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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 4, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's wednesday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, and chloe tilley, welcome to the programme. spain's northern region of catalonia — which includes barcelona — could declare independence from the rest of the country in a matter of days, according to its leader. translation: no society should accept the status quo it does not want, against its will, through force and beatings. we'll have the details and also get reaction from the capital madrid. everybody stay down, stay down! police in las vegas release a video of the immediate aftermath puncheon of sunday's shooting and confirm that gunman stephen paddock placed before beginning his deadly attack. and helped as many people as i could over the rails, i was piling them on the stage and within seconds the front of the stage was full, it was crammed with people. i was yelling to google, moved back, looked back. you grab as many as you can and then another wave of fire comes through. theresa may will set out her vision for the uk when she addresses
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the conservative conference this morning — but will it be enough to win back young voters? we are taking action for young people. i recognise the need to look at issues young people are particularly concerned about, those who fear they will be worse off than their parents's generation in the future. we'll be live in manchester. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. also on the programme today, housing association tenants tell us they are being asked to overpay their rent so they don't get behind when universal credit is introduced. let us know if you've been affected by the new benefit. and if you're a young voter, let us know what you want to hear from theresa may. she will be speaking later on this morning. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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our top story today. the leader of catalonia's devolved government has told bbc news his region will declare independence from spain in a matter of days. the dispute of a cata la n matter of days. the dispute of a catalan independence from spain escalated on sunday with complaints of police violence as voters went to the polls to vote on a controversial referendum. in his first interview since the vote carles puigdemont warned his side not to take any action. in barcelona last night a show of numbers hundreds of thousands of cata la n numbers hundreds of thousands of catalan people protesting the way the government handled sunday's referendum. but in a most unusual televised address king philip of spain laid the blame squarely at the feet of catalan separatists. the king did not once mention the violence used by national police against voters. but in a defiant
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interview with the bbc catalan president said he would go ahead with a declaration of independence. we will probably do this when they have the votes in from abroad at the end of this week or thereabouts. we will act at the end of this week or the beginning of next week. yesterday their demonstrations were largely peaceful yet there is real anger on both sides. these are national police penned into their hotel. viva espa nyol the national police penned into their hotel. viva espanyol the shard, z. not all catalan people want independence but they do want the right to decide for themselves. there is a feeling that madrid's heavy handedness has only strengthened their cause. annita mcveigh is in the newsroom with a summary mcveigh is in the newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. police in las
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vegas have given more details of the shooting spree in the city, they say that the killer placed surveillance cameras outside the hotel room so he could watch as police approached. 47 weapons have been recovered from three properties. dramatic body come footage from officers first on the scene has been released. laura baker reports from las vegas. go that way. amid the chaos the officer keeps his instructions clear, ye offers others' safety as he runs towards the hail of bullets. police desperately trying to find out whether shots are coming from is the barrage of gunfire rains down on concert crowds over nine minutes. among those trying to stay alive was caitlin, this trainee paramedic. first she ran to the medical tent to help and then she called her dad. first she ran to the medical tent to help and then she called her dadli don't help and then she called her dad.” don't remember saying it but a p pa re ntly don't remember saying it but apparently i said, dudley, they are
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shooting at us. the emergency crews at the concert were employed by her father brian. now his stuff and daughter were being shot at and he had to help. he rushed to the scene. i cannot describe it as anything but carnage. yesterday i don't think one hour went by that i was awake that i did not cry. i have been doing this a long time and i thought i had seen everything. this is only one of the weapons found in the room of the 32nd floor of the mandalay bay hotel which the killer, steven paddock and used as a base. so far police have not found a motive for the massacre. america wants more grieving the victims of another mass shooting. president trump will visit las vegas today amid calls for stricter gun laws. he says now is not the time for that discussion but others are asking if not now, when. laura bicker, bbc news, las vegas. gary
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o'donoghue is in las vegas for us. picking up on what laura said at the end of this report, many people do think that now is the right time for the discussion on gun laws as police try to figure out why the killer carried out this horrendous attack. do you think president trump's visit to las vegas will encourage that debate at all? i am sure he will be asked about it while he is here. yet he comes to a state that has some of the most liberal, shall we say, less restrictive gun laws in the whole of the union. you can go into a shop and 15 minutes later after one phone call you can either the weapon. i can buy a weapon and sell it to you with no checks whatsoever as a private individual. you can buy rifles, shotguns, handguns, and some of those devices that paddock apparently bought to
