batshuayi came on as a substitute only moments before slotting home the winner. it is the first time any english club has won at atletico, and the victory takes chelsea two points clear in their group. much of the pre—match focus had been on diego costa, who has officially left the londoners to rejoin his old club.
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we deserved to win. we continue to play with good personality. we kept our head on the pitch, in every moment of the game, and yes, we deserved to win, against a really good team like atletico madrid. celtic won their first european group match in 17 attempts, with what was in the end a comfortable 3—0 win away at belgian side anderlecht. that result moves them off the bottom of their group, level on points with second—placed bayern munich. captain scott brown says this group of players are creating history. managerjose mourinho was full of praise for romelu lukaku, after the striker scored twice as manchester united emphatically beat cska moscow, 4—1. the belgian has now scored ten goals in nine appearances, a record mourinho says is amazing. first 30 minutes, we had four shots. we scored three goals, and the keeper made a phenomenal save to a first—post shot.
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so we started really strong, and by winning 3—0, we had the game in our hands, and then was just to control. so it was really good. the top tier of the women's super league will be for full—time clubs only from the start of next season, after the fa approved changes to the licensing system. the league will have between eight and 14 sides. but all clubs, including those currently in it, will have to apply for their places. top—flight clubs will be required to run an academy, under the new criteria. and finally, the story of when one sporting legend got to meet his hero. manchester city manager and former barcelona boss pep guardiola was just a schoolboy when gary lineker starred for the catalan club. pep admits lineker was his idol, and the two finally caught up for a good chat for this evening's premier league show. do you know, i was a ball boy, and gave pupils to play with.”
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do you know, i was a ball boy, and gave pupils to play with. i didn't know, i probably didn't control them — gave know, i probably didn't control them ‘ ‘ gave you know, i probably didn't control them —— gave you all is. know, i probably didn't control them -- gave you all is. you had have them? in the right side. that i remember. is it not correct to say i asked you for your shirt after the game, and you never gave me. never. really? i feel really bad. they never allowed us to give away shirts. nowadays they had many shirts, but then you had to keep the same shirt all season. do you think gary lineker really had to keep the same shirt all season? it isa to keep the same shirt all season? it is a great story, isn't it? imagine if you get to meet your heroes and it is gary lineker and pep guardiola. the founder of playboy magazine died this morning. the businessman known as hef began publishing playboy in
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his kitchen, selling millions of copies. he was the world's most famous hedonist. jeanne wolf joins us famous hedonist. jeanne wolf joins us from los angeles. thank you very much forjoining us. you met hugh hefner many times. what was he like? yes, he was glamorous, he was very polite, but very charming. and you know, i would sit and interview him in his silk pyjamas and his bath robe, which was his favourite outfit. beautiful goals all round. but he was a very thoughtful man. i think that one of the memories that a lot of people had is the famous mike wallace, tough interviewer, saying to hugh on the air, come on, admit, it is just saying to hugh on the air, come on, admit, it isjust a dirty book. and
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hugh said absolutely not, it is a man's magazine, with great articles, and let's remember, he had fabulous authors contribute into the magazine, and he said yes, and it is full of sex, which is a very important part of life. he felt that most people were hypocrites about, you know, the booze and not admitting what they were interested m, admitting what they were interested in, and not admitting that they wa nted in, and not admitting that they wanted to party, and not admitting that they loved to look at big — bosomed, beautiful women. that they loved to look at big — bosomed, beautifulwomen. and that they loved to look at big — bosomed, beautiful women. and we are showing famous covers of playboy magazine, with some famous and high—profile faces, and one of the things that you have had to do with the magazine, we said he was almost credited with ushering in the sexual revolution of the 1960s, he had to actually fight the mail service, because it didn't want to send these out. tell us about that. the post 0ffice refused to mail out playboy,
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and hugh was not going to sit still for that. he went all the way to the supreme court. and that was not all he was fighting for. he was fighting against censorship, he was fighting for free speech, he was fighting for free expression. he was a very serious guy about the politics that he believed in, but people had a right to want what they wanted and say what they wanted to say. in the post office, some little thing called the government, was not going to stop him. and as he got over, he died at the age of 91, he did not seem to be stopping. he was very prolific in the public eye. well, he was very sad about his divorce from, you know, his long—time marriage, and he started to go out again, and he said! and he started to go out again, and he said i am doing everything at home, and! he said i am doing everything at home, and i discovered a whole new world. i invented playboy because i missed the roaring 20s, and now when igo missed the roaring 20s, and now when i go out, in my later years, people
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tell me i am sad that i missed the 60s and 70s. but hugh brought it to them. he made no apologies for believing in glamour, for believing in what he says, his own invention, which was himself. he said i invented myself, i decided who i wa nted invented myself, i decided who i wanted to be, and spent the rest of my life rehearsing who i wanted to be. i am sure he would think, and his family, who are missing him greatly, would think he got it right. thank you very much for giving us your thoughts on hugh hefner, the founder of playboy, who has died at the age of 91. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: ryanair has hit more turbulence, with the regulator now threatening legal action following thousands of extra cancellations. children are warned to flee rather than film. a new celebrity campaign tells young people what to do if they're caught up in a terror attack. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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she is outdoors on the balcony. good morning. a fabulous view. a cloudy one in london. pretty wet. a grey starred in many parts of the uk this morning and damp with patchy fog. —— start. we will have some rain. it will go away. sunshine later on. nine o'clock in scotland, rain in the northern isles and mainland scotland. but away from that, brightening up with one or two showers. north—west england will have a brighter start to the day. north—east england affected by the same weather front as scotland. it goes all the way down across most of eastern england. drizzle. eventually, slowly, that will move away and brighten up. the east
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midlands seeing cloud this morning. the west midlands, brighter. going down to dorset. patchy fog in the south—west and in wales. that will lift and then sunshine. northern ireland, variable cloud and sunshine. not a cold start to the day. not a cold start to the day a nyway day. not a cold start to the day anyway currently. 14— 16. through the morning, that will go into the north sea clearing many areas. some will hang on to the cloud and the lunchtime. north—east scotland, cloud and rain, notjust today, tonight and tomorrow. with the sun coming out and a ridge of high pressure, a fine day in the west. later, clouding in northern ireland. a new weather front. later, clouding in northern ireland. a new weatherfront. 0vernight, drifting from west moving eastwards. quite windy as well around it. as a
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result, not a cold night. roughly 10-14. result, not a cold night. roughly 10—14. down a touch on this morning. that rain tomorrow continues its journey going east through the uk. behind it, it will brighten up. we will see sunshine coming through and a few showers. north—west scotland, you could hear the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures down again on what we are expecting today, but only by a couple of degrees. 0nce again later, thickening cloud towards the west heralding the arrival of the next weather front coming our way. however, arrival of the next weather front coming ourway. however, saturday. looking at a lot of dry weather and sunshine around. one or two showers in the west. the odd rumble of thunder. the next weatherfront in the west. the odd rumble of thunder. the next weather front from the west introducing wet and windy condition on sunday. 0ne the west introducing wet and windy condition on sunday. one exception, that could change. we will have two
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ex—hurricanes in the atlantic which could interfere with the weather. by no means are we expecting any near us. that is reassuring, but it is difficult tojudge us. that is reassuring, but it is difficult to judge and estimate the impact they will have. it is. also, tracking them as well. if you look at all of the different models, some of them take them a bit further north, some south. at the moment it looks like we will see heavy rain, especially in the west, and strong winds, especially in the west. we will keep you up—to—date on brea kfast. will keep you up—to—date on breakfast. thank you. i am glad it has stopped raining. it has. thank you. poetry is supposed to move us in ways nothing else can, but is it all a bit old fashioned? today is national poetry day, an annual celebration encouraging people around the uk to enjoy, discover and share poems.
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performance poet argh kid is one of those hoping to encourage a new generation to gain confidence through writing poetry of their own, as brea kfast‘s graham satchell reports. where are you from? over there. know, where are you from? your people, your relations? we are in stockport with david scott, a performance per watt better known as argh kid. in the room, a group of young people in training courses. many feel the same way. what do i think poetry? i never understood why we have poetry. it was not something for me. i have never been able to engage with poetry. david says
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poetry is all around us and is for everyone. sun here agree. as a child, i grew up with the idea that i cannot show emotions, i cannot be a strong boy and portray that stuff. i think poetry is the sense of being able to say how you feel and make sure you able to say how you feel and make sure you share your emotion is. so i started writing it down. —— emotions. it worked, it helped me get over my anger and social issues and everything. the reason i have been asked to come today is we are doing a project for national poetry day across all of the juniper centres around the theme of freedom. the door slammed shut. why am are here for so long? how can i ever be free? the session ends with a diss
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off. 0ne free? the session ends with a diss off. one group has to be donald trump. the other, kimjong—un. off. one group has to be donald trump. the other, kim jong-un. so that's your plan, throw your weapons atjapan? that's your plan, throw your weapons at japan? throw your toys at the pram. didn't you google map it first? mass devastation to a small population! now, it is estimated 56 million people in england and wales had passports at the last census. so, we obviously like to travel! but with 18 months to go until we are due to leave the eu, how will that change?
