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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 29, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. an ultimatum for ryanair from the airline regulator. the company has until five o'clock today to tell passengers how they'll be compensated for flight cancellations or face legal action. good morning. it's friday the 29th of september. also this morning: nurses say patients are dying alone on hospital wards because staff don't have enough time to care for them. we'll have the latest from the white cliffs of dover as a campaign to protect them raises £1 million. good morning. is the phrase northern powerhouse anything more than just a slogan? it has been used for four yea rs. slogan? it has been used for four years. iam
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slogan? it has been used for four years. i am at this electronics factory to find out. in sport, ben stokes and alex hales won't be considered for england selection until further notice. stokes was arrested and they're both investigation after a brawl outside a bristol night club this week. voice of radio one. it's been the soundtrack for many teenagers since the 60s. we're celebrating 50 years of radio one. sarah is on their roof looking at the weather. good morning. a bit of a drizzly start to the day. mild. the rain should clear by lunchtime. that will leave sunny spells. i will have all the in about 15 minutes. —— details good morning. first, our main story. budget airline, ryanair, has until five o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations or face possible legal action by the uk's aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently
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misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements, as sarah corker reports. criticism of rya nair's criticism of ryanair‘s treatment of nearly three quarters of a million passengers is intensifying, accused of consistently misleading customers. the civil aviation authority has issued this written ultimatum. by 5pm today ryanair is to tell passengers they are to be rerouted by another carrier and explain how that works or face legal action. we want to make it clear to every single passenger what they are entitled to in terms of compensation. we don't think that is a big task. the regulator says airline is must book passengers on other carriers if they cannot replace the cancelled flights. that is not what ryanair said last week. we will not pay for other flights.
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it is not part of the entitlement. the no—frills carrier blames the cancellation of 20,000 flights on the overbooking of pilot holidays. customers are furious. this woman tweeted this. sean rebooked with another airline. the coast is more than the total of the original trip. for some, the coast is more than the total of the originaltrip. forsome, it the coast is more than the total of the original trip. for some, it is anything but satisflying lately. the airline says it will comply with the regulator and has issued guidance to staff. sarah corker, bbc news. care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals, and in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards, according to the royal college of nursing. in a survey of 30,000
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of its members across the uk, more than half said they were upset after their last shift because they couldn't provide the care they wanted. jenny walrond reports. the royal college of nursing survey heard from members describing themselves as exhausted, demoralised, and totally burned—out. in may, it asked nurses to describe their last shift. among more than 30,000 responses were stories of delays of medication like insulin for diabetics. patients were wetting their beds because no one was helping them to the bathroom. and people were dying alone. they talked of family tensions caused by geelong hours they worked and sobbing because they could not give patients the care they deserved. they have been so stressed with the level of ca re been so stressed with the level of care they are having to provide. we have now got to the stage where the
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nhs is in the worst level i have seen it in my a0 year career as a nurse, andi seen it in my a0 year career as a nurse, and i think we are seeing patient care suffering because of it. the department of health says there are over 11,000 more nurses on there are over 11,000 more nurses on the wards than seven years ago, and it has committed to finding an extra 10,000 post for nurses and other staff by 2020. —— posts. but nhs providers representing hospitals and other health trusts says the report isa other health trusts says the report is a powerful reminder of the relentless pressure faced by frontline staff and that trusts are doing all they can to sustain safe staffing levels under the most difficult of circumstances. jenny walrond, bbc news. a british climber has been killed after a huge rockfall in california's yosemite national park. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall, fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion.
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the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of the people involved. theresa may is to stress the uk's commitment to the defence of europe at an eu summit in estonia today. she will meet the german chancellor, angela merkel on the sidelines of the event. the prime minister will tell eu leaders that as preparations for brexit continue, she wants to build a new security partnership with brussels. ahead of the talks, she'll address british troops in estonia. millions of older people are putting themselves at risk of falls because they are failing to maintain their strength. the chartered society of physiotherapists says nearly a quarter of those over the age of 65 don't do any strengthening exercises. falls among the elderly cause the vast majority of hip fractures and cost the nhs around a billion pounds each year. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, has more. come back in. rest yourfoot come back in. rest your foot down. just three more. keeping up your strength as you age may feel like a challenge. lift your knee up! but as this simple exercise class in north manchester shows, it doesn't have to be complicated. four, five... here, they're concentrating on building strength to help avoid falls and the benefits are obvious.
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pull your hands up. this class is a godsend because it — it increases your flexibility and my problem is my balance. i had a stroke. and it helped me get my muscles back. physiotherapists warn that not enough people realise the need to maintain strength as we age. three, four, five... a survey of over 65s found that nearly a quarter do no strengthening exercises at all. nearly one in five people said they don't know how to do strengthening exercises, while a similar number said they just didn't want to. as we get older, our strength isn't as good as it used to be, our balance may not be as good as it used to be, maybe our feeling in our feet is not as good, or our vision is not as good, and so that's why doing exercise to improve strength and balance is really,
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really important. stand up nice and tall. that's it. falls among the elderly cause the vast majority of hip fractures and cost the nhs around £1 billion each year. physios say that encouraging people to keep their strength up will pay dividends, helping them to live independent, healthy lives for longer. dominic hughes, bbc news. tens of thousands of people with dementia and other severe mental impairments aren't claiming the council tax exemptions they're entitled to according to consumer website money saving expert. freedom of information research has revealed large variations in the number of people claiming the discount in britain. the government says it expects all councils to make sure that people entitled to this support receive it. this discount has been given to protect the most vulnerable in society and give them more funds to make their homes more suitable to live on as their condition deteriorates. that is a good thing. but the fact that bureaucratic ineptitude in stopping people getting that discount is not a good
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sign. —— is stopping. ukip will name a new leader today as it tries to reinvent itself after a disastrous general election that saw it lose more than three million votes. it could prove a pivotal moment for the party. mass resignations have been threatened if anne marie waters, a candidate who has described islam as "evil," were to become leader. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, reports. in this pretty harbour, there is an array of fish on offer, and for a few days, there will be an influx of kippers as well. this is where the annual conference of ukip is taking place. preparations are under way. as the banners and goals are set up, the party is preparing for another new leader. —— stalls. this is where it will be announced. despite riding high after the eu referendum, ukip has had a tough run. there has been infighting, bad election results the previous will be the fourth leader of the party in over a year, and
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they have a tough job. there are seven candidates in the mix, but two have been named as the favourite of the bookies. the current deputy leader says brexit should be the priority of the party. anne marie waters is an active campaign against islam and sharia law. some in ukip are threatening to resign if she wins, saying she was take the party in the wrong direction. but with five others in the mix, anything could happen. the result showed this could happen. the result showed this could be a turning point for ukip, setting priorities and deciding its fate. bbc news. singing happy birthday while washing your hands could prevent you from catching diseases. scrubbing your hands for 20 seconds, how long it ta kes to hands for 20 seconds, how long it takes to sing the song twice, is the only way to get rid of viruses and bacteria. we have not tried it yet,
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charlie. it sounds like a long time, but it is not that long. it depends oi'i but it is not that long. it depends on your but it is not that long. it depends on your name, but it is not that long. it depends on your name, how long that song takes. you would have extra clean hands. imagine if you had the longest name in the world herbert blane wolfgang... well, a long name. the fact remains you would have to wash your hands a long time. ben stokes is apparently devastated and well aware of the magnitude of what has happened. he and alex hales will not be playing for england. investigations continue. no one has
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been charged as yet. they will not play for england until further notice. it's looking more and more unlikely that ben stokes will be able to play in the ashes tour. he was selected despite being arrested under suspicion of causing actual bodily harm following a brawl outside a bristol nightclub earlier this week. no charges have been brought but investigations continue. theo walcott scored twice as arsenal beat bartey borisoff to make it two wins from two in the europa league, including this bizarre goal set up by the goalkeeper. there were defensive errors at goodison park too, where wayne rooney scored for everton against apollon limassol. but the match ended 2—2, leaving them bottom of their group, with just a point. and castleford tigers are through to their first ever grand final in super league, after an extra time win over st helens. luke gale, who had his appendix removed only two weeks ago, kicked the winning point to send the tigers to old trafford. at half past six we will hear how he
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felt afterwards. what an amazing achievement. it happened in cycling. and then luke as well. just two weeks later. incredible. and now we will get the weather. good morning. how is it looking? good morning. it isa how is it looking? good morning. it is a bit damp and drizzly at the moment. a bit of a dry interlude. certainly a mild start to the day, not just certainly a mild start to the day, notjust in london, but many parts of the country, certainly. rain around first thing. it should go away later on. a return to sunny spells for many of us. in northern and eastern scotland this morning, a saudi start to the day with outbreaks of rain. bright starts to
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the south—west. as we go further south into northern england, a wet start with a weather front bringing rain this morning. going further south, through east anglia and the south—east, one or two drizzly showers to start the day. some brighter spells. 0utbrea ks of showers to start the day. some brighter spells. outbreaks of rain in hampshire and somerset. devon and cornwall, brighterskies. in hampshire and somerset. devon and cornwall, brighter skies. the odd shower. wales as well. sunny spells in the morning. a few showers pushing in from the west. northern ireland as well. some sunshine in belfast in the morning. but also scattered showers heading in. through the day, that rain for central and eastern parts of the country clearing away, clearing the east coast by around lunchtime. back to sunny spells. dry for many of us but some showers continuing to move on from the west. temperature is not doing bad at all. 1a— 19. it should
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feel pleasant. the evening. continuing to see a mix of clear spells and a few showers, especially in the west. it will be a bit fresh, the last night. temperatures falling down into single figures in the countryside. 9— 13 degrees by first thing saturday morning in towns and cities. starting the day on saturday with sunshine to kick off the weekend. again, a few showers, especially for the west of the country. moving slowly eased through the day. during the afternoon, more persistent rain in ireland, wales, and the south—west of england. ahead of that, not a bad day. temperatures, 13— 18. a fraction cooler than out today. the rain in the west will go further east through the second half of the weekend. a spell of wet and windy weather during the day on sunday going east. than a return to
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sunshine and showers again be blustery by sunday. temperatures reasonably mild, up to 19 degrees. back to you. thank you. it's 06:16 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. let's take a look at this morning's papers. the madeleine mccann investigation, police have been given more money in connection with that, the ongoing search for madeleine mccann. variety of stories on the front pages today. the daily mail is looking at thousands of women who are dying unnecessarily rest cancer because of a direction of duty by ministers. " a report by a leading health charity which says that progress on tackling of breast cancer in the uk has stalled because of nhs red tape. the image on the front page of the times newspaper, hugh hefner, he has died at the age of 91. this story is about wood—burning which is set to be banned in some urban areas to reduce
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air pollution. and a look at the daily telegraph as well. universal credit thrown into chaos. government's welfare reforms thrown into jeopardy yesterday evening, as 12 conservative mps have written a letter to the work and pensions secretary demanding a pause in the rollout of universal credit. what have you got for us, mike? nothing to do with the ben stokes story, but gareth southgate was asked how he would treat his players if they get to the world cup in russia for england, it is that has been a debate in the past, rememberthem getting bored in south africa, how much freedom players should given when they are on world cup duty. southgate says if they get to russia his players will not be allowed on nights out. they will be allowed to see their families but they will not have free rein to go in let their hair down. it is an internal problem for managers, isn't it? trusting them to behave correctly, or do you literally... it is an ongoing saga. he was asked about cricket in
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general, and his theory is that cricketers are on tour for longer. he says it is different for footballers, there are more people trying to get involved with them and trying to get involved with them and try to trip them up. i was going to ask how much downtime that actually have when they are away. world cup, probably not that much time. it depends how long you lost in the tournament but you normally only get a few days between each game. and i suppose for the foot or fans, this is quite interesting, we think the fans are so obsessed with the champions league and what happens on those big european nights, but actually it turns out that this week, three times as many people watched cardiff against leeds on television in the championships, the second tier of english would all, then watched manchester city and spurs playing in the glamorous champions league ties. why? a top of the table clash in the championship, there is a lot of interest. on the theme of glamour, we held up the daily telegraph a moment ago. now,
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everybody knows who these two are. robert redford and jane fonda, reunited for a new drama they are doing, also all is not. —— new drama they are doing, all souls night. she has done an interview in which she has done an interview in which she has said, they did some very big films many years ago, so we are going back 50 years, 29—year—old jane fonda and 31 your old robert redford, barefoot in the park.|j haven't seen it. a delightful film. they play young lovers. it has turned out all these years later the jane fonda has said, i was in love with him. she says herself, she was married at the time. he has done a few interviews where he said, you know, i didn't know that. i was blissfully unaware about. is he kicking himself now?|j blissfully unaware about. is he kicking himself now? i think the reality is they had different circumstances. something was never said. people rather enjoy it,
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because they are reunited once again, ata because they are reunited once again, at a very different stage in life. i wonder if we will say that about each other in 50 years. that is taking it in a whole different direction, mike. of course. i'd better go. awkward! ok. the white cliffs of dover are a symbol of britain, recognised around the world, and today it's been revealed £1 million has been raised to protect them. there were worries the landmark would be sold to developers, but thousands have donated to an appeal by the national trust. brea kfast‘s john maguire's there for us this morning. good morning, john. good morning, everyone. you are probably wondering why we are talking about the white cliffs, talking about conservation, and standing in what might seem to you to be strange looking buildings. well, this is a second world war magazine. there were air defence guns dotted along this coastline.