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make rifles fire more rapidly, you can buy them for $160, he apparently had one. for the police, in terms of the investigation the motive is still a problem. they are waiting to speak to the killer's girlfriend, now back in the country. marilou danley. what does she know about what paddock did what he did. thank you, gabby. theresa may will tell the tory party to shape up when she addresses the conference in manchester this morning. she is expected to set out her vision for the uk while improving the lives of ordinary working people. alex forsyth has more. putting the finishing touches toa more. putting the finishing touches to a crucial speech, theresa may will use her address to the tory conference today to tell her party to shape up and give the country the government it needs. in a plea to
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party members she will say despite obstacles and barriers, she wants to make a difference and she will urge them to get behind her. as the conference prepares for its last day theresa may will hope the focus will finally shift from talk of division and disunity. she will say in her speech that beyond the gossip in the papers and beyond the corridors of westminster that are ordinary people living their lives and they should be the focus of the government. plagued by questions about her leadership, this has not been an easy c0 nfe re nce leadership, this has not been an easy conference for theresa may. her foreign secretary has been accused of undermining her. he gave a loyal speech yesterday, publicly praising the prime minister. now it is certain to deliver. the test, whether she can convince her party and the country that she has both the vision and the authority to deliver it. alex forsyth, bbc news, manchester. yahoo says all 3 billion
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of its user accounts were affected bya of its user accounts were affected by a hacking attack in 2013, three times the original estimate. verizon which bought yahoo this year says the stolen information did not include plaintext passwords bank account information and it was sending e—mails to all the affected users. that's a summary of all the news, back to you, chloe. thank you, the reuters news agency is reporting that the jordanian embassy the reuters news agency is reporting that thejordanian embassy in paris has confirmed that a motorbike exploded outside the jordanian attach a building in paris. that's all the information we have for the moment. it has been confirmed that a motorbike exploded outside the jordanian attach a building in paris. no news with hugh row. let's
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talk about ben stokes. time is running out if he wants to go to australia the ashes. the on him? good morning, things are looking very ominous for ben stokes on the field and off it. the england all—rounder will be withdrawn from the ashes squad if he remains under police investigation when the tour to australia begins. the 26—year—old was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm following an incident outside a bristol nightclub in september. police have put no timescale on the inquiry and such cases can take months to be resolved. he hasn't been charged with anything yet. it means it is unlikely to be on the plane with england when they leave for australia. england fly out on 28th october, with the first test starting on 23rd november. if the investigation is concluded before the squad departs, the england and wales cricket board will assess the outcome before deciding whether stokes
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is to retain his place or be dropped. although no formal decision has been made, the bbc understands that stokes will not go to the ashes if the investigation is ongoing. now the premier league. for many yea rs now the premier league. for many years it has been contentious, how much money is in the game, especially for the premier league. the clubs are meeting today about how to divide it out. will this change? could be one of the most important — and controversial — meetings in premier league history. we don't know yet if it will change. the six richest clubs have proposed ending 25 years of the equal sharing of income from overseas tv rights, worth billions of pounds. 35% of the revenue would be divided according to league position, instead of being shared equally among the clubs. the league is keen to reach a compromise before going into its domestic rights negotiations, where worries over what the ‘big six‘ could do next — if they are blocked — that could create uncertainty. the big question is what will happen
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if they fail to reach an agreement. there has been a lot of talk fears about the likelihood of the european "super league", if those top six clu bs were "super league", if those top six clubs were to leave the premier league what would their model be like in the future? a question hanging over not just like in the future? a question hanging over notjust the england premier league but all of european football, clubs like psg and bayern munich. clubs in spain have had this agreement for a long time and they make more money than other teams in their leagues. hugh, we will catch up their leagues. hugh, we will catch up with you later. the latest details about the las vegas attack show much planning went into the attack. the killer set up a surveillance system in his hotel. police say that cameras in the hallway and one in the peephole allowed him to see if anyone was approaching. police in las vegas have released footage taken
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from their officers body cameras, showing what happened when the firing began. you may find this distressing. we already played you a clip that lets see it in full. gunfire they are shooting right at us, guys. everybody stay down, stay down. president donald trump has conceded
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that the time will "perhaps" come for a debate on gun laws. the subject is certainly dominating us news programmes. the president called this an act of pure evil and i think he is right. so what, then, are we willing to do to combat pure evil? the answer cannot be nothing. it can't. this time it was a concert in las vegas, last time it was republican congressman and their staff at a ball game. jimmy kemmel is from las vegas so you can ball game. jimmy kemmