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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 29, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's 9am. i'm tina daheley. welcome to the programme. theresa may says europe's defence has never been more vital as she pledges to stand firm with eu countries after brexit. while we are leaving the european union, as i've said many times, we are not leaving europe. so, the united kingdom is unconditionally committed to maintaining europe's security. we'll have the details from the eu summit in estonia. family courtjudges must do more to stop abusive parents having access to their children. more on new guidance aimed at keeping children safe. and we investigate ayahuasca, a potent and illegal drug taken in ritual ceremonies, sometimes with devastating consequences. i think that, had he, had he not taken it, would sam still be here? probably yes. we'll have a full report on this controversial substance. hello.
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welcome to the programme, we're live until ”am this morning. we also want you to share your memories of radio 1 with us this morning. the station celebrates it's 50th birthday this weekend. we'll be talking to presenters past and present a bit later on. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. theresa may has stressed that britain is unconditionally committed to the defence of europe. the prime minister says that the uk's role in europe's security has never been more vital. she's attending a summit in estonia where she'll also meet the german chancellor, angela merkel, and is expected to press for her support in moving the brexit negotiations into their next phase. ahead of the summit, mrs may addressed british troops in estonia. russia's continued aggression
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represents a growing danger to ourfriends here in estonia, as well as in latvia, lithuania, poland. and our response must be clear and unequivocal. and while we are leaving the european union, as i've said many times, we are not leaving europe. so, the united kingdom is unconditionally committed to maintaining europe's security. and we will continue to offer aid and assistance to eu member states that are the victims of armed aggression, terrorism, and natural or man—made disasters. our correspondent gavin lee is in estonia. how important is theresa may's reassurance on defence? it is essentially what she can add to the
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value of these conversations, security and defence, 800 british troops. a quick word with the bbc? that was donald tusk, and he is important here, they are meeting at this cultural centre and his aunt gave most of it away. these leaders are not here to talk about brexit, we and others may be persona non grata because the message theresa may got earlier this week when donald tusk came to see her was not to mention the b word, don't talk about brexit in front of other leaders at the dinner last night where they listen to emmanuel macron talking about the future of the eu without the uk when it comes to integration and defence and the economy. we are waiting right now, if we can show you, this is where the leaders will arrive in the next five minutes with emmanuel macron and theresa may arriving soon. theresa may will talk about in the
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sidelines, what they call by the way diplomacy, what are the chances of a good deal because in three weeks they have to have some kind of an a nswer they have to have some kind of an answer from the leaders as to whether there has been significant progress or not so this is almost a warm up. and what does this mean for brexit going forward? stepping back from this, this is the future of europe and theresa may is a bystander. but in aboutan and theresa may is a bystander. but in about an hour she will meet with angela merkel and sit down separately, angela merkel who was bruised at the weekend after losing a lot of seats in the german elections, and she will be talking about the chances that there are also since the florence speed when theresa may said there would be this two—year extension so that britain could leave europe smoothly by 2021, four theresa may it is about having words in the corridors and on the sidelines, not in public, but fast
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forward three weeks in brussels and the leaders have the decision as to whether they can move on from the irish border, the economy, the exit bill, these citizens have become groundhog day said that they keep setting is more leaders come in, including the bulgaria president. a quick word lived on the bbc with the lithuanian president, i know brexit is not what we should be talking about but has theresa may helped at all given her florence speech?” think yes. because at least some clarity more, not all we wanted to listen and hear but it is one step further. today we can say that negotiations are a little bit behind the schedule and probably we are already facing the necessity of transitional or additional period for brexit and this is the message, we need to be openly acknowledging
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to each other, that the brexit negotiations are out of schedule. to each other, that the brexit negotiations are out of schedulem there anything else you want to see thatis there anything else you want to see that is not there yet for you? for me and lithuania, we do not have some individual interest, it is all european interest and i think european interest and i think european nations and british interests, we have defined the joint solution good for all —— we have to find. thank you for your time. that was the lithuanian president given a sense and we heard it, some of the leaders think they are not far potentially from significant progress but there are still gaps. thank you very much. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. budget airline ryanair has until 5 o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations or face possible legal action by the uk's
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aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements, as sarah corker reports. criticism of rya nair‘s treatment of nearly 750,000 passengers is intensifying. accused of persistently misleading customers, the uk regulator has now issued this written ultimatum. by 5pm uk time today, ryanair must tell passengers they're entitled to be re—routed by another carrier and explain how that'll work, orface legal action. we want them to make it crystal clear to every single passenger what that passenger is entitled to in terms of re—routing, expenses, and compensation — where that is applicable. we don't think that is a big task. the regulator says airlines must rebook passengers on rival carriers if they can't replace the cancelled flight. but that's not what ryanair said last week.
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we will not be paying for flights on other airlines, no. it's not part of the eu261 entitlement. the no—frills carrier blamed the cancellation of 20,000 flights on the overbooking of pilot holidays. customers are furious. kerry tweeted. .. sean rebooked tickets with another airline. and kevin said... the airline says it will comply with the regulator, and it's issued guidance to call centre staff. armoured vehicles designed to protect british troops from roadside bombs keep breaking down. the foxhound, which cost
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nearly £1 million each, replaced the controversial snatch landrovers on deployments in iraq and afghanistan. the v—shaped hull is designed to give better protection from roadside bombs, however the bbc has been told there are serious concerns about the reliability of the vehicles when in hot conditions. care is being compromised because of a shortage of nurses in nhs hospitals and in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards, according to the royal college of nursing. in a survey of 30,000 of its members across the uk, more than half said they were upset after their last shift because they couldn't provide the care they wanted. the government says it is investing in nursing and there will be more than 10,000 more nurses by 2020. a british climber has been killed after a huge rock in yosemite national park in california. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall, fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion.
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the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of the people involved. dozens of conservative mps are calling for theresa may to cap energy bills for the millions of households on standard variable tariffs. 76 tory backbenchers are among the 192 mps have signed a letter to the prime minister asking her to deliver on the election promise to cut energy prices. ukip will name a new leader today as it tries to reinvent itself after a disastrous general election that saw it lose more than 3 million votes. it could prove a pivotal moment for the party. some members have threatened to resign if anne maria waters becomes the leader. french experts say a charcoal drawing of a new woman could be a sketch for of the mona lisa —— of a
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nude woman. experts say it is almost certain a preparatory work for an oil painting and is truly remarkable quality. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30am. and some breaking news about uber who say their new ceo is set to meet tfl commissioner next week to discuss the decision to strip its licence. this comes 2a hours after theresa may called the decision from tfl not to renew the operating licence disproportionate. uber said its new ceo will meet the tfl commissioner next week to discuss the decision to strip its licence. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag victorialive and, if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. time now to get some sport. a blow for manchester city fans this
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morning. i am afraid some of those bands might be quite worried. the clu b bands might be quite worried. the club have confirmed in the last hour that sergio aguero has apparently been involved in a crash in holland and we're hearing he was in a taxi taking him to the airport and within the last hour at the club released a statement saying he will be assessed by clu b statement saying he will be assessed by club doctors after being involved in this road accident on thursday. a p pa re ntly in this road accident on thursday. apparently he was in holland on his day off and sustained these injuries but will return to manchester and his status will be checked ahead of the match against chelsea this weekend. we can see the pictures that have been on twitter which are quite graphic and you can see the taxi involved. this will be a concern forfans. taxi involved. this will be a concern for fans. they will have fingers crossed he is not sustained any serious injuries also the
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reports coming from his native argentina that he broke his ribs and that would be a major blow for the club. we have been in great form this season, scoring six goals already and on his way to becoming the top goal—scorer for the club but broken ribs could mean being on the sidelines for up to two months which would mean he would not only miss out on the trip to chelsea on saturday but also matches against arsenal in the premier league and napoli in the champions league, a huge blow for the club especially when you consider that benjamin mendy will be out of action for the next couple of months at least. we will keep an eye on that. and a good night for the english teams in the europa league but not the goalkeepers? an absolute nightmare for some of them! arsenal got their second victory in the europa league in belarus last night against butter borisov in a game which saw theo
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walcott scoring twice —— bate borisov. the second was really quite odd. it was a milestone for 0livier giroud, scoring his 100th goalfor the club. it was a very young arsenal team. any young goalkeepers, remember what can go wrong! everton we re remember what can go wrong! everton were also in action and this was a match that perhaps they should have had in hand against apollonia limassol. but for the seventh time in eight games they considered the first goal. wayne rooney could not believe his luck when he equalised but after nicola vlasic had given them the advantage they could not hold on to the lead. some poor defence which allowed limassol to get the draw. frustrating for ronald koeman. thank you very much. family courtjudges must not allow parents to see their children if there is any risk of harm to the child — either
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physically or psychologically. the order is part of new, tougher guidance that's being brought in on monday to protect children during custody battles. the changes follow a campaign by the charity women's aid, which was launched on this programme last january. in the last 12 years, 20 children have been murdered because they've had contact with an abusive parent. our legal correspondent clive coleman is here and can explain what these changes mean. what are the changes clive? the most important one is thatjudges are being told what they are required to do. what they must do, rather than under the previous guidance what they should do, so the language is considerably beefed—up and they are told in child contact cases where there is domestic abuse, there is now a mandatory requirement for the court to determine whether both the child or the parent, the non—abusing pa rent child or the parent, the non—abusing parent looking after the child will be at risk if there is a contact
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order. if there is a risk of that, then a contact order should not be made. even if that contact is for supervised contact within a contact centre, so it is really beefing up the language, it is focussing the judge's attention on the risk of harm. there is also a greater broader definition of what domestic abuse amounts to, more guidance on what coercive control, psychical abuse, and it makes it clear that judges must carefully consider how domestic abuse impacts on children, and in particular, and this is critical, it questions the presumption, there is a presumption within our law, that contact with both parents is in child's best interest, is in their welfare interest. now, judges must now question that. i think that is a significant change of emphasis. in family through a is a pendulum, if you like and there is a feeling, the
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pendulum has swung too far in favour of the presumption it is in the child's interest always to have contact with both parents. this really rows back on this and focuses thejudge's attention. really rows back on this and focuses the judge's attention. more wide—ranging, first ladier language, will they make a difference? the hope is they will. —— firmer language. there have been some catastrophic failures of the system. a lot will come down to the training thatjudges get, you know, there will be risk assessments hearings, there will be experts involved, but it is really up to the judges, to be well trained and to take onboard fully, this new guidance, obviously the hope and expectation is it will make a real genuine difference. speaking to people, you know, there are mixed opinions as to how concrete that difference will be. 0bviously everyone hopes it will solve this dreadful problem. why are
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there mixed opinions? what are the risks? well, i think there are, one of them is the training ofjudges, and some people you speak to feel thatjudges simply and some people you speak to feel that judges simply are and some people you speak to feel thatjudges simply are not training well enough to pick, it is a fiendishly difficultjob to do. and it is regrettably the case that some people do gain the system, they do lie, they deceive and it is for judges to unpick all of that, but, you know, ithink judges to unpick all of that, but, you know, i think there is a real concern that unless they have proper professional face to face training with experts, then, it is going to be difficult for them to have the confidence to apply this. thank you very much. we're joined now by claire throssel, who launched the campaign for these changes with us last year. claire's two sons, jack and paul, were killed by her former partner darren sykes in a house fire in october 2014, while they were on a weekend access visit. and lucy reed is a family lawyer, who's in our bristol studio.
