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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 3, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11.00: police investigating the mass shooting in las vegas discover the killer, 66—year—old stephen paddock, had amassed a significant cache of weapons and explosives. we have recovered 23 firearms at mandalay bay, and 19 firearms at his home in mesquite. vigils have been held for the 59 people who died, as details begin to emerge of some of the victims. we will not be tarnished by this one sick horrible human being, that he thought he could destroy who and what we are. the other main stories developing this hour: theresa may dismisses questions over boris johnson's recent theresa may dismisses questions over borisjohnson‘s recent brexit comments, saying she does not want a cabinet of yes men. the eu's chief negotiator says britain hasn't made enough to move on to trade talks.
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thousands take to the streets in a general strike in catalonia, in protest against spanish police tactics during sunday's disputed referendum. # i'm free dart—mac freefallin‘ #. # i'm free... freefallin‘ #. and tributes to the american rock star tom petty, who's died at the age of 66. good morning — it's tuesday third october. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. police in las vegas investigating sunday's mass shooting at a music festival are trying to establish the motive of the killer, 64—year—old stephen paddock. paddock opened fire on crowds of concert—goers from the window of his hotel room on the 32nd floor of the mandalay bay hotel, before shooting himself dead. vigils have been held in memory of at least 59 people who died
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and more than 500 who were injured. it is the deadliest mass shooting in modern us history and has once again raised the bitterly divisive issue of gun control in the country. the president, donald trump, has called the massacre "an act of pure evil." the flag at the white house is flying at half mast, as details emerge of some of the victims. they include an off—duty las vegas police officer, a special needs teacher and a us navy veteran recently returned from afghanistan. it is not yet known if any britons are among the dead. police have been searching this house — paddock‘s home in a retirement community in mesquite, nevada — where they discovered a huge cache of weapons. investigators say he had no criminal record and they have found nothing
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to link the killer to terrorism at home or abroad, despite a claim to link the killer to terrorism at home or abroad. richard galpin has more. details of the victims are now being made public. sandy casey was with her partner at the concert. she was an education teacher from california and was described as being absolutely loved by her colleagues and students alike. 34—year—old charleston hartfield was a las vegas police officer, military better in and football coach, who was off duty at the concert. dayna gardner had been a county employee in california for more than two decades. she was described as a dedicated public servant. —— dana gardner.
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described as a dedicated public servant. -- dana gardner. everyone in this community has been so touched by the loss of these lives and the actions of that sick human being, who has taken into his hands devastation, and imprinted in our minds for ever the day that really does not belong in our fabulous beautiful city. but already the people of las vegas have been coming together, holding vigils like this one, to grieve but also to demonstrate solidarity, in the face of such overwhelming violence. and people have also been getting involved at a more practical level. here hundreds queue up to give blood. they need is great. more than 500 were injured in the attack. but mystery still surrounds the motive of the wealthy 64—year—old retired accountant, stephen paddock, who carried out the attack. police and fbi agents have already searched his house in a quiet town north—east of
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las vegas, and discovered a large cache of weapons and ammunition here, as well as the hotel room in las vegas from where he opened fire. detectives are uncovering evidence to discover the motives behind the shooting and any other pertinent information that will help shed light on this horrible event. we have recovered 23 firearms at mandalay bay and i9 firearms at his home in mesquite. members, please ta ke home in mesquite. members, please take their seats... back in washington politicians held a moment of silence in memory of those killed in the attack. with reports that the gunmen used a high velocity assault rifle, the issue of gun control is highly likely to come back on the agenda here. richard galpin, bbc news. our correspondent gary o'donoghue is in las vegas. hejoins us now. what is he joins us now. what is the latest on the investigation, gary? as you heard in richard's report there, the
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police have been gathering this huge arsenal of weaponry that stephen paddock had been amassing, notjust 42 separate weapons, but thousands of rounds of ammunition, some explosives as well, some imodium nitrate, that sort of fertiliser quite often used in improvised car bombs and ieds etc, that was also found. but they still seem to be pretty at a loss to know what the motivation behind his massacre was. it is clearly early days in the investigation. they will be combing through his acquaintances, speaking to them, looking at his phones and any computers he might have had to work out what his thinking was. they have already ruled out international terrorism, dismissing the claim by the so—called islamic state group that he was a soldier of theirs who had that he was a soldier of theirs who ha d rece ntly
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that he was a soldier of theirs who had recently converted to islam. but that does not get us any nearer to an explanation how someone who had spent a life as an accountant had got a taste for the gambling life down here on the strip, and did a bit of property investment, but then all of a sudden seemingly wanted to mow down concertgoers with absolute merciless murderous accuracy and terror, in the space of about 72 minutes. it is something that is bill will doing everyone. gary, we have been hearing more about the desperate effort of those concertgoers, not only to escape to help others —— is something that is bewildering everyone. yes, as you would expect stories of great
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heroism and human decency, protecting others, people trying to help get others out of there, and one case of an off—duty police officer who was shepherding some people out of the way, he lost touch with his wife, and as of monday evening he did not know where his wife was and she didn't have identification on her, and he was fearing for the worst, that she might end up being one of those who was either critically ill in hospital or who lost their life, so you do hear some heart—rending stories, and you only have to look at those pictures to know the sheer terror that was instilled in that audience when the guns started firing. thank you, gary. our correspondent they are, in las vegas. here at home theresa may has defended her style of leadership, as speculation continues to rage about possible challenges to her position.
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the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, who controversially set out his personal brexit red lines is due to give a speech to the conservative party conference later today. the prime minister said she wanted a team that would freely discuss issues. radovan yes—men. our assistant political editor norman smith is at the conservative party conference in manchester. —— rather than yes men. norman, will theresa may be cheering boris johnson and in his speech? we are told the idea of his speech is to let the lion roar, which gives an idea of the first of the speech certainly in terms of brexit, you can expect him to revisit his very enthusiastic optimistic upbeat vision of what brexit will be like for britain. we are told it will be a100% for britain. we are told it will be a 100% loyal speech, so do not expect boris johnson a 100% loyal speech, so do not expect borisjohnson to get out his red marker pen and start writing a whole load of new red lines. also
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interesting to see the reaction from a lot of people who are no doubt very enthusiastic and adulatory towards the foreign secretary, but just to tell you one conservative party member coming up to me a short time ago the end, we have to take boris down. that gives you a sense that some people are deeply uneasy about what they see as his disloyalty over brexit, albeit the prime minister this morning signalling she was comfortable with the differences of opinion within the differences of opinion within the cabinet. i don't set red lines. everybody uses i don't set red lines. everybody uses this phrase, red lines. i don't set those sort of red lines, and all i would say to this, actually i think leadership is about ensuring you have a team of people who are not yet men, but the team of different voices are the table so we can discuss matters and come to an agreement and then put that government view for —— who are not yes men. and that is exactly what we have done. one of the interesting things will
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be the mood in the hall when boris johnson speaks because to be fair it has been a fairly flat conference, a lack of pizzazz, and that is one thing borisjohnson tends to bring to the party. and a lack of the media —— the media attention that he seems to attract, if you look at him out jogging seems to attract, if you look at him outjogging again, always followed by camara is pretty much wherever he goes. he seems a constant source of potential headlines, and inevitably there will be compare and contrasts between the sort of a reception he gets and the sort of reception the prime minister has been getting, although i am told she will not actually be in the hall this afternoon to hear borisjohnson speaks. meanwhile in the real difficult world of brexit negotiations, more sense of potential trouble ahead, at least on the brussels end of the swing. because this morning the main man from the european parliament in terms of the brexit negotiations said he doesn't think it is likely
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there will be any progress to the next stage of brexit talks, and his reason is because of tory divisions and cabinet disunity meaning the europeans don't really know what they are dealing with. have a listen... if you are at the other side of the negotiation table, there is a lack of clarity. there is even disunity — there are oppositions between hammond and fox, there is opposition and divisions, i should say, between johnson and may. it is difficult to make sufficient progress and it is difficult to make the steps towards the second phase of the negotiations. what are we to make of others? i am joined by the immigration minister brandon lewis. let's start the boris question. is it time that he went shtum and brexit? i think boris is someone shtum and brexit? i think boris is someone who has an importantjob to
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do in terms of the work we do. an important thing we heard they are, we have a unified position behind what the prime minister outlined in florence and i think ourjob is to get on with delivering that in the interest of everyone in the united kingdom. but we have heard boris johnson seeing a two—year transition period, not a second more than two yea rs, period, not a second more than two years, emphasising she has left the door open to a longer period. it hardly sounds as if the two are in sync. if you look at what the prime minister has said in florence speech, transition period of around two years is entirely compatible. we need the right deal to make sure we are leaving the european union as we will do in march 2019, get control of our borders, that the laws come back into uk law, but at the same time we need to make sure that we make sure the economy in this country, jobs and prosperity, continues to settled your brief of course is clamping down on immigration and you said recently that freedom of movement would end
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in march 2019 —— central to your brief. freedom of movement does end in terms of march 2019. we have control of our borders and all those laws will be in british law. people will need to go through the... we will need to go through the... we will need to go through the... we will need to go through the details of this in the white paper towards the end of the ottawa later this year. giving a really clear idea of the system we will have leaving the european union —— towards the end of the autumn later this year. but in the autumn later this year. but in the transition period we do not have control of our borders because freedom of movement in all but name will continue. you're asking me to prejudge what will be the white paperand in the prejudge what will be the white paper and in the negotiations david davis has brilliantly taken forward with european union so we will have to see how that develops but we will have control of our borders. for when we leave the european union in march 2019, and what we will be looking at today and you will hear the home secretary talking injust a short period of time about the
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details behind some of the things we wanted to make sure we are able to remain safe, protected, not of the british public with some of the changes we will make in counterterrorism law, but also protecting those who protect us as well. another big question at this conference, where is the big idea? we have had policy announcements but let's be honest they are full of micro announcements, schemes for private landlords. there have been little tweaks but not the big policy to change the political dynamic. actually i would argue what we are doing is showing real practical things that make a difference to people's lives, more money in the pockets of people at university, young people, more opportunities to young people, more opportunities to young people, more opportunities to young people and families to get a home of their own, their first step oi'i home of their own, their first step on the housing ladder, and more people renting to ensure they are properly treated, driving a rogue landlords and more importantly rogue letting agents. jeremy hunt announced this morning 5000 more nurses, and we will be ensuring we keep people here at home safe.
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brandon lewis, thank you very much indeed. when will you publish the white paper on immigration? later this autumn. this month, next month? later this autumn. laughter that will give a clear sign of the thinking in government circles about the new rules that will apply to eu migrants coming to britain. much more from you later, norman, but for now, many thanks. i want to bring you some news from the high court in london. the actor and comedian steve coogan has received damages and an apology from mirror group newspapers over phone hacking. steve coogan was at the high court for a settlement of his action which involved misuse of private information. that lead of damages was not revealed at the hearing but steve coogan confirmed outside court that it was a 6—figure sum, and he said it was a 6—figure sum, and he said it would be distributed to good causes. so steve coogan, the actor
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and comedian, has received a 6—figure sum in damages and an apology from mirror group newspapers over phone hacking. the health secretaryjeremy hunt has announced plans to boost training places for nurses in england. more nursing associates will be trained and an apprenticeship scheme will allow a work based path to a nursing qualification. the royal college of nursing say they welcome the boost but raised concerns that students would be plugging gaps in the workforce at the expense of quality patient care. the headlines on bbc news: police investigating the mass shooting in las vegas discovered that the killer, stephen paddock, had amassed a large —— cache of weapons and expose us. theresa may
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has said she doesn't want a cabinet of yes men, dismissing boris johnson's —— situation over boris johnson's —— situation over boris johnson's with his comments. in sport wales star player gareth bale has been ruled out of the final two world qualifiers this week. he picked up a clustering with real madrid this week. second in the group should be enough to secure a play—off spot but they have tricky matches away in georgia and in the republic of ireland. the former england cricket captain michael vaughan said the management should have penalised ben stokes when he went out drinking during the old trafford test against south africa in august. he was arrested last month after a brawl outside a night clu b month after a brawl outside a night club following another match in bristol. and the british gymnast failed to make the podium in montreal. he took gold in rio de janeiro. i will be back with another
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update in 15 minutes. see you then. the president of the european union jean—claude juncker says not enough progress has been made in the brexit negotiations to move to the next phase of talks about trade and the future relationship. addressing meps at the european parliament ahead of motion criticising the uk approach to brexit negotiations, mrjuncker also warned others not to go over the head of the eu chief negotiator. adam fleming is at the european parliament in strasbourg. we're here for regular monthly session for an update on the talks betweenjean—claude session for an update on the talks between jean—claude juncker and michel barnier. the european parliament only has a decisive say on the final brexit deals of this is
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more of a taken of the temperature in the eu is the brexit talks progress. meps have just voted in the eu is the brexit talks progress. meps havejust voted on a motion which is quite critical of the british government on issues like their attitude to the rights of eu citizens living in the uk after brexit, the uk government approach to settling its debts, as the eu sees it, as it leaves the eu. the border with northern ireland, and even its request for a transition agreement. meps have overwhelmingly voted in favour of that quite critical motion. everyone is obsessed with this idea of sufficient progress, which is the idea that enough progress has to be made on issues like ireland, money and citizens' right before you readers can agree to open the second phase of talks, all about trade and the future relationship —— before the future relationship —— before the eu can agree to open the second phase of talks. now we know that the eu parliament is pretty sceptical about progress so far, sharing the view of the eu chief negotiator michel barnier. this is what he had
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to say on that issue earlier on. translation: today we have not yet achieved sufficient progress to begin in full confidence the second phase of negotiations. firstly on what would be a new transition period, possible transition period, possible transition period. and the conditions are clearly defined by the european council. and then a discussion on the framework of our future relations, our partnership in the future, with this great country. that was michel barnier speaking in his native french in the chamber of the parliament a couple of hours ago, because they have been discussing this for three hours. before him was his boss, jean—claude juncker, the president of the european commission, who said nobody should think about going over the head of his chief negotiator, michel barnier, taken as a coded big
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against the british strategy to appeal directly to the leaders of the eu, the prime ministers and chancellors directly rather than going through the european commission. less coded and diplomatic was the language from the german mep, weber, the leader of the largest centre—right group in the european parliament and this is what he had to say about the british government at the moment. the top question i think for the moment is who shall i call on london? who speaks for the government, to be borisjohnson, or david davis? by reading johnson's text against his own prime minister, he shows the british government is trapped by their own and political contradictions. london is good at putting lines on the table for pleasing their party
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supporters but not good at supporting their voters and citizens. i fully agree with theresa may, in one single point she said, we can do so much better than this. theresa may, please don't put your party first. please put britain first, please put the citizens first, please put the citizens first, and please, no more speeches and leadership and content, and the best would be please sack boris johnson because we need a clear answer, who is responsible for the british position. so that is what is really striking here in strasbourg, a place that is billed as the heart of eu democracy, all the meps talking about british domestic political gossip, and how that impacts on the brexit process, so that debate about brexit is now wound up luggage rack and they will discuss other eu issues for the rest of the day and tomorrow everybody will be coming through theresa may's tory party conference speech —— brexit is now wound up here and they
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will discuss other eu issues. they will discuss other eu issues. they will now concentrate on her tory party speech for clues and there are brexit approach. almost 2000 monarch employees have been made redundant, following the airline's collapse yesterday. about 12,000 more holiday—makers are being flown back to the uk today. a similar number of its customers were brought home yesterday on planes chartered by the civil aviation authority. around 100,000 are yet to be repatriated. the collapse of the 50—year old company is the largest ever for a uk airline. our correspondent selin girit is at dalaman airport in south—west turkey. what is happening where you are?m is calmly in the airport now,
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dalaman airport. there were people waiting to queue into their replacement flight until midnight. i have spoken to the turkish representative of monarch airlines, and they said that everything was taken under control since the civil aviation authority got involved, and every passenger that was supposed to ta ke every passenger that was supposed to take a monarch airlines flight back home was given a replacement, to get ona home was given a replacement, to get on a replacement carrier with no extra cost, and that would be the case within the next two weeks. tonight we are expecting another flight tonight we are expecting another flight to take off from this airport. yesterday there were five flights taking off from this airport. the monarch airlines representative told me there are around 2000 people, only around this area, that are supposed to be flying within the next few days, back to their home. and she said this would ta ke their home. and she said this would take place with no extra cost. i
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managed to speak to some passengers yesterday and they seemed calm and relaxed about how this crisis was handled, and they said they were looking forward to going home after a couple of intense and anxious hours. you say that passengers are being flown home and replacement flights at no extra cost, but are they returning to their airport of departure, or are they returning to just any departure, or are they returning to justany uk departure, or are they returning to just any uk airport which can be found? well, i have been told the predominant aim is to return them to their departure airports, but if they can't do that, for instance, yesterday there was a flight to birmingham and there was a flight to luton airport in london, but some passengers were taken to other airports and other flights passengers were taken to other airports and otherflights because there was no room on the replacement flight, there was no room on the replacement flight, so the main aim is taking
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these passengers as soon as is to their departure airports, but if thatis their departure airports, but if that is not the case they will of course “— that is not the case they will of course —— there would of course be a tra nsfer course —— there would of course be a transfer flight in between. selin girit at dalaman airport in south—west turkey, thank you. nhs patients are being asked to take part in what's described as the world's first trial for a universal flu jab. researchers at oxford university say the vaccine should work against most types of flu and offer years of protection. people aged 65 and older who live in berkshire or oxfordshire are being invited to volunteer. let's catch up with the weather with simon. hello. some sunshine at the moment and this is the scene a very short time ago in wiltshire, cumulus cloud there in the sky, and for many we will see that building up into
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the afternoon. i think the cloud is thickest towards north wales, north—west england and of course western scotland where we can still see a few showers in the afternoon. still fairly breezy conditions in northern areas particularly in the far north and east. in the sunshine it will feel quite pleasant but if you are exposed to the wind and some shade it may feel a bit chilly. there are denied the winds will pick up there are denied the winds will pick up across there are denied the winds will pick up across scotland and northern ireland, with some rain moving in to the early hours of wednesday morning, but in the south it will remain dry, and could be quite chilly with clear spells. so i chilly with clear spells. so i chilly but bright start for much of wales, the midlands, eastern and southern parts of england, but in the north we have this rain gradually moving southwards, strengthening winds as well, but in the far north of scotland things are brightening up as the day goes on. goodbye. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: police in las vegas are trying to establish a motive for the mass shooting at a music festival on sunday which left at least at least 59 people dead. the gunman is said to have amassed an arsenal of forty—two weapons.
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details are emerging of some of those killed when stephen paddock opened fire on innocent concert—goers. theresa may has brushed off speculation about her future by insisting she doesn't want to be surrounded by "yes men" — following recent comments on brexit by borisjohnson. not enough progress has been made in the brexit negotiations to move to the next phase of talks about trade and the future relationship — says the president of the european commission. before we catch up with the sport, i wa nt to before we catch up with the sport, i want to bring you news that rodney bickerstaff, who was the former general secretary of two unions has died today. the unison general secretary has paid tribute to rodney
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b i cke rstaff secretary has paid tribute to rodney bickerstaff saying that rodney was a great personal friend to many of us and a dedicated champion of all the union members he proudly represented throughout his career. he coupled a great sense of humour with a deep—rooted sense of socialjustice and commitment to unison. that is the unison general secretary paying tribute to the former general secretary, rodney bickerstaff, who has died. now the sport and ollie is at the sports centre. morning to you. we start with with a blow for wales. wales star man, gareth bale has been ruled out of their final two world cup qualifiers. he picked up a calf strain with real madrid last week. scans have revealed he won't be fit. wales are second in their group which would be likely to secure
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a play—off spot but have tricky matches away in georgia and at home to the republic of ireland. ba rnsley‘s barnsley‘s tom bradshaw has be called up to wales' squad. you can catch up with the rest of the news on the sport web—site. chelsea morata could be out for more than a month with a hamstring tear. he was injured during saturday's defeat by manchester city. morata will miss spain's world cup qualifiers too against albania and israel. police say they are not expecting any developments in the ben stokes case for another two to three weeks. the england player was arrested on
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suspicion of causing actual bodily harm ina suspicion of causing actual bodily harm in a brawl in bristol. the former england cricket captain michael vaughan says the england management should have been stricter with ben stokes when he went out drinking during the old trafford test against south africa in august. vaughan spoke to mark champman last night —— chapman last. vaughan spoke to mark champman last night -- chapman last. the story came out that ben stokes was out until 3am came out that ben stokes was out until3am ina came out that ben stokes was out until 3am in a test match in manchester. i knew that at the time. i knew that. it was the talk of the media centre. the story was ripped out of the papers. it wasn't allowed to go in. they fought to make sure the story didn't reach the papers. i have no sympathy for ben stokes in what he put himself into. but the management of the england team have to say, could we have done more and been stricter? england's women have
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become the no1 ranked team in the world. they have overtaken australia. their captain says it is flattering and a sign of progress. double olympic champion max whitlock has failed to reach the floor final at the world championships in montreal. the british gymnast took gold in the discipline in rio last year — he did reach the pommel final though. he stumbled during his routine. he has put in a lot of changes to the routine after rio. i made a mistake on the second from last. but i'm happy with the whole thing. i went out quite inexperienced, so i'm happy. out quite inexperienced, so i'm happy- i out quite inexperienced, so i'm happy. i will so go back to the gym and work hard and hopefully come
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back next year with some big improvements. that is all the sport for now. thank you. more now on our top story this morning — the police search for a motive for the worst mass shooting in modern us history. vigils have been held for the victims — at least 59 dead and more than 500 injured. detectives say the gunman, 64—year—old stephen paddock, who opened fire on crowds at a music festival in las vegas on sunday night, had no criminal record and no known links to terrorism. authorities are still trying to piece together stephen paddock‘s movements and motives and while they do many are asking if this devastating event could be the catalyst for stronger gun control laws across the us. take a look at this. scott lucas is a professor of american studies at the university of birmingham. hejoins us now. some quite
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staggering figures there, we have been here before though, another mass shooting, more calls for restrictions on dpuns. —— guns. what are the chances of that happen something? slim and none, we are caught ina something? slim and none, we are caught in a ground hog's day, where iispeak caught in a ground hog's day, where i i speak every few months about the latest worst mass shooting. several yea rs latest worst mass shooting. several years ago it was sandy hooke. now it is las vegas. what we have after... well, we may have lost professor lucas. no, ithink well, we may have lost professor lucas. no, i think the line may have frozen. are you back with me? carry on if you are? thank you, we are in a ground hog's day where we get
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state m e nts a ground hog's day where we get statements after each shooting that something must be done. but the problem is two fold. one is there is a lot of money, a lot of lobbying, like the national rifle association that insist there is should not be restrictions on guns and a lack of political will. either because politicians like to stay in office and believe they can't defy the gun lobby, or they believe in gun ownership. we have a few investigations and deal with the fraynings. s —— fringes. when you have assault rifles there no attempt to make sure that people with mental conditions don't have guns, you have a problem that can't be corrected. that is a problem that is unique to the united states. why could australia do something about it, but america can't? you're right, australia responded to the shock of what happened in the nineties and
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the uk responded in dunblane saying there is a notion that society can't live with this unrestricted violence. in the us that myth almost that the individual cannot be checked by government that, it is a god given right to have guns, which isn't true, but that is very powerful and something those who wa nt to powerful and something those who want to continue to pose any legislation they feed on that and they do it now even more quickly in they do it now even more quickly in the era of social media. there is pa rt the era of social media. there is part of second amendment a right to bear arms. does that have any bearing on this argument? well there isa bearing on this argument? well there is a heated legal debate, the fact is a heated legal debate, the fact is the second amendment does not give an unrestricted for individuals to bear arms. it gives the right to raise a militia with arms. at that point we were facing you lot in britain. however the myth continues that the individual, as america
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grew, it became their right and that the government can't interfere. it is very hard to dislodge that. even if legally that is not technically true. how much of a test is this for president trump, who was endorsed by the national rifle association in the national rifle association in the presidential campaign?” the national rifle association in the presidential campaign? i don't think it is a specific test for trump, in that i don't think there will be enough of a demand for really meaningful legislation. i think he sort of safeguarded, because most politicians in congress don't want to act. but there is a symbolic test here... we have lost you again. but professor scott lucas, we got the gist of what you we re lucas, we got the gist of what you were saying and we are grateful forrure team. people in catalonia are in strike today in protest at the violence that marred the region's independence poll on
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sunday. large crowds are protesting against the spanish police's behaviour at the weekend. pro—independence groups are calling for everyone in the state to stay away from work. more than 800 people we re away from work. more than 800 people were injured in the clashes that happened in voting in barcelona. barcelona's football team has confirmed its players will also strike. our correspondent gavin lee is in catalonia and september us this —— sent us this. is in catalonia and september us this -- sent us this. this is barcelona, the shops are shut, businesses are closed, public transport closed, the flag is ever y where. they're trying to make this city have a shut down for the day to support the independence movement and condemn the police violence. you can see ballot papers on the
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pavement. there are people of all ages and i have been talking to a few and they say, today if they can get a message to the government with their voice, with the signs, maybe they will get a response. the other thing that is notable is how apparent it that is from the spanish government and from the catalan government and from the catalan government here, you can barely hear them. the president we were told by tonight there might be a declaration for independence for the 7.5 million here. but my sources suggest within the government that that might not happen and they‘ re the government that that might not happen and they're listening to the spanish government and they're watching each other. the other threat from the spanish government is if there is a declaration of independence, they will enact article 155 of the constitution and they will take over the government here. so the risks are high and at the moment we are only seeing one
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side. i have talked to those on the other side, those who don't want independence and there are three or four million who said they didn't and they say they don't feel co mforta ble and they say they don't feel comfortable being here now. many are indoors. the american rock musician tom petty has died. he was 66. it's believed he suffered a cardiac arrest at his home in california. mhe was best known for a string of hits with his band — the heartbrea kers. he also helped form the supergroup, the traveling wilburys. tim allman looks back at his life and career. 1977 and tom petty was still flying the flag for rock and roll. that long, blonde hair, rake—thin, cool as can be.