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this was all covered with undergrowth, which has just this was all covered with undergrowth, which hasjust been this was all covered with undergrowth, which has just been cut back by the national trust over the last couple of days. when you are here you get a real sense, you can imagine its swarming with troops back during the war. we were here a couple of years ago when they reopen some of the tunnels in the cliffs. the cliffs are just beyond us there. if you like, we are beyond —— behind the front of the white cliffs. this area of land has been protected by that incredible fundraising drive. we will be speaking to richard and virginia. more than £1 million raised in three or four weeks, something like that. even the national trust must have been blown away by that? yes, blown away is the right phrase. we were completely overwhelmed and quite humbled as well. the level of support we got, it wasjust less well. the level of support we got, it was just less than three weeks, in fact, when we managed to get over the million. we have been completely touched by everybody getting behind
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the appeal, we are so excited. why did you raise the money in this way, and why was it important to protect this particular parcel of land? the opportunity came up to acquire this land, which effectively means we have deepened our ownership of the white cliffs of dover. we will now be able to protect them forever, and for everybody, really. the coastal strip is getting quite narrow in places. we are seeing about half a million people now and we needed a bit more spreading room to spread to those people onto, to make sure they could keep the cliffs, but also, the opportunities for nature conservation gains are absolutely tremendous. and then of course, as he said, there is this wonderful world war two heritage story to be told. richard, you are the expert when we talk about conservation. what are you going to do with the land? well, the current resource of the white cliffs of dover is that internationally, we are a habitat called unimproved grassland. the challenge here is that on one side you have the ocean, with coastal
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erosion, and on the other side, intensely farmed arable land. this trip of nature reserve we know as the white cliffs of dover is only ten metres wide in some places. —— in the strip. what we are going to do is revert some of the arable land that hasjust do is revert some of the arable land that has just been do is revert some of the arable land that hasjust been bought and turn it back into grassland to provide a buffer for wildlife and also give it more of a sense of a nature reserve as well. what sort of things to you get here? of course, it is synonymous with bluebirds. interestingly, the area that we reverted back in 2012 is already showing over 100 species of plant, not necessarily plants typical of grassland, butjust not necessarily plants typical of grassland, but just good not necessarily plants typical of grassland, butjust good grassland species. the diversity isjust food for birds and animals in general. we are expecting a lot of good things. what is really interesting about this is that the national trust is also planning, we're talking 15 hectares for grassland and the rest
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will still be produced for crops, but ina will still be produced for crops, but in a way that is sensitive to wildlife. so it will provide habitat for ground nesting birds which are threatened like skylarks and grey partridges. but also, of more concern, we partridges. but also, of more concern, we will provide much—needed comfort for pollinators such as bumblebees, which are really under threat. thank you very much indeed, guys. we will speak to you again later on. we will have a good look around the site want to get some daylight. the white cliffs of dover have always been, well, i don't want to say iconic, because it is overused, but so if operative. this parcel of land, as they were saying, will provide this buffer. half a million visitors to this area, everybody wants visitors but they do ta ke everybody wants visitors but they do take their toll. it is a fascinating site and an impressive and very rapid fundraising efforts that has taken place here. john, what time does the sun come up? 6:50am. i am
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reliably informed. well, that's good. and very precise. i expect nothing less. it is like those postcards, you know, the eiffel tower in the dark. just a black piece of card. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning, three years since the phrase northern powerhouse was coined, sean is finding out what's happened to it. yeah, good morning. iam at yeah, good morning. i am at the siemens electronics factory in share share, in the north of england, where for decades they have been manufacturing electric components. lots of workers here, you can see latifah through the gap, building these drives this morning. they do this all around the clock. this is basically what runs your baggage handling machines in your airports, in your warehouses, the things that pick out all of your packages that make sure they get to you on time. these are the kinds of things being designed. this has been going on for
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decades. this morning we are talking about the next 50 years, what kind of investment will happen here in the uk, the northern powerhouse. is it just the uk, the northern powerhouse. is itjust a the uk, the northern powerhouse. is it just a slogan? the uk, the northern powerhouse. is itjust a slogan? a big report is out which says they want billions of pounds of investment, but will it happen? will workers like ian and julie, who are working very hard, hello, we have the boss in town as well. julie, good morning. what are you doing? just helping to create jobs here in congleton? is that what you are doing? you are doing a very good job. i will let you crack on. julia is working very hard this morning. we will be speaking to small businesses and speaking to the region as well, and we have the boss of siemens manchester airport's app group, about all the money going into the north. is it because of that phrase that george osborne created, the northern powerhouse, or would this money have come around anyway? we will talk about at the first two venues, travel and weather where you are. —— talk about that but first we will get news, travel.
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good morning from bbc london news. the royal college of nursing says care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals. and it claims in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards. it surveyed 3,000 of its members in london, more than half of whom reported what they described as "dangerous" staff shortages while on shift. but the department of health says there are over 11,000 more nurses on wards than there were seven years ago and it's committed to funding an extra 10,000 places for nurses and other health workers by 2020. the prime minister has discussed the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe with president rouhani of iran. the hampshire resident has been in prison in iran since 2016, having been jailed for security offences. she maintains her innocence and the official charges against her have not been made public. her husband is wary of being too optimistic about her release. i guess we were here last year, last year president rohani met with the prime minister, and it didn't lead to anything concrete. so i am wary of getting too optimistic without
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details of what has been said. we live in hope. i try not to get too hopeful but after 5aa days it has to happen soon. the fa has fined west ham and totte n ha m the fa has fined west ham and tottenham £20,000 for failing to control their players at the london stadium during spurs deposit 3—2 premier league win on saturday. both sets of players clashed late after an incident between andy carroll and fernando lourenco. let's look at the travel now. there is a few problems on the tube. london 0verground and district line, no service gunnersbury to richmond because of a signal failure at richmond. kennington, the a23 brixton road down to one lane for gas works. thamesmead, central way is closed by the police following a stabbing last night. police are at the scene. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a fairly grey start
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across london this morning but not cold. a couple of showers at the moment but mostly it is dry. just now we do have some patchy rain working its way in as we head through the morning, clearing later. a couple of showers just now, but drier weather for a couple of showers just now, but drier weatherfor most of a couple of showers just now, but drier weather for most of us, and then this rain comes in towards the latter pa rt then this rain comes in towards the latter part of the morning, clearing away nicely as we head into the early pa rt away nicely as we head into the early part of the afternoon, taking the cloud with it in the sunshine later. a dry start to the weekend, and saturday definitely the better dale two. i think in the afternoon there will be more in the way of cloud coming through. a few showers here and there are, pretty light, with that top temperature of 18 degrees. saturday was the best day of the weekend. here is what we have for sunday. low pressure driving bans of rain towards us. one for the morning and a patchy one for the afternoon. it is all in the isobars, the white lines here, suggesting the key feature on sunday will be the strength of the wind. having said that it will not be a cold day.
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there will be dry weather as well through the day. 19, 20, maybe 21 celsius. a bit fresher on monday but still really windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we'll find out why singing happy birthday while washing your hands may be the key to preventing some illnesses. most of us switch off when it comes to terms and conditions, but we'll take a look at why they're so important for children's social media accounts. and we're travelling back in time to our favourite saturday morning children's tv programmes as a new one starts on the bbc. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. budget airline, ryanair, has until five o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy
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for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations, or face possible legal action by the uk's aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements. we wa nt we want them to make it crystal clear to every single passenger what that passenger is entitled to in terms of rerouting, expenses, and compensation. we don't think that is a big task. the law is clear. there is no disputing it. it is about their willingness to do that. care within nhs hospitals is being compromised because of staff shortages, according to the royal college of nursing. a survey of 30,000 members found more than half felt their last shift was understaffed, and patient safety was at risk. the government say it's investing in nursing and there will be 10,000 more nurses and health workers by 2020. a british climber has been killed
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after a huge rockfall in california's yosemite national park. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall, fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion. the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of the people involved. theresa may is to stress the uk's commitment to the defence of europe at an eu summit in estonia today. she will meet the german chancellor, angela merkel on the sidelines of the event. the prime minister arrived in estonia last night for an informal dinner with eu leaders. today, she will tell them as preparations for brexit continue, she wants to build a new security partnership with brussels. millions of older people are putting themselves at risk of falls because they are failing to maintain their strength. the chartered society of physiotherapists says nearly a quarter of those over the age of 65 don't do any strengthening exercises. falls among the elderly cause the vast majority of hip fractures and cost the nhs around a billion pounds each year. tens of thousands of people with dementia and other severe
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mental impairments aren't claiming the council tax exemptions they're entitled to according to consumer website money saving expert. freedom of information research has revealed large variations in the number of people claiming the discount in britain. the government says it expects all councils to make sure that people entitled to this support receive it. this discount has been given to protect the most vulnerable in society and give them more funds to make their homes more suitable to live in as their condition deteriorates. that's a good thing. but the fact that bureaucratic ineptitude is stopping people getting that discount is not a good scenario. ukip will name a new leader today as it tries to reinvent itself after a disastrous general election that saw it lose more than three million votes. it could prove a pivotal moment for the party. mass resignations have been
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threatened if anne marie waters, a candidate who has described islam as "evil," were to become leader at the party's conference in torquay. french art experts say a charcoal drawing of a nude woman could be a sketch for leonardo da vinci's 16th century masterpiece, the mona lisa. it had previously been attributed to the artist's studio, but after tests at the louvre museum in paris, experts believe the sketch is at least in part by leonardo da vinci himself. experts say it is almost certainly a preparatory work for an oil painting and is of truly remarkable quality. we are all looking very closely at that. the faces similar. she is smiling in the naked one. is that because she is feeling more comfortable? we will have to wait and see. i am no expert. they are the star players of england. we will have to wait and see whether they will be in the ashes. they are in a fragile and devastated state, and
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are aware of what has happened, they say. england cricketers, ben stokes and alex hales, will not be considered for selection until further notice, as investigations continue into a brawl outside a bristol nightclub earlier this week. stokes was arrested under suspicion of causing actual bodily harm, but no charges have been brought against him. yesterday, a video was released that appeared to show him involved in a violent fight. why did he say it would be better if he was there? yes. but he has a broken finger in his right hand as well. that would probably kill in time for the second or third match. —— heal. and we will move on to the football. arsenal made it two wins out of two in the europa league despite fielding a weakened side
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against bate borisov in belarus. theo walcott scored twice on his return to the starting line up, including this bizarre goal set up by bate‘s goalkeeper. and 0livier giroud claimed his one hundredth goal in an arsenal shirt as the gunners won a—2. look at that. so generous. passing the ball exactly straight to him. we had a good match with a good pace in the game and we maintain good for 65 minutes, perhaps. the last 20 minutes were a bit more difficult. there were defensive errors at goodison park too where wayne rooney equalised for everton after apollon limassol had taken an early lead. everton went ahead midway through the second half, but yuste made it two all in the final moments. the draw leaves ronald koeman's side bottom of their group onjust one point. ijust i just love this story. castleford tigers have booked a place in rugby league's grand finalforfirst time in their history, beating st helens in extra time 23—22, thanks in part to luke gale.