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claire, thank you for coming in and talking to us. i know you been on the programme several times before, how much do the changes mean to you? it means the world if the judges actually take this onboard, and are open to the training, and open to the fact that coercive control, and mental and motion abuse is as harmful as physical abusing, just because you can't see the bruising doesn't mean to say that the scars aren't there. they are there forever. you can look in a mirror, and you get to a point where you don't recognise the person looking back at you. it is the same for the children. this has meant two years of ha rd children. this has meant two years of hard work, getting to this point for the government to even start listening and to start recognising
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emotional and coercive control, and for to happen now, it is a great step forward but i am hoping it moves on to even more, such as the aggressive cross questioning in court, family courts still need to be made much saferfor the court, family courts still need to be made much safer for the victims of all domestic abuse case, and when i went to downing street injanuary, and we handed in the petition, there was 115,000 people adding their voice to this, there is people, have wrote to this, there is people, have wrote to me from all over the country, that are going through this process which is so traumatic and so easy for the childrens‘ voices to get lost among the process and trauma and the separation, it is hard for the people to get out of this situation. what i would like to say to them today is this is the start of the hope this is the start of the journey for things to change, for all the children, it is too late for
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my two, but their voices are finally being heard. jack was never interview. the day he was supposed to have his interview was the day he fell asleep in my arms and must never happen again. no 12—year—old should have to say to a fireman or a policeman or a doctor, my dad did this and he did it on purpose. we have to protect children more, and for me today, or monday, it is the start of that hope, because if we don't have hope we have nothing. if we have nothing, then nothing can ever change, and i would like to say to everybody out there, it is starting to change, believing us, we are still fighting, we are still getting our voices out there. your fight has been instrumental in making the changes come about. it has been three years since you tragically lost your boy, can you remind us what happened? yes, they we re remind us what happened? yes, they were on an access visit, just three hours and that is all, well it took
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15 minutes for my life to end and my existence to start. they had gone down to see their dad, i missed them by five minutes that day, i had been working, and the police came to the door, 20 minutes later with a knock, and my mum said that's the boys they're back. i said they would have run through the door and given me a hug, because they were scared, they we re hug, because they were scared, they were frightened. they needed reassurance whenever they came back, and a policeman was stood on the door, i knew by his face, i said whats he's he done. i had warned cafcas and social services he was capable of hurting the boys. he said there had been an incident at the house, there had been a fire and i needed to go with him, now, to sheffield children's hospital. i went to sheffield children's hospital, and there was paul and he was having cpr done, and they said
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there is nothing more we can do now, we are going to let him go, and as i held him in my arms, i promised him that i wouldn't let no other parent have to go through this,en i know —— no parent should have to hold their child in their arms, knowing it is as the hands of someone who should protect them and love them and finally, on monday, that promise has begun to be fulfilled. seven days later, i held jack the same way, in manchester hospital, and he, he died too. as i say, that was the day that ca fcas too. as i say, that was the day that cafcas was supposed o interview jack. his voice was never heard. now his voice has finally been heard, his voice has finally been heard, his wishes with and feelings are out there, and as i say, it is too late for them, but we can make things
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right forker people, we can give children a voice, have their wishes and feelings recognised. there is is and feelings recognised. there is is a law there already, that isn't used enough about children's wishes and feelings, it is contact at any cost, and this as colin quite rightly said needs to change, and no perpetrator. it is changing on monday. why don't we bring in ourfamily law specialist lucy. lucy, do you think the changes that are coming in on monday will stop tragic cases like this from happening again?” monday will stop tragic cases like this from happening again? i don't think that whatever changes are brought in in terms of guidance can completely eradicate the type of tragic case claire is describing, there are, these cases are very difficult to predict, and very difficult to predict, and very difficult to predict, and very difficult to completely prevent. fortunately they are quite rare, exceptional cases, where children are killed or parents are killed,
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but it is important that all those professionals in this system, whether it isjudges or lawyers or cafcass officers are made increasingly wear of the risks not just of obvious physical violence but the softer more difficult to identify types of abuse, such as coercive control. control. this guidance, by and large has been in place for number of year, coercive control is something that has been identified in our guidance for a numberof years, identified in our guidance for a number of years, what won't happen on monday is we suddenly achieve a realisation that that is as significant as physical abuse. it has always been the radar but it is right that there is a need for us to get better at identifying that type of abuse and upping what the impact is on children and —— understanding, and caring parents and dealing with the risk management, making sure we make safe orders. how do you
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identify that type of abuse, especially when it is coercive, controlling, emotionally abusive behaviour? becausejudges as controlling, emotionally abusive behaviour? because judges as clive was saying are going to be trained, to deal with this but part of that must be trying to spot the signs of it in the first place? well, coercive control in particular, non—physical violence, where there isn't an obvious black eye or a physical injury that can be seen, is more difficult to prove by its nature. the reality is thatjudges are faced with a very difficult task. some allegations that are made are true and accurate. some allegations are not accurate for one reason or another, maybe they are exaggerated and in some cases they are malicious, judges have to try and work out from the best evidence they can gather, where the truth of things lie, what has happened in the past in the first instance, the court will make findings of fact, and then, having decided what has happened in the past will need to
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look at what will happen. what a perpetrators attitude to what he or she has done, is there any evidence of change, what can we do to manage any risks we have identified? so there is a whole process, which has beenin there is a whole process, which has been in the guidance that has been updated for a number of years, one of the main concerns that has been raised, largely based on anecdotal evidence but which is consistent with my experience is that hasn't always been consistently applied by judges, for me what is more important than the amendments to the guidance. by and large it is the same as it has been for year, is the emphasis from the president of the practice of president of the family division, when he has reissued the guidance, he has emphatically said it is really important thatjudges are following this guidance in every case, whether it is physical violence or other forms of abuse. for me one of the important changes
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is that where we used to talk about domestic violence and abuse, the language has shifted. we talk about abuse now. there is a recognition there is a more serious and less serious type of abuse. all those different types of abusive behaviour as important, as potentially risky. thank you. claire, will the fight continue? definitely. it is not over yet. i just hope continue? definitely. it is not over yet. ijust hope that the judges really ta ke yet. ijust hope that the judges really take this onboard, and undertake the training, and that children aren't made to see a parent until their interviews have been made, their voices have been listened to, no matter what age they are, even if they only whisper what they need they must be listened to and understood. claire, thank you very much. lucy and clive for speaking to us this morning. the deadline is looming for ryanair — it has until 5 o'clock this afternoon to meet strict targets set by the civil aviation authority in dealing with passengers affected by its flight cancellations.