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over the next few months, a new bbc series is going to look at the big issues we face. this morning, steph is at cambridge airport looking at potential travel changes. you may have a flight simulator, but i have a big passport. yeah, so i heard. apparently it looks fantastic andi heard. apparently it looks fantastic and i will look at it soon. we are inside a simulator of a burling aeroplane. this is essentially were pilots learn to fly. —— boeing. this isa pilots learn to fly. —— boeing. this is a trainer. we are about to go through a cloud. you will see less soon. we are over europe. we took off from austria. pilots come here to train and use this facility to learn how to fly a jet aircraft. is it hard? it is hard. by those who come to us have already done 18 months of training light aircraft. —— but. when they come here they are
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learning how to work as a crew and to be an airline pilot. fascinating. it isa to be an airline pilot. fascinating. it is a key time because we have got not enough at the moment. we are here because we are looking at different areas of our lives that could be impacted by the european union and leaving it. today i will look at the aircraft and airport experience. i have simon here with me. what can make a difference for passengers? the first thing is the most tangible benefit of eu mentorship has been open skies for many people. the opportunity to fly anywhere. that has brought cheap flights. britain has by far the most competitive air routes in the world and the greatest choice and lowest prices. no one knows what will happen from 2019 onwards because the
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eu open skies agreement, there is no replacement for it yet on the horizon. passports, it is easier. if you have a passport up until the day before we leave the eu it will still look like this, the typical european union passport to be after that, many thought we would get the old ha rd cover many thought we would get the old hardcover one. we will not. they must all be a standard size and the same shape, though a little bit different. what about health? the health insurance card is valuable to many people going overseas. no clarity on that. and the driving licence, it has the eu symbol on the top left— hand licence, it has the eu symbol on the top left—hand corner. nobody knows what is going to replace it. but i don't think you will find suddenly you will need to get these old style permits to go to calais.”
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you will need to get these old style permits to go to calais. i am impressed you brought all of these props. now, our next guest, tell us what you want to hear from negotiations going on in terms of keeping us flying and passengers having safe and easy trips. keeping us flying and passengers having safe and easy tripsm keeping us flying and passengers having safe and easy trips. it is the scale that is so important. 53 million britons each year go overseas. getting this right is important. we have seen from brussels the talks are a bit tetchy it. the public want us to get this sorted out. remember, all of the flights to the eu and america are tied up in membership of the eu. unless something replaces that, some deal is done on aviation, it is not clear what that will look like. making sure that happens is important. yeah. we will land this plane safely, i will land this
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plane, later on. james will show me how to do that. join us later. you are apparently somewhere over the alps in the imaginary world of aircraft travel. we will be landing that plane later. well, she will. 0k, that plane later. well, she will. ok, now it is time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. the number of teenagers in london being hurt with knives has gone up almost a third in the last five years. according to figures obtained by the bbc, there were more than 1,200 injuries to people under 20 last year. despite this, some teenagers believe knife crime is not something to worry about and have instead learned to avoid getting into situations that put them at risk. some people obviously i have had altercations with. after a shift with my friends they will look at me and give me that look. i will not argue with them.
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they might have a knife. there is no point for me to step into that situation because i cannot get out. i will ignore it and get out of the situation. the family of an 82—year—old cancer patient who was beaten and robbed in east london say they're "appalled" by what happened to him. they've released a new image of ahmet dobran, who's in a critical condition in hospital after being attacked in newham last month. police have also released pictures of three men they want to speak to who have still not been identified. they say they are not from the local area. first, as you've probably heard on bbc breakfast, there's been a serious crash on the m23 near gatwick airport. 0ne one person has died and others are injured. this is how the motorway looks now. you can see to the left of your screen, the southbound carriageway is closed from junction 7 of the m25 tojunction 9 for gatwick. it's causing a knock—on effect on the a217 southbound through reigate and hookwood, and the a23 southbound through horley. and on the tube, the metropolitan line has no service
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between moor park and rayners lane to wembley park. severe delays on the rest of the line. and the 0verg round, which is already partly closed for works, is not running between liverpool street to seven sisters and walthamstow central due to an electrical fault. that's also affecting greater anglia trains and the stansted express. no service between liverpool street and hackney downs. time for a look at the weather. good morning. a thoroughly wet and miserable night. nearly an inch of rain in places through the night. still some to the east of london. but it is pulling away nicely. so, drying up this morning and becoming brighter as the day moves on, turning into a fine afternoon. mist and murk around at the moment. be aware of that as you get out of the door. improving as the rain moves to the north sea. taking the cloud with it. top temperatures, 20 degrees. tomorrow, we start with yet more rain. it has moved in through the night.
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then showers through the day tomorrow, i think. a few heavy ones in the afternoon. but it does clear up in later on. 20. that gives us a fine start to the weekend. saturday is the better of the two days. behind me you can see wet weather moving in for sunday. the isobars are starting to pack together, meaning it is getting ever windier. so, definitely, saturday is the better of the two days. wet and windy later in the day on sunday. and it looks like we are feeling autumnal to start the new week with more wet and windy weather on monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. ryanair is threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights. the move by the uk's air regulator follows the cancellation of thousands more flights — affecting up to 400,000 people. good morning, it's thursday
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the 28th of september. also this morning: a new campaign to warn children not to put themselves in danger by filming terror attacks. the founder of playboy magazine, hugh hefner, has died aged 91. good morning. it is 18 months until we are expected to leave the european union. we are looking at how it could impact different areas and today we are looking at how it could affect travel. in sport, it was a successful night for the british teams in the champions league, chelsea grabbed a dramatic victory against atletico madrid. there were also wins for manchester united and celtic. we'll meet the man who went to the doctor with a bad cough — and found out it was all down
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to a tiny toy traffic cone he accidentally inhaled 40 years ago! and carol has the weather. good morning. it is rowdy —— rather cloudy with rain pushing in from the east into the north sea. lingering across norfolk is —— north—east scotland. most of us will have a few showers with sunny spells. at more in15 showers with sunny spells. at more in 15 minutes. good morning, first our main story. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched "enforcement action" against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption — it's the first step towards court action, as sarah corker reports. it has been a turbulent few weeks for europe's biggest airline. ryanair blames its cancellation chaos on messing up pilot holiday rosters. but the civil aviation authority has accused the no—frills carrier
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of persistently misleading passengers. it said ryanair was wrong to claim it did not have to reroute customers on rival airlines. the warning came as more cancellations were announced yesterday. and this second raft of cancellations relations will affect 18,000 flights, disrupting another 400,000 passengers. the airline says it will place 25 fewer planes, to cut the risk of further cancellations. and more than 30 routes will be suspended, including popular tourist routes like london stansted to edinburgh and glasgow. and, earlier this month, the airline cancelled up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. it has now also dropped its plan to buy the italian carrier alitalia. the company insists it has no pilot shortage. passengers are being offered a full refund and vouchers of up to 80 euros, while ryanair could end up in court. sarah corker, bbc news.
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simon calder is the independent‘s travel editor. he joins us now from cambridge airport. simon, this is a significant move from the aviation regulator? it's absolutely unprecedented in my experience. here is a 3—page letter from andrew hayes, the chief executive of the civil aviation authority. in it, he leased the series of what he lists a series of misleading passages —— passengers. michael 0'leary told passengers they weren't in titled to be rerouted on other airlines. civil aviation authority wrote to him and said you know that is not true, please issue a correction. ryanair hasn't yet
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done that. and so, last night, they wrote to rya nair done that. and so, last night, they wrote to ryanair saying that unless they actually tell people what they are entitled to, they will take action under the enterprise act because they believe they are misleading people are making all sorts of decisions they wouldn't otherwise make and they want them to stop. have been in touch with ryanairand stop. have been in touch with rya nair and they have stop. have been in touch with ryanair and they have been in correspondence with the civil aviation authority, they say. the problem is, if your ryanairflight was one of the 400,000 that was cancelled, as you are entitled to three options. a refund, at different light on ryanair or crucially, a flight on another airline if it is an emergency on which ryanair must pay. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do in the event of a uk terror attack, and are also warning eyewitnesses to flee the scene, rather than trying to film atrocities on mobile phones. the call follows a number of attacks in the uk this year, including the manchester arena bombing, which targeted people
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at a pop concert. andy moore reports. i've trained in taekwondo for 16 years. the new video, aimed specifically at young people, features some famous faces, with a message that police hope is becoming familiar to the british public. do you know what i'd do, in a knife or gun terror attack? i'd run. hide. tell. this campaign has been launched against a backdrop of a wave of terror attacks, including the manchester arena bomb, where many young people were killed and injured. their message is to run if you can, hide if you can't, and then tell police about the threat as soon as it is safe to do so. after the parsons green attack on the tube in london, some people stopped to film a partially exploded device that was still on fire. police are taking this opportunity to remind everyone that their first priority is their own safety. they should move rapidly away from danger. hello, you're through to the nspcc hotline. .. the nspcc is also involved in this campaign. they have been contacted by 300
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young people worried about terrorism since april. police are hoping this new message will be taught in schools and colleges to all 11—16—year—olds. remember: run. hide. tell. we'll be getting some advice from the nspcc and the met police in a few minutes' time. children are being warned not to stop and take pictures if they're caught up in a terror attack. the advice is part of a new campaign aimed at young people following an increased number of attacks in the uk. we will bring more at about that later on. we are talking to the met
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police soon. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises said he passed away peacefully at home, from natural causes. 0ur la correspondentjames cook looks back at his life. you have no was the teenaged boy who never grew up. you have no was the teenaged boy who never grew up. a pioneer of sexual liberation in the 1960s, bunny girls, nightclubs, a corporatejet called big bunny. all made possible by the magazine he started at his kitchen table. with madeline munro at —— marilyn monroe as the first ce ntrefold, at —— marilyn monroe as the first centrefold, it sold a lot of copies. are you a happy man? 0h centrefold, it sold a lot of copies. are you a happy man? oh yes. never more happy than now. hugh hefner lived the lifestyle portrayed by his magazine but feminist accused him of
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reducing women to sexual objects. sales eventually dwindled and he retired to his mansion where the party and continued. at the age of 86, he married his third wife, crystal harris, a playboy playmate, 60 years his junior. crystal harris, a playboy playmate, 60 years hisjunior. he said it was the secret to staying young. hugh hefner wasn't all about sex, he also published some great writing and fought and equality. —— fought in quality. he was a self—styled godfather of the sexual revolution. theresa may will defend the uk's free market economy later in a speech at the bank of england later. it comes a day after jeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a "crisis of legitimacy". chris mason is in westminster for us — chris is the prime minister on the defensive here? just hours afterjeremy corbyn's
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speech in brighton yesterday and the mood we saw in brighton where labour seemed to have managed to claim an emotional victory from a mathematical defeat in the general election from earlier in the year. the prime minister really picking up on first principles of politics, if you like, in the wayjeremy corbyn was. yesterday, corbyn made a proud socialist speech. listen to this message from the prime minister this morning, she says a free market economy operating under the right right rules is the best thing that humans have created. it is the underfunded borrowing and significant higher levels of taxation of the labour government. she will be well aware, too, as well as the political contrast, the mood contrast between the parties. labour
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we re contrast between the parties. labour were cheaper in brighton and tories gathering in manchester for their conference are likely to be relatively downbeat. 0ne conference are likely to be relatively downbeat. one final thought, people used to moan a lot about all politicians being the same and they all believe the same stuff. not many people say that now. the body that was responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council. the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council's track record of rehousing survivors. 20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation and a further 52 have accepted offers in principle. president trump proposed —— cuts for most americans. the democrats say
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the proposals actually reward the wealthy and could add trillions of dollars to the deficit. president trump insisted that working men and women would benefit most. al-qaterji and our economy cannot ta ke fla k al-qaterji and our economy cannot take flak it should unless we dramatically reform america's outdated, complex and extremely burdensome tax cut. relic. we have got to change it. we have got to compete. compete with other countries. —— power of country. —— our country. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do the children's charity, unicef uk,
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says orphaned refugee children with relatives in britain should to be able to come here to live with theirfamilies. it says bringing them directly to the uk would make them less likely to set out on perilous journeys to other parts of europe, and would stop them being exploited by criminal gangs. the home office said its approach was to resettle whole families. on mobile phones. it's a sad fact of life that children have been caught up in recent terror attacks — most notably in the manchester arena bombing. so the authorities have decided to issue advice to young people on what to do in the very rare event that they're involved in one. they're particularly keen to stress that children shouldn't risk their lives by taking photos with their smartphones. let's get more on this now. we're joined in the studio by the nspcc‘s emily cherry, and in our london newsroom is lucy d'0rsi, the metropolitan police's deputy assistant commissioner. this advice is very specific to young people. what message are you
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trying to get across? it is right that it trying to get across? it is right thatitis trying to get across? it is right that it is to young people. my message to them is that their safety is paramount in the unlikely event that our caught up in the middle of a terrorist attack, particularly one involving knives and guns. that has to be their priority, rather than staying around to use their phones to film. immediately people must be thinking, and this doesn't really only apply to children, you in your police work find information gleaned from those sources vary in format —— very useful. some people might think that. whether there is footage out there, it is always useful but my message is, young people, adults, anybody, really, your safety has to come first. when i am discussing this with my family, that is the message i always say. make sure you are safe, look at your options and we are looking at telling people to run, hide and tell. this is on the back of a spate or high frequency of attacks in the last few months, the last year. it is obviously at the forefront of many young people ‘s
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minds. how useful is this advice in terms of scaring young people that something like this will happen ain? something like this will happen again? what we know through childline is that in april this year, we have had 300 calls from children worried about terrorism. —— since april. this could reduce their anxiety. it is important we do it. what are they concerned about when they call? how to behave or the fact that it might happen? they started looking for advice. we are hearing from children say emotionally impacted by what they are seen, the images in the news, it is having an effect on their emotional health and well—being. we are having children worried that world for three is starting. it is vital that parents, children and teachers speak to children. lucy, it is something we have been through before, in some ways, with different generations. you think of the eye —— ira bombing.
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this is coming back to us in a different way, a new generation of people but also with a lot more technology surrounding the issues. we've acknowledged, young people, this is targeted to 11— 16 —year—olds, but they do get the news feeds on their phones and i share the view they are anxious about not knowing what to do rather than being unable to deal with it so we are hoping that by listening to them and listening how they want to receive their advice, they tell us they want to receive some information from celebrities and we are grateful for celebrity support and working with the department for it education and nspcc, so young people can have an informed discussion and the third phase will be exciting, around discussing this in the classroom
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teachers who have been trained to have that conversation and we are grateful for the support of the nspcc as well. in amongst what is a clear message, many young people have been caught up in events sadly and have shown amazing resilience and have shown amazing resilience and done the right thing at the right time. that is part of the campaign as well, i do think young people are amazing, they listen to advice, but it's how they can share the information and advice with older generations as well and in the unlikely event they are caught in the middle of a terror attack, their to help other people and share the sort of messaging is sort of —— is really important and i feel young people are ready to have a debate with and certainly our —— and certainly we are in a position with the nspcc to give them the relevant advice. if you are in a crowded place, take a moment to look at your options and consider where the exit points are if you are out and about.
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listening to lucy about the third phase, the teaching in schools, what format will that take? it's vital teachers are equipped with this —— with the tools to give them the message and the space to talk about the practical advice and also reassure them. we need to reassure children and that is the role of parents and teachers that these are unlikely events but given those practical tools, it is good and if parents don't know, we are here 24— seven at the nspcc. thank you both. we should say as well, if you want to co nta ct we should say as well, if you want to contact the nspcc helpline, the number is 08 08 8005000 and we will make sure the number is available on the bbc website. let us look at the weather. it was raining this morning. it's brightening up where you are, carol.
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good morning to you. a lot of cloud around this morning. quite a great start for me and we have seen some rain. it's started to rain again in london. there is some drizzle around as well but that will give way to sunshine across the uk. the rain will ease, the sun will come out. the exception is across the northern isles. we'll have that today, tonight and tomorrow. starting the forecast at nine o'clock, wilder is some brighter skies around, still a fair bit of cloud, especially in the east, producing rain and drizzle. the same holds true as we pushed down the east coast of england. a fair bit of cloud around, some drizzle and some rain. further west, to the north—west and the west midlands down towards dorset, brighter skies. still that of cloud at the moment. some patchy fog across south—west england and wales.
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we are also looking at some sunshine coming through. for northern ireland, afair coming through. for northern ireland, a fair bit of cloud around but that will break and some sunshine will come through. as we go through the course of the day, watch that weather front. watch it moved into the north sea. 0r that weather front. watch it moved into the north sea. or some parts east of the country, we will see that happen mid—morning but east anglia, you might hang onto that and drizzle. west, we will see the sunshine coming through. we will also see the sunshine come through. highs of about 20 degrees. in the afternoon, it will cloud over. 0vernight, rain moving from the west. some of it will be heavy. as a result, it will not be a cold night. that is how we start the day tomorrow. currently, about 60 degrees in parts of the country.
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tomorrow, that rain moving from west to east. as it moves away, it will brighten up. there will be one or two showers floating around and across the north—west of scotland they can prove to be bunbury in nature. temperatures down just a touch. as we head into saturday, a lot of dry weather around. a fair bit of sunshine. we will see the arrival of a new weather front from the west. it will be wet and windy weather. the heaviest of which are not as heavy as it moves towards the south—east. thank you very much, carol. brexit is throwing up some big issues. isee carol. brexit is throwing up some big issues. i see what you did there. and we have a big passport.