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tom petty epitomised a classic, straight from the heart blue—collar sound, going on to become one of the biggest—selling artists of all time. # she might need a lot of loving, but she don't need you... along with his band the heartbreakers, he specialised in melody, intelligence, and sincerity. tom petty was born in gainesville, florida, in 1950, his interest in music prompted by a meeting with elvis presley when he was ten years old. he formed the heartbreakers in the mid—‘70s, although initially, they were more popular in the uk than the us. # it's all right, as long as you lend a hand... later, he would join the rock'n'roll supergroup the travelling wilburys, releasing two hugely successful albums. but he would carry on recording and performing with the heartbreakers
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almost until the day he died. tom petty once said, "if you do something you really like, and hopefully it pays the rent, as far as i'm concerned, that's success." bob dylan told rolling stone of his stock at the news. he said it is shocking, crushing news. ithought the world of tom, he was a great performer, full of light and i will never forget performer, full of light and i will neverforget him. and other stars have been taking to twitter to express their sadness at tom petty‘s death. sir paul mccartney tweeted that he was "sending his love"
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to petty and his family. sir paul's former beatles bandmate, ringo starr, shared a photo of himself in conversation with petty and posted: "god bless tom petty peace and love to his family. i'm sure going to miss you tom." in a tweet which also referred to the victims of the las vegas shooting, singer carole king said her "heart goes out" to "family, friends and fans of tom petty, of which i'm one". beach boys star brian wilson tweeted that he was "heartbroken" to hear of the news. he said that petty was "a hell of a songwriter and record—maker." and last night at their concert in portland, oregon, coldplay were joined by former rem guitarist peter buck to perform a cover of ‘free fallin' in tribute. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: police investigating the mass
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killing in america say the killer had amassed a collection of weapons and explosives. theresa may says she doesn't want a cabinet of yes men. the president of the european commission says not enough progress is being made in brexit negotiations to move on to trade talks. now the business news. the boss of monarch says he's "absolutely devastated " that the airline has collapsed. andrew swaffield told the bbc the decision to stop trading came after it became clear it would lose well of 100 million pounds next year. we'll have more on this shortly. the man in charge of uber meets the man who run's london's transport system, today. dara kozruhshahhi , will be talking to mike brown about transport for london's decision not to renew the company's licence — for safety and security reasons.
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uber is appealing. it's been a tasty quarter for greggs. sales were up more than 8.5% with sales at breakfast time especially strong. it's also seen more sales of its healthy eating range and opened 98 new shops. in his first interview since the collapse of monarch, chief executive andrew swaffield has told the bbc that monday was a "heartbreaking day". he apologised to customers and to the nearly 2,000 staff affected by the collapse. he says the airline was expected to lose about £100 million next year and had "tried everything" but "just couldn't find a way " to stem the tide of red ink. the collapse of the airline monarch has left 110,000 passengers abroad and around 750,000 people with flights they have paid for, but will not be able to take. guy anker, managing editor, money saving expertjoins me now. what can customers do? first it is
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important to check whether your booking is atoll protected. this is the government's protection scheme. package holidays generally well and flight package holidays generally well and flight only booked before mid—december last year. so most won't be covered. if it is you will get a refund or you can continue your holiday and they will get you home. don't despair if it is not ato l home. don't despair if it is not atol protected, you may be able to claim off your credit card. if it cost more than £100 and you paid on credit card, you claim under section 75 of the consumer credit act. if it was less, or any amount on a debate ca rd was less, or any amount on a debate card you can claim on the charge back scheme, where your bank goes to monarch's bank and says, can i have the money back. if you get your
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money back, isn't it the case the closer you get to your flight date the more expensive it becomes? yes we have talked about getting your money back. if you have a £50 flight. money back. if you have a £50 flight. the odds are you won't get as good a deal on an alternative. so shop around as quick as you can and try comparison sites li sky scanner. what about travel insurance? that will cover car hire and hotel extras. hopefully for most people there will be some route for getting your money back for the flight. about, only about half of travel insurance policies will offer any form of protection for what is called scheduled airline failure. they tend to be additional add ones
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or on more premium policies. check with your insurer, but be prepared for the worst. so in other words contact the companies you have been dealing with. thank you. in other business news. the uk construction sector contracted in september, according to the latest purchasing managers survey from ihs/markit. its index of business activity fell to 48.1 in september, down from 51.1 in august. any figure below 50 indicates contraction and september was the first month sincejuly 2016 that the number has been below that level. ryanair says it rya nair says it flew ryanair says it flew more people, despite cancelling flights because of mistakes over rotas. nissan is recalling more than a million cars injapan after regulators said they failed safety checks . it'll cost the firm around $220 million dollars. the vehicles will be re—inspected. telsa has missed its production target for the model 3. that's the company's first electric car aimed at the mass market. tesla has blamed a production
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bottleneck for the delay. now a quick look at the markets. positive all the way around. shares in the plumbing company ferguson are doing well after it announced a big jump doing well after it announced a big jump in profits and greggs seeing improvement. that is it from me. thank you. can you smash the glass ceiling in a week? that's a question that the bbc‘s 100 women season is asking this year. a team of female academics and tech experts have been brought together by the bbc in silicon valley to try and find solutions to gender inequality in the workplace. they've got until friday before they have to reveal a prototype. nuala mcgovern reports. every year, the bbc‘s 100 women series celebrates the stories of women around the world. this year, we are doing something a little bit
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different. over the next month, we are challenging teams of women from across the world to find solutions to some of our biggest problems — gender inequality in sport, illiteracy and sexual harassment on public transportation. but we're starting here — the first challenge to tackle in silicon valley? the glass ceiling. silicon valley is certainly the front line in the battle for gender equality in the work place. a series of scandals have rocked some of the big tech companies and a recent study showed just one in ten senior positions here are held by women. all of this rings true for sasha and lea, they're starting their careers in tech here in silicon valley and have already experienced routine sexism in some of the smaller firms where they have interned. so this on e male engineer said to me, who was kind of pushing back against something i said, he said, "i think hr have really ruined the company culture, if any of us ever said anything
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‘rape—y‘ to you, sasha, you could tell us." one of them, i drove all the way up to the city, so two hours to do this in—person interview and at the very end of it, they told me they didn't think it was a good fit. but the head of recruiting wanted to give me a hug. 100 women has given this team five days to come up with a prototype to tackle gender inequality in the work place and the board room. now the parameters are very broad. but, this being silicon valley, i expect it to be a tech—based solution. it could be an app, it could be wearable technology — it is up to them. but after this meeting today, they have five days to reveal the outcome of their work. one of the things i hope we identify are the microdynamics. so, a lot of times people, when they approach this issue, want a really big solution. like the silver bullet you mentioned? the silver bullet. i believe that it's how we are treated every day. the dynamics of whether my ideas are valued in a team meeting, or whether when we talk about who did great work,
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whether my name's included in that list. the gender gap has become such a toxic issue here, it is known as the "elephant in the valley." we are going to to see what strides we can make in a week. the team want to hear your ideas and suggestions — find out how to get involved at bbc.com/100women. a record jackpot is up for grabs in the national lottery. if a single ticket scoops tonight's euromillions draw they will take they will take home £167 million — making it the single biggest win in british and european history. now the weather. good morning, we have got a dry and a pleasant day for most parts. some lovely sunshine
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this morning and this weather watcher photograph from devon. some fair weather cloud and sunshine coming through the trees in cambridgeshire. plenty of fine and dry weather this afternoon. it well feel pleasant in the sunshine. but there is still a breeze, particularly in northern parts where it might feel quite cool. still a few showers in western areas of scotla nd few showers in western areas of scotland into the afternoon. but for the vast majority of us, it is dry and bright. with the sunshine in the south—west of england, temperatures in exeter up to 15 degrees. 16 or 17 in the capital. you notice there will be more cloud developing this afternoon, but it is fair weather cloud. and dry for many of us. one or two showers around cumbria and western scotland and the far north of northern ireland and windy still infar of northern ireland and windy still in far north—east of scotland. but
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that wind will ease down this afternoon. tonight, we will see that wind strengthening as more rain moves into scotland and then northern ireland. to the south of that, with clear spells, it is chilly. temperatures in the countryside down to low single figures. but while it is chilly to start off, some sunshine to start off in wales, the midlands and eastern and southern england. some sunshine in scotland and the winds easing down. but the rain moving down across scotland and into northern england and the far north of wales too. this rain is associated with a developing area of low pressure. it is a small one. but it will move from west to east wednesday night to thursday and it will give a spell of heavy rain and strong winds in the early hours of thursday. that rain quickly moving away and then for many of us a blustery day on thursday, but dry
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with bright spells. again it could feel chilly in that wind. but with some shelter in the sunshine, temperatures up to 17 degree. the winds lighter on friday. again a lot of dry weather and some sunshine. these temperatures are typical for the beginning of october. more available on the web—site. that is all from me. have a good afternoon. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday: police investigating the mass shooting in las vegas discover the killer, stephen paddock, had amassed a significant cache of weapons and explosives. we have recovered 23 firearms at mandalay bay, and 19 firearms at his home in mesquite. vigils have been held for the 59 people who died, as details begin to emerge of some of the victims. we will not be tarnished by this one sick horrible human being, that he thought he could destroy who and what we are. the other main stories
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developing this hour: theresa may dismisses questions over borisjohnson's recent brexit comments, saying she does not want a cabinet of "yes men." the president of the european commission says not enough progress has been made in brexit negotiations to move on to trade talks. mirror group newspapers pays comedian steve coogan an undisclosed six—figure sum over phone hacking. # i'm free... free fallin' #. and tributes to the american rock star tom petty, who's died at the age of 66. good afternoon — it's
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tuesday third october. i'm rebecca jones. welcome to bbc newsroom live. police in las vegas investigating sunday's mass shooting at a music festival are trying to establish the motive of the killer, 64—year—old stephen paddock. paddock opened fire on crowds of concert—goers from the window of his hotel room on the 32nd floor of the mandalay bay hotel, before shooting himself dead. vigils have been held in memory of at least 59 people who died and more than 500 who were injured. it is the deadliest mass shooting in modern us history and has once again raised the bitterly divisive issue of gun control in the country. the president, donald trump, has called the massacre "an act of pure evil." the flag at the white house is flying at half mast, as details emerge of some of the victims. they include an off—duty las vegas police officer, a special needs teacher and a us
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navy veteran recently returned from afghanistan. it is not yet known if any britons are among the dead. police have been searching this house — paddock‘s home in a retirement community in mesquite, nevada — where they discovered a huge cache of weapons. investigators say he had no criminal record and they have found nothing to link the killer to terrorism at home or abroad. richard galpin has more. two days after the deadliest mass shooting in modern us history, the identities of some of those killed are now being made public. sandy casey was with her fiancee at the concert. she was a special education teacher from california, and was described as being absolutely loved by her colleagues and students alike. 34—year—old charleston hartfield was a las vegas police officer, a military veteran and a football coach. he'd been off duty at the concert. and dana gardner, who was 52, had
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been a county employee in california for more than two decades. she was described as a dedicated public servant. everybody in this community has been so touched by the loss of these lives and the horror of that mentally sick human being, who has taken into his hands devastation, and imprinted in our minds forever a day that really does not belong in our fabulous beautiful city. but already the people of las vegas have been coming together, holding vigils like this one — to grieve but also to demonstrate solidarity, in the face of such overwhelming violence. and people have also been getting involved at a more practical level.
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here hundreds queue up to give blood. the need is great — more than 500 were injured in the attack. but mystery still surrounds the motive of the wealthy 64—year—old retired accountant, stephen paddock, who carried out the attack. police and fbi agents have already searched his house in a quiet town north—east of las vegas, and discovered a large cache of weapons and ammunition here, as well as in the hotel room in las vegas from where he opened fire. detectives are combing through evidence to uncover the motives behind the shooting and any other pertinent information that will help shed light on this horrible event. we have recovered 23 firearms at mandalay bay and 19 firearms at his home in mesquite. and all persons to rise for the purpose of a moment of silence. —— the chair would ask
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all persons to rise for the purpose of a moment of silence. back in washington politicians held a moment of silence in memory of those killed in the attack. with reports that the gunmen used a high velocity assault rifle, the issue of gun control is highly likely to come back on the agenda here. richard galpin, bbc news. lets take you live to the conservative party conference, where the home secretary amber rudd is setting out her intention —— hasjust —— has just got —— hasjust got up to speak. communities came together, united in sadness, with the desire to show the city was not beat. such a display of courage in the face of terror, of resilience and compassion, that i think should make us proud, proud of the spirit that pools us altogether in defiance of those who would harm us. in defiance of those who would harm us. this is i believe what britain is about, and this is the spirit we must harness to build a safer more
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united britain. iwas must harness to build a safer more united britain. i was struck by what bear said about the spirit of the scouts, reminder of the civic groups that bind our society together. the united britain we all wanted to see. as home secretary, you see the sort of initiatives are around the country doing excellent work to build stronger and more resilient communities. after the year we have faced, we will need more of them. i have spoken to mothers learning about what their kids to online so they can learn where they could be vulnerable to these pernicious influences, places were sports are being used against racism to encourage greater integration with communities. establishing the new commission on countering extremism will further support this agenda, by exposing extremism and division. it will be key in challenging those who preach hatred. the task of tackling
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the warped islamist ideology iss that have inspired terrorist attacks this year is without a doubt amongst the greatest we have faced, but it is not the only one. violent and non—violent extremism in all its forms, anti—semitism, neo— nazism, islamophobia, intolerance of women's rights, these and others cannot be permitted to fester. our values are far better than this. and we we owe it to ourselves to help root out this wherever it emergencies. the safety i will help build as home secretary is a united one. as we have build as home secretary is a united one. as we have seen build as home secretary is a united one. as we have seen all too painfully this year the uk faces an unpredictable threat from terrorism, from lone wolf actors to those
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radicalised online in their bedrooms, the daesh groups hiding in the ruins, we face random attacks at home and well— planned attacks to british nationals and our interests overseas. we also face a real and growing threat from the extreme right. we all remember the tragic murder of the excellent mpjo right. we all remember the tragic murder of the excellent mp jo cox as she took part in our democratic process. last year, i made the first terrorist proscription for a right—wing group national action, and just last year i banned to more mutations of that group. whilst five plots got through this year, seven we re plots got through this year, seven were also stopped by our world—class security services. —— and just last yeari security services. —— and just last year i dined to matt moore. ——
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banned two more. be in no doubt our counterterrorism efforts are saving lives, even when we have tragically seen so many lost. if we are to do better we need to be a step ahead, which means being nimble and responsive as the threat evolves. over the last month i have been reviewing our counterterrorism powers and legislation. we have seen what could be interpreted as a shift towards crude attacks, of loan or few attackers using everyday items. there also appears to be a trend towards shorter timescales from aspiration to attacks. we are going to keep people safe, we need to disrupt plots in their early stages. many such plots will include some element of online radicalisation. extremist and terrorist material can still be published online, and it is then to easily accessible on some devices within seconds. messages of hatred and violence, accessible from any laptop or smartphone.
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progress is being made, but this has got to stop. today i am announcing that we are taken in ourlaws today i am announcing that we are taken in our laws to individuals looking at this type of material online —— for individuals looking at. we will change the laws of people repeatedly viewing terrorist content online could face up to 15 years in prison. this will close an important gap in legislation. drifting a friends only applies only if you have downloaded or stored such material, not for repeatedly viewing or streaming it online, a critical difference. we will also change the law in another important way. if someone publishes information about our police or armed forces for the purpose of preparing an act of terrorism, then they could face up to 15 years in prison. myjob is notjust to
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protect the public but also to protect the public but also to protect those who put their lives on the line for us. these changes will do both. but it is notjust government who has a role here. in the aftermath of the westminster bridge attack i called the internet companies together, companies like facebook, google, twitter and microsoft, and i asked them what they could do to go further and faster. they answered by forming an international forum to counterterrorism. this is good progress, and i attended their inaugural meeting on the west coast. these companies have transformed our lives in recent years with advances in technology. an now address them directly. —— and now i address them. call and you urgently to bring forward technology solutions to read your platforms of this vile terrorist material that plays such a
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key in radicalising. act now and honoured your moral obligations —— urge you to bring forward technology solutions to rid your platforms. removing harmful material from the internet is a core activity of prevent, our prime counter radicalisation programme. there is also a safeguarding element. in london earlier this year i met a mother whose son had travelled to syria to fight for daesh. she had no idea of his plan. she was devastated, but it was notjust her son who had been groomed by daesh's toxic influences. her daughter's school had concerns that she also made travel to syria. the local prevent team provided counselling to both mother and daughter. without the support prevent provided it is likely she simply would not have known where else to turn.
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conference, prevent works. this is not to say that we cannot improve it. but i would issue this challenge today to its detractors. work with us, not against us. we all have a role to play. prevent is not some big brother monolithic beast. it is all of us working together, through local initiatives set up by local people, schools, universities and community groups. now, i have done something very unusual for a politician in current times. i have spoken for this long without mentioning brexit. backin mentioning brexit. back injune mentioning brexit. back in june 2016 everyone had mentioning brexit. back injune 2016 everyone had their say. the country made a clear decision. i have said it before and i see it again. i fully respect the result. —— i see it again.
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applause we chose to leave and we must make a success of brexit. our children's futures depend on it. these negotiations are going to be challenging, but great challenges also bring great opportunities. with david davis i have proposed an ambitious new security treaty, so that even as we leave the eu, we can continue to work with our european allies to keep us safe, and later in the year we will publish a paper on our future immigration system, showing how we will have greater control over the immigration rules in future. but also how there will be no cliff edge for business, because i appreciate it will take time for them to adjust, after over 40 years of freedom of movement. as we build that new immigration system and deliver on the results of last year
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referendum i am committed to working with businesses, both large and small, to make sure we don't impose unnecessary burdens or create damaging labour shortages. we will be taking these decisions on the basis of comprehensive new evidence. i have commissioned the government's independent advisers and migration to make reports, for the first time ever, and both the impact of free movement and the british economy, and the value that international students bring to our world—class university sector. a new security treaty, and a new immigration system, decisions based on evidence and consultation. that is how we can bring the country together. how we can restore the public's confidence in immigration, and keep british citizens safe as we leave the european union. applause put simply, my job applause put simply, myjob as home secretary
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is to make britain safer. i have talked today about terrorism. but it also includes protecting the most vulnerable in our society. those who have been exploited, abused, made victims of crime. among them, there will be those suffering abuse that she no escape a refuge. there will be those whose trust in the system has been lost after being failed and there will be those were the injustices must not be allowed to fade away uncorrected. abuse suffered by children over decades in this country is shocking. before 2010 child sex abuse was simply not a sufficient enough priority. measures we have implemented in re ce nt measures we have implemented in recent years have changed that. but as with all crime, it is evolving rapidly. technology has made content and online abuse is easier to find and online abuse is easier to find and participate in, from peerto
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peer file sharing, chat rooms and online forums. and it has created conduits that allow abusers to search out and make contact with their victims in new ways. the national crime agency tell me there has been an exponential surge in the volume of child sexual abuse and referrals. they tell me it is one of the most challenging threats we face. this is a vile crime with thousands of victims around the world. today i can announce the uk government is investing in a ground—breaking government is investing in a ground— breaking technology which partners in canada developed. it is called project arachnid, an apt name because it identifies images of child abuse across the web and get them taken down at an unprecedented rate. it will also enable internet companies to search and destroy illegal images in their systems. we
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wa nt illegal images in their systems. we want them to start using it as soon as they can, and our question to there will be — if not, why not? and i will demand very clear answers. applause this is a global technology solution to global technology problem. it would not be possible without the efforts of partners and intranet companies around the world, —— internet companies around the world and their efforts are to be commended. we also no end—to—end encryption services like what's up —— what'sapp are being used by criminals. there are other platforms and emerging trends that are equally worrying. we must require the entire industry to move faster and more aggressively. they have the
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resources, and there must be greater urgency. if not, the next generation of our children will have been needlessly failed. that is not a cce pta ble needlessly failed. that is not acceptable to me, and i can tell you, conference, on my watch that simply will not be happening. a year ago simply will not be happening. ayearagol simply will not be happening. a year ago i stood before you and set out my priorities as home secretary. keeping your neighbourhoods and country safe, protecting the vulnerable, moving at a pace with evolving crime to better disrupt it. where crime is moving increasingly online, we are expanding our effort is. with billions invested in cyber security and hundreds of millions invested in police transformation there is a renewed focus on combating fraud, and we are introducing new offences to protect women and girls. we will also shortly publish our consultations, outlining how we
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intend to crack down on violent crime and offensive weapons. it will be complemented next year by a new strategy to combat serious violence. we will prevent children purchasing knives online and we will stop people carrying acid in public if they don't have a good reason. acid attacks are absolutely revolting. you have all seen the pictures of victims, that never fully recover. endless surgeries, lives ruined. so today i am also announcing a new offe nce today i am also announcing a new offence to prevent the sale of acids to under18 offence to prevent the sale of acids to under 18 's. furthermore, given its use in the so—called mother of satan, home—made explosives, i also announce my attention to dramatically limit the public sale of sulphuric acid. this is how we will help make our
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communities safer, as crime changes. none of this would have been achieved without the dedication of my ministerial team. brandon lewis, ben wallace, nick hurd, there newton, susan williams, and the wider support group in parliament, andrew griffiths, robert jenrick, james cleverly, simon holt and charlotte vere. i am so grateful for all your work. thank you. applause but as an mp in a marginal seat, i thank you should go to you. i know more than most how nerve—racking it can be to see a handful of ballot papers representing the future, your future, my future, notjust remaining an mp, but continuing the work is your home secretary with essential work that needs doing. i cannot overstate my appreciation, for all the people who chose to go out with me in the rain on a
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saturday morning, the scrabble on hands and knees to shove a leaflet through those irritating letterboxes, located at the bottom of the door, my personal haque! laughter who negotiate ferocious dogs or in the case of hastings and right, swooping seagulls, to get those pledge letters to every door. there is no question that you made the difference. without that, i simply wouldn't be standing here today. please know that i am so grateful to you for your time and belief, and when it is that close, as in my case, 346 votes close, it gives the phrase every vote counts are whole new meaning. applause lam very applause i am very grateful diane abbott wasn't doing the sums that night. laughter a year laughter ayearon laughter a year on from standing here for the first time as your home secretary my
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priorities remain unchanged. we live in dangerous times. as we have so tragically seen in the last few days, with events in canada, france and now las vegas. in britain there is still much more work to do to build a safer country. notjust to tackle the threat from terrorists, crucial as that is, but also to help those shackled in domestic servitude, to better support through a new build the victims of domestic violence and more effectively for the perpetrators. to make sure we never forget the commitment of our police, our police and crime commissions, and our intelligence forces, by whose diligence and vigilance we are kept safe. that is why my department is working with the police federation and its campaign to protect the protectors. we have already funded a new national police welfare service. we are reviewing the law, so the
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police can pursue the appalling fogs and mopeds attack people on our streets, and we are also examining whether we clearer rules so that anyone who assault and emergency service worker faces a tougher sentence — — service worker faces a tougher sentence —— thugs on mopeds. the police protect us and it is ourjob to make sure we protect them. conference, i would like to share two final thoughts. what the country is facing... while the country is facing so many complex threats, i do not believe that our country will be safe in the hands of jeremy corbyn, that our country will be safe in the hands ofjeremy corbyn, john mcdonnell and diane abbott. applause the conservative party has always been and always must be the party of law and order. and i will give credit to previous
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labour home secretary to take important steps to improve our security, but this lot are different. they have spent three decades of posing anti—terrorist laws —— opposing. they have talked of their friends in high mass and hezbollah. they are silent and anti—semitism in their party. they weren't clearly condemn —— hamas and hezbollah. they don't condone the actions of the ira, they don't support police officers shooting to kill. they have called for the disbanding of m15 and the disarming of police officers. saying you condemn all violence and when specifically asked you condemn one group's actions is not good enough. staying silent group's actions is not good enough. staying sile nt when group's actions is not good enough. staying silent when your supporters abuse and insult people, because of their religion, sex or political views is not good enough. simply paying lip service to demonstrate your commitment to our security is
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not good enough. there are record proves they are not serious and your safety would not be their priority asa safety would not be their priority as a result. britain deserves better leadership than this in these difficult times, and it has it, with my distinguished predecessor to reason and the conservative party. — — predecessor to reason and the conservative party. —— my distinguished predecessor theresa may and the conservative party. my second conviction is one that i hope you will also share. throughout history our nation has faced many threats. in the 20th and 21st century those that have at times been a cute, but we have faced them, and we have to face them down —— they have been acute. westminster, manchester arena, london bridge, finsbury park and parsons green, some of the worst terrorist attacks in decades. they have tested our resolve. it will likely be tested again. what
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terrorists want is for us to fear, to turn away from each other and to become divided. we will not. we will stay united together, because this is our britain, not theirs. it is our way of life that defines us is a country. it is our values, our freedoms, and the communities built that make us approach strong and united nation, they will always do so. thank you. applause we have been watching the home secretary amber rudd addressing the conservative party conference in manchester. as indeed has our assistant political editor norman smith, whojoins us now. norman, a wide—ranging speech. what did you make of it? well, the home secretary
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there i think focusing the guts of her speech on the terror threat, also fronting up to the big internet companies. there has been a constant strea m companies. there has been a constant stream of criticism from government about their lack of spores to taking down material linked to terrorism. the home secretary announcing today that people viewing, notjust downloading, but viewing terrorist material could face a prison sentence of up to 15 years —— their lack of effort to taking down material. she also announced a ban on the sale of assets to under 18s. she spoke about the difficulties in her own and stages a —— the ban on the sale of acid. speaking about brexit, amber rudd of course are prominent the main campaigner, but saying she stuck by the decision and the need to implement it. joining me now is the justice minister philip lee —— amber rudd was a remain