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rugby league has a man of steel award, and gale has to be up there. he had his appendix removed only two weeks ago, but wasn't going to miss his sides biggest game. he scored 15 of their 23 points, this try helping them get in front against st helens, who came back and led until gale kicked a last—minute penalty to force extra time. but he wasn't finished there. the winning point again coming from his boot. look what it meant to him and his team—mates. here's what he had to say afterwards. i have got like a corset on under here. keeps me nice and tight. when adrenaline is pumping, you do what you can to get through it. i knew if i played i wanted to make a difference. i did not want to play
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just beyond the pitch, i wanted to make a difference. luckily, it paid off. that is quite remarkable. british bobsleigh's women's team will now get a bit of support, ahead of the winter olympics next year after the sport's chief executive, richard parker, left his role. earlier this month, the b.b.s.a said it was withdrawing funding from the women while continuing to fund three men's teams. what is the collective noun for former presidents? they are still called president. no, the collective noun... here they are, three of them. they are watching the golf at them. they are watching the golf at the president's cup. the americans are on top. who has the best handicap of them?”
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think george bush must. whoever that youngster was to got that selfie must be very happy. should we explain this? we are talking about washing hands. apparently we do not washing hands. apparently we do not wash them for long enough to prevent stomach bugs and colds, et cetera. how long do you think you have to watch them ? how long do you think you have to watch them? usually i am in a rush. five seconds. less than that. you should do it for 20. professor ash soni is president of the royal pharmaceutical society. hejoins us now. 20 seconds is the recommended time. it is funny. that is quite a long time. we will illustrate it now. will you join me in singing? time. we will illustrate it now.
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will youjoin me in singing? you have to sing it. to food? —— who. we will do it to dr sony. 0k. it —— who. we will do it to dr sony. ok. it feels like a long time. ready #happy birthday to you. happy birthday to you. happy birthday. keep going. 0nce birthday to you. happy birthday. keep going. once more#. aside from the slightly embarrassing issue of singing, that did feel... that did feel like an extremely long time to be washing hands. much more than people would naturally do. absolutely. what you did not wash here. part of it is how do you make sure you cleaned them? you tend to
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do that and that and that. but you need to do between your fingers.“ it important, rather than hand wash, use soap to get it under the nails? any type of soap will do, but it is important. many people use antibacterial gel is now. is that a good alternative? —— gels. antibacterial gel is now. is that a good alternative? -- gels. it is a good alternative? -- gels. it is a good alternative, but soap and water are the best. what can we catch? stomach upset, cough and cold, food poisoning. what is a subject you talk about, people say i am always ina hurry, talk about, people say i am always in a hurry, i have a lot to do. are we more we; i that is the properly? i think so. that is the problem. modern technology, mobile
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phones, constantly using technology. also, think about it. 20 seconds to wash your hands. if you got one of these bugs, it could be a week before you recover. actually, 20 seconds against a weaker builders? in your into 5 ‘ you and ‘ you the and z 7 ‘and you don't ‘ and you don't watch ‘and you don't watch all the stuff and you don't watch all the time. you wash as much as you can. people don't wash hands after going to the toilet. apparently one in five do not. i do! but in your own home, some people might think it is
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not so bad. i know my toilet is cleanish. there are still bugs. and what about bleaching the kitchen and never getting exposure and building resistance. what about over—washing? the chance of the washing everything off is almost impossible. the chance off is almost impossible. the chance of you doing that is very low. i would not use bleach, soap and water. if you use bleach and try to clean surfaces constantly, there is a greater risk. but we are nowhere near that. actually, we just need to reduce the amount of antibiotics we use. do you wash your hands for 20 seconds? i try to, use. do you wash your hands for 20 seconds? itry to, but i'm like anyone else. but if you do it
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properly, it becomes automatic.” have made the air of leaving the soap and water. it is difficult to get out. —— error. and then you cannot keep holding it and itjumps out of your hand. i will have to be careful. thank you very much. it's 06:a5 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. ryanair has until 5:00 this evening to meet strict targets set by the civil aviation authority in dealing with passengers affected by its flight cancellations. the royal college of nursing says care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals, and in some cases patients are dying alone on wards. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. it is just it isjust a it is just a brightening it isjust a brightening up it is just a brightening up this morning, sarah. how is it looking? a bit chilly? not too cold, actually,
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reasonably mild because we have a blanket of cloud across much of the country to begin today. quite a wet start. some clear spells here in central london, and as we head through the day, the rain elsewhere will be easing away and we should start to see a bit of sunshine breaking through as well. quite a bit of rain this morning across scotland, especially in the north and east. clearer skies for the south—west, and the western isles, which will see a fine start to the day. down across northern england, a 5°99y day. down across northern england, a soggy morning to come, with outbreaks of rain. across the country, just a few drizzly showers down towards east anglia and the south—east of england, but clear spells around as well. certainly mild. 17 or18 spells around as well. certainly mild. 17 or 18 degrees. rain through central parts of england in the morning but in the south—west and much of wales, clear spells with sunshine to kick off the morning, and just a few showers pushing in from the west, most places looking drive. across the irish sea towards northern ireland, temperatures here
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around 12 or 13 degrees in belfast in the morning with some sunshine, but showers pushing in, and having their way further east through the day. that rain across central and eastern parts of the country will clear away from the east coast to be replaced by drier weather with some sunshine. we will still see showers rattling in across western parts, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. they are pretty hit and miss further south, so many places will have a decent afternoon, and temperatures not doing too badly, around 1a or 19 or possibly 20 degrees or so. those showers set to continue in the west as we move through this evening and overnight, but with clear spells it will be feeling quite fresh. temperatures in the towns and cities around 8— 13, and a bit colder in the countryside first thing on saturday. after that fresh and bright start to the day on saturday we will see showers continuing across western parts, filtering further east through the
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day. not too bad a day. temperatures still doing reasonably well, around about 13 to 18 degrees, with more persistent rain working in the across the west, particularly for northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england in the afternoon. that front will have further east as we move through saturday night into sunday. so that speu saturday night into sunday. so that spell of wet and windy weather will push its way eastward across all parts, clearing to leave a mix of sunshine and blustery showers by the afternoon, things still looking pretty mild. for most of us, saturday will be the better dale of the weekend. thank you, sarah. see you later. it's just over three years since the northern powerhouse idea was announced. what has changed as result? sean is at technology firm, siemens, in congleton in cheshire. i was just about to say, chancellor george osborne put it forward and it seems to have faded away. yes, and very bold statement by him. they
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kept talking about it all the time. have there been any changes? sean joins us from congleton. yes, we are at an electronics factory in cheshire this morning, siemens. siemens have had a big role, they have been involved with the northern powerhouse this whole time. they have been building electronics for decades and decades. the kind of things they are doing now, these drives which powerade lot of warehouse machinery, things that are automated, which we rely on a lot. pauline is doing a final touch up lot. pauline is doing a final touch up that drive. i will leave you to it, i won't distract you too much. the reason we are here in cheshire, the north of england, is because there is a big report out this morning asking for billions of pounds of investments from the northern powerhouse partnership. now, what does that mean? that is something which has been created by george osborne, he wanted to get lots of businesses together in the north, and at g are up a bit of
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momentum. —— and gee up. he was worried theresa may might not the so keen on the northern powerhouse as before. let's go have a chat to jurgen and rob. now, jurgen, you run siemens here in the uk. the northern powerhouse, in the last three years, what have people seen in that time? thank you. 31 years ago, we started here. what we have seen in the last especially five years as we are beginning to see more investment and focus on advanced manufacturing, and thatis focus on advanced manufacturing, and that is what this is all about. we are seeing morejobs that is what this is all about. we are seeing more jobs and that is what this is all about. we are seeing morejobs and more investment. you are a big business in the uk about as big and efforts for you. we have heard a lot about the northern powerhouse and people in the north of england are maybe wondering what it has meant for them
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in three years. so the electric gate of the railway, for example. there has been a u—turn on the stock —— electrification of the railway. well, we have seen investment in advanced materials, advanced manufacturing. we are beginning to see new jobs manufacturing. we are beginning to see newjobs being created. now, we need to create the northern powerhouse. this is now a journey for the next ten, 20 years. we want to create the fourth industrial revolution here in the north of england. rob, let's chat to you. you runa england. rob, let's chat to you. you run a business which re— furnishers sash windows. south lake a great business. do you make of that? well, what we are hearing today, it is quite a big isner strategy, the northern powerhouse. we have to remember that the vast majority of this is in the north are small to medium—sized businesses. there are lots of existing entrepreneurs who are struggling to promote growth. before we start looking at big
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investment from outside and new strategies, let's take a look, if we ta ke strategies, let's take a look, if we take greater manchester as an example, the 10021400 existing small businesses with less than 15 employees who are already struggling to turn themselves into larger businesses. if we want a true northern powerhouse... and i use seeing that in these strategies? no. frankly i am seeing small and medium—sized businesses overlooked. if we want a true northern powerhouse for all of the north, and not just the select few, we powerhouse for all of the north, and notjust the select few, we need to look at the small businesses that are already here. we need to focus on helping those small businesses transitioning to medium businesses, because at the moment, there is a blockage. it is a very difficult ceiling to break through, and i do not see policies which are going to help us achieve it. jurgen, quickly, is that fair? i totally agree that this needs to be about small and medium—sized businesses. large business needs to support that and
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thatis business needs to support that and that is what we are doing. we have created a training academy for small businesses to get involved with new digital technologies, and that is going to get more people engaged in this industrial resolution. very interesting, rob. thank you. so, who is the northern powerhouse working for and when is it really going to kick in? interesting to hear later, as well, ifjurgen is encouraging other large businesses to help small businesses. it is all very well saying that you are the business driving this, but are the business driving this, but are the business driving this, but are the others buying into that? anyway, we will talk about that later. yes, we are talking about a different kind of revolution now, a musical one. on 30 september 1967, bbc radio 1 took to the airwaves for the very first time. dj tony blackburn played "flowers in the rain" by the move for his opening track, heralding a new era of popular culture. this weekend, the station celebrates its 50th birthday with a series of special programmes. 0ur arts correspondent david sillitto has taken a trip down memory lane to sample the sounds of the ‘60s.