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why wouldn't we? there's no mistaking what this huge maroon document is — it's a breakfast—sized passport! why's it here? well, there are now 18 months until we are due to leave the eu. today a new bbc news series begins to look at the key issues that will affect all of us. the passport probably gives it away — but we're starting with travel. steph is at cambridge airport for us this morning. we are talking about problems and challenges in the air industry. good morning, everyone. have a look at this. this is it. i'm going to fly a plane with james's help. he's the boss of the company that does all this aviation training. tel is a bit about where we are. it looks like are descending into milan, the italian alps, the lakes, just under 10,000 feet. how am i doing? you are doing great for no instruction at
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all. how often are you looking out the window? there are so many things to ta ke the window? there are so many things to take into account. it can be useful. a lot of time there might be cloud, night—time commerce of the most important thing are the instruments in front of you. they tell you everything. how long does it take to train? for someone doing the training in the most intensive way, 18 months to get to the stage where they would come to us in the final stage of their training before joining in ourline. final stage of their training before joining in our line. we are going to land this plane. before that, there isa land this plane. before that, there is a serious reason why we are here because 18 months until we leave the european union or are expected to do there is loads of areas in our lives where this could be impacted and travel is one of them. i went to sta nsted to look travel is one of them. i went to stansted to look at the difference it could make. #come fly with me, let's fly, let's fly away#! travelling to any of the 27 eu
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countries is fairly straightforward at the moment. the british government has said it wants to keep it that way so eu citizens can come here without needing a visa and hopefully they'll do the same for us. great. thank you very much. see you! there are actually quite a lot of countries where you don't need a visa before you get there. 0ver170 in total, including eu countries. and the government wants to keep that free flow of tourists in and out. #0nce i get you up there, i'll be holding you#. now, if you're anything like me, you will love a bit of duty—free shopping because you are not paying taxes. some shops will give you a discount no matter where you are going, but on the whole, duty—free only applies when you are leaving the european union. so, that might be something that could change. now, let's talk holiday money.
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since we voted to leave the eu, the pound has fallen against the euro and the dollar. it is more expensive to go abroad, but it is cheaper for tourists coming here. but let's face it, the currency markets go up and down all the time. over 6,000 flights leave uk airports every day, more than half of them landing in europe. and it's these guys in air—traffic control that make sure this happens safely. at the moment we are part of the eu single aviation market, meaning less red tape. that has helped low—budget airlines. they are keen we stay part of this agreement like norway has. but that could mean we have to stick to all of the eu aviation rules, or we could do a separate agreement like switzerland have. now, we love to moan about queues.
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and airport operators warned earlier this year that any changes to passport control after brexit could make waiting times longer after people arrive. the government has not said how it will work yet, which queue will we join? will we have our own queue? these are all questions that need to be answered if we are going to have a smooth flight out of the eu. #pack up, let's fly away#! there we go. that is some of the issues we could face on travelling. we will look at health insurance and what it means for data roaming but before that, i'm going to try to land this plane underjames's instruction so we are just coming
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into milan outboard, aren't we? tell everybody to take their seats. take your seats the landing, please. this is great. what is the key to this? touching down and a successful landing is one you can walk away from. you are flying towards the runway, keep that picture in your mind. you can see there are some white lights beside the runway. coming down a bit more rapidly. making gentle corrections. so no quick turns anything. keep calm. what are the key skills you need to bea what are the key skills you need to be a pilot? what are the biggest skills the days —— these days as leadership, management, teamwork, it is not just about the leadership, management, teamwork, it is notjust about the hands—on flying skills that you need to become a crisis and have good situation or lan is. and probably me wearing stilettos is not great. it
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won't make it any easier. we are nearly there. i our high hourly? we are 1100 feet above the ground and you've done really well. two red lights, too white lights. given we are on live tv, any chance of landing itany are on live tv, any chance of landing it any faster?” are on live tv, any chance of landing it any faster? i don't think air—traffic control would be too happy. how my gate to do this properly? passengers don't panic, i am landing the plane. ifi heard that, as a passenger, don't panic, i would panic. what we are going to do, this imaginary plane, that could bea do, this imaginary plane, that could be a little bit scary. we will go back and see how steph got on with the landing of the plane a little later. the prediction? it will be
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fine. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. the number of teenagers in the capital being injured with knives has gone up by almost a third in the last five years. figures obtained by the bbc show there were more than one thousand —— 1,200 injuries recorded last year. bbc london has been talking to teenagers about how they view the dangers and how they respond. they might have a knife. there is no point for me stepping into that situation knowing i can't get out because they may chase me. i will ignore it and get out of the situation. the family of an 82—year—old cancer patient who was beaten and robbed in east london say they're appalled by what happened to him. they've released a new image of ahmet dobran who's in a critical condition in hospital
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after being attacked in newham last month. police have also released pictures of three men they want to speak to who have still not been identified. first — as you've probably heard — there's been a serious crash on the m23 near gatwick airport. one person has died and others are injured. this is how the motorway looks now— you can see to the left of your screen the southbound carriageway has just opened from junction 7 of the m25 tojunction 9 for gatwick. the metropolitan line has no service between moor park and rayners lane to wembley park. severe delays on the rest of the line and the 0verground which is already partly closed for works is not running between liverpool street to seven sisters and walthamstow central due to an electrical fault. that's also affecting greater anglia trains and the stansted express no service between liverpool street
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and hackney downs. time for the weather now with sara thornton. good morning. a thoroughly wet and miserable night. nearly an inch of rain in places through the night. still some to the east of london. but it is pulling away nicely. so, drying up this morning and becoming brighter as the day moves on, turning into a fine afternoon. mist and murk around at the moment. be aware of that as you get out of the door. improving as the rain moves to the north sea. taking the cloud with it. top temperatures, 20 degrees. tomorrow, we start with yet more rain. it has moved in through the night. then showers through the day tomorrow, i think. a few heavy ones in the afternoon. but it does clear up in later on. 20. that gives us a fine start to the weekend. saturday is the better of the two days. behind me you can see wet weather moving in for sunday. the isobars are starting
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to pack together, meaning it is getting ever windier. so, definitely, saturday is the better of the two days. wet and windy later in the day on sunday. and it looks like we are feeling autumnal to start the new week with more wet and windy weather on monday. there's more from us in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched "enforcement action" against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption — it's the first step towards court action. ryanair said it was confident there would be no more cancellations. children are being warned not to stop and take pictures if they're caught up in a terror attack.
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the advice is part of a new campaign aimed at young people following an increased number of attacks in the uk. police also want the safety measures to be introduced in classrooms. it comes after images of the bomb at parsons green were posted online within minutes. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises inc said he passed away peacefully at home, from natural causes. hefner began publishing playboy in his kitchen in 1953. it became the largest—selling men's magazine in the world, shifting seven—million copies a month at its peak. his son cooper hefner said he would be "greatly missed by many". the body that was responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council. the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council's track record of rehousing survivors.
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20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation and a further 52 have accepted offers in principle. the children's charity, unicef uk, says orphaned refugee children with relatives in britain should to be able to come here to live with theirfamilies. it says bringing them directly to the uk would make them less likely to set out on perilous journeys to other parts of europe, and would stop them being exploited by criminal gangs. the home office said its approach was to resettle whole families. a bumbling thief tried to steal a cached door in a service station in melbourne and he got trapped inside. this shows him try to prise open the automatic doors. he did eventually escape and now police are looking for him. i was hoping for a happier
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ending for that story. unimpressed with that one. he didn't get caught, he got away. at the end, it's just a video of someone stealing a cash box. video footage has emerged that allegedly shows england's ben stokes in a brawl outside a nightclub. it's all over the papers, all over the internet. we don't know to sure if it is him ashore. —— for sure. the all—rounder was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after an incident in bristol on monday. despite this stokes has been selected as vice captain for the england squad's upcoming ashes series in australia. the squad features seven potential ashes debutants,
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mixed in with some vast experience. ultimately, it doesn't matter who is on the plane. it's a very special tour to the be on, and, you know, it's one of those iconic tours. and luckily, you know, in a month's time we can get out there, hopefully get together as a squad and play some very good cricket. and yes, it'll be very special. well england were without stokes for their fourth one day international with the west indies at the oval, but they came through winning by six runs on the duckworth lewis method to seal the series. england were up against it when moeen alli came to the crease but once again he salvaged their innings alongsidejos buttler. they scored quickly to take england six runs ahead of the par score when the rain came. england go 3—0 up in the series with one more match to play. the nature, and everything we do, and everything we enjoy, is about playing cricket. so to get away from the distraction and produce a performance like this, you know, the proof is in the pudding. the guys were focused coming into the game, and focused on winning the series, so very proud today.