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campaigner. it has been said that the conservatives are lacking in ideas, but you have come up with the big one, taxing, not work, but assets, because taxing workers and their two young people. can you explain that? i think you are faring comment i made an fringe meeting discussing the younger generation, and that is what this is about, the next generation, for me, and i think this conference has very much been about that as well. i did not actually make any policy suggestion. this is the problem with the absence of new laws on twitter, but i did suggest that when confronted by the big democratic challenges faced by britain, and indeed other countries as well, we need to be careful to make sure that for younger generations, those people under 40, that they feel they are part of the social contract britain so proudly had at the moment. and your view at the moment, they are getting a raw deal, in terms of the services they can expect, pensions and the health
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service, even though they are paying into it, yet you describe the nhs is ponzi scheme for young people?” into it, yet you describe the nhs is ponzi scheme for young people? i was talking about how health and welfare relies on people in work paying tax for the necessary and essential services health, social care and welfare and indeed all other government services are paid for by people in work, and i think those individuals need to feel that they are listened to. i was talking at a meeting about how only 25% of people under44 meeting about how only 25% of people under 44 would consider voting conservative. i want to be known as an honest politician with good intent, who is also a conservative, andl intent, who is also a conservative, and i think it is important people like me bring the professional experience of being a doctor, who has the best interests of his patients at heart, into the political arena, because i think it is long overdue. would you accept there has been a distinct lack of big ideas? little micro—policies but no big ideas for people to grasp and be energised by? elin, actually i think the party has
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started to think about those big issues that we are facing, such as extremism, such as ageing, such as britain's position in the world. i have been at meetings where these things have been discussed and party co nfe re nce things have been discussed and party conference is a forum at which they should be discussed. the conservative party is a serious party, looking to the future so, the country we enjoy now is there for the future and i know the prime minister agrees with me and that is why she has been talking in similar terms. thank you, philip lee. of course attention this afternoon will move to brexit, because we have the brexiteers, david davis and boris johnson. just hearing his father sta nley johnson. just hearing his father stanley who is at this conference speaking, saying that borisjohnson was the father of brexit. he had spent his whole life working for it. we shall see what he has to say this
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afternoon. the title of boris johnson's speech we are told islet the lion roar! and you're leaving it there, norman. thank you. now the weather. it is not a bad day. some spells of sunshine, the winds not as strong. although they're still lively in northern scotland. here some showers too stretching into north—west england. a few clipping northern ireland. but many places dry. tonight in scotland the showers give way to more persistent rain that will sink to the borders and northern ireland. to the north chilly in rural glens, but further south as well under clearer skies. the rain pushes south into northern ireland, northern england, the midlands and wales. further north a
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fresher breezy day. more rain tomorrow evening, bringing some heavy spells for a time. the winds will strengthen too and that will lead to gales in wales, northern england and the midlands. something we are keeping an eye on. it could bea we are keeping an eye on. it could be a disturbed spell of weather over night into thursday. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: police in las vegas are trying to establish a motive for the mass shooting at a music festival on sunday which left at least 59 people dead. the gunman is said to have amassed an arsenal of 42 weapons. details are emerging of some of those killed when stephen paddock opened fire on innocent concert—goers. theresa may has brushed off speculation about her future by insisting she doesn't want to be surrounded by "yes men" — following recent comments on brexit by borisjohnson. not enough progress has been made
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in the brexit negotiations to move to the next phase of talks about trade and the future relationship — says the president of the european commission. the comedian steve coogan is to receive an undisclosed six figure sum and an apology from mirror group newspapers over phone hacking. let's return to the conservative party conference in manchester. our assistant political editor, norman smith is at the conservative party conference in manchester. thank you, we move into the brexit moment with the three brexiteers on stage one after another, culminating in one b johnson. stage one after another, culminating in one bjohnson. his dad is here,
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sta nley, in one bjohnson. his dad is here, stanley, and he has been given a build up to mrjohnson's speech, which he is calling let the lion roar! so it will be upbeat and confident about brexit. his dad was similarly enthused about what he expected his son to say. have a listen to him. it will be tremendously helpful. who set it all going? boris. he has a view. why shouldn't he put that view forward. and he is putting forward government policy. so good for him. it isn't quite government policy. he has defied them twice. no, i see no difference, not a hair's breath of difference, not a hair's breath of difference, he just happens to put it over well. is he unsackable? who knows why anybody should want to sack the father of brexit at this
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crucial moment. what a crazy thing that would be. these father of brexit. of course he is. boris was thinking about brexit and britain's position in europe 30 years ago. the man has devoted his life time to it. so he is the man to lead us into brexit negotiations. as foreign secretary, what else could he do? that was boris johnson's father, joining me now is nicky morgan, a prominent i suppose critic of a lot of brexit process. borisjohnson, what do you think he is up to? well i'm not entirely sure and i think the mood here is that people want boris to do what he does in cabinet to accept the prime minister's florence speech and her position, which most of us thought was pragmatic and realistic and designed to lead to a deal. that what is the
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prime minister says she wants. how far is there a risk that boris johnson's interventions on brexit actually thwart the negotiations, because we heard from the european parliament's chief because we heard from the european pa rliament‘s chief negotiator saying that we don't know what the british government actually wants, because of the different voices we are hearing. there is two dangers, one is there are different voice and there will be people in the party and in the membership who can have a their views on something that matters as much as brexit. but you can't have different voices among ministerial ranks or the cabinet. the other thing is a lot of the times the europeans are saying they are not sure what britain wants, behind closed doors i hear they have having good discussions. but there isn't time for different voipss from the cabinet. we heard the prime
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minister seemingly relaxed about having different voipss in the cabinet. —— voices in the cabinet. were borisjohnson to intervene again, should he be sacked. that is again, should he be sacked. that is a matter for the prime minister. but somebody who can't give up the option of publicity and decides he wants to set down arbitrary red lines doesn't have a place in a responsible government. isn't the difficulty, this has been a fairly flat conference. borisjohnson injects energy, excitement, the delegates like him. and that is what this party lacks. i agree in the sense you need bold, exciting policy announcement, on things other that brexit. the polling says we are talking about europe so much that we are not talking about other issues
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that people care about and they want to hear from their government. you can have a lot of energy, but what the conservative party what polling show has taken a batter is o the conservative party what polling show has taken a batter is 0 brand and reputation for competence. so in this pzazz is outweighed by confidence and clear sighted vision. thank you. the prime minister will not be in the conference hall for the speech. because because it would bea the speech. because because it would be a moment when all the cameras would be trained on herfor her reaction to borisjohnson's speech. so theresa may won't be there for the b—moment. so theresa may won't be there for the b-moment. thank you. the american rock musician, tom petty has died. he was 66. it's believed he suffered a cardiac arrest at his home in california. he was best known for a string of hits with his band — the heartbrea kers. he also helped form the supergroup, the traveling wilburys. tim allman looks back at his life and career.
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1977, the year of punk, but tom petty was still flying the flag for rock and roll. that long, blonde hair, rake—thin, cool as can be. tom petty epitomised a classic, straight from the heart blue—collar sound, going on to become one of the biggest—selling artists of all time. # she might need a lot of loving, but she don't need you... along with his band the heartbreakers, he specialised in melody, intelligence, and sincerity. tom petty was born in gainesville, florida, in 1950, his interest in music prompted by a meeting with elvis presley when
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he was ten years old. he formed the heartbreakers in the mid—‘70s, although initially, they were more popular in the uk than the us. # it's all right, as long as you lend a hand... later, he would join the rock'n'roll supergroup the travelling wilburys, releasing two hugely successful albums. but he would carry on recording and performing with the heartbreakers almost until the day he died. tom petty once said, "if you do something you really like, and hopefully it pays the rent, as far as i'm concerned, that's success." well the music world has been paying tribute to tom petty. bob dylan told rolling stone magazine told of his "shock"
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upon hearing the news that his close friend and former traveling wilburys bandmate had died. he said: "it's shocking, crushing news. i thought the world of tom. he was a great performer, full of the light, a friend, and i'll neverforget him." and other stars have been taking to twitter to express their sadness at tom petty‘s death. sir paul mccartney tweeted that he was "sending his love" to petty and his family. sir paul's former beatles bandmate, ringo starr, shared a photo of himself in conversation with petty and posted: "god bless tom petty peace and love to his family. i'm sure going to miss you tom." in a tweet which also referred to the victims of the las vegas shooting, singer carole king said her "heart goes out" to "family, friends and fans of tom petty, of which i'm one". beach boys star brian wilson tweeted that he was "heartbroken" to hear of the news. he said that petty was "a hell
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of a songwriter and record—maker." and last night at their concert in portland, oregon, coldplay were joined by former rem guitarist peter buck to perform a cover of ‘free fallin' in tribute. the radio 2 presenter, bob harris, met the musician in the 1970s and hejoins us now from oxford. here he is speaking to tom in 1977. i love england. how do the two countries compare for you? england and america? yeah. well, they're different, but they're a lot alike. this tour is very much like the england tour, where you come out and... the kids are pretty much the same. they all just want to rock. rock and roll‘s pretty universal. it isa rock and roll‘s pretty universal. it is a bit different there and here. but i don't know, it is a hard