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many are complaining they've been misled about their rights by the airline. 0ur correspondent theo leggett‘s here. ryanair has rya nair has been ryanair has been in the news a lot lately. can you explain where we are now? ryanair had something of a crisis to deal with. it didn't have enough pilots. it says it miscalculated their leave. so to begin with it cancelled 2,000 flights at short notice and upset a lot of passenger, then its decided to avoid short notice cancellation it would cancel another 18,000 flights. that is bad enough. but the problem has been how ryanair has responded to its customers and how its dealt with their revised travel plans. and there are regulations that are supposed to set out what your rights are. among those there isa your rights are. among those there is a right to be re—routed to your destination if you wish. the civil
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aviation authority interprets that as means that if you need to be carried by another airline, ryanair has to do that but ryanair has been misleading customers, and hasn't been doing what it sup posed to do. that is why customers have been complaining. they are. co—plaining about being misled. let us talk about being misled. let us talk about the deadline what are the target, how has ryanair responded? the target is that ryanair has to explain how its going to re—route passengers, make a statement on the website of what its policy is and how it is going to get passengers to different airports, so for example if your flight will leave from luton instead of sta nsted, if your flight will leave from luton instead of stansted, rare is —— ryanair is instead of stansted, rare is —— rya nair is supposed instead of stansted, rare is —— ryanair is supposed to pay to get you there. it is meant to put out a clear statement of what its policy is, how it will help passengers an how will it be reimburse them. ryanair says it fulfils all its
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requirements. still to come, a special report on i/o still to come, a special report on i/0 asker —— on ayahuasca. and a think tank warning that a war between korea and the us is a real possibility and the uk needs to prepare as to how it will respond. time for the latest news. here's annita. the headlines on bbc news. theresa may has stressed that britain is unconditionally committed to the defence of europe. the prime minister says that the uk's role in europe's security has never been more vital. she's attending a summit in estonia where she'll also meet the german chancellor, angela merkel, and is expected to press for her support in moving the brexit negotiations into their next phase. more than 20 people have died and
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many others have been injured after a stamp paid as a stampede in mumbai. it took place just after russia on a narrow pedestrian bridge leading from one station to another —— after rush—hour. budget airline ryanair has until 5 o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations or face possible legal action by the uk's aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements. armoured vehicles designed to protect british troops from roadside bombs keep breaking down. the foxhound, which cost nearly £1 million each, replaced the controversial snatch landrovers on deployments in iraq and afghanistan. the v—shaped hull is designed to give better protection
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from roadside bombs, however the bbc has been told there are serious concerns about the reliability of the vehicles when in hot conditions. care within nhs hospitals is being compromised because of staff shortages, according to the royal college of nursing. a survey of 30,000 members found more than half felt their last shift was understaffed, and patient safety was at risk. the government say it's investing in nursing and there will be 10,000 more nurses and health workers by 2020. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you. ruth has got in touch, what a strong lady claire is talking about her sons, i am in awe of her strength and determination and wish her and the strength and determination and wish herand the campaign strength and determination and wish her and the campaign massive success as it takes on monday. i could not imagine how hard it is for her to relive the tragedy in such detail. she is remarkable. time now to get
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some sport. the top story, manchester city have confirmed sergio aguero has been involved in a road accident in holland. the club said he was on a day of and had suffered injuries in the incident. he will return to manchester this morning and will be checked by club doctors. he has scored seven goals in eight matches already this season and is on the brink of becoming their record goal—scorer so we are watching that closely. arsenal made the most of some questionable goalkeeping to make it to micro wind out of two in the europa league as babied bate borisov —— as they beat. everton could only draw at home to apollonia limassol. luke gale was the hero for castleford as they booked their place in the grand final after beating st helens 23—22. he only had his appendix removed two weeks ago and played wearing a
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corset following the operation! he's scored 15 of their 23 points and scored 15 of their 23 points and scored the winner in extra time. lewis hamilton took sixth place in the practice of the malaysian grand prix this morning, max verstappen was quickest but heavy rain and dangerous driving conditions caused some problems. second practice is now beginning. more on those stories in the next half an hour. thank you. ayahuasca is a potent hallucinogenic tea that's been popular in the amazon for years, but is becoming increasingly available at retreats across europe. it can be extremely dangerous — sometimes known as the "vine of death", it can cause vomiting and hours of hallucinations. but one doctor in the uk says it should be considered as a treatment for a wide range of mental health issues. simon mundie has been finding out more about this controversial drug. these people have taken ayahuasca, one of the strongest
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psychedelic drugs in the world. many backpackers have taken it in south america over the last few decades, but there are significantly more ayahuasca ceremonies being run in europe now, too. although it is illegal here, and can be dangerous, one doctor thinks it should be researched as a possible treatment for things like depression and ptsd. as a medical doctor and a research scientist, what i'm asking for is that we do this research, we carry out these studies, and we demonstrate whether these drugs, ayahuasca, can be used as a treatment to reduce distress and pain for mental health patients. if we can show that ayahuasca works and can be used safely, it's absolutely ethical that we develop this as a medicine. ayahuasca is a potent hallucinogenic brew that has been used by shamans or healers in the amazon
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for centuries for medical and spiritual purposes. drinking ayahuasca can make you physically sick, but that's not the only thing you need to be wary of. it can be a psychologically traumatic experience. there is very little recreationaljoy or hedonism to be had from ayahuasca. it's a difficult experience. it's a physically difficult and painful experience, purging, vomiting, diarrhoea, all of these things can happen. and it's a very intense, psychological experience. laws on ayahuasca vary and are sometimes fuzzy. according to the ayahuasca defence fund it is legal in peru, illegal in canada, illegal for everyone in the us apart from two religious organisations, and appears to be caught by prohibitive legislation in the uk by the new psychoactive substances act, which came into force last year. and the fact that it contains dmt, which is listed as a class a drug.
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in recent years, the use of ayahuasca has increasingly spread from south america into europe. ayahuasca's active ingredient is n,n—dimethyltryptamine, an extremely powerful hallucinogen. normally the dmt in the tea would be destroyed in the digestive system by a chemical called monoamine oxidase. but by adding a second plant, containing a monoamine oxidative inhibitor, an mao|, the dmt survives the digestive process and reaches the brain where it alters the person's state of consciousness. a trip can last anything up to eight hours. john lives in london and took part in a ayahuasca ceremony on the continent that he says changed his life. over the years i've done a lot of work on myself.
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i've done various forms of therapy. i've had some, sort of, childhood issues that i've been dealing with as i was growing up, and as an adult i've been sorting them out. so i've done various other things, traditional therapies, then i was doing some research online and i read about ayahuasca and read about the amazing benefits and how it can be, like, ten years of therapy in a weekend or one night, and i was really keen to try it. the ceremony i went to, it's in the middle of the netherlands in, like, a rural, sort of, farm area, so it was very peaceful, it was out in nature. they like people to dress in white, all white colours, so everybody is in a, sort of, uniform colour. and you take the ayahuasca, and it's drunk in, like, a shot, a very, sort of cover small amount that you drink. it takes anywhere from ten minutes to an hour to come on. the ceremony is like this epic eight—hour journey. i mean, it really is,
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it's a journey. it was like night and day. it was self—esteem. and how i feel about myself on a daily basis. and, it literally... after that ceremony it was a dramatic change that i would notice on a daily basis. and if before, let's say before the ceremony my self—esteem was 10%, after the ceremony it was 90 or 100%. and it really was, it was that dramatic. there are clearly people who, likejohn, claim ayahuasca has been beneficial for them. but others have taken it and have had terrifying experiences and violent reactions. and there have even been reports of ayahuasca related deaths. in 2014, dave travelled abroad to be ayahuasca ceremony with a friend of his called sam, who killed himself months later. he had his life together. he had a girlfriend. he had moved in with her. they had just got a dog together. 0n the surface, he was
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someone you would be proud to hang around with. it was a small ceremonial hall. you have little mattresses. you all sleep in there together. he was actually laid right next to me on a mattress on the floor. the thing was he spent the whole time there laughing. so, how was sam when you came back from the ceremony? was there any indication that there was anything wrong? absolutely not. like, on the surface, man, he was cool, had his act together, completely, like, all he did was talk about what a great time he had. like, he was, like, he posted on facebook and stuff about how, it was this incredible, life—changing transformation he had had. he showed no signs for, like, two months after the ceremony, there was no signs that anything was wrong. it had opened pandora's box, to an extent. it had brought to the surface things
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he's been carrying his whole life and he didn't have the support to deal with it, to integrate this emotion into his life. and i think that's why he decided to kill himself. so you are sure in your mind that the ayahuasca contributed to it? i think that had he, had he not taken it, would sam still be here? probably yes. i wouldn't say i'm in the minority in medicine... if ayahuasca is dangerous, and it is illegal, why is this doctor calling for it to be researched as a potential tool to help people with mental illness? there has been a relative lack of what we called double—blind placebo—controlled studies. but there has been one quite interesting one fairly recently, it's not yet been published,
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it'sjust being finished in brazil, looking at treatment with ayahuasca for depression. it's demonstrated a very positive, significant effect at rapidly treating depression in people with severe treatment resistance. we've spoken to someone who took ayahuasca with a friend of his, and a couple of months later his friend killed himself, and the guy we spoke to is firmly of the opinion that the ayahuasca contributed to to his death. on that basis, surely that shows it is dangerous and it needs to be still very strongly regulated. absolutely. things need to be regulated that are potentially dangerous. but there is a difference between regulation and prohibition. it's terribly sad to hear about instances of risk or harm or death that have occurred with ayahuasca, or other chemicals like this. what i would say is we need to find a way to make it as safe as possible. because to throw the baby out with the bath water and say they have no uses unless they are 100% safe, that'sjust not good science.
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you mentioned that you have really noticed that the interest in things like ayahuasca is surging in recent years. a quick look on the internet shows there lots of places you can go now in europe, not the amazon, but in europe where they have these retreats where you can go and drink ayahuasca for a weekend. and then come back. what is your view, then, of people self treating, if you like, by going to places like this and coming back? that sounds extremely risky. the studies we've been designing involve notjust taking the drug, but many weeks of follow—up afterwards, in which you can integrate the drug experience, get support for any of the difficult material that may have emerged during the drug experience. and that is not only safer, but that's much more effective. when you look at when people have bad experiences with hallucinogens or psychedelics, lsd, whatever, when they take them recreationally, it's usually not just the experience itself which is all over within a few hours, but it's the weeks, days, maybe months later.