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the voice of radio 1! good morning, everybody. into the exciting new sound of radio 1. i didn't suffer from nerves at all on that day. they we re from nerves at all on that day. they were a from nerves at all on that day. they we re a lot from nerves at all on that day. they were a lot ofjournalists on the other side, as i remember, a lot of cameramen on the other side of the glass. at it was very relaxed. it was only an hour and a half, the programme. it went very well, very smoothly. day one of radio 1. and for a young dj called tony blackburn, this was a life changing moment. in the early days of radio 1. moment. in the early days of radio 1, the djs were as big as the artists. they really were. we would go anywhere and we would be absolutely mobbed, which was very nice. i enjoyed it. welcome once again to the fun filled, frivolous, frolicking world of fun. that is what it says here, at any rate. for anybody who thought that television
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would conquer everything, this proved them wrong. radio was in many ways saved by pop music. and diverse record to be played was this. from a band called flowers in the rain. and the man who wrote that song was roy wood, from the move, ear low—end wizard. aged 19, he made history, but he was fast asleep at the time and he missed it. i hadn't got a clue. and it was a big deal being on radio1? clue. and it was a big deal being on radio 1? it was massive. we usually had the car radio 1 when that happened. it was brilliant. then you knew that you are making a success of it. 50 years on, that pop music formula is still thriving. there are now more than 500 stations. 0ne recent new services this, fix radio. what the dickens is this? fix radio isa what the dickens is this? fix radio is a niche radio station targeted
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towards trade people. a radio station for builders? that's right, yeah. the question is, 50 years on, what about the future? exactly how p0p what about the future? exactly how pop classic is the older wireless for today's discerning listener? can i give you this? it is a radio. you've got it upside down at the moment. what you find radio 1 on there? —— would you find?” moment. what you find radio 1 on there? -- would you find? i will try. use the dial to find them. you've never used a radio, have you? is this where you find signals? no, it is this thing here. you've really never tried this? no! you've never held a radio, have you? you've done it. in one. i'm a legend! do you ever listen to the radio? no. but
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90% of us do still listen every week. cheerful company, good music. it will survive. but your old school fm radio probably won't. the first voice on radio 1, in 1967, tony blackbourne just walked into the studio. a bit of nostalgia there. that is lovely, not knowing how to use a radio. it shows how the world has come on. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the royal college of nursing says care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals. and it claims in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards. it surveyed 3,000 of its members in london, more than half of whom reported what they described as "dangerous" staff shortages while on shift. but the department of health says there are over 11,000 more nurses on wards than there were seven years ago and it's committed to funding an extra 10,000 places for nurses and other health workers by 2020.
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the prime minister has discussed the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe with president rouhani of iran. the hampshire resident has been in prison in iran since 2016, having been jailed for security offences. tech entrepreneurs and businesses in london need to be help with more support to help with the recycling problem. too much is going to landfill, according to the london assembly environment committee. the committee says that businesses need to be smart about the stuff they throw away. it is also reusing bits of wood that have come out of houses to maybe new furniture, it is using metals. the london waste and recycling board actually has a route map in six different areas they want people to focus on. one is textiles, but there is also reusing metal, electrical goods, lots of different things that can be reused. let's look at the travel situation. the
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district line is part suspended between gunnersbury and richmond because of a signal failure. that problem is also affecting london 0verground between those stations. kennington, the a23 brixton road down to one lane for gas works. thamesmead, central way is closed by the police following a stabbing last night. police are at the scene. city, a10 bishopsgate closed southbound at camomile street for electricity works. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a fairly grey start across london this morning but not cold. a couple of showers at the moment but mostly it's dry. just now we do have some patchy rain working its way in as we head through the morning, clearing later. a couple of showers just now, but drier weather for most of us, and then this rain comes in towards the latter part of the morning, clearing away nicely as we head into the early part of the afternoon, taking the cloud with it in the sunshine later. a dry start to the weekend, and saturday definitely the better day of the two. i think in the afternoon there will be more in the way
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of cloud coming through. a few showers here and there, pretty light, with that top temperature of 18 degrees. saturday was the best day of the weekend. here's what we have for sunday. low pressure driving bands of rain towards us. one for the morning and a patchy one for the afternoon. it's all in the isobars, the white lines here, suggesting the key feature on sunday will be the strength of the wind. having said that it will not be a cold day. there will be dry weather as well through the day. 19, 20, maybe 21 celsius. a bit fresher on monday but still really windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. an ultimatum for ryanair from the airline regulator. the company has until five o'clock today to tell passengers how they'll be compensated for flight cancellations or face legal action.
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good morning. it's friday the 29th of september. also this morning: a survey of nurses say patients are dying alone on hospital wards because staff don't have enough time to care for them. we'll have the latest from the white cliffs of dover as a campaign to protect them raises £1 million. amazing pictures. good morning. is the phrase northern powerhouse more than a slogan? it has been used for more than three yea rs. has been used for more than three years. a big report is calling for millions of investment. i am at a factory to find out why. in sport, ben stokes and alex hales
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won't be considered for england selection until further notice. stokes was arrested and they're both investigation after a brawl outside a bristol night club this week. voice of radio one. it's been the soundtrack for many teenagers since the 60s. we're celebrating 50 years of radio one. radio one is broadcast from broadcasting house in london. sarah is on their roof looking at the weather. good morning. a drizzly start to the day for many of us. sunshine already in the west replacing the cloud and rain later on. all of the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. budget airline, ryanair, has until five o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations or face possible legal action by the uk's aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim.
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ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements, as sarah corker reports. criticism of ryanair‘s treatment of nearly three quarters of a million passengers is intensifying, accused of consistently misleading customers. the uk regulator has now issued this written ultimatum. by 5pm today ryanair is to tell passengers they are to be rerouted by another carrier and explain how that works or face legal action. we want to make it clear to every single passenger what they are entitled to in terms of compensation. we don't think that is a big task. the regulator says airline is must book passengers on other carriers if they cannot replace the cancelled flights. that is not what ryanair said last week. we will not pay for other flights. it is not part of the entitlements.
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the no—frills carrier blames the cancellation of 20,000 flights on the overbooking of pilot holidays. customers are furious. kerry tweeted this. sean rebooked with another airline. the cost is more than the total of the original trip. kevin said this. for some, it is anything but "satisflying" lately. the airline says it will comply with the regulator and has issued guidance to staff. sarah corker, bbc news. care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals, and in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards, according to the royal college of nursing. in a survey of 30,000 of its members across the uk, more than half said they were upset after their last shift because they couldn't provide the care they wanted.
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jenny walrond reports. the royal college of nursing survey heard from members describing themselves as exhausted, demoralised, and totally burned—out. in may, it asked nurses to describe their last shift. among more than 30,000 responses were stories of delays in giving essential medication such as insulin for diabetics. patients were wetting their beds because no one was helping them to the bathroom. and people were dying alone. nurses also talked of family tensions caused by the long hours they worked and sobbing because they were unable to give patients the care they believe they needed. they have been so stressed with the level of care they are having to provide. i think we have now got to the stage where the nhs is in the worst level that i have seen it in my
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a0—year career as a nurse, and i think we are now seeing patient care suffering because of it. the department of health says there are over 11,000 more nurses on the wards than seven years ago, and it has committed to finding an extra 10,000 posts for nurses and other health workers by 2020. but nhs providers that represent hospitals and other health trusts says the report is a powerful reminder of the relentless pressure faced by frontline staff and that trusts are doing all they can to sustain safe staffing levels under the most difficult of circumstances. jenny walrond, bbc news. a british climber has been killed after a huge rockfall in california's yosemite national park. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall, fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion. the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of the people involved.
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theresa may is to stress the uk's commitment to the defence of europe at an eu summit in estonia today. she will meet the german chancellor, angela merkel on the sidelines of the event. the prime minister will tell eu leaders that as preparations for brexit continue, she wants to build a new security partnership with brussels. ahead of the talks, she'll address british troops in estonia. gavin lee is in the capital. what are we expecting to hear? it echoes what we heard in florence. 800 british troops in the east of the country where they are part of the nato efforts to take on the perceived threat of russia. they have been heading the battle group since april. in terms of this summit, it is almost like being a strange guest at a party. she arrived for dinner last night. the
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other leaders, she was politely informed before she arrived they will be talking about the future of the group with president macron giving talks about the future and she was told not to mention the "b" word. this was donald tusk saying this is not about what the eu can do for your country, but what your country can do for the eu in the future. they were talking about a parallel partnership. the key for theresa may is to be in the sidelines. she is here for solidarity. this morning, angela merkel, the german chancellor, has agreed to have an audience with her and spend time with theresa may. losing voters last week but winning at the same time, it makes her still at the same time, it makes her still a kingmaker in terms of brexit talks. we are still three weeks away
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before they will talk about the next stage of brexit talks. it could be an important set up meeting ahead of the brussels summit. we will show you some pictures of troops lining up you some pictures of troops lining up to hear theresa may speak later today. gavin just outlined what we expect as she continues a charm offensive with eu leaders. millions of older people are putting themselves at risk of falls because they are failing to maintain their strength. the chartered society of physiotherapists says nearly a quarter of those over the age of 65 don't do any strengthening exercises. falls among the elderly cause the vast majority of hip fractures and cost the nhs around a billion pounds each year. tens of thousands of people with dementia and other severe mental impairments aren't claiming the council tax exemptions they're entitled to, according to consumer website,
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money saving expert. freedom of information research has revealed large variations in the number of people claiming the discount in great britain. 0ur health editor, hugh, pym reports. do you go. vivian has a rare form of alzheimer's. for her daughter and the rest of her family, alzheimer's. for her daughter and the rest of herfamily, organising ca re the rest of herfamily, organising care was the rest of herfamily, organising ca re was a the rest of herfamily, organising care was a daunting task. they were not told they could make savings on the council tax bill. they found out by chance and were eventually able to claim back thousands of pounds. it has not been an easyjourney. we had to ask and verify the information. it was frustrating is. anyone with severe mental issues like this can claim 100% tax discount. average savings of around £a00,000 per year. new research shows huge variations in people claiming the reduction. it isjust
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ten residents here. you give them all money to make their homes suitable to live in as their homes suitable to live in as their condition deteriorates. that isa their condition deteriorates. that is a good thing. the fact bureaucratic ineptitude is stopping people getting that discount, it is not a good scenario. a whitehall spokesman said overall, councils we re spokesman said overall, councils were expected to make sure people entitled to the support did receive it. hugh pym, bbc news. ukip will name a new leader today as it tries to reinvent itself after a disastrous general election that saw it lose more than three million votes. it could prove a pivotal moment for the party. mass resignations have been threatened if anne marie waters, a candidate who has described islam as "evil," were to become leader.