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one thing as a group we are very strong at is sticking together as a side, and working well as a team. certainly, in the past, the best thing we've been able to do is to focus on our cricket, and i think this instance is no different. there is a little bit of distraction outside the team, and there's the potential to affect the game tomorrow. but not letting that happen is probably something that we can strive to do. the rules of cricket will change on sunday, with umpires given new powers to sin bin — or even send off — players for violent and threatening behaviour. the mcc, which manages the laws of the game, decided to act after it noticed an increase in the number of amateur matches being abandoned. fraser stewart is from the mcc. hejoins us from our london newsroom. thank you but chatting with us this morning. what is the problem in cricket? are we seeing some degeneration of the gentleman ‘s game? only slightly. most games pass
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with everyone enjoying the game but we have seen in recent years the slight deterioration in pattaya. 0r the amateur game than the professional one. national governing bodies are around the world and with umpires association ‘s, they said to us give the umpires a bit more teeth or something up their sleeve so bad behaviour from players can or something up their sleeve so bad behaviourfrom players can be or something up their sleeve so bad behaviour from players can be dealt with and provide an in match consequence. what have you been seen? 0ne consequence. what have you been seen? one of the written rules or maybe originals is cricket should be played not only within its laws but the spirit of the game. do you think the spirit of the game. do you think the spirit of the game is being lost? the spirit of the cricket was set out by mcc and sets out third idea of respect, players and
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particularly to the umpires. perhaps that has been eroded over time and the spirit of cricket is something very much debt the mcc says is important. if it is just felt it was a move we really did think long and ha rd a move we really did think long and hard on. we felt given the —— hitting the umpires the power to say look, i have got these powers, i don't want to use them butjust having it there will help control the behaviour of the players. are you struggling to find umpires? we know there has been a problem in full ball, the tension —— particularly amateur football will stop they might not give up their saturdays and sundays to referee. —— foot wall. 30 to 4096 of umpires last
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you are considering leaving the game and around half had said in the last few years they had been abused, mainly verbally but sometimes physically. we thought that doing this would hopefully help to stop that problem. justin leppitsch at how it is of this, could you do the scenario for us. —— just on the practicalities of this. what would it look like when it happens? the umpires will first call time, stop the play, and spend the two umpires will consult and work out what level they think. we have brought in four levels, level one being the most lenient and level for the most serious. they will then work out what level that offence fell into and beatt is one that will result in and beatt is one that will result in a removalfrom the and beatt is one that will result in a removal from the field, and beatt is one that will result in a removalfrom the field, it and beatt is one that will result in a removal from the field, it will be f3, level four will be a permanent removal. —— ten overs for the sin
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bin. the second one would be the same flapping of the armed followed by an out signal for the level for offence which would be permanent removal. that will be made to tell the scorers, really, what is going on. the umpires will still speak to the captain that the offending player comes from and ask them to remove that player. cricket has a lwa ys remove that player. cricket has always placed the onus on the captain to control his or her players so which will still be up to the captain to tell his or her player to leave the field. thank you for bringing us up to date. we've got that followed by that followed by that. that's the sin bin one. that followed by that is a straight red. straight off. interesting it still remains the obligation of the captain to say, you know, you have
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been told you have got to leave i am the person that needs to pass on the information to the player. same in rugby, isn't it? the captain has a lwa ys rugby, isn't it? the captain has always walked over to talk to the rectory. in the 93rd minute — with the very last kick of the game — chelsea scored to win 2—1 at atletico madrid. michy batshuayi came on as a substitute only moments before slotting home the winner. it's the first time any english club has won at atletico — and the victory takes chelsea two points clear in their group. we deserved to win. we continue to play with good personality. we kept our head on the pitch, in every moment of the game. and yes, we deserved to win, against a really good team like atletico madrid. managerjose mourinho was full of praise for romelu lukaku after the striker scored twice as manchester united emphatically beat cska moscow four—one. the belgian has now scored ten goals in nine appearances. celtic won their first european group match in 17 attempts
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with what was in the end a comfortable 3—0 win away at belgian side anderlecht. that result moves them off the bottom of their group, level on points with second placed bayern munich. captain scott brown says this group of players are "creating history". i think at this level, it's all about the belief. you're playing against top—class players, fantastic clu bs. against top—class players, fantastic clubs. everyone knows the area they are in here at this moment. for our quys are in here at this moment. for our guys to show what they have done in the last 12 months and improve is a credit to them. they will gain belief, they will gain continent —— confidence. the top tier of the women's super league will be for full—time clubs only from the start of next season after the fa approved changes to the licensing system. the league will have between eight and 14 sides but all clubs, including those currently in it, will have to apply for their places. top—flight clubs will be required to run an academy under the new criteria. and finally, the story of when one sporting legend got
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to meet his hero. manchester city manager and former barcelona boss pep guardiola was just a schoolboy when gary lineker starred for the catalan club. pep admits lineker was his idol. and the two finally caught up for a good chat for this evening's premier league show. do you know i was a ball boy?” didn't know that. blair i didn't know was you. you probably had hair then. maybe it is not correct to ask you,... they never then. maybe it is not correct to ask you, . .. they never allowed then. maybe it is not correct to ask you,... they never allowed us. nowadays, they have many shirts. they had to keep the same shirt all season. hard to imagine pep
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guardiola as a ballboy at barcelona. here he is several years later as one of the most successful football managers in the world. carol is busy wedding to passers—by from her balcony. i can be like rapunzel and let my hair down. here in london, brightening up quite nicely. the sun is trying to come out. in many of us, it is a great start. quite a cloud around in the east, still producing some rain and drizzle. that will ease through the day. we will see some sunny spells developing. if we start the forecast at nine o'clock in scotland, rain across the northern isles. it will stay not just tonight across the northern isles. it will stay notjust tonight but across the northern isles. it will stay not just tonight but tomorrow. the rest of scotland, bright start to the day. some cloud on the east
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and the cloud is the weather front which is draped down the east coast of england. still a fair bit of cloud in eastern counties come producing some rain and drizzle. it is not a cold start. temperatures 14-16. is not a cold start. temperatures 14— 16. across the midlands, the west midlands with brighter skies. that division holds true light the way down to the isle of wight. into south—west england and wales, some sunny skies starting to come through and some patchy frog —— fog which will lift. northern ireland, variable amounts of cloud and sunshine. certainly so through the course of the day. in the afternoon, the weather front across the east moves into the north sea. for some, a slow process and we will hang on to the cloud, maybe until lunchtime but then it should brighten up. and foremost, a fine day with a fair bit of sunshine around and hires up to 20 celsius. later, more cloud will build across northern ireland. then
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we will start to see some rain. that rain is another weather front coming from the west, drifting towards the east. with all the cloud and the rain around, fairly breezy. not cold. tomorrow, we start off on that note. temperatures down just a touch. the rain continuing to drift from the west towards the east. behind it, north—west england, northern ireland, it will brighten up. that brighter process will follow in. looking at a few showers in the west. the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures about 19 degrees at best. it will be dry, it will be bright, affair that of sunshine, just one of two showers. the odd rumble of thunder. later in the day, another system coming in. more wet and windy weather. a bit of
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a chart for sunday at the moment. what it looks like being is wet and windy, particularly in western areas. some heavy rain, possibly severe gales with exposure. as it d rifts eastwards, severe gales with exposure. as it drifts eastwards, the reason for this was there was some uncertainty. two ex— hurricane is currently in the atlantic tangled up, it won't be cold. that is how it is happening. i think it is greatly don't have a sunday chart, it is better to have a happy saturday chart. you might this story from yesterday. paul baxter feared he you might this story from yesterday. paul baxterfeared he had cancer. he was coughing and felt ill but it turns out he had inhaled his tiny
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toy on his seventh birthday. he swallowed it, it went down the wrong hole and it had been there ever since. paul can talk to us now. and the doctor who made the discovery. thank you for your time this morning. you have taken a quick break from the job. tell us about the feeling you are getting that lead you to seek help. i was just having a normal winter cough. the cost was persistent. it must have been for weeks, six weeks, soi must have been for weeks, six weeks, so i thought i would go to the doctors after a bit of nagging from my wife is on antibiotics and the doctor put me on antibiotics but then she wanted me to go for an x—ray. then she wanted me to go for an x-ray. and it up having to x-rays. she wasn't happy with them so she referred me to the doctor. in the
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first time he became aware, we are looking at the x—rays, it's quite ha rd to looking at the x—rays, it's quite hard to pick things out. when were you aware that the problem was the cohen? when it came out. i didn't know anything about it. i knew absolutely nothing about it. what did they tell you, paul? they said, we are going in, we have seen something. do they have any idea? the doctor went in with the camera to start with and he says, i can see something. little pincers on the end of his camera. he says, i can't reach it but there is something definitely there, it's orange. come back and we will do it again. 0bviously back and we will do it again. obviously i went back to the hospital and put a longer probe down and managed to pull it up. it came
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up and managed to pull it up. it came up and we were watching it on the screen and nobody could tell what it was. it came up and it was that little thing that came out of my mouth and everybodyjust fell about laughing. did you remember it from your childhood? only playing with them, i don't remember eating them. but obviously i've had it in my mouth and i've inhaled it because normally if you swallow, it goes down the other pipe and passes through you normally but this has been inhaled and gone into my lungs. you've got the best work colleagues. you've got the best work colleagues. you haven't seen what happened behind you on one of your colleagues walked past with a massive traffic cone on his head. they are like that here. they are a bunch of nutters. paul gave a layman ‘s explanation of
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what happened. you know there is something there. and then you see what it is. he was referred to me with a suspicion that it could be a blockage of the airwaves. the blockage of the airwaves. the blockage of the airwaves. the blockage of the airwaves is often due to something more sinister like a tumour in the lung. when i inserted the camera into his airways, it did not look like a tumour. it was very odd in appearance. it was covered with mucus and debris. only when i cleared all about and being grabbed it with forceps, alligator forceps, and tugged on it, i realised it was and tugged on it, i realised it was a mobile object, what we refer to as a mobile object, what we refer to as a foreign body in the away and as it was being brought up, my colleagues we re was being brought up, my colleagues were seeing the screen in trying to guess what was. only it came close didn't look anything like a mini
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traffic cone. we've been laughing and paul is a great character and is obviously well now and we mustn't negate the seriousness of this. when you do swallow something like this. we've spoke to breakfast about being careful about children not swallowing small objects. usually you expect them to choke all paul said, would this normally pass through the body or would always have an impact? it goes down the tube, yes, but mostly through the normal route it would pass that here, most people would choke and come to you pretty early. we do this pretty often. 40 years? that is what is fascinating. it is extraordinary. i've removed so many different things. most commonly peanuts, seeds, even teeth and coins. one coin over the years. i've removed so many things but i've never come across something that has been there
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40 yea rs. across something that has been there 40 years. did you check for other items? like the miniature policeman? paul, are you well now? this was done three years ago. yeah, i'm fine. i wasn't really... i just thought it was a normal winter cough. it's extraordinary. we are glad you are well. thank you so much that telling us your tail and enjoy your day at work. doctor, they give are joining us. it's estimated that 56 million people in england and wales had passports at the last census — so we obviously like to travel. but, with 18 months until we are due to leave the eu — how will the way we travel change? over the next few months, we'll be looking at some of the big issues we face. this morning, steph is at cambridge airport looking at potential travel changes.