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question. you arrived in england in the centre of the new wave. right. what is more people link you'd into that situation too. yeah, well that was only, i expected that, we had to be in the new wave, because we weren't in the old wave. ijust don't like clubs. i don't like to join anybody‘s club. we didn'tjoin no clubs. we were our own club. we we re no clubs. we were our own club. we were just no clubs. we were our own club. we werejust a no clubs. we were our own club. we were just a rock and roll band. we don't know what else to call it. bob harris joins don't know what else to call it. bob harrisjoins us. don't know what else to call it. bob harris joins us. that must take you back. what was he like? well, i thought he was terrific. i really did. he was kind and gentle and sincere. i think that integrity that you heard even there in that conversation, i think that is one of the things that people most admired about him. that he wanted to rock
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and roll, he was in a rock and roll band. he loved what he did. he didn't want people telling him what to do and he kept true to his mew —— music. i know they were one of your favourite bands, why were you such a fan? they seemed to be able to encapsulate in two and a half minutes a box of energy. you look back at the original song at the start of your sequence there, anything that's rock and roll, that sums up them thup. up. they could encapsulate rock and roll in two minutes like buddie holly in the 50s and you have the mixture of sound of the the byrds and the beatles and you have a great mix. as a performer
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he had an unmistakable voice? yes, he had an unmistakable voice? yes, he had an unmistakable voice? yes, he had an unmistakable look. the long, blonde hair. yeah, he was an interpreter of songs i think. in the lyrics of the songs he was able to ca ptu re a lyrics of the songs he was able to capture a moment. i'm thinking particularly about running down a dream. you have him in the car listening to del shannon, the sun shining, you're in the car with him. it ca ptu res shining, you're in the car with him. it captures a moment and i went back down —— and i won't back down, that isa down —— and i won't back down, that is a statement. we all don't want to give in to pressures that we don't agree with. tom petty all stuck firm with that. when you listen to the songs, i'm struck by how thoughtful some of the lyrics are. do you agree? they really are, yes, absolutely, he had a great knack of
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being able to articulate the feelings of the fans that loved his music. we all seem to be bound together by the songs that he wrote and that is an amazing gift. he had and that is an amazing gift. he had afan and that is an amazing gift. he had a fan following here, but a huge fan base in america. what was it what appealed about him?” base in america. what was it what appealed about him? i think the universality of the songs, they are just great songs. they're catchy. in the old days then those old days of the old days then those old days of the old days then those old days of the old grey whistle test, the songs that passed the test, all of tom petty‘s songs seemed to pass the test. having heard them once, they seemed to stick in your head, you could hum along to them and remember the words. that is amazing. we were hearing from bob dylan and others, who influential was he as a musician, how much did he inspire others? hugely i think. of course
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imvery much involved in the country music world and you talk to the country stars, they have been influenced by tom petty at some stage or another in their writing careers. in particular you know groups like the jay hawks, they very much influenced by tom petty and the heart breakers and people like tif, the merit. bob harris, a sad day, but great to talk to you. thanks for you team. now the headlines: police investigating the mass shooting in las vegas say the killer had amassed a large cache of weapons and explosives. theresa may dismisses questions over boris johnson's recent brexit comments, saying she doesn't cant a cabinet of yes—men.
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the president of european commission said not enough progress has been made in brexit negotiations to move on to trade talks. now the markets. trade isjust trade is just under way in the united states. large crowds are gathering in barcelona to protest against spanish police tactics during sunday's disputed independence referendum. trade unions have called a general strike across catalonia. people are taking to the streets in large numbers. here are live pictures from spain. several groups picketed police barracks as well as the regional headquarters of spain's governing people's party. you can see the size of the crowds
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there. schools and shops are also closed. more than 800 people were injured in the clashes at the weekend, many of which happened during voting in catalonia's capital barcelona. a short while ago, gavin lee — who is in barcelona — sent this report. this is down town barcelona right now. the shops are shuttered off. businesses closed. public transport closed. children and families on the streets. the flag is every where. this is life now to make a point that trying to make this city have a shut down for the day to support the independence movement, but also to condemn what happened with police violence on sunday at the banned polling booths. you can see voting slips on the pavement. there are people of all ages and i have been
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talking to a few and what they're saying is that today if they can get a message to the spanish government with their voice and the signs here, maybe they will get a response. because the other thing that is notable, is how apparent it is from the spanish government and from the cata la n the spanish government and from the catalan government as well here, you can barely hear them. the president, we we re can barely hear them. the president, we were told by tonight there maybe a declaration of independence for the 7.5 million here, the region is the 7.5 million here, the region is the size of belgium. but my sources suggest within the government that that might not happen and they're listening to the spanish government and like—wise. they‘ re listening to the spanish government and like—wise. they're watching each other. the other threat are the spanish government is if there is a declaration of independence, they will enact article 155 of the constitution and that means they will take over the government here. so the risks are high. at the moment we are only seeing one side. i have talked to those on the other sides,
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cata la ns talked to those on the other sides, catalans who don't want independence and from their point of view, they're saying they don't feel co mforta ble they're saying they don't feel comfortable being here now. many are indoors. tributes have been paid to rodney bickerstaff, the former head of unison who has died. the unison general secretary described mr b i cke rstaff general secretary described mr bickerstaff as a true giant of the trade union movement and said, we will all miss him greatly. almost 2,000 monarch employees have been made redundant, following the airline's collapse yesterday. about 12,000 more holidaymakers are being flown back to the uk today. a similar number of its customers were brought home yesterday on planes chartered by the civil aviation authority. around 100,000 are yet to be repatriated. the collapse of the 50—year old company is the largest
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ever for a uk airline. our correspondent selin girit has been to dalaman airport in south—west turkey. it is calm here now at the moment. everything seems to be under control. yesterday night, there were people waiting, queueing to check into their replacement flights until midnight. i have spoken to the turkish representative of monarch and they said that everything was taken under control, since the civil aviation that's right got involved and every passenger that was supposed to take a monarch flight was given a replacement ticket on a replacement flight at no extra cost and that would be the caste within the next two weeks. tonight we are
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expecting another flight to take off from this airport. yesterday there we re from this airport. yesterday there were five flights taken off from here. the mo monarch representative said there were about 2,000 people around the area that are supposed to be flying within the next few days back to their home. and she said this would take place with no extra cost. i have spoken to some passengers yesterday and they seemed calm and relaxed about how this crisis was handled and they said they were looking forward to going home after a couple of intense and anxious hours. you say that passengers are being flown home on replacement flights at no extra cost, but are they returning to their airport of departure or to just any their airport of departure or to justany uk their airport of departure or to just any uk airport which can be found? well, they are, i have been
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told the predominant aim is to return them to their departure airports. but if they can't do that. yesterday, there was a flight to birmingham and there was a flight to luton airport in london. but some passengers were taken to other airports on other flights, because there was noroom on the replacement flight. there was noroom on the replacement flight. so the main aim is taking the passengers as soon as possible to their departure airports, but if thatis to their departure airports, but if that is not the case, there would of course be a transfer flight in between. a record jackpot is up for grabs in the national lottery. if a single ticket scoops tonight's euromillions draw they will take home £167 million — making it the single biggest win in british and european history. ina in a moment the news at one. first
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the weather. after the strong winds that some of us saw yesterday, today is quieter. we have high pressure building in from the south west. still that squeeze in the isobars in scotla nd still that squeeze in the isobars in scotland and it will stay windy here. further south and many of us are seeing almost wall to wall sunshine. changes through the afternoon. a bit more cloud filling in. and still some showers for north western parts of scotland and north—west england and maybe some in wales. for much of england and wales in the afternoon, mainly dry. a bit more cloud than this morning. the winds are lighter than yesterday. out of breeze in the sunshine highs between 13 and 16. pleasant enough for the time of year. a few showers in northern wales into cumbria. a few in the eastern side of the pennines. the lion's share of the
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showers in north western scotland and northern ireland. the winds stay strong in northern end and more per is more per sis —— persistent rain moving south. clearer skies further south and that means a chill in the airfirst thing. that rain south and that means a chill in the air first thing. that rain tomorrow sinks southwards into northern ireland and into northern england and eventually into northern parts of wales. further north a brighter, fresher day in northern scotland and central parts of england mainly dry with some sunshine. highs between 13 and 16 celsius. tomorrow evening this rain becomes more persistent bringing some wet weather into northern ireland and northern england and the midlands and wales. gales are likely too. something we are keeping an eye on. a disturbed speu are keeping an eye on. a disturbed spell of weather tomorrow into
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thursday. that rain will clear from south eastern england during thursday morning and behind it a few showers, but for mouch of the country, dry with sunshine. cool in the breeze and the winds ease down into friday morning. so some of us could see a touch of frost. we end the week bright with sunshine and still cool in the breeze. the las vegas shooting — police try to find out what drove a retired accountant to kill 59 people and injure hundreds of others. some of the faces of his victims. they were at a music festival when the gunman opened fire on them with an automatic weapon from a hotel. vigils are held in las vegas for the victims of the worst mass shooting in modern american history. stephen paddock, the 64—year—old gunman, had amassed an arsenal of 42 weapons. but it's not known why he used them to such deadly effect. we will not be tarnished by this one, sick, horrible human being, that he thought he could destroy
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who and what we are. also this lunchtime: boris johnson warms up for his conference speech as the prime minister defends her leadership style.
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