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singing happy birthday while washing your hands could prevent you from catching diseases. scrubbing your hands for 20 seconds, how long it takes to sing the song twice, is the only way to get rid of viruses and bacteria. 20 seconds of hand washing is what is recommended. don't forget to wash in between yourfingers, notjust is recommended. don't forget to wash in between your fingers, notjust on top. we will have the sport and weather soon. first, one of the main stories this morning. mounting pressure on nhs staff is leading to patients being left in pain, and medicines being given late, according to a new report by the royal college of nursing. in a survey of 30,000 of its members across the uk, more than half said care had been compromised on their last shift. janet davies, the chief executive and general secretary of the royal college of nursing joins us now from our london newsroom. thank you very much for your time
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this morning. you spoke to 30,000 of your members. the questions you were asking, give us a sense of what you are trying to establish. we were asking what their experience was of the last shift they worked. rather than looking at statistics, which we normally do, we wanted the real story from nurses. what did they experience in their last shift? we wa nted experience in their last shift? we wanted them to tell us did they have the staff expected on the board, shortages? the experiences of patient care. were patients treated properly like they would want their loved ones to be treated? we wanted to know if they felt it was safe. this was all nurses, notjust in the nhs, hospitals, but actually prisons and independent centres as well. they work everywhere, obviously, in the uk to be it was all across the
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uk. we knew there were vacant as an problems. but we were ourselves quite shocked by what we heard. it is about nurses struggling to provide safe and effective care and stories of them going home crying unable to look after their children because they were stressed after working 12 hours and another hour unpaid just to get the job done. we heard harrowing stories about them wanting to give care and finding they were dying on their own because they were dying on their own because they were dying on their own because they were not enough staff to sit with that person. lots of different pressures all at the same time having to prioritise, which they we re having to prioritise, which they were finding demoralising. that was about half of them in that sort of situation. we also heard stories of where staffing was good and the difference that made in terms of how the nurses felt about giving professional ca re the nurses felt about giving professional care and the experience of their patients who got good quality care. everyone at the end of
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that shift felt safe and healthy and looking forward to the next day of work. you will be aware that the government says they are creating more nurses than ever before. 11,300 more nurses than ever before. 11,300 more nurses than ever before. 11,300 more nurses on wards since may, 2010. heart attack correspond with what is happening on the wards —— how does that. it was in may, not during the winter pressures. we don't do that during winter when eve ryo ne don't do that during winter when everyone is struggling to keep things going. statistics, you can use them any way you like. we know there are a0,000 vacancies. we wa nted there are a0,000 vacancies. we wanted the real experience for patients and nurses. no matter what statistics were used, this is real life. we believe we need a different approach now. we really think it is
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timely legislated... the thing with nursing levels, it is unpredictable. we don't have accountability for planning across the whole of the uk, and alter the whole of the sector to be we have not got them where we to be. we need to plan for numbers and there needs to be responsibility for that. the image created by this, highlighted by the media, it is a very emotive image. people dying in hospital beds alone. i want to be clear, was that one story in among the 30,000 you asked? the danger is one anecdotal story becomes a very vivid picture for people to see in their minds? it isa it is a vivid issue and that is just one amongst the many. we have 30,000
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stories that we have heard. there are other things, that is one thing that people pick up. what this shows is that there are patients at the moment who are not getting the care that we believe they should have because there are not enough nurses working in that area, be it hospitals, community or prisons. also in the independent sector, although it is not as bad there from our figures. these although it is not as bad there from ourfigures. these are real—life stories and we can make of it what we want. but to be honest, for me as a nurse, one person dying alone is one too many. thank you for your time this morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: ryanair has until five o'clock this evening to meet strict targets set by the civil aviation authority in dealing with passengers affected by its flight cancellations. the royal college of nursing says care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals — and in some cases patients are dying alone on wards. here's sarah with a look
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at this morning's weather. she is on the roof of new broadcasting house. i can see behind you that it has been raining. good morning. it has been raining this morning. it has been raining this morning. it has been raining this morning. it isjust morning. it has been raining this morning. it is just started drizzling again just now so a few showers around. across many parts of the country it seems fairly similar to the one behind me, a gloomy and grey skyline across london. a mild start to the day wherever you are but the rain we have for most places should ease and it will be replaced by sunshine coming through a little later on. to begin your morning, there will be a lot of rain across northern and eastern scotland. the south—western half of scotland looks decent through the morning with sunshine but as we move away south across the country it will be a wet morning to come across northern england although it should brighten
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up england although it should brighten up later on. a few showers through east anglia, the london region in south—eastern england as well with outbursts of rain towards gloucestershire. moving our way further way as, clear skies across devon and cornwall with just the odd isolated shower and a similar picture into wales as well. sunshine through the morning with a few scattered showers towards the west. across northern ireland, a largely dry start of the day with temperatures in belfast around 12 or 13 degrees. there will already be some showers moving in from the west. those showers are through the day, they will move their way into western parts of the country, particularly for scotland and northern ireland as well. in the east, things will improve. we will lose the band of cloud and that will be replaced by sunny and dry weather. the temperature will do well for this time of year, 1a— 19 or 20 degrees. that will fill pleasa nt or 20 degrees. that will fill pleasant with the light wind around this afternoon. into the evening, we
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keep the feet of showers coming in from the atlantic across western parts of the country, but clear skies elsewhere which means it will be colder than we have recently seen. first thing on saturday, the temperatures between eight and 13 degrees towns and cities, colder than that in the countryside. a fresh start to saturday, there will be sunshine, particularly from any central and eastern parts of the country. still some showers towards the west that will move eastwards through the day. some more persistent rain arriving across northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england later in the afternoon could make. temperatures are not too bad, 13— 18 degrees on saturday. the wet and windy weather in the west will make its way eastwards through saturday night and on into sunday. during sunday, the band of rain and brisk wind or clear towards the east and that will be replaced by a return to sunshine, blustery showers although it will turn windy during the second half of the weekend. thank you very much,
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sarah. i need to ask you, we are celebrating 50 years of radio one today. the first programme was tony blackman, i don't expect you to remember that. any favourite memories of radio one? listening to the charts? absolutely. listening, recording and my tape cassette every sunday religiously and then fast forward into my favourite song. definitely the tracks of my teenage yea rs, definitely the tracks of my teenage years, certainly. even now i don't think i'm too to listen to radio one. you know it is illegal to take that music, don't you? yeah, that's right. let us not admit to wrecking the law... i used to do it as well. the northern powerhouse. you might remember that phrase, george osborne
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is to say it all the time. it was one of those mantras. but what did it mean in practice and did anything changed? it mean in practice and did anything changed ? surely censure it mean in practice and did anything changed? surely censure should this sean is in session this morning. a big company here. what we are talking about today is what big businesses like siemens want out of the northern powerhouse. you ask if you remember the phrase, part of the issueis you remember the phrase, part of the issue is that maybe there is a bit ofa issue is that maybe there is a bit of a feeling that investment into manufacturing in the north of england and other areas like energy, digital, hills, has not been what it should have been back when george 0sborne first came up with their. 15 million people, across the north of england, workers including the skies here who are looking for more investment in the north. we spoke about the north—south divide, there is still a huge gap between the
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amount of muggy going into the london and the south—east, compared to the rest of the country. before we crack into the detail, let's have a quick chat here. bring a camera around here. danny, you have the best bit of kit i have seen, what is it cold? it is a niblo. -- niblo. it ta kes it cold? it is a niblo. -- niblo. it takes the threat from the side of the board, that comes down and then we need to take this off and it gets incorporated the first stage. so you nibble off the edges? got it. and thatis nibble off the edges? got it. and that is what we see an baggage handlers and things like that? just before we go, i will bring to let in from manchester airport. a huge business across the country. when we talk northern powerhouse, what is it that you would like to see? there is
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a report out today. for me it is about working together as one team across the north, be that business or private or public sector, to make sure we can increase productivity. i think if we can do that we know that the size of the prize is significant. work shows us that we can create another 850,000 newjobs across the north, bringing in over £100 billion worth of value to the region by 2015. for us it is about working together and making sure we prioritise the investment into the areas that really matter. we have heard charlie an hour der saying northern powerhouse, it is a three—year—old power the phrase. in the last few years have you seen enough of the benefit from the northern powerhouse? it is definitely starting to get momentum. if you look into it as a movement, we have got serious investment that we have got serious investment that we make now, notjust within our airport but across the region. i think it is definitely resonating
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with governor and and support for the northern powerhouse rail is critical for us. the northern powerhouse rail is criticalfor us. but the northern powerhouse rail is critical for us. but there has been controversy around the rail as well. always controversy but for us it is important that we do not lose the fa ct important that we do not lose the fact that transport is very important. let me bring you back in. we were talking earlier, rob, you area we were talking earlier, rob, you are a small business in the uk. in the north. when you hear big businesses like siemens and manchester airports talking about 850,000 jobs with billions of pounds of investment, does that make difference to you? yes, it does. in one respect it does but in another does nothing at all. we won a strong northern economy and because many small businesses will be serving... if the whole of the north is stronger, that is good for all of us. however, there is a specific challenge in getting the existing small businesses in the north, that
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northern entrepreneurs with less than 50 employees, it challenging and growing and transitioning into larger businesses. think that specifically help the existing businesses, the existing entrepreneurs read through the blockage and become a medium business. collett, just before you 90, business. collett, just before you go, stansted business. collett, just before you go, sta nsted are business. collett, just before you go, stansted are one of your airports as well. we are talking this morning about ryanair again. ryanair‘s base this morning about ryanair again. rya nair's base is this morning about ryanair again. ryanair‘s base is at stansted. have manchester airports group started to ta ke manchester airports group started to take any role in how may come at ryanair have take any role in how may come at rya nair have been take any role in how may come at ryanair have been treating their customers? if you look first of all manchester airport, we are lucky enough not to have any of the routes cancelled. it is just a change frequency did there are other routes available. we are encouraging customers to rebook and make sure they can enjoy their holiday plans. in terms of stansted, ryanair are one of our clients and we are
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working with them to minimise the disruption on customers. we'll talk more about the northern powerhouse later. illicit working for? small business, big business? the workers who are trying to get to work every day along the m6, catching rail? —— who is it working for? let's show some marvellous pictures. we have been blessed this morning. a drone is filming for as. 0n the right there you can see the white cliffs of dover with seaport in the background. a dramatic image as the light starts to gradually fade out there. the national trust has successfully raised £1 million that was needed to save an area of some 700,000 square metres of land around the cliffs. we will be live there
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throughout the morning this morning but for the moment we are just enjoying those dramatic images. john maguire is there to bring us more throughout the morning. enjoy that image, time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. the royal college of nursing says care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals. and it claims in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards. it surveyed 3,000 of its members in london, more than half of whom reported what they described as "dangerous" staff shortages while on shift. but the department of health says there are over 11,000 more nurses on wards than there were seven years ago and it's committed to funding an extra 10,000 places for nurses and other health workers by 2020. the prime minister has discussed the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe with president rouhani of iran. the hampshire resident has been in prison in iran since 2016, having been jailed for security offences. she maintains her innocence and the official charges against her have not been made public.
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her husband is wary of being too optimistic about her release. i guess we were here last year, last year president rouhani met with the prime minister, and it didn't lead to anything concrete. so i am wary of getting too optimistic without details of what has been said. we live in hope. i try not to get too hopeful but after 5aa days it has to end soon. tech entrepreneurs need to be given more help to solve the recycling problem. too much is going to landfill and less is being recycled. the committee says businesses need to be smarter on the stuff they throw away. let's look at the travel now. there is a few problems on the tube. london 0verground and district line, no service gunnersbury to richmond because of a signal failure at richmond. london 0verground, no service on the gospel 0ak to barking line for engineering works. kennington, the a23 brixton road down to one lane for gas works. thamesmead, central way is closed by the police following a stabbing last night.
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police are at the scene. city, a10 bishopsgate closed southbound at camomile street for electricity works. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a fairly grey start across london this morning but not cold. a couple of showers at the moment but mostly it's dry. just now we do have some patchy rain working its way in as we head through the morning, clearing later. a couple of showers just now, but drier weather for most of us, and then this rain comes in towards the latter part of the morning, clearing away nicely as we head into the early part of the afternoon, taking the cloud with it in the sunshine later. a dry start to the weekend, and saturday definitely the better day of the two. i think in the afternoon there will be more in the way of cloud coming through. a few showers here and there, pretty light, with that top temperature of 18 degrees. saturday was the best day of the weekend. here's what we have for sunday. low pressure driving bands of rain towards us. one for the morning and a patchy
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one for the afternoon. it's all in the isobars, the white lines here, suggesting the key feature on sunday will be the strength of the wind. having said that it will not be a cold day. there will be dry weather as well through the day. 19, 20, maybe 21 celsius. a bit fresher on monday but still really windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. budget airline, ryanair, has until five o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations, or face possible legal action by the uk's aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently
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misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements. we want them to make it crystal clear to every single passenger what that passenger is entitled to in terms of rerouting, expenses, and compensation. we don't think that is a big task. the law is clear. there is no disputing it. it is about their willingness to do that. care within nhs hospitals is being compromised because of staff shortages, according to the royal college of nursing. a survey of 30,000 members found more than half felt their last shift was understaffed, and patient safety was at risk. the government say it's investing in nursing and there will be 10,000 more nurses and health workers by 2020. speaking earlier on bbc breakfast, the chief executive of the royal college of nursing, janet davies, talked to us. we knew there were vacancies and
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problems, but we were quite shocked and surprised at what we heard. that is about nurses struggling to provide safe and effective care. stories of nurses going home crying unable to look after their children because they were so stressed after working 12 hours and then perhaps another hour unpaid just to get the work done. we heard stories of passionate nurses just wanted to get the work done to be and patients dying on the road because there was no one able to get there. —— done. a british climber has been killed after a huge rockfall in california's yosemite national park. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall, fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion. the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of
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the people involved. theresa may is to stress the uk's commitment to the defence of europe at an eu summit in estonia today. she will meet the german chancellor, angela merkel on the sidelines of the event. the prime minister arrived in estonia last night for an informal dinner with eu leaders. today, she will tell them as preparations for brexit continue, she wants to build a new security partnership with brussels. britain will always stand with allies in defence of these values. from the fight against islamic state in iraq and syria to the commitment to spend 8% of our gdp on defence. we have been at the forefront of the nato alliance, and that is exactly where we will remain. millions of older people are putting themselves at risk of falls because they are failing to maintain their strength. the chartered society of physiotherapists says nearly a quarter of those over the age of 65 don't do any strengthening exercises.