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i'm just going to take off on this plane, it's a simulator, we'rejust taking off milan outboard. we are getting up to 135 knots. that will be able to pull this back. james, tell me more. we will rotate and pull back and then get the craft of the ground. i'm going to take off now. i am the ground. i'm going to take off now. iam pulling it up. it the ground. i'm going to take off now. i am pulling it up. it feels so realistic. tel is a bit business to you at the moment. you are so busy training pilots. there is a huge amount of pilots and it's hard for training to keep up. you are in the simulator, were got another one coming ina simulator, were got another one coming in a few months‘ time. just to try and keep up with demand. travel is a massive industry. we‘ve
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got a couple of guest passengers in the back of my plan. we are talking about what impact leaving the european union could have on travel and have also got alan from the association of british travel agents. what are the priorities in terms of the differences? so many things people take for granted when travelling, cheap flights across europe, visa free travel. being looked after by a british person. so much that is underpinned by eu membership and given 53 million brits travel to europe each year it is important politicians on both sides recognise the scale of that and sort it out so we talk about the future, the deal is done to make sure brits can continue travelling the way we love to do. how is the industry preparing? the travel industry preparing? the travel industry is very resilient. the aviation industry are looking at this as well. this is a vital
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industry. people visiting friends and family, its core to the british economy and way of life that the deal is done so jobs underpinned by travel. making sure both sides know it is vital the deal is done. as you said, it‘s important industry. tell us what your thoughts are. we don't know what's happening with open skies. this is the law which allows any british airline to fly anywhere within europe and airlines like ryanair to offer within europe and airlines like rya nair to offer cheap flights. within europe and airlines like ryanair to offer cheap flights. we are the passports will continue to carry the eu logo up until the day before we leave the eu. we are not going to get a good old hardcover british passport back. it will be the same size. a different colour. in terms of driving, even though your licence has an eu thing, after we leave, we won't need to get the
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old international driving permit. finally, healthcare, we don't know what will happen to the european ca rd what will happen to the european card which gives you free treatment abroad. also, the data roaming issues. sorry, james, itotally left you there. let‘s carry on. we are just having over the alps. the italian lakes about. i will disconnect the automatic pilot. there is an alarm. you guys are to go andjoin me there is an alarm. you guys are to go and join me later and i will try and land the plane a bit later on. i crashed it earlier. an alarming prospect, flying the plane with one hand. you were reassured that steph would make the landing. we will find out how it may —— how it went later on. good morning. sonja jessup with bbc london news. the number of teenagers in the capital being injured with knives has gone up by almost a third in the last five years. figures obtained by the bbc show
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there were more than 1,200 injuries recorded last year. bbc london has been talking to teenagers about how they view the dangers and how they respond. they might have a knife. there is no point for me stepping into that situation knowing i can‘t get out because they may chase me. i will ignore it and get out of the situation. the family of an 82—year—old cancer patient who was beaten and robbed in east london say they‘re appalled by what happened to him. they‘ve released a new image of ahmet dobran who‘s in a critical condition in hospital after being attacked in newham last month. police have also released pictures of three men they want to speak to who have still not been identified. they say they believe they‘re not from the local area. let‘s look at the travel now. first — as you‘ve probably heard — there was a serious crash on the m23 near gatwick airport. the motorway looks is now open.
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you can see the delays there, serious delays around chelsea bridge as well, we are told. the metropolitan line has no service between moor park and rayners lane to wembley park. severe delays on the rest of the line and the 0verground which not running between liverpool street to seven sisters and walthamstow central due to an electrical fault. that‘s also affecting greater anglia trains and the stansted express between liverpool street and hackney downs. time for the weather now with sara thornton. good morning. a thoroughly wet and miserable night. nearly an inch of rain in places through the night. still some to the east of london. but it is pulling away nicely. so, drying up this morning and becoming brighter as the day moves on, turning
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into a fine afternoon. mist and murk around at the moment. be aware of that as you get out of the door. improving as the rain moves to the north sea. taking the cloud with it. top temperatures, 20 degrees. tomorrow, we start with yet more rain. it has moved in through the night. then showers through the day tomorrow, i think. a few heavy ones in the afternoon. but it does clear up in later on. that gives us a fine start to the weekend. saturday is the better of the two days. behind me you can see wet weather moving in for sunday. the isobars are starting to pack together, meaning it is getting ever windier.
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so, definitely, saturday is the better of the two days. hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. ryanair is threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights. the move by the uk‘s air regulator follows the cancellation of thousands more flights affecting up to 400,000 people. good morning. it‘s thursday 28th september. also this morning: run, hide, tell. a new campaign to warn children not to put themselves in danger by filming terror attacks. the founder of playboy magazine, hugh hefner, has died aged 91. good morning. it is 18 months until
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we are expected to leave the european union. we are doing a series looking at the different areas where it could impact on our lives. today we are travels though i am atan lives. today we are travels though i am at an aviation centre where they train up the pilots. in sport, it was a successful night for the british teams in the champions league. chelsea grabbed a dramatic victory against atletico madrid. there were also wins for manchester united and celtic. we‘ll hear how the colourful life and career of vincent van gogh has inspired the world‘s first fully painted feature film. carol has the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london where the sunshine is coming out. but for many parts there is cloud and drizzle but it will clear and most areas will have sunny spells with just a few showers and the exception is north east scotland where you will hang on to the ring. more details in 15 minutes. the youth then. —— hang on the rain. more
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details in 15 minutes. see you then. good morning. first our main story. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched enforcement action against europe‘s biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption. it‘s the first step towards court action, as sarah corker reports. it has been a turbulent few weeks for europe‘s biggest airline. ryanair blames its cancellation chaos on messing up pilot holiday rosters. but the civil aviation authority has accused the no—frills carrier of persistently misleading passengers. it said ryanair was wrong to claim it did not have to re—route customers on rival airlines. the warning came as more disruption was announced yesterday. and this second raft of cancellations will affect 18,000 flights, disrupting another 400,000 passengers. the airline says it will fly 25 fewer planes, to cut the risk of further cancellations.