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risk, would london be bombed or anything like that? no, certain as i can be there would be no physical risk to the united kingdom, but it would send the international economy into a very serious tail spin. i mean, the repercussions initially of this unless the us were uncredibly lucky would be very serious indeed. we will be discussing the drug later in the programme. we will be discussing the drug later in the programme. coming up... armoured vehicles designed to protect british troops in iraq and afghanistan have been breaking down. the uk needs to plan for a conflict in north korea because a war there with the us is now a "real possibility". that's according to a leading defence think tank. the royal united services institute said a war would likely result in hundreds of thousands of people being killed or injured. there's been increasing concern about the situation, as north korean continues to develop its nuclear weapons, with donald trump and kimjong—un being heavily critical of each other in the media. war could be triggered by either north korea or the us but there is a growing risk that donald trump will decide to "resolve" the issue "sooner rather than later", according to its report. if that was the case, the uk would have only a few hours at most to decide how to respond. the former foreign secretary,
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jack straw, gave me his response to the central claim in the report, that a war between north korea and the us was a real possibility. i think it is a real possibility. and the risks of diplomatic conflict escalated into military action between north korea and the united states, and therefore taking in initially the whole of the far east theatre, is very serious and more serious certainly than at any come i can think of when i have taken an interest in foreign policy, so more serious than for 30 years. is it a good idea? no, it isn't. and it really does require the united states administration under donald trump to use every diplomatic skill it has available, which raises the question, to try to resolve
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the matter peacefully. if war is triggered by either side, by north korea or by donald trump, america, how should the government respond, if, as this report says, there will only be a few hours at most to decide how to respond? well, it'd depend entirely on the circumstances. i mean, there are obviously circumstances in which the united states would be fully justified to take military action against north korea. what are those circumstances? the circumstances are where they are acting in self defence in a way that is recognised by international law. or they are acting on behalf of the security council. and if the supreme leader in north korea were to launch missiles against the united states territory, which includes guam, or effectively against south korea, with the idea of killing civilians and damaging property to a great extent, then i think any us president,
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whoever it was, leaving aside the fact it is donald trump, would be likely to feel obliged to take some military action against that. 0n the other hand — so that is at one end of the scale, the other end of the scale is so—called pre—emptive action where donald trump says he was acting to prevent further action by the supreme leader in north korea and is unable to produce the evidence to show that the supreme leader, however paranoid the man may be, was about to launch an attack. this is really difficult and you cannot really give a hypothetical answer to your question. i understand the question but exactly in what circumstances should the british government react. what is also critical here is the view that china takes. and i know there has been, as there usually is these days, a lot of rebarbative rhetoric from donald trump about china, although it is interspersed with thanking them, china has a huge
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problem with north korea. the koreans are not ethnically chinese at all, there is centuries of enmity between the koreans and the chinese. the chinese, the communist chinese were famously on the side of the north koreans in the korean war in the early 19505, and they have acted as their protector ever since, but they are driven frankly nuts by the action of the korean government now. 0n the other hand they do not want huge instability on the border with all the political problems that could entail. china has shifted, its cost it quite a lot in terms of its economy, to put further pressure on north koreans, and although these things are perfect. i think a policy of continuing that, to contain the problem of north korea, rather than to try to bomb north korea out of existence, with terrible
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and unpredictable consequences we can speak now tojohn everard, who was the uk's ambassador to north korea between 2006 and 2008, as well as dr john nilsson—wright, a senior university lecturer in international relations at cambridge university. welcome both to the programme. i'm going to ask you the same question i asked jack straw, do you think war with north korea and the us is a real possibility as this report asserts? yes. i mean, i have been saying this for some time, and i am on the one hand delighted that somebody so distinguished as malcolm trarmers said just the same. 0n the other hand, of course i would have rather he proved i have been wrong and we are all safe. safe. war is a
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real possibility either through miscalculation or because one side or the other feels their hand has been forced and that a whole range of possibilities that might lead to a war which as has been pointed out would escalate quickly and get out of control. so three scenario, miscalculation america strikes first or north korea does. yes. which do you think is most likely?” or north korea does. yes. which do you think is most likely? i don't think it is possibility at this stage to attach probabilities to any of them. they are all possibilities, any could lead to a devastating conflict. i would agree with john. the biggest risk is miscalculation, neither side, neitherthe us or north korea at this stage is intent or pre—emptively attacking the other, all though as the report makes clear, once we reach a stage where north korea can definitively with a nuclear warhead strike at the united states, the press on any american president, you have seen this already with statements from
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senior american politician, lyndsey graham said that the us would be prepared to put south korea in the firing line to protect san francisco. i think the biggest risk at the moment is a conflict arising through misperception, kim jong—un has proven himself to be a very determined risk taker. he likes to push the envelope, he likes to poke his finger in the president's eye symbolically and we can imagine as the north koreans have been saying, a possible test of a thermonuclear device beyond the borders of north korea and firing in the direction of guam, to demonstrate the north koreans have that capability or equally worrying a conventional challenge that is at a much lower level. sending special forces south. how do the americans responds to that? it is a different form. is 245
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that? it is a different form. is 245 that you mean by miscalculation? yes, basically overconfidence in assuming that for example the north koreans assume the americans won't respond, and jean—claude juncker, it is part of his —— kimjong—un it is pa rt is part of his —— kimjong—un it is part of his legitimacy at home to prove he is strong, but also he can challenge his rivals. your ambassador to north korea for a time. how bad is the situation now? also in the context of dealing with two unpredictable leaders? no, kim jong—un is not unpredictable. can we get that clear. donald trump may well be but kimjong—un get that clear. donald trump may well be but kim jong—un and the korean workers party have set out in detail what they will do and why they are going to do it and how. it is all in the documents of the party copping they held last year, and they are falling through on a public plan. —— following through. they are falling through on a public plan. -- following through. they made claims about their capabilities which we know aren't all true? do
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we. every time they make a claim about their capabilities that aren't true, there seems to be a flurry to say actually they may have been closer to the truth than we thought. remember, that when the sixth nuclear test was detonated it was a bigger yield than a normal fission bomb and the experts poo—pooed the north korean claim it was a hydrogen bomb, then they realised the yield was bigger than they thought and they do probably have a hydrogen bomb. if they have a plan and it is pushing ahead, how should our government respond, if as this report says, there will only be a few hours to decide to to respond? they have to make the key decision in advance, if there is a war between north korea and the us do we commit british military assets to that war? and everything then hinges on that. in the fog of war you are probably not going to know who started it. it is likely to be just
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a mass confusion, you will have moments to make that decision, you have to take it now. so the us-north korea, the key players how will this impact the rest of the world, specifically the uk? i think the uk is as faras specifically the uk? i think the uk is as far as we can tell, in terms of our official position, we have made it clear deterrence is very important. we have called on the united nations to reiterate the message north korea needs to be more responsible. here, one constructive role britain can play is by providing advice in a constructive way, as a friendly ally of the yuck united states, to tell donald trump lower the rhetorical tone, it was a british prime minister in 1950 who got on a plane, travelled to washington at a time when there was great fear a nuclear bomb would be used to resolve the korean war. i think it is important for international actors, think it is important for internationalactors, including think it is important for international actors, including our prime minister and the foreign office to promote that message deliberately, because as the report makes clear, if a conflict happens
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it is going to be catastrophic in terms of the lives of not only south koreans but we have 8,000 british individuals, resident in south korea, somewhere in the region of one 00,000 visitors from britain. not that far from the border. exactly. this will have a major impact. war is the last resort. of course some people in the us yes, including the defence secretary have been making that clear. thank owe both very much indeed. thank you for getting in touch using the hashtag, we started the programme talking about changes to guidelines for judges in family courts, specifically in custody case, someone on twitter who wants to remain anonymous said i had a restaining order against my ex—and cafcass representing families suggested i get it amended to facilitate contact with the emotionally abusive parent. now my child has disclosed sexual abuse
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while having contact with the father. the system is flawed. louise says the law regarding no contact with the child. for now, we will finish withjudith. my life ended and my existence began. heartbreaking from claire, perpetrator took ultimate control and knew exactly what he was doing. you can keep your messages coming in on all of our stories. let us go to isaa on all of our stories. let us go to eaaa on all of our stories. let us go to is a a a with the weather. thank you. it has been a grey drizzly start to the day, but for many of us that rain we have got round the morning should tend to ease away and we will see sunny spells breaking through during the afternoon. here is the the radar picture that shows where we have had the rain. it has been pushing eastwards, few heavy busts through central england, eastern scotland too. low pressure sitting out to the north—west, driving these weather fronts across the country. so as we
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head through today we will see sunshine over the next few hours in western scotland, northern ireland, wales and the south—west too. further east more cloud producing drizzly outbreaks of rain and it will feel breezy, but the rain clears towards the east during the afternoon and we all see a return to clearer skies with a mix of sunshine and showers. for scotland the showers heavy in the west and the odd heavy one and frequent as well. drier to the east of the pennines and across eastern parts of england where temperatures likely to reach 18 or 19 degree, then across the south—west of england and wales, some sunshine with just the odd light shower pushing in. moving through this evening and tonight we will continue to see that feed of showers in the north—west, where it will be breezy, but clearer skies for central and eastern parts means it is going to be a fresh sort of night. so colder than last night.
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temperatures 8—13 in towns and cities. colder in the countryside. after that fresh and bright start to saturday we will see more showers in the western half of the country, pushing further eastwards but many eastern parts of england and scotla nd eastern parts of england and scotland staying dry for a good part of the day. again, temperatures doing well between 13—18 degree, but more persistent rain works into northern ireland, wales and the south—west, late on saturday courtesy of this weather front and during jarred night into sunday, that front pushes eastwards, the next area of low pressure approaches from the north—west, bringing us a more autumnal feel to the weather. during the second half the weekend the winds pick up, that initial band of rain works from west to east. it will be followed on sunday by sunshine and heavy blustery showers, still quite mild, 19, possibly 20 degrees or so. but as we look ahead through the second half of the
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weekend, into next week, the weather is turning unsettled. hello, it's 10am. i'm tina daheley. patients are being left to die alone on hospital wards because there is a shortage of nurses to care for them according to the royal college of nursing. we'll have the details. ayahuasca, a potent hallucinogenic tea popular in the amazon, is becoming increasingly available in europe. it's known to be extremely dangerous. i think that, had he, had he not taken it, would sam still be here? probably yes. we'll be speaking to drug and psychiatric experts about whether ayahuasca can ever be safe. ten seconds to go before radio one, tony blackburn. radio 1, go. and tomorrow marks
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the 50th anniversary of the launch of bbc radio 1. we'll be looking back at its first 50 years and asking what its future could look like. good morning. here's annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. thank you and good morning. theresa may has stressed that britain is unconditionally committed to the defence of europe. the prime minister says that the uk's role in europe's security has never been more vital. she's attending a summit in estonia where she'll also meet the german chancellor, angela merkel, and is expected to press for her support in moving the brexit negotiations into their next phase. more than 20 people have died and many others are injured after a stampede at a railway station in india's financial hub, mumbai. the stampede took place just after rush hour on a narrow pedestrian bridge leading to elphinstone road train station in central mumbai. the authorities are investigating
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what caused the stampede, but eyewitnesses said heavy rainfall led to overcrowding on the bridge. budget airline ryanair has until 5 o'clock this evening to correct its compensation policy for hundreds of thousands of passengers affected by flight cancellations or face possible legal action by the uk's aviation regulator. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements. armoured vehicles designed to protect british troops from roadside bombs keep breaking down. the foxhound, which cost nearly £1 million each, replaced the controversial snatch landrovers on deployments in iraq and afghanistan. the v—shaped hull is designed to give better protection from roadside bombs, however the bbc has been told there are serious concerns about the reliability of the vehicles when in hot conditions. a british climber has been killed
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after a huge rockfall in california's yosemite national park. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall, fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion. the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of the people involved. care within nhs hospitals is being compromised because of staff shortages, according to the royal college of nursing. a survey of 30,000 members found more than half felt their last shift was understaffed, and patient safety was at risk. the government say it's investing in nursing and there will be 10,000 more nurses and health workers by 2020. ukip will name a new leader today as it tries to reinvent itself after a disastrous general election that saw it lose more than 3 million votes. it could prove a pivotal moment for the party. some members have threatened to resign if anne marie waters, a candidate who has described islam as "evil", were to become
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leader at the party's conference in torquay. french art experts say a charcoal drawing of a nude woman, which has been in a french collection for 150 years, could be a sketch for the mona lisa. it had previously been attributed to the leonardo da vinci's studio, but not the artist himself. experts say it is almost certainly a preparatory work for an oil painting and is of truly remarkable quality. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10.30am. thank you. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. time to get some sport now. good morning, first of all we are talking about that huge blow for manchester city with the club confirming that sergio aguero has suffered injuries ina road sergio aguero has suffered injuries in a road accident in holland. more
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on this now from our footballer reporter simon stone. we don't know a lot moment, we are seeing pictures on social media but what do we it seems sergio aguero was on a day off. he went to holland to attend a concert in amsterdam and was on his way back to the airport when the taxi appears to have hit a lamp post or something. the car sustained quite serious damage and aguero was taken to hospital quite serious damage and aguero was ta ken to hospital where quite serious damage and aguero was taken to hospital where he spent the night. we understand that he had suffered rib damage. he will fly back to england today and have tests to see if he can play against chelsea tomorrow but at this stage it is thought he is likely to be out for six weeks to two months. understandably the fans will be worried because this is a huge blow
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for the club who have already had injury concerns in the last few weeks. it was a major concern, it was only last night they confirmed that benjamin mendy suffered cruciate knee ligament damage that will probably rule him out for eight months. if aguero is out for two months, we are talking about 11 matches, that is a big chunk of their season. it will seriously damage their chances of winning the premier league. at the moment they are more concerned about the game on saturday, the big game against chelsea, the champions. they are not giving up on aguero being fit for that but at this stage it is highly unlikely. it is a story we will be a cross over the next couple of days but thank you for now all stop what a night for luke gale of castleford who helped his team book their place in rugby league's grand final for the first time in their history after they beat saint helens 23—22.
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he had his appendix removed two weeks ago and he scored a try and showed the corset he was wearing after the operation! he scored 15 of their 23 points as a thrilling game went to extra time and he scored the winning drop goal.” went to extra time and he scored the winning drop goal. i have got a corset on underneath! to be honest, when the adrenaline is pumping, you do what you can to get through. i knew if i played i wanted to make a difference, i wasn't going tojust play this to be on the pitch, i wanted to make a difference and i knew i wouldn't let the boys down and luckily it paid off. we will have more on sergio aguero this morning but that is all for now, more at 10:30am. thank you. when they were first deployed in afghanistan in 2012, armoured vehicles designed to protect british forces were described as providing "unparalleled protection" for their weight and class.
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the ministry of defence spent more than £370 million on the 400 foxhounds which were brought in to replace the snatch land rover. now troops have told the bbc there are serious problems with the vehicles reliability and they "cannot handle the heat". the mod insists the foxhounds have been keeping soldiers safe. let's get more on this now. we did speak our defence correspondent, what can you tell us? this all happened by accident, we we re this all happened by accident, we were on a trip in iraq with another newspaper journalist and we were on a trip in iraq with another newspaperjournalist and we were in front of some foxhound vehicles that we re front of some foxhound vehicles that were being used to transport british troops. unsolicited, an army sergeant offered the view that they we re sergeant offered the view that they were a pile of manure, to paraphrase him. we asked what was wrong. this
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was the sergeant responsible for maintaining seven vehicles, clearly frustrated the was having to maintain them because they kept on breaking down and he said they could not handle the heat and if you looked at them there were dark bits on the bonnet at the air intake which he had to alter to try to get more air into the engine to call them down because he said they cooked out the engines at 50 degrees. it is very hot in that part of iraq, where they are being used, along with in kabul. they were designed to withstand the heat? they we re designed to withstand the heat? they were meant for the heat and four helmand province where it is very hot. what they do do well is protect troops from roadside bombs which the snatch land rover did not do, which it replaced. that was the problem. this vehicle was rushed into service but clearly there is a problem in hot weather with it breaking down and that is something that other sources have confirmed. how has the
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mod responded? they are making the point that it has saved lives and thatis point that it has saved lives and that is quite right. it is doing its job in that camp in iraq at the moment because it is being used to transport troops within a military base, from the british section to the iraqi section where they are training troops but the questions are if it is being used in a high threat area and then breaking down, that would be a bigger problem. this sergeant was particularly frustrated because he had to maintain them and he had to strip down the engines every few weeks when it should be a couple of times a year. others have admitted that the reliability is not as good as other vehicles so they are managing but this would be a bigger story if it was being used in high threat areas and breaking down and coming under fire. thank you for now. we can speak to colonel richard kemp, a former commander of british forces in afghanistan and hilary meredith,
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ceo of hilary meredith solicitors, who has represented relatives of soldiers killed while patrolling in military vehicles. i want to start with you, richard. what is your response to this first of all? i think it is an issue that the mod should be looking into in more detail now it has been raised by the bbc. obviously one side and, orbit may be backed by other sources, saying there is a reliability problems cannot be taken as rosol and what the mod and perhaps the defence committee should look at is proper reliability statistics which are maintained for all of these vehicles. having said that, i have spoken to many soldiers when the foxhound first came out, i have not used it myself but i spoke to soldiers who have, and i spoke to a sword at this morning about this, and his view and the general view is
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that they are good vehicles, very protective and have saved a lot of lives as jonathan protective and have saved a lot of lives asjonathan pointed out. but every military vehicle has to issues, one of which, i have owned a carfor about issues, one of which, i have owned a car for about five years and that same car has never broken down. i have never experienced a military vehicle you could say that about. they break down frequently and readily and there are two reasons, firstly because they are used in rugged terrain and differently to cars, they are not comparable. they are smashed around across desert terrain or whatever and driven very ha rd terrain or whatever and driven very hard and used in a tough way and no matter that it cost £1 million, you cannot really ruggedised it to the extent it will be unbreakable. and the second issue which might also be true at the vehicles get older is that the mod, because they are starved of cash, they probably don't
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have enough spares for the vehicle so they are having to budge them and sometimes cannibalise vehicles, take one piece from another to make them work. those factors combined i suspect might be responsible for this is the vehicles get older.” suppose people watching at home must be thinking that these cost £1 million each and for someone who does not know about military equipment you would not expect that if something is new and has been brought in to replace those land rovers, you would expect them to be faulted but as you say, are hearing from one sided, but i want to bring you in hillary. in the past courts have suggested that faulty equipment could be a breach of human rights. where do you stand on that? at the moment these decisions are made by the courts and there is a very sensible notion that if you are in direct combat with the enemy in the
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heat of battle, thinking is in bed and there is no liability on the mod. what happened with the snatch land rover cases is that the mod did not fight that in the court because they thought snatch was the right vehicle, the court it because they wa nt vehicle, the court it because they want to be to say, if you are at a desk in whitehall procuring equipment for battle you are in the heat of battle and you think it is impaired and they have no liability. it took two years before the mod listened to the men and women on the ground to change the snatch land rover and ground to change the snatch land roverand in the meantime, as we know, there were many deaths in those vehicles. this vehicle has been brought in to replace it and it does save lives if you hit by an ayodi or drive over one. but there is no use surviving if it breaks down and you are under fire. —— ied. there is no confidence in this
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bigger but there is a bigger picture because in february the defence secretary brought out a white paper saying that they wanted to take the decisions about combat immunity away from the courts and mike pollitt once legislation put in that the amadou will suffer no liability and will have no liability if they are sent with the wrong equipment and thatis sent with the wrong equipment and that is very worrying. we will have to leave it there. ayahuasca is a potent hallucinogenic tea that's been popular in the amazon for years, but is becoming increasingly available at retreats across europe. it can be extremely dangerous but one doctor in the uk says it should be considered as a treatment for a wide range of mental health issues. these people have taken ayahuasca, one of the strongest
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psychedelic drugs in the world. many backpackers have taken it in south america over the last few decades, but there are significantly more ayahuasca ceremonies being run in europe now, too. although it is illegal here, and can be dangerous, one doctor thinks it should be researched as a possible treatment for things like depression and ptsd. as a medical doctor and a research scientist, what i'm asking for is that we do this research, we carry out these studies, and we demonstrate whether these drugs, ayahuasca, can be used as a treatment to reduce distress and pain for mental health patients. if we can show that ayahuasca works and can be used safely, it's absolutely ethical that we develop this as a medicine. ayahuasca is a potent hallucinogenic brew that has been used by shamans or healers in the amazon
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for centuries for medical and spiritual purposes. drinking ayahuasca can make you physically sick, but that's not the only thing you need to be wary of. it can be a psychologically traumatic experience. in 2014, dave travelled abroad to be ayahuasca ceremony with a friend of his called sam, who killed himself months later. he had his life together. he had a girlfriend. he had moved in with her. they had just got a dog together. 0n the surface, he was someone you would be proud to hang around with. it was a small ceremonial hall. you have little mattresses. you all sleep in there together. he was actually laid right next to me on a mattress on the floor. the thing was, he spent the whole time there laughing. so, how was sam when you came back from the ceremony?