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falls among the elderly cause the vast majority of hip fractures and cost the nhs around a billion pounds each year. dozens of mps are calling for theresa may to cap energy bills. a letter has been signed and sent to the prime minister asking her to deliver on her election promise regarding energy prices. french art experts say a charcoal drawing of a nude woman could be a sketch for leonardo da vinci's 16th century masterpiece, the mona lisa. it had previously been attributed to the artist's studio, but after tests at the louvre museum in paris, experts believe the sketch is at least in part by leonardo da vinci himself. experts say it is almost certainly a preparatory work for an oil painting and is of truly remarkable quality. if you look at it you can see the connection. the nose. i don't know how you prove it. art experts look
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at the paint and the composition and the paper. we will find out. what? you are doing a face impression. arsenal are doing this face. you know the pressure arsene wenger was under. they lost a—0 to liverpool. but in autumn, he has got five out of six. they are happy with arsene wenger at the moment? do you love watching comedy errors in sport?” do, but there is some agony as well supplied young goalkeepers should watch and learn. —— well.
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theo walcott scored twice on his return to the starting line up, including this bizarre goal set up by bate‘s goalkeeper. and 0livier giroud claimed his one hundredth goal in an arsenal shirt as the gunners won a—2. another one at goodison park. wayne rooney cannot believe his luck. a great facial reaction. the draw leaves ronald koeman's side bottom of their group onjust one point. there are reports this morning that the manchester city striker sergio aguerro, has been injured in a car crash. it's reported he was attending a concert in amsterdam, and it's feared he may have broken a rib. there's been no confirmation from the club. castleford tigers have booked a place in rugby league's grand finalforfirst time
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in their history, beating st helens in extra time 23—22, thanks in part to luke gale. rugby league has a man of steel award, and gale has to be up there. he had his appendix removed only two weeks ago, but wasn't going to miss his sides biggest game. he scored 15 of their 23 points, this try helping them get in front against st helens, who came back and led until gale kicked a last—minute penalty to force extra time. but he wasn't finished there. the winning point again coming from his boot. look what it meant to him and his team—mates. it is fitting that a made the finals after how good they played all year. i have got like a corset on under here. keeps me nice and tight. when adrenaline is pumping, you do what you can to get through it. i knew if i played i wanted to make a difference. i did not want to play just beyond the pitch, i wanted to make a difference.
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luckily, it paid off. his appendix out two weeks ago. his corset helped. i should have worn one when i had mine. in that kind of sport, he should be careful. england cricketers, ben stokes and alex hales, will not be considered for selection until further notice, as investigations continue into a brawl outside a bristol nightclub earlier this week. stokes was arrested under suspicion of causing actual bodily harm, but no charges have been brought against him. yesterday, a video was released that appeared to show him involved in a violent fight.
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british bobsleigh's women's team will now get a bit of support, ahead of the winter olympics next year after the sport's chief executive, richard parker, left his role. earlier this month, the b.b.s.a said it was withdrawing funding from the women while continuing to fund three men's teams. and what's the collective noun forformer presidents? presidents, of course. well, three of them, bill clinton, george bush, and barack 0bama, were laughing together and watching the golf at the presidents' cup. that is phil mickelson. we did not spot that earlier. i said he was a youngster. he would be pleased, seeing as he is in his 405. the presidents cup, which runs until sunday features american golfers playing against an international team in a series of 30 matches taking place in newjersey. i wonder who has the best handicap. there is a table that ranks all of the presidents. donald trump is at the presidents. donald trump is at the front. he isn't there obviously.
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have we seen any of them hit a ball? there is plenty of footage. george bushjunior there is plenty of footage. george bush junior is second, there is plenty of footage. george bushjunior is second, i think. do they list them in terms of how much they list them in terms of how much they have won? i think it takes a lot into consideration. it is a great way to relax. the 13th of september 1967 is when bbc radio one took to the airwaves for the first time. flowers in the rain was the opening track. it started a new era of popular culture. we will look back. good
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morning and welcome to radio one. i did not feel any nerves on that day. there were manyjournalists on the other side and cameramen on the other side and cameramen on the other side and cameramen on the other side of the glass, but it was very relaxed. it is only 1.5 hours. it went well, smoothly. the first day of radio one. for tony, it was lifechanging. in the early days, they were huge. we would be mobbed. it was nice. i enjoyed it. welcomer once again to the world of fun. that is what it says here anyway. for anyone who thought tv would conquer anything, this showed they were wrong. radio was saved by pop music. the first record to be played was this. flowers in the rain. and the
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man who wrote that song is roy from the move. he made history at the age of19, the move. he made history at the age of 19, but was fast asleep at the time and missed it. i have not got a clue. it was a big deal? massive. you would have the car radio on a lot. it was brilliant. you knew you we re lot. it was brilliant. you knew you were making a success. 50 years on, that pop music formula is still thriving. there are now more than 500 stations. 0ne thriving. there are now more than 500 stations. one recent new service is this, fixed radio. it is a niche radio station to towards builders. 50 yea rs radio station to towards builders. 50 years on, the question about the
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future is how poptastic is the wi reless future is how poptastic is the wireless for today's listener. this isa wireless for today's listener. this is a radio. you have it upside down. could you find radio one on there?” will try. use that dial. you have never used one? i have not. how do you find signals? it is this thing here. oh. have you really never tried this? no. you have never held a radio, have you? you have done it! in one! i am a legend. do you ever listen to the radio? no. but 90% of listen to the radio? no. but 9096 of us still do listen every week. good music, cheerful company, it will survive. but the old school fm radio, it probably won't. tonyjust
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walked in. david sillito, bbc news. everyone has their own era. i was thinking about peter powell. everyone has their own moment in time. i am with sarah, who will give us the weather. i used to make mix tapes of my favourite songs. it was really exciting when it got to radio 0ne. really exciting when it got to radio one. illegally? you are not supposed to do it. hearers a drone at the white cliffs of dover. raising money to protect that area. you get a sense of the weather looking at the sky there. fix cloud. sarah could do a much betterjob
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than me. good morning to you both. we have some grey skies over the white cliffs of dover today but also grey skies across many other parts of the country as well. some sunshine in the west to begin things and for all of us a mild morning. temperatures in defence. the rate we have today should either way and we will see sunshine replaced rain over most parts of the country. a few showers as well. at nine o'clock this morning there will be rain across the northern and eastern scotland, brightness further south and west across northern england will be raining through the course of the morning. that will clear away little later on. a few drizzly showers likely across parts of east anglia and down towards the south—east as well. there could be a few clear spells around as well. temperatures 17 or 18 degrees, very mild so this time of year. there will be rain through central parts of england, down towards the south—west of england and for wales as well, you should see sunshine from the word go this morning. still a few showers pushing into the west
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coast but they will be hit and miss. pushing north into wells across northern ireland, clear skies here as well for belfast. 12 or 13 degrees in the morning and we will see showers pushing into the west of northern ireland. generally the showers across western parts of the country will continue through the day but the rain in the east will clear away. sunshine returning, the wind is falling light and the temperature is doing quite well, roundabout 1a— 19 or 20 degrees they should feel quite pleasant later on this afternoon. we will see a couple of heavy showers in the west and blustery for scotland and northern ireland at times. into the evening our iron hours, most of this will finish dry but we will see showers feeding from the west overnight. the spells elsewhere means a fresh night ahead. and temperatures by first thing tomorrow morning between eight and 13 degrees. a little cooler than that in rural spots. after that fresh start to saturday morning there will be sunshine, particularly in the central and eastern parts of the country. a few showers pushing
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into the west and later on in the afternoon the more persistent rain arrives across northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england as well. to the east of that, not a bad day at all. in the sunny spells, temperatures are down or today that it across the west, the temperature will move so we will see a spell of wet and windy weather during sunday. it should clear to the east to leave a mix of sunshine and scattered showers, temperatures not doing too badly. you will feel quite windy during sunday afternoon. people need to wash their hands for a full 20 seconds to get rid of viruses and bacteria that can cause cold, flu and upset stomachs. earlier on the programme we spoke to a professor, a professor, the president of the royal pharmaceutical society. he told us we were to wash our hands
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for the same amount of time it takes to sing happy birthday twice. it is quite a long time. # happy birthday to you. # happy birthday to you. # hgppy to you. # happy birthday to you. # happy birthday dear ash. # happy birthday to you. keep going. # happy birthday to you. # happy birthday dear ash. # happy birthday to you. aside from the embarrassing issue of singing there, that did feel like an extremely long time to be washing hands. much more than i think most people would naturally do it. absolutely. that you did not wash across there. oh, so i wasn't thorough? part of it is making sure you clean it. what did he do wrong? he did this, he did that but he forgot to claim between his fingers, front and back on both hands.“
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forgot to claim between his fingers, front and back on both hands. is it important? using hand washer so? any type of soap will do but soap is important because a clean so things away. many people use antibacterial gel is now. is that a good alternative to washing? it is if you do not have access to water but soap and water is the best. what are the most common things we are at of catching? stomach upsets, respiratory illness, cough, cold, food poisoning. is there any evidence... is a time constraint? people always say they are in a hurry, they have other things to do, using their phone all the time, were more likely to come across bugs and less likely to wash our hands properly? i think so. as part of the problem. with modern technology, smartphones, . .. that everybody users. . . smartphones, . .. that everybody users... and, also, the thing is that if you think about it, 20
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seconds to wash your hands, but if you got one of these bugs that could be one before you recover. 20 seconds against of weeks of illness... it occurs to me, however, that in your ordinary work, wherever it is, you are constantly coming into co nta ct it is, you are constantly coming into contact with things. how can you... you cannot wash your hands all the time. when you go shopping, use the staircase, a washing the time. no, not all the time but as much as you can under the circumstances. for example, people do not always wash their hands after going to the toilet or after they prepare food. one in five to wash their hands... i tell you what to do guide to wash my hands everytime i go to the toilet. at the home, people may be thing well, it is fine. perhaps in public toilets but your home toilet is clean —ish... there are still bugs there. yes. do
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not feel patronised by that. 20 seconds of handwashing does feel like a long time. i'm sure most people don't. nine minutes to aid is the time. and now to every antique hunter's green. it's every antique hunters dream — after years rooting around in the back of old junk shops you finally find an unexpected treasure. that's exactly what happened to paul laidlaw from the bbc‘s antiques road trip. he discovered an old camera that broke a record for the show. let's take a look. in yourcabinet in your cabinet over their. 0ptical instrument. 75 on that.” in your cabinet over their. 0ptical instrument. 75 on that. i will give you 50 quid. 60 and i will shake your hand, i will not do any better than that. a lot of interest here. 0pening than that. a lot of interest here. opening the bidding at £1000. £2000. £3000. a000. £a000. £10,000 online.