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and more than 30 routes will be suspended, including popular tourist routes like london stansted to edinburgh and glasgow. and earlier this month the airline cancelled up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. it has now also dropped its plan to buy the italian carrier alitalia. the company insists it has no pilot shortage. passengers are being offered a full refund and vouchers of up to 80 euros, while ryanair could end up in court. sarah corker, bbc news. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do in the event of a uk terror attack and are also warning eyewitnesses to flee the scene, rather than trying to film atrocities on mobile phones. the call follows a number of attacks in the uk this year, including the manchester arena bombing, which targeted people at a pop concert. andy moore reports. i‘ve trained in taekwondo for 16 years. the new video, aimed specifically at young people, features some famous faces, with a message that police hope is becoming familiar
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to the british public. do you know what i‘d do in a knife or gun terror attack? i'd run. hide. tell. this campaign has been launched against a backdrop of a wave of terror attacks, including the manchester arena bomb, where many young people were killed and injured. their message is to run if you can, hide if you can‘t, and then tell police about the threat as soon as it is safe to do so. after the parsons green attack on the tube in london, some people stopped to film a partially exploded device that was still on fire. police are taking this opportunity to remind everyone that their first priority is their own safety. they should move rapidly away from danger. hello, you‘re through to the nspcc hotline. the nspcc is also involved in this campaign. they have been contacted by 300 young people worried about terrorism since april. police are hoping this new message will be taught in schools and colleges to all 11 to 16—year—olds. remember: run.
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hide. tell. andy moore, bbc news. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises said he passed away peacefully at home from natural causes. our la correspondentjames cook looks back at his life. hugh hefner was a teenage boy who never grew up. the pioneer of sexual liberation in the 1960s, bunny girls, nightclubs, corporate jet called big money, all made possible by the magazine he started off his kitchen table, with marilyn monroe as its first centrefold. playboy was an instant hit. in its heyday it sold 700 million copies a month.” suppose you are the world‘s most famous head on it. are you a happy man? oh, yes. never more happy than now. hugh hefner portrayed the
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lifestyle portrayed in his magazines but feminist accused him of reducing women to sexual objects. sales dwindled and he retired to his mansion, where the lifestyle continued. he married a playboy playmate called crystal harris 60 yea rs playmate called crystal harris 60 years hisjunior. playmate called crystal harris 60 years his junior. he playmate called crystal harris 60 years hisjunior. he wasn‘t playmate called crystal harris 60 years his junior. he wasn‘t only about sex. he also published some great writing and ford equality. he died at the playboy mansion in la, surrounded by friends, the self—styled godfather of the sexual revolution. james cook, bbc news, los angeles. the latest round of brexit negotiations will draw to a close later today. senior eu officials in brussels have suggested that the uk has so far failed to make adequate progress in the talks. ben wright is in brussels for us this morning. are we expecting to hear anything today? there is a ritual of some kind press conference after they have had their negotiations. that is right. there is. the last couple of
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times that david davis, the brexit secretary, michel barnier, the eu chief negotiator, have had that dual press co nfe re nce chief negotiator, have had that dual press conference at the end of their talks, they have been rather prickly, fractious affairs, indicative of the fact that these negotiations are proving difficult in their early stages. this is the fourth round of talks they have had this week. officials have been meeting very intensely and this morning david davis and michel barnier will meet. we think there will be some words and they will a nswer will be some words and they will answer some questions afterwards. it will be a fascinating moment. it follows a week of quite conciliatory tone from the uk government in particular. remember theresa may‘s speech in florence last week in which she talked about uk honouring its financial obligations, wanting a very deep, close trade relationship with the eu after brexit, talking about the need for a transition deal after we have left. the hope within government, and within the brexit department, at number 10, government, and within the brexit department, at number10, is government, and within the brexit department, at number 10, is that the tone will break the deadlock that clearly exists within these
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talks. but the eu have got real concerns about whether uk is coming from. they don‘t thinks of progress has been made so far and some core issues such as how the border between a republic of ireland and northern ireland will work after brexit. financial contributors from britain, and the key question of the rights of eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. the eu are adamant that until there is progress on those front, there cannot be any proper discussion about future trade relationships, which is what the uk wa nts. relationships, which is what the uk wants. we will see today if there has been any progress. we will hear more about that later on in the day. thank you. the body that was responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council. the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council‘s track record of rehousing survivors. 20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation and a further 52 have accepted offers in principle. president trump has called for the biggest us tax overhaul in three decades.
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he proposed tax cuts for most americans but was criticised for suggesting the tax rate for corporations should be lowered from 35% percent to 20%. democrats say the proposals reward the wealthy and could add trillions of dollars to the deficit. president trump insisted that working men and women would benefit most. but our country and our economy cannot take off like they should unless we dramatically reform america‘s outdated, complex, and extremely burdensome tax code. it‘s a relic. gotta change it. we have to compete, compete with other countries. the children‘s charity unicef uk says orphaned refugee children with relatives in britain should be able to come here to live with their families. it says bringing them directly to the uk would make them less likely to set out on perilous journeys to other parts of europe and would stop them being exploited by criminal gangs. our home affairs correspondent,
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june kelly reports. the perilous route to europe for thousands of refugees. amongst them, children travelling on their own, hoping to eventually reach relatives in the uk. as an ambassador for the children‘s charity unicef, the actor michael sheen has met many families from syria displaced by the war there. unicef is campaigning for unaccompanied under—18s with family in the uk to be able to come here directly. at the moment, you can‘t apply to be reunited with your grandparents, or older siblings, or aunts and uncles, unless you are already in europe. so what that‘s doing is it‘s making young, unaccompanied children have to take that incredibly dangerous journey to get to europe, just to have a chance to be with the only family they have. omar, a syrian refugee whose identity we are protecting, is getting messages from his teenage brother, still trapped in their home country. he wants to bring his brother
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here directly, and fears for the teenager‘s future if he stays in syria. he faces the risk of being recruited and drafted, you know, by different factions. so everyone is trying to recruit these young people. the home office says its approach is to resettle children and their families directly from conflict regions, and that unaccompanied children may be eligible to come to the uk under the vulnerable children‘s resettlement scheme. june kelly, bbc news. those are the main stories this morning. it is 12 minutes past eight. connor sparrowhawk‘s family were devastated by his death four years ago, but adding to their torment were the questions over exactly what happened to him in the place where he was supposed to be looked after. his mother sarah has written a book about her experiences with the health trust who eventually admitted that the death of her son —
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who had epilepsy, autism and learning difficulties — was preventable. sarah and connor‘s brother tom are here. good morning. we will talk to you in a moment, but first let‘s remind viewers what happened to connor. connor was known to his family as laughing boy because of how much they used to hear him doing just that. he was 18 and he had autism, epilepsy and learning difficulties. when things became too difficult for his family, they turned to the professionals for help. they are trusted him to the care of a specialist unit run by southern health, but in july specialist unit run by southern health, but injuly 2013, connor died, drowning in a bath tub after a seizure with no staff member there to help. southern health said his death was down to natural causes but his family never believed that. a long campaign by his mother sarah led to a verdict that serious failings and neglect had contributed to connor‘s death. this month,
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southern health admitted the death was preventable and apologised to his family. the trust is due to be sentenced next month. sarah and tom are both with us this morning. everybody seeing matt and seeing you here will be mindful that it can‘t be easy for you. —— everybody seeing that. it is an important book you have written and i want to ask you first about the apology and where you are in relation to the health authority. what does it mean to you that that has happened? it is good obviously. it is good that they are pleading guilty. we have got mixed feelings about it because it has taken such a battle to get to this point. but we are glad that finally we can get some accountability. the book you have written, i will ask you about why you rated first of all, but a lot of it is about connor. tom, few people would be better placed than the brother of
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connor to tell us what he was like. laughing boy, that gives a hint of what his personality was like. he was really funny, really interesting quy~ was really funny, really interesting guy. he was so interesting and different ina guy. he was so interesting and different in a great way. we got along really well. that is quite unusualfor along really well. that is quite unusual for brothers when they are younger! we are close-knit family. we got along extremely well. tell us, iam tell us, i am assuming that when you write this story, notjust the story of what happened to him when he was supposed to be in care but the story of his life, presumably that is very important to you. people get around a picture, rather than seeing it has something that went wrong which is hugely important, that there is a bigger picture. that's absolutely right, connor died because he was not seen as a fully human person or being. he was more than human to us.