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was there any indication at all that there was anything wrong? absolutely not. like, on the surface, man, he was cool, had his act together, completely, like, all he did was talk about what a great time he had. like, he was, like, he posted on facebook and stuff about how, it was this incredible, life—changing transformation he had had. he showed no signs for, like, two months after the ceremony, there was no signs that anything was wrong. it had opened pandora's box, to an extent. it had brought to the surface things he's been carrying his whole life and he didn't have the support to deal with it, to integrate this emotion into his life. and i think that's why he decided to kill himself. so you are sure in your mind that the ayahuasca contributed to it?
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i think that had he, had he not taken it, would sam still be here? probably yes. you can see the longer version of that probably yes. you can see the longer version of that report probably yes. you can see the longer version of that report on probably yes. you can see the longer version of that report on our probably yes. you can see the longer version of that report on our programme probably yes. you can see the longer version of that report on our programme page. on our programme page. let's talk now with harry shapiro, director of online drug information service drquise, who says that although ayahuasca might have benefits in a clinical setting, it's a strong drug and people should not be experimenting with it naively. dr christos dimitriou is also here in studio with us. he's a consultant psychiatrist who has specialised in treating patients with depression and ptsd for the past 24 years. and with us on skype from san francisco is dr bia labate, an anthropologist who has focused her studies on ayahuasca and spent time in the amazon experiencing ayahuasca ceremonies and meeting shamans. welcome to the programme. harry i
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wa nt to welcome to the programme. harry i want to start with you. why co—do you have concerns about this? as we heard in the reportjust now, it is a very powerful hallucinogenic drug and it has other compounds in it. it is not just and it has other compounds in it. it is notjust the dmt. and i think, i meani is notjust the dmt. and i think, i mean i have been to a meeting in london with shamans a few years ago, they explained the kind of very detailed ceremonies that people go through, particularly young boys going into man hood. it is a kind of rite of initiation ceremony. take them into the jungle. rite of initiation ceremony. take them into thejungle. they prepare them into thejungle. they prepare them for week, special diets and the rest of it. they have their own spiritual and tribal support if things don't necessarily go the way they should. i am not at all convinced that probably desperate people, who may well have found other treatments not working for them, to go online and go to these
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treats in a fairly kind of, sort of naive kind of way, without fully realises what the psychological impact of this can be. so, i think it's, there is a latin phrase called caveat emptor which means bayer beware. and it could be the people who are most vulnerable are the ones that could be most needy and most tempted to try something which as we heard in that report, they might not be able to control in the end. would you rule out testing? what about potential benefits that we have heard talked about, if testing happened in a cling at environment? absolutely. with this drug and with ketamine, ecstasy, there are clinical trials going on round the world, to try and, because a number of these drug drugs were used, lsd as well were used in psychotherapy before they got banned because they
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we re before they got banned because they were being used reck croatianly. they have tremendous potential but under the kind of rue brick if you like of proper clinical therapeutic trials and not some of the random stuff i suspect is going on with this. so you have treated people with depression, pssd for the past 24 years, is it worth experimenting, exploring drugs like ayahuasca because of the potential benefits for treating conditions like those? i would be careful with the word eexperimenting. it needs to be investigated. in a clinical environment. like any, any compound, any chemical compound we are considering at some point for it to become treatment. do not believe it's a treatment for the here and now. potentially though, you know,
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just looking at cannabis and so many people talk about the health benefits and the personal benefits they have experienced taking drugs like cannabis. a better example since we are talking about particularly with ptsd is the research on mdma which is much further progressed in the use of ptsd and only recently towards the end of 2016 it got the green light for phase three trials. now, mdma is much further along the road, to one day perhaps becoming a licensed treatment. it is not yet, but i would expect ayahuasca to follow exactly the same pathway, if it is going to be a credible treatment one day. let us bring in our ohs guest. you have devoted your academic career to the study of ayahuasca. you have written 17 books what is
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the appeal? thanks a lot for having me,| the appeal? thanks a lot for having me, isay the appeal? thanks a lot for having me, i say hello from san francisco, 2am, that is how much i enjoy this topic, i am up to have this conversation, i am topic, i am up to have this conversation, lam happy topic, i am up to have this conversation, i am happy to be here as apparently i am the only one with emperrical experience and focus on the topic. i want to remark that ayahuasca was presented as a vine of the dead. that is the wrong way to designated it, when native people say it is the vine of the death. it doesn't mean it causes you to die. when they say that, meaning by that the vine of the souls, or that it is a means of communication with the spiritual world, it is kind of a bridge, a kind of dialogue with the invisible world, with ancestor, with the spiritual world, so ayahuasca is a central sacrament or medicine or
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there is other ways to call it, for hundreds of indigenous tribes in the amazon forest. it has been used for, we don't know how much time, but probably you know, immemorial time and it has played a central road in the society in all aspects of life, both as, as somebody mentioned initiation but also in socialisation, transmitting of histories and transmitting of identityt histories and transmitting of identity t and socialising, it is related to art, related to the very idea of being human, so a lot is said about ayahuasca, but very little is known. it is kind of a large topic but i am happy to share more about it. let me ask you how you would respond to our guests' serious concerns about this, about ayahuasca? serious concerns about this, about ayahuasca ? about this serious concerns about this, about ayahuasca? about this being used in a drug tourism environment and about this being used outside of a
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clinical setting? well, i think it is legitimate to be concerned with something you don't know of. when you don't know things, it's normal attitude of the human mind to be prejudiced on to be fairful, but it isa prejudiced on to be fairful, but it is a bit funny to claim ayahuasca can only be used in a clinical setting when its the central part of a numberof ending setting when its the central part of a number of ending news groups outside of big cities like, you know, san francisco, or london, or new york, and it has been used, i also, you know, don't know where e where the programme gets its designation as extremely dangerous. there has been at least 20 years of solid research showing that ayahuasca is pretty safe under controlled circumstances, so there... whose research is that?
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there is lots of research. the pioneer research started at the beginning of the '90s in brazil. observing long—term users in brazil. there is a branch of a certain religion in the uk, they were trying to get legal and are having a hard time because of lack of knowledge and understanding. there is all kinds of research that has been researched with native american people, in the northern hemisphere and there is a big, large clinical trial with over 70 subjects that happened over the last three years in brazil. the first results have been published. this isjust not about the research. this is about, you know, religion and beliefs and culture practises that have deep roots in the amazon forest and naturally as culture transforms, globalisation comes along and the
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means of communication are increased, this practise tends to expand abroad. so a very is approach to banish them in to stigmatise them, what we have to is to understand them and to create fay rabble conditions for this expansion to happen smoothly. 0k. rabble conditions for this expansion to happen smoothly. ok. i rabble conditions for this expansion to happen smoothly. 0k. ijust want to happen smoothly. 0k. ijust want to get our ore guests to respond to that. i think the, to get our ore guests to respond to that. ithink the, it is to get our ore guests to respond to that. i think the, it is important to put across the medical perspective. when we look at medicine, treatments, we are not expecting a treatment to be without any risk whatsoever. we accept risk as part of treatment. what we are saying about ayahuasca and any compound that has not gone through a research process , compound that has not gone through a research process, is we do not fully understand those risks, what happens with other treatments, by the time they become licensed is they become more predictable from the point of view of us understanding safety and
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efficacy of those treatments so patients can make informed decision and weigh their option, i don't believe we are that the point with ayahuasca. i i think the point your guest made, it makes the point that these substances have been part of traditional cultural religious practises, particularly in south america and elsewhere, going back many year, centuries probably, where the whole thing has become a cult rised and in a sensuous safely and people know what they are doing. but she makes the point about globalisation and how these practises will begin to spread. it is that transition point, i think, thatis is that transition point, i think, that is the point of where people need to be aware of what they are doing, so! need to be aware of what they are doing, so i think, you know, the culture of an amazonian tribe in brazil is one thing, trying to extend these practises safely, you know, in the a large mansion in
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southern england somewhere, or a tent, however it is done is different. the drug is the same, how important, so is the environment?” would argue against that the point is that people seem to think a drug effect is simply the relationship between the drug and the brain. it is not. it is more complicated than that, you have the what they call the setting, so the impact of a drug will depend also, particularly hues general nick drugs like this on the environment in which the drug is taken, whether environment in which the drug is ta ken, whether you environment in which the drug is taken, whether you feel safe, protected and supported and the other issue is what they call set, which is what your ex epen tasting is of what is going to happen. if you go into that, without much knowledge and fearful of what is likely to happen, the effects of that drug may likely to be be dramatic and more negative. so the important thing here, is notjust drug and brain, there is much more to the drug experience than simply
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the reaction between chemicals. use said the drug was the same and i don't believe that is true. if someone is watching and wondering what the difference is between taking it in the amazon or here, if you are talking about the same substance. it is notjust about the substance. it is notjust about the substance. lu red substance. it is notjust about the substance. lured is a compound of two su bsta nces, substance. lured is a compound of two substances, dmt which is psychoactive and mao| which is another psychoactive substance and when you have ayahuasca in the setting we are the driving, you don't know how much of each you will be getting. —— we are describing. and you do not know what is within the individual in terms of pre—existing conditions, mental or physical health conditions, anything else they may have taken or not. it isa else they may have taken or not. it is a much more unpredictable setting. the phase one trials which
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are the first line for any compound to go on the licensing route is basically about using set amounts of set compound and establishing safety parameters. i'm not aware of that having been the case with ayahuasca. a lot more discussion needs to happen clearly, thank you very much for coming onto the programme. still to come, tomorrow marks 50 years of bbc radio 1, but what does its future hold? and a report says that patients are dying alone in hospitals, as a shortage of nurses puts more and more pressure on those at the front line of health care. time for a summary of the news. here's annita. our latest headlines. theresa may has stressed that britain is unconditionally committed to the defence of europe.