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11 is next. 11,000. 12. 13,000. 15,000. 17,000. 17,000 11 is next. 11,000. 12. 13,000. 15,000.17,000.17,000 pounds. £18,000. £19,000. £20,000. at £20,000 online. at £20,000, if we are all done... £20,000. wow. you cannot help but smile watching that. you actually seemed quite reserved there. if it were me i would be fist pumping and jumping up i would be fist pumping and jumping up and down. on the inside that is what was going on, rest assured. i was
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what was going on, rest assured. i was really nervous that it would not deliver on its potential. this is the truth of the matter. if it did not come across to we are all human andl not come across to we are all human and i was hoping for the result. a result. but those options... was that in your scope of hope? yes, or more. this was an unknown quantity. it has formed. we looked, we could not find another compatible result that it could have been anything. believe me, on the inside when it delivered on potential, the fist pumping was going on. will celebrate that wonderful thing of discovering something that makes a lot of money. there's a bit of me that starts to think i feel a bit sorry for the person who added and did not know and who never got to gain from... clearly, when you have an amazing
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list in the value of something, somebody has missed out. that is the nature of the game. however, this one, the profit does not go into a bank account ring to shares, it goes to children in need. and does that not take the edge off it all? you are right. in this situation that changes it all good. we brought a few items in to show us. what do you have? i am trying to demonstrate the treasure that is out there and how easy it is to get it wrong, to be frank. so. what do we have? what is this? it looks like a piece of plumbing mounted as a paperweight. i think, personally, there is an engraving on a. read the engraving. it says that this is part of... it isa it says that this is part of... it is a safety cap from the first shell fired by the british during the first world war. the gun that fired
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it considered so important it is that the national maritime museum. this is where it begins. the existence of that was unknown but it turned up online, displayed as a paperweight. that was purchased for just over £100. it is, if there is a priceless object, that if it. there is only one. it begins there. widows of huge import. how about the watch. everybody wears watch and we think we know something about them.” everybody wears watch and we think we know something about them. i am an auctioneer. i option is shortly. someone comes in, with his father ‘s old watch. it looks like nothing. he has no expectations. he could do easily taken it to a cabinet shop. it looks like a £10 watch. that is cost and jewellery, that is why turned up 20 years ago in a charity
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shop for £5. that is what you to be. 1860, parisi and, diamond encrusted. it flatters the lady wears it, it is a pendant big £5 in a charity shop. i auctioned that for over £2000. there are amazing stories. thank you very much. congratulations on your win for the charity. ‘antiques roadtrip' is on bbc one this afternoon at half past four. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the royal college of nursing says care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals. and it claims in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards. it surveyed 3,000 of its members in london, more than half of whom reported what they described as "dangerous" staff shortages
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while on shift. but the department of health says there are over 11,000 more nurses on wards than there were seven years ago. the prime minister has discussed the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe with president rouhani of iran. the hampshire resident has been in prison in iran since 2016, having been jailed for security offences. she maintains her innocence. her husband is wary of being too optimistic about her release. i guess we were here last year, last year president rouhani met with the prime minister, and it didn't lead to anything concrete. so i am wary of getting too optimistic without details of what has been said. we live in hope. i try not to get too hopeful but after 5aa days it has to end soon. tech entrepreneurs need to be given more help to solve the recycling problem. too much is going to landfill and less is being recycled. the committee says businesses need to be smarter on the stuff they throw away.
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let's look at the travel now. there is a few problems on the tube. london 0verground and district line, no service gunnersbury to richmond because of a signal failure at richmond. london 0verground, no service on the gospel 0ak to barking line for engineering works. severe delays as well on the metropolitan line between 0xbridge and will be due to the signalling problem. minor problems on the piccadilly line as well. on the roads, this is the live scene in cannington. the road is slow in moving. let's have a look now off at the weather. —— a look now at the weather. —— a look now at the weather. a fairly grey start across london this morning but not cold. a couple of showers at the moment but mostly it's dry. just now we do have some patchy rain working its way in as we head through the morning, clearing later. a couple of showers just now,
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but drier weather for most of us, and then this rain comes in towards the latter part of the morning, clearing away nicely as we head into the early part of the afternoon, taking the cloud with it in the sunshine later. a dry start to the weekend, and saturday definitely the better day of the two. i think in the afternoon there will be more in the way of cloud coming through. a few showers here and there, pretty light, with that top temperature of 18 degrees. saturday was the best day of the weekend. here's what we have for sunday. low pressure driving bands of rain towards us. one for the morning and a patchy one for the afternoon. it's all in the isobars, the white lines here, suggesting the key feature on sunday will be the strength of the wind. having said that it will not be a cold day. there will be dry weather as well through the day. 19, 20, maybe 21 celsius. a bit fresher on monday but still really windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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ryanair is told to stop misleading passengers or face court action. the airline has until 5 o'clock today to tell 700,000 customers how they'll be compensated for flight cancellations. good morning, it's friday the 29th of september. also this morning... patients are dying alone on hospital wards because staff don't have enough time to care for them, according to a survey of nurses. we're live from the white cliffs of dover as a campaign to protect them raises £1 million. good morning. is the northern powerhouse more than just a slogan? there is a report out today calling for billions of pounds of investment
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in the north of england so i am at this seems that the in gesture to wind—up. —— find out. in sport, a gift for arsenal in belarus. they round off a september to savour — as theo walcott says thanks very much, in their europa league win. that was the best! reinventing saturday morning telly for a new generation. we'll meet the presenters hoping to take childrens' tv back to its glory days. broadcasting house has been the home of radio 1 for 50 years. sarah is on the roof with the weather. if you are waking up to grey skies and a bit of drizzle, bear with it because for most of us there will be some sunshine later. a full forecast in about 15 minutes. thank you. first, our main story. budget airline ryanair has until 5 o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations or face possible legal action by the uk's
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aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements, as sarah corker reports. criticism of rya nair's treatment of nearly three quarters of a million passengers is intensifying. accused of persistently misleading customers, the uk regulator has now issued this written ultimatum. by 5pm today, ryanair must tell passengers they are entitled to be re—routed by another carrier and explain how that will work orface legal action. we want them to make it crystal clear to every single passenger what that passenger is entitled to in terms of re—routing, expenses and compensation where that is applicable. we don't think that's a big task. the regulator says airlines must re—book passengers on rival carriers if they cannot replace a cancelled flight but that is not what ryanair said last week.
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we will not be paying for flights on other airlines, no. it's not part of the eu261 entitlement. the no—frills carrier blamed the cancellation of 20,000 flights on the overbooking of pilot holidays. customers are furious. kerry tweeted. .. sean rebooked tickets with another airline. and kevin said... so for some it is anything but satis—flying lately. the airline says it will comply with the regulator and it has issued guidance to call centre staff. sarah corker, bbc news. care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals and in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards, according to the royal college of nursing.
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in a survey of 30,000 of its members across the uk, more than half said they were upset after their last shift because they couldn't provide the care they wanted. jenny walrond reports. the royal college of nursing survey heard from members describing themselves as exhausted, demoralised, and totally burned out. in may it asked nurses to describe their last shift. among more than 30,000 responses were stories of delays in giving essential medication such as insulin for diabetics. patients wetting their beds because there was no one to help them to the bathroom. and people dying alone. nurses also talked of family tensions caused by the long hours they worked and sobbing because they were unable to give patients the care they believed they needed. i have seen nurses in tears at the end of their shift because they have been so stressed with the level of care they are having to provide with the number of staff. i think we have now got to the stage
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where the nhs is in the worst level i have seen it in my a0—year career as a nurse. and i think we are now seeing patient care suffer because of it. the department of health said there are over 11,000 more nurses on the wards than seven years ago and it has committed to funding an extra 10,000 posts for nurses and other health workers by 2020. but nhs providers, which represents hospitals and other health trusts, says the report is a powerful reminder of the relentless pressures faced by front line staff. and that trusts are doing all they can to sustain safe staffing levels under the most difficult circumstances. jenny walrond, bbc news. the british climber who was killed after a huge rockfall in california's yosemite national park has been named as 32—year—old andrew foster from wales. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall,
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fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion. the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of the people involved. theresa may has stressed in a speech at a military base in estonia that britain is unconditionally committed to the defence of europe. the prime minister says the uk's role in europe's security has never been more vital. at a conference in the estonian capital, tallinn, later this morning she'll tell european leaders the uk wants to build a new security partnership after brexit. 0ur correspondent gavin lee is there. they had what they call the informal dinner last night, i cannot imagine it is that informal but discussions around the formal talks? yes, the building behind me on the corn is where they met last night and where they will meet today and it is a good point. it is well choreographed, so much so that earlier this week donald tusk was in
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downing street talking to theresa may, politely we are told, saying don't mention the b word at the dinner, don't talk about brexit because this is not about what the eu can do for your country but what you can be for the eu. the speech was fourth emmanuel macron and his vision for better integration and come together on the economy and defence and for the other leaders to hear that. interesting for theresa may because her point is about solidarity, saying what is important and we heard echoes of this in florence last week. she visited a place where there are 800 british troops, part of the nato defence force, to say that solidarity in defence is unconditional in the future and the other thing to bear in mind, in about half an hour she will be meeting with angela merkel on the sidelines of this summit. after her victory but bruised in the election and losing some vote last
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week, she is still a key player in the brexit talks but if you step back at this, look at this as a step up, for theresa may to get a sense of the mood in the sidelines with other leaders because in three weeks in brussels is when they will decide whether or not they see sufficient progress in the brexit talks to go to the next round of talks. for the moment, thank you. some newsjust coming in. at least 15 people have been killed and more than 20 wounded in a stampede at a train station in india. the information we are receiving is this. the incident happened in the city of mumbai at a railway station during a heavy downpour. we'll bring you more as we get it. millions of older people are putting themselves at risk of falls because they are failing to maintain their strength. the chartered society of physiotherapy says nearly a quarter of those over the age of 65 don't do any strengthening exercises. falls among the elderly cause the vast majority of hip fractures and cost the nhs around
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a £1 billion each year. as we get older, our strength is not as good as easterby and our balance might not be, maybe feeling in our feet or our vision. that is why doing exercise to improve all that is very important as we get older, actually even more important than when we are younger. tens of thousands of people with dementia and other severe mental impairments aren't claiming the council tax exemptions they're entitled to, according to consumer website money saving expert. freedom of information research has revealed large variations in the number of people claiming the discount in great britain. the government said it expects all councils to make sure that people who are entitled to support received it. ukip will name a new leader today as it tries to reinvent itself after a disastrous general election that saw it lose more than 3 million votes. it could prove a pivotal moment for the party. mass resignations have been threatened if anne marie waters, a candidate who has described islam as "evil", were to become
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leader at the party's conference in torquay. and one other story. french art experts say a charcoal drawing of a nude woman could be a sketch for leonardo da vinci's 16th century masterpiece, the mona lisa. it had previously been attributed to the artist's studio, but after tests at the louvre museum in paris, experts believe the sketch is at least in part by leonardo da vinci himself. you can draw your conclusions yourself as to whether you think there are similarities. did you do that deliberately? what? draw your conclusions! it just that deliberately? what? draw your conclusions! itjust happens! anyone living with a severe mental impairment, including dementia and parkinson's, in great britain can claim a council tax discount. they are exempt from 100% of the bill if they live alone, or 25% if they live
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with one other person. research by consumer website money saving expert found tens of thousands of people aren't claiming the discounts they are entitled to. martin lewis, the founder of moneysavingexpert.com joins us now from our london newsroom. you put in the freedom of information request to get this, what did you discover? there were actually about 260 requests. if somebody has a diagnosis of severe mental impairment and are eligible for certain benefits, mostly disability benefits but also many of the standard income —based benefits, they are disregarded for council tax purposes like students are, which, as you say, mean that if it is one person living with another they are entitled to the 25%. it is much more rare that somebody is living by