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too often, i think that people like connor are just disregarded and dismissed, and a lead in impoverished lives. they die preve nta ble impoverished lives. they die preventable deaths, it‘s just important for people to know that connor was such a cool kid and the subsequent unfolding of what happened. in the book, will be how you fought for connor‘s death to be recognised as preventable. that's right. is one of him being neglected. totally. tom, how do you feel about the book? people would say that it would dredge up awful memories of a very tough time, and a tough sequence of events for your family? i was worried, the book sums up family? i was worried, the book sums up the last four years, it's coming to an end but they are not really memories, they are still current. it has dragged on so long. i'm really happy that the book has been
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written. what can people learn from the book? i‘m talking about people of your age, you‘ve written it from a mother ‘s perspective but from the family‘s perspective as well. a mother ‘s perspective but from the family's perspective as well. just to treat people as humans, the government puts pressure on people to do the right thing, and not let this happen like it has done so many times. there are so many out there. and tom, often when families are involved in situations like this, some form of trauma, they are required to do things they never thought they would have shown. demands were made of you as a family in dealing with this. people remember you speaking to the southern health nhs trust, you address them directly yourself, i can only imagine that must have been very difficult for you but also very important, a very important moment in time for you? i was in the meeting and they were doing what they do, making excuses and saying
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that they have changed and stuff. then, ithink that they have changed and stuff. then, i think katrina said she apologised or something and i had had enough, i said you haven't actually changed. something overcame me and! actually changed. something overcame me and i had to say something. i'm glad i did. it came over quite well. we must also say that southern health made this apology on the 18th, saying the effective connor‘s death has been far reaching and although it no way compensates for the family‘s loss, it has led to significant changes and improvements in the trust, which must reassure you in terms of you not wanting anotherfamily you in terms of you not wanting another family to go through this ain? another family to go through this again? to us, they arejust another family to go through this again? to us, they are just words, we know the family is still affected by the actions of the trust, and while we have those words, and we appreciate that they apologise, we would rather see the changes then hear them, quite honestly. is there a sense that it could be here or
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elsewhere, in other situations, people are still being treated with disregard? sometimes it does not have consequences but other times it will. i think it does have consequences, even if it is a benign thing, people are leading lives with no imagination or anticipation. they aren‘t ready proper lives, like we all have the ability to lead. i think sometimes there are serious consequences, people are harmed or they die, but even without that seriousness, they are still leading non—lives. seriousness, they are still leading non-lives. -- still leading their lives. thank you to both of you. sarah‘s book is called justice for laughing boy: connor sparrowhawk — a death by indifference. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning. iam good morning. i am on the roof of broadcasting house in london, all kinds of weather here. studio: apologies, we appear to have
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lost the lovely carol on the roof of new broadcasting house, she will bring us the weather as we kick the gremlins out of the technical systems! sometimes that happens when we are outdoors... those gremlins need a spank every now and then! let‘s go back to one of our main stories this morning... ryanair has been threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched "enforcement action" against europe‘s biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption — it‘s the first step towards court action. simon calder is the independent‘s travel editor. he joins us now from cambridge airport. we should set the scene, we are doing a special on travel today as we look at 18 months towards brexit, steph is there this morning. let‘s have a look at this story. the civil aviation authority‘s actions, these are aviation authority‘s actions, these a re really aviation authority‘s actions, these are really significant in terms of bringing about action? it certainly is. i have a 3—page letter from the
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civil aviation authority saying that ryanair, when you cancel all of these flights, you have to tell people what their rights are. and you have persistently misled passengers about what they are entitled to. as a quick reminder, if you are one of the 400,000 people who got caught up in the latest bonfire of the boarding passes at ryanair, then you are entitled to one of three things. a full refund. an alternative flight on ryanair. or, crucially, if there is no suitable flight, rebooking on another airline. for thousands of people rebooking from glasgow or edinburgh to sta nsted, people rebooking from glasgow or edinburgh to stansted, or belfast international to gatwick, the obvious thing to do is switch to easyj et obvious thing to do is switch to easyjet who fly exactly the same brutes. but rya nair, easyjet who fly exactly the same brutes. but ryanair, says the civil aviation authority, you have not been telling people that they are entitled to doing that and unless you do we will launch legal action
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against you. simon, of course many of the implications against this action, whether it is enforced not, comes down to rail and air‘s relationship with the passengers and how it stands. —— ryanair‘s relationship. to say it has been poor is an understatement! and nobody has seen anything like this in aviation. i was speaking to a guy yesterday who bought full return tickets at the weekend because ryanair put on a seat sale for the winter, belfast to gatwick and then yesterday he was told, sorry, none of those flights are going ahead. that is despite ryanair telling us days ago that there was nothing to see, we are cancelling 2000 flights between now and the end of october that the winter schedule will be fine. it is clear the pilot rostering issues, which must comprise the biggest staff shortage scandal of all time, go much deeper than we thought. they‘ve cancelled 18,000 more flies, disrupting travel
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plans of 400,000 people, and have now been told that you‘ve got to toe the line. we had a statement from ryanair, they say they comply fully with eu 261, the european legislation that governs passengers rights, we are talking to the civil aviation authority and we do whatever they tell us. that could mean people who have already rebooked with other airlines that their own expense, they may be able to go after ryanair to pay the difference. it is not going away, we will speak to you in about this. thank you. second time lucky, let‘s go to carol with the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london. different weather here this morning, cloud, weather and drizzle, now sunshine which sums up the forecast for the uk. drizzle easing through the course of the morning, sunshine comes out. but for most of us, sunny spells with the exception being across the northern isles where we
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hang on to the rain notjust today but tonight and tomorrow. for the rest of scotland, it dries up as we had through the morning, sunshine coming through. north—west england shows some sunshine. north—east england and write down eastern counties of england we have some cloud around, spots of rain and drizzle. slowly pushing off in the direction of the north sea. if it holds true through the midlands, down towards the isle of wight, points west of that, seeing something brighter. patches are fog this morning across south—west england and wales, lifting and allowing sunshine to develop. some more sunshine coming through across northern ireland. through the morning, we lose that weather front from the east end it brightens up. it takes longer to clear east anglia. it may be lunchtime before you see the back end of that cloud. under the pressure, things improved. decent sunny skies with some showers in the west. some might be thundery
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in the west. some might be thundery in the far north—west of scotland. temperature range of up to 20 degrees. later, the cloud beckons across northern ireland, hazy sunshine, heralding the arrival of the next weather front which through the next weather front which through the evening and overnight advances from the west to the east. with all of the cloud around and the rain, it would be particularly cold although temperatures will be down a couple of degrees on what we had last night. about 10—14d. tomorrow, we continue with that weather front pushing west to east. eventually clearing south—west england, north—west england, northern ireland and western scotland. the sun will come out but we are not immune to the odd shower. there could be the rumble of thunder in north—west scotland. temperatures tomorrow in the sunshine of up to 18 or 19 degrees. saturday dawns bright and dry with some sunshine around. there will be a couple of showers but they are the exception rather than the rule. later in the day, we see a new
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weather front coming into the west. it looks like it will introduce more u nsettled it looks like it will introduce more unsettled conditions that on saturday, the sunshine, for the last day of september, it feels rather pleasant. on sunday the 1st of october it feels different. it will be wet and also windy. studio: we are glad we got you back, carol. from the top of new broadcasting housein from the top of new broadcasting house in london, now the top of the skies! this is simulated weather... we all believed it was real and to use it! that is a simulated view of the alps. we are showing it to you because staff is talking about travel. we are 18 months away from brexit. steph is looking at the impact it could have on travel and is flying simulated aircraft with varying degrees of success. due to land in milan shortly. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. we have had a wet
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night across the uk with a band of rain spreading east. it is this cold front. and its moves west to east, clearing away for most of us, we are left with drizzly conditions in eastern areas of england this morning. that will clear away, except perhaps the far north east of scotla nd except perhaps the far north east of scotland where it will linger into the afternoon. as where it is looking rather fine and the afternoon. as where it is looking ratherfine and dry the afternoon. as where it is looking rather fine and dry this afternoon. —— elsewhere. sunny spells and gentle southerly winds with maximum temperatures into the
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high teens, the low 20s, feeling pleasa nt high teens, the low 20s, feeling pleasant in the afternoon and pretty good for late september. plenty of sunshine across northern areas of england as well after the cloud and drizzle clears away from eastern parts. i mentioned that the far north east of scotland could be cloudy and wet but elsewhere in scotla nd cloudy and wet but elsewhere in scotland largely dry. in northern ireland, the cloud thickens up with some rain. this area of low pressure is throwing this weather front to the east, so on thursday evening the cloud thickens and rain pushes into the west. strengthening winds here as well. patchy rain overnight spreading east. with cloud around, temperatures will not fall too far, 12 or 14. friday morning starts of quite worked mainly across the western parts. heavy rain spreading eastwards but into other areas it will be more patchy. as it clears, there will be drier and brighter weather in the afternoon with the risk of some showers into western scotla nd risk of some showers into western scotland and northern ireland. top
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temperatures 17 to 20, perhaps feeling a bit fresher towards northern and western areas. into the weekend, saturday looking like it will be dry and bright with sunny spells and the winds picking up with rain moving into the west. a lot of uncertainty with the rainfall as we go into sunday. more details on the website. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and alice baxter. slashing taxes? president trump promises to reform america‘s tax code but will it be enough to stop us firms stashing cash overseas? live from london, that‘s our top story on thursday 28th september. president trump says tax cuts will bring jobs back to the us.
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he said it will boost the economy. but critics warn they‘ll fuel inequality and drive america deeper into debt. and will congress gave the green light anyway?

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