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the prime minister says that the uk's role in europe's security has never been more vital. she's attending a summit in estonia where she'll also meet the german chancellor, angela merkel, and is expected to press for her support in moving the brexit negotiations into their next phase. interest rates will rise in the "relatively near term" the governor of the bank of england has told the bbc. in the clearest indication yet that there could be a rate rise as early as november, mark carney suggested that it was time for the bank to "ease its foot off the accelerator". the next opportunity for a change in interest rates is the bank's monetary policy committee meeting on november 2nd. more than 20 people have died and many others are injured after a stampede at a railway station in india's financial hub, mumbai. the stampede took place just after rush hour on a narrow pedestrian bridge leading to elphinstone road train station in central mumbai. the authorities are investigating what caused the stampede, but eyewitnesses said heavy rainfall led to overcrowding on the bridge. armoured vehicles designed
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to protect british troops from roadside bombs keep breaking down. the foxhound, which cost nearly £1 million each, replaced the controversial snatch landrovers on deployments in iraq and afghanistan. the v—shaped hull is designed to give better protection from roadside bombs, however the bbc has been told there are serious concerns about the reliability of the vehicles when in hot conditions. a british climber has been killed after a huge rockfall in california's yosemite national park. a massive sheet of granite, roughly 12 stories tall, fell from a vertical rock formation, crushing the man and seriously injuring his female companion. the foreign office says it's providing support and assistance for the families of the people involved. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you. here's some sport now with holly. the top story is that manchester
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city have confirmed that sergio aguero has been involved in a road accident in holland. in a statement they said he was on a day off and had suffered injuries in the incident but will return to manchester this morning and will be checked by club doctors. aguero has scored seven goals in eight matches already this season and is on the brink of becoming the club's record goal—scorer. arsenal made the most of some questionable goalkeeping to make its two wins out of two in the europa league as they beat bate borisov for. everton could only draw 2-2 at borisov for. everton could only draw 2—2 at home to apollonia limassol. luke gale was the hero for castleford as they reached the grand final, beating st helens 23—22. the only had his appendix removed two weeks ago but he scored 15 points and kicked the winner in extra time. and frustration in malaysia for lewis hamilton who struggled in
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second practice, finishing sixth. sebastian vettel was quickest. more on all those stories in half an hour. thank you. 50 years ago tomorrow, at 7 in the morning, dj tony blackburn launched a brand new radio station on the bbc. over the decades since, radio1 has played a huge role in music, entertainment and popular culture, from creating household names, launching the careers of countless artists and building on its brand, including the live lounge, the official chart and its sister station, 1xtra. it's been the soundtrack to many people's lives in the uk for the last 50 years, but, as young people increasingly chose streaming services like spotify over radio, what will its future look like? ten seconds to go before radio 1, tony blackburn. stand by for switching, get tuned to radio 1 or 2. five, four, three, radio 1, go. the voice of radio 1. woke up one morning half asleep.
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welcome to the exciting new sound of radio 1. music, music, music. listen to the music. radio1. and now the story so far... blue, blue, blue, blue, electric blue. how you doing gang, all right? all right? don't go breaking my heart. this could be massive. first i was afraid, i was petrified. nothing really matters. the radio! road show. london calling to the far away sound. radio, radio 1 with its sound for you. england, scotland, ireland, wales. more rock than you can handle. 275, 285. britain's favourite music, music, music. three, two, one...
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we're in fm. britain's favourite radio. radioi. stop showing off! in the '90s. oh la, la, la, it's the way that we rock. radio1. this is very exciting. as we continue... strike a pose, there's nothing to it. oh, it's a bit hot, isn't it. trailer park girls go round the outside, round the outside, round the outside. i say, don't you know... this is radio 1. love's got me looking so crazy right now. you say you don't know. there's a fire starting in my heart. let the music soothe you. and good morning everyone.
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welcome to the exciting new sound of radio 1. too big for your boots. a lot of highlights from the last 50 yea rs. a lot of highlights from the last 50 years. goodbye greg james, adele roberts who presents the early brea kfast roberts who presents the early breakfast show, former radio 1 brea kfast breakfast show, former radio 1 breakfast presenter and currently radio 2 presenter sara cox and ben cooper, the controller of radio one. but first a reminder of some of the event and hit of the past five years but let's start with you, ben. a very happy birthday! how are you marketing it? —— marking it. very happy birthday! how are you marketing it? -- marking it. it is a time to reflect and celebrate but also a time to look to the future. that is what we have tried to get the balance right this month with,
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doing the live lounge, iconic artists like jay—z and stormzy and miley cyrus coming in but also launching this weekend tomorrow from six o'clock you will be able to get a p°p‘up six o'clock you will be able to get a pop—up digital station called radio1 a pop—up digital station called radio 1 vintage which is 50 hours of 50 old shows with things like kenny everett, and uniting out, john peel and even sara cox! —— annie nightingale. collectively there is a lot of broadcasting experience between you. you hosted the brea kfast between you. you hosted the breakfast show in 2000? yes, i started in radio! the year before andl started in radio! the year before and i did breakfast three and a half years which was the huge show and really exciting. i got to go and see missy elliott in miami, to go to new york with eminem and interviewed
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these people. but the same now with radio 2 these people. but the same now with radiozand these people. but the same now with radio 2 and it is all about the listeners, and it's notjust being cheesy but it is the content. i note that terry said the same thing when he signed off, they give the show to us and we do our best to make them laugh. if they are stuck on the rainy m6, we can make them laugh! it is an honour to do it. i love that you still listen to radio one!” listened to annie nightingale last night and it was incredible! i was thinking what is this?! she was doing some special shows this week. how much has it changed?” doing some special shows this week. how much has it changed? i think it has always been about the music. it has always been about the music. it has been about the listeners. for me that has been the constant and the way people listen to radio now. the fa ct way people listen to radio now. the fact that you can download our shows, if you wanted to download
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sounds of the 80s! people can take the shows with them so we think about how we reach people more now. adele, you wake up earliest out of all of us! take us back to when you first got there, was it your dream job? without a doubt, growing up in southport and recording the chart show, i never dreamt of being on that station. it is a dream job and greg knows this, to open the day on radio one, it is such a special time of day will stop even though it is early, when he opened the microphone you can feel the electricity of the listeners and they get you through it and they entertain you. and your earliest memories, greg?” it and they entertain you. and your earliest memories, greg? i listened to it and i heard people like sara cox and scott and chris moyles and i thought it sounded the most fun thing ever. you felt they were your mates. to do that, to be the mate of
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the listeners now is the coolest thing. you listened to it and you thought there was something different about this station, a bit magical and it felt very real and honest and funny and stupid at its best. that is why i loved being on it hopefully for a lot more. what are the most significant developments? 50 years is a long time in the history of radio 1. developments? 50 years is a long time in the history of radio i.” think like doctor who it is to regenerate for every generation. you will note famously about the smash antoniazzi era where matthew bannister had to control the focus of the —— the smashie and nicie era. radio1 is to keep of the —— the smashie and nicie era. radio 1 is to keep fresh and on of the —— the smashie and nicie era. radio1 is to keep fresh and on its toes. and it has to reflect the lives of young people in britain and thatis lives of young people in britain and that is what it does and that is why it is the most famous radio station
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in the world probably, because it keeps doing that. the way you do thatis keeps doing that. the way you do that is by getting listeners into the radio station whether that is through paid internships or school trips, and they tell us what we are getting wrong. they are not shy! we listen to the listeners and if we can keep reflecting their lives and what is happening in society for young people then we will be around for another 50 years. you said at the start about streaming services, everything is so noisy, there is so much stuff all the time, on your phone, so things like radio, even though it is a really old medium, it is so simple and direct. you can change it so quickly and it is spontaneous and reactive and that is wide radio always wins, whether it is breaking news or a big pop story or something funny that happens, you can talk about it that second. that is why it strangely the oldest medium is the most useful and quickest. i think radio as a real
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resurgent in the last few years of people like curated stuff as well. there is so much going on, sometimes you want someone to go, it's a great thing or a great album to listen to, someone is your friend saying, have a listen. you that radio wins but is a listen. you that radio wins but is a general trend, as young people listen to the radio, how do you compete with. .. listen to the radio, how do you compete with... you're not as competing with other broadcasters but with content creators, netflix, spotify, youtube, facebook, have you compete? we plan the show as a great radio show, but you have to think about how that idea looks on someone's instagram feed or what is the bit that people can take away and share on twit irand say that show is really good. next time they might go that guy and put it on, you have do ideas on those platforms where you can't go here's a linear radio show and i'm done. it is great
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to look at someone on youtube and laugh but it is funny to relive it with your favourite people in the carand get theirspin with your favourite people in the car and get their spin on it, and because they are like your friends, so it is more interactive really. the death of radio has been greatly exaggerated. we are getting ten million listeners a week but we are adapting to audience needs, we get 1.5 million views on youtube a day to our channel. we have nine million followers on social media. it is about being on people's phone, the first thing you do, after this show tina is check your phone. we all do. on the telly. lol. i have signal. so what is the future for radio? general, radio 1, for you? my biggest challenge is can we remain useful in people's lives? so sarah and adele and greg have said it is about having that connection with your audience, so radio 1, it