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themselves at home and in that rare case they would get 100% discount. that is the equivalent to about £a00 a year typically offer a council tax bill and a year typically offer a council tax billand in many a year typically offer a council tax bill and in many cases it can be backdated which means we started campaigning on this year ago and we already have a lot of stories who have followed it through and got thousands of pounds back. we got people who were telling us, i have tried to do this and your information is wrong, the council says i cannot claim and we wanted to investigate that. we did 260 freedom of information requests and a mystery shopping exercise at 100 different councils. we found an absolute postcode lottery of the take—up of this smi discount. in some areas, 77 times more people get it than other areas and that is simply not justified by it than other areas and that is simply notjustified by demographic differences. it is simply because, for some reason, some councils are
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better at it than others and when we did the mystery shopper exercise in almost 70% of cases front line staff at council officers did not give correct information. some had not heard of it, others confused it with benefits, others said the eligibility criteria —— criteria, which were simply untrue. if it's all about council tax disregard and the truth is that the discount itself is being disregarded by councils whose staff are not well trained in and not being proactive enough to tell people that if you have a severe mental impairment or you are caring for somebody who has, you are caring for somebody who has, you are caring for somebody who has, you are probably entitled to a reduction in council tax in most circumstances. have you challenged the government to see what it will do about this? we launched the report today and the challenge comes in different areas. first to councils, talk to staff and make sure they are trained and that in your council tax information you are
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telling people about this discount. also to central government and devolved government, one of the problems we have had is finding out exec the hammers bid for this effect. back of the envelope populations show it is up to 100,000 —— finding out exactly how many people this effect. then government needs to make sure that each council has a standardised easy form with easy explanation that people can pick up, fill out and get their money. there is another postcode lottery as well which is that some councils allowed backdated claims and others do not. there is no legal way to force councils into giving backdated claims but i would say there is a moral duty here. in another area of our research, we looked at if there was a correlation between those councils who are not giving out good information and those who don't have many people claim itand those who don't have many people claim it and no surprise, there is a correlation. what we really need to do is say to councils, you need to backdate, backdate exactly how much
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and tell everybody they can backdate the claims. sorry, somebody else was talking in my earpiece! it was nothing to do with this! we will change the subject and take advantage of your knowledge of this. we have been leading with ryanair today, there is a deadline at 5pm for them to make clear how it will compensate passengers whose flights have been affected. have you any advice for those who are waiting for this news or are trying to get money back? cancellations and flight delays are dependent on what is called eu regulation, i will have to take my earpiece out, 261/200a. what that saysis earpiece out, 261/200a. what that says is if your flight is cancelled and you are given less than two weeks notice you are entitled to the choice between a full refund and an alearn thetive flight which can be your carrier, if they can't do that
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it can be with an alternative carrier. you are entitled to compensation if it is the airline's fall which it is in this case. if you have more than two weeks notice you have more than two weeks notice you are not entitled to the compensation. the civil aviation authority has stated to ryanair it must comply with these rules including you are entitled to an alternative flight. if ryanair isn't doing it. we can have this debate and this spat but that doesn't help anyone who is trying to work out if they should take the cash and rebook for themselves, if your flight is weeks or months away, the best thing to do now, while this ultimatum is on ryanair is to sit on your hand and waitand on ryanair is to sit on your hand and wait and see what will happen. and see whether ryanair is going to ‘fess up and say we will put you on an alternative flight. you are going to have to make the decision if ryanair don‘t comply. to have to make the decision if rya nair don‘t comply. because to have to make the decision if ryanair don‘t comply. because the civil aviation authority can slap it
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across the face and fine it but if it won‘t give you the money you might have to go to court. martin, thank you very much for going through that with us. apologies for the technical problems. here‘s sarah, with a look at this morning‘s weather. morning sarah. morning. here in central london it is fairly cloudy, there have been drizzly skies round. we have a weather front draped across the country bringing outbreaks of rain today. it is mild outbreaks of rain today. it is mild out there, but the rain will ease away, and we will be seeing sunshine returning to most parts later on in the day. this morning we have a lot of rain to come in northern and eastern scotland, brighter towards the south west, some rain too for much of northern england which will be heavy and blustery at times. heading south across east anglia, down towards the south—east of england, there will be a few drizzly shower hearse and there but some
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clearer spells and it is mild at 17 or 18 degrees. we will see outbreaks of rain on that weather front across central parts of england but towards the south—west it is looking descent, some sunshine to start your morning and temperatures in the mid teen, there will be a few showers pushing in in the far south—west and for western parts of wales too, but for western parts of wales too, but for much of wales you should see a dry morning with spells of sunshine, mostly dry to start the day for northern ireland too, but showers in the west will creep further east in the west will creep further east in the morning. so we will see showers continuing in western parts, particularly for scotland, northern ireland, a few for wales and the south—west, but the bulk of the rain for central and eastern areas, that clears away, leaving sunnier sky, drier weather and the winds easing. temperatures round 1a—19 degrees or so, perhaps a degree or so warmer, we will feel pleasant during this afternoon, we will continue to see showers, particularly in north—west parts into this evening, but elsewhere many of us end the day on a dry note. a few showers in the
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west tonight but clear skies elsewhere means a fresh feeling night i had. colderthan elsewhere means a fresh feeling night i had. colder than recent nights with temperatures down to eight to 13 degrees in towns and cities. cooler in the countryside. so it looks like saturday will get off toa so it looks like saturday will get off to a fresh bright start for many. we will continue to see showers in the west which will feed further eastwards through the day. they will be hit—and—miss, many of us will avoid them, particularly the further east you are. temperatures not dissimilar to today, round about 13-18 not dissimilar to today, round about 13—18 degrees or so. wet and windy weather works into the west later on on saturday, between northern ireland, wales, the south—west and overnight into sunday it will push eastwards, so during sunday morning we see that band of wet and windy weather clearing to the east. that will be replaced bier sunshine and heavy and blustery showers. turning increasingly unsettled through the weekend. back to you both. we are wading through pages of
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stuff. these are terms and conditions for social media websites. we are talking about whether children on social media are aware of all the terms and conditions. this one, for whatsapp is 23 printed pages long. to help them understand, a social media jargon—buster‘s been put together for them by the children‘s commissioner for england, anne longfield, who joins us now. also with us is andrew shakos, executive head teacher at the dean trust academy group. good morning. also with us is andrew shakos. i think adults are bad enough. we have simplified those down 2000 page, in terms of the length and also the use of language so it says in plain english what you are signing up. they are still
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sound? so the simplified version isn‘t a legal documentment there is still the main document but what that does is explain in really plain terms what you are signing up to. now, for adults, you know, we all sign up to it, but for kids this is the first time they will have come across a contract. they won‘t be able to fathom what that means and there is things in there about wavering their privacy rights, commercial use of their data and indeed use of images too. things that children need to know about. you have been a head teacher andrew, you are executive head teacher now what is the reality of the way that youngsters use these and whether, whether north you have a simplified version. does that make a difference? first of all, i will applaud your work, because anything that helps us educate our young people, to have a greater understanding of how to keep safe on line is vitally important. we do a
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lot of work with young people, but the reality is the astructure, the pull to social media is so strong, not only injust pull to social media is so strong, not only in just children but adults, that when you get to that bit where it says terms and conditions you start trying to read helps us educate our young people, to have a greater understanding of how to keep safe on line is vitally important. we do a lot of work with young people, but the reality is the astructure, the pull to social media is so strong, not only in just children but adults, that when you get to that bit where it says terms and conditions you start trying to read it and keep safe on line is vitally important. we do a lot of work with young people, but the reality is the astructure, the pull to social media is so strong, not only injust children to social media is so strong, not only in just children but adults, that when you get to that bit where it says terms and conditions you start trying to read it and you go "accept" and you are in. you used to be forced to scroll through the terms and conditions, didn‘t you, but now on many you just click, you say i accept. if you have a shiny phone you want to get on the app. someone is saying log on now. they press tick on that. you know, there is things about being tracked, percentage of battery use, they can tell that. i don‘t think these are going, we are not trying to get kids off line, we going, we are not trying to get kids offline, we are
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going, we are not trying to get kids off line, we are not try doing that. this is about giving them the information. if you like the power to be able to make an informed choice. that might be about privacy settings, how they use it. it is curious you use phrase pow over what you are doing, given what you were saying earlier the reality is most youngsters and other people as well, will regardless, whether they have simplified version or another version, or someone tells them, they will do it any way. it is about doing something in an informed manner. at the moment, obviously with the exception of the massive work that is happening in schools, on keeping safe, but you see reading terms and conditions is only one small part of that. it is about not going on the right website, be careful who you are talking to, how can you trust what you are saying is... in in your role, have you had to dealfirst is... in in your role, have you had to deal first hand with problems that have arisen round youngsters posting things and then after going, ididn‘t posting things and then after going, i didn‘t know this was going to happen, have you had to deal with that first hand ? happen, have you had to deal with that first hand? of course, it generally happens over the weekend and it is brought into school on
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monday morning. we have people in place to support young people when that happens, but this idea of being ata that happens, but this idea of being at a complete, being hidden —— computer, makes people braver in terms of what they might post online. they don't always understand the implications of that. we have seen it with adults in the media all the time. you use the word contract. that is something i suppose no—one comprehends it is is a binding document. you are giving permission for these things. i want children to know about this. it is good they know about this. it is good they know about this. it is good they know about it, it is good they have as much information as possible. i wa nt as much information as possible. i want the social media companies to be more transparent. i want them to be more transparent. i want them to be able to step out and do this on their own accord and simplify the information they are putting out. without naming names, we don‘t want you to name and snakist shame what is the most surprising thin that will surprise children the most when they read the terms and conditions.
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i think the tracking, at any point they will know where they are. kids hate that, but just they will know where they are. kids hate that, butjust the use of their data, and their information, and they can read without naming any names, the content of messages as well. these organisations have a social responsibility and ultimately you have to question why until now, there haven't been, you know simplified versions of the terms and conditions. the end of the day we are working for our children to be better educated to make informed decisions. more and more questions are being asked of the social media company, are they taking it seriously or paying lip—service to it. people think they say the right things, of course we will check every instance when we... there is a lot more they can do. there is a lot more they can do. they tell me they are committed to this but they need to show kids they from committed to this and parents and put the tinges
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in place that mean if kids report things they get taken down, it is is a long way to do that, i don‘t think they are taking it seriously and i think they need to. thank you very much for your time this morning. we have been talking about the weather. this is one of our favourite views, white cliffs of dover, we have been talking about the national trust and what it has done has, and it has raised £1 million to save something like 700,000 square metres of land on the white clever clevers of dover after it launched an appeal. more than 17,500 people made donations to the trust, we are going to be talking to you about it and look at some of the things that can be done to put that land to good us. that will be working its way
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eastwards. this morning ‘s wet weather gradually clearing away. it might take until after lunchtime until it clears from the norfolk and suffolk coastline and there will be some showers come into the north and west but for the bulk of the uk it will be dry the suffering with some sunshine, perhaps feeling a bit fresher compared to yesterday with temperatures down by one or 2 degrees but still 17 or 18 with the last of the rain clearing from norfolk. a few showers in western scotla nd norfolk. a few showers in western scotland and northern ireland but a fairly lost three south—westerly wind and still quite wet in the far north—east of scotland as the rain will take awhile clear. this evening and night there will be some showers mainly in these western areas but with clear skies across many parts it will be fairly chilly with temperatures in towns and cities about ten or 11 but lower than that in the countryside. chilly start to saturday but a bright start to the weekend. it will turn wet particularly windy going through
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late saturday and into sunday. this is saturday, some sunny spells for many, a bright start but some showers around. they move through fairly swiftly. late in the day you can see in the west some rain coming into northern ireland and through wales and the south—west of england with temperatures between 15 and 18 was a bit uncertain on sunday but likely to be windy with some gales around and heavy rain spreading from west to east but the details could change nearer the time. more on the website. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and rachel horne. more connected and more at risk. as eu leaders gather for a digital summit, we look at the rising risks of cyber crime. live from london, that‘s our top story on friday 29th september. the risks and rewards of the digital world.
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we have the details on a major eu pow wow on the issue today. also in the programme... as tensions on the korean peninsula rise, america‘s top diplomat heads to beijing for more sanction talks. and we‘ll be getting the inside track on all this week‘s
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