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brea ks with your audience, so radio 1, it breaks new british music. if we can do that, we will inform people about it. if we can educate our audience and they can educate us about the issues happening in society for young people and reflect that back on the radio we will be useful. if we can entertain. people just want to be entertained. if we can do that, i will be happy. to be entertained. if we can do that, iwill be happy. great. quick fire quiz to check your knowledge. you will know these. i know you will ben. first record played on radio 1? the move flowers in the rain the second record played on radio 1? no. don't know that one. massachusetts bee gees. how many presenters of the radio breakfast show have there been? about nine? 15. you will know this. first female dj on the station? annie nightingale. when was
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the sister station launched ? station? annie nightingale. when was the sister station launched? 14th august. i was only asking for a year! better get the year right. 2002. 2002. you are right. well done. thank you very much. do we win anything? remind us where we can listen from tomorrow morning. get your phone out, download the app and your phone out, download the app and you will see the vintage logo, click on there, any time from 6.00. thank you'll for coming in. thank you for all of your comments on ayahuasca and the dangers of the drug. details of organisation are offering information and support with addiction are available on the website. next this morning, a new report's claiming some patients in the uk are dying alone in hospital because there aren't enough nurses to care for them. the royal college of nursing
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says a quarter of staff say they're looking after 14 patients or more at a time. the department of health says there are over 11,000 more nurses on wards than seven years ago and it is committed to funding an extra 10,000 places for nurses and other health workers by 2020. with me now is janet davis. she's the chief executive and general secretary of the royal college of nursing. in surrey, arezou rezvani, a nurse and hospital manager who's been working in the nhs for 22 years. and in walsall, chris humpage. his mum audrey died in 2014 after doctors at walsall manor hospital diagnosed her with bowel cancer when in fact she had a pelvic abscess. he claims nurses there were understaffed. at one point his mum got out of bed, fell and broke her hip. what is your reaction to what we are
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hearing? we were quite shocked when we got the results of our questionnaire, what we did is we went out to members and asked them to tell us what was their experience of their last shift. we know it is ha rd to of their last shift. we know it is hard to recruit nurses, we think in england there are 40,000 vacancies at the moment. what we needed to do is to turn that into real evidence and stories of what difference was that making, and, even though we had heard stories before from members and nurse widely, we were shocked at some of the stories we heard it was distressing for the nurse themselves, for the patients and relatives, when they are having to work with so few staff, for the patients' needs and that is what we are hearing, is that the needs of the patients weren't being met. can you give us specific examples of some of the stories. yes, we have 30,000 stories, we have heard of someone falling, interestingly, because the nurses couldn't stay
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with them, they #23450u they needed to be with them all the time but they have more patients not able to have a one—to—one with someone who needed someone with them all the time, of people getting their medication latings when they really need it. we heard stories of there being two nurses and 32 patients with heavenly dependent and the nurses feeling like they were plate spinning. there is that story of the nurse who was so distressed going home because someone died on her shift and there wasn't anybody with them because they were soed bye, looking after all the other patients, so lots of story, we had patients, so lots of story, we had patients, good examples of good care. we heard from people where they had good levels of staffing where they felt proud of being a nurse, that the patients were all co mforta ble, nurse, that the patients were all comfortable, well looked after, progressing well, i think one of them was in a mental health ward where everything was calm. am going to bring in another of our guests.
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are these stories stories you recognise, what is it like for you in yourjob? these are the stories we whateverry day, and, you —— we whateverry day. our staff are doing their best to provide their care, i wouldn't say the patients are not not getting good care, they are trying to give excel —— excellent ca re trying to give excel —— excellent care but they don't have time to provide that caring aspect. it is becoming more task orientated nursing, rather than when i trained we tried to provide and spend time to care for our patients. at the moment we are task orientated. we do have what we have to do. we don't have what we have to do. we don't have time to provide the caring aspect of nursing, the listen we go into nursing. the government says it is investing in nurses to make sure there are enough staff. 123450 i would disagree with that, g mayi be ininvesting in
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tbs/ism z they come tbs/957 7 they come and they are $8957 7 they come and they are phased with lots of —— faced be paperwork, lots of pressure of meeting some k pr, key performance indicator, we are pressured because at the moment we are told we can't have agents, we have to think about the salaries, so they come and they, the responsibilities that have and the money they get is, is not worth for them to carry on staying in there. so they divert and they go to other aspects. have two nurses going to it. completely different career because they just say they get more money, so they have been offered a job at 40,000. why would they want to stay in a job they don't get break, their lunch break and they go
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home really stressed because they can't provide their caring - i home really stressed because they can't pro\ to their caring - i home really stressed because they can't pro\ to thei| chrisg - to -. m -. 71189 w m77» hear what happened to you. can you to us about some of the talk to us about some of the experiences you had with nurse, at the hospital your mum was being looked after? yes, obviously due to a shortage at one point, i think you mentioned my mum got out of bed and fell over, that was due to no—one wanting to answer the buzzer, to ta ke wanting to answer the buzzer, to take her to the toilet, simply because they didn't have the time. so if someone could have answered the buzzer and took her to the toilet, i don't think that would have happened. i think she would still be alive today. at the time, chris, did you complain, did you speak to the hospital, did you know? yes we complained on many occasions and unfortunately i have to say once you start complaining, it can be held against you, and doesn't go
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down well. how? there was an atmosphere on the ward between staff, that we quite felt, because we were seen as the family that felt, because we were seen as the fa m ily that co nsta ntly felt, because we were seen as the family that constantly complained, but we were well within our rights to do so, because things were not going well for mum at all and she was very going well for mum at all and she was very vulnerable in there. how does that make you feel hearing chris's story, i can see you shaking your head. i am saddened to hear that, certainly my area, i encourage all patients, their family, their relatives and we take complaints very seriously. we investigate them. in this incident, it really, it is sad, it is not because the nurses didn't want to answer the bell. i think as you rightly say, they don't have the time. they have to give medication or something that is, you
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know, so, i am very saddened to hear they saw this family as a trouble maker. the only way management can improve things is by hearing an investigating each complaint and put things right that that incident doesn't happen again. this isn't just a funding issue want can an» —— g; can do’lv ;; , , can doggi'that??? , , what can be do about that? is a vicious circle. if you are working at this intensity all the time, you are not getting a break, you are working extra hours unpaid, you are distressed because you know you want to provide excellent care, you can't, you become demoralised. you worry about the fact you can't do your o job worry about the fact you can't do your ojob properly. this was predictable so it is a financial issue. 0ver year, predictable so it is a financial issue. over year, we predictable so it is a financial issue. 0ver year, we have not had a really sensible approach to workforce planning. this is
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workforce planning. this is workforce planning. this is workforce planning for nurses on all sector, its covers more than the nhs, it covers prison, community services, it covers the independent sector and we have no trained enough nurses. when we have an underfunded health service, what happens is the hospitals and the areas have to cut their budgets. they do that by holding nurses vacancy, then they find the nurses aren't there. in addition we haven't been training enough, because it is alleged we can't afford to train them. so it's a financial issue. we will have to leave it there. a department of health spokesperson has told us: "we are helping the nhs to make sure it has the right staff, in the right place, at the right
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time to provide safe care — that's why there are over 29,600 more professionally qualified clinical staff including over 11,300 more nurses on our wards since may 2010." "we have also committed to funding an extra 10,000 places for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals by 2020, to ensure the nhs has the staff it needs both now and in the future." bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. hello. good morning it is friday of course which means it is nearly the weekend, and for many of us as we start the weekend it is going to be dry and bright, but things turning wetter, as we go through saturday evening into sunday, with gales developing later on on sunday as well. for the rest of today we will see this cloud and rain in eastern areas finally clearing away from norfolk and suffolk by mid afternoon. elsewhere there will be sunny spells developing. 0ne
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afternoon. elsewhere there will be sunny spells developing. one or two showers in northern ireland and scotla nd showers in northern ireland and scotland but maximum temperatures 17-19, a scotland but maximum temperatures 17—19, a degree or so lower than yesterday. this evening not a great deal of change. a few more showers but a chilly start for your saturday morning and while it is dry and bright, for many of us you will scheme that sunshine in northern areas but for northern ireland, wales and the south—west, there will be increasing cloud here, outbreaks of rain and the winds starting to pick upa of rain and the winds starting to pick up a bit. temperatures 15—18, by sunday, some strong winds and some heavy rain. more details later on in the morn. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11:00am:
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interest rates could rise as soon as next month, according to the governor of the bank of england. theresa may meets european leaders in estonia for the first time since brexit speak in florence. but the head of the eu commission says not enough progress has been made in talks. at the end of this week, i'm saying that there will be no sufficient progress from now until october unless miracles can happen. the number of british people applying for citizenship in other eu countries has risen by tens of a mumbai f8'18888 , mumbai bylaws has left mumbai f8'1888§_ has left at! mumbai railway station has left at least 22 people dead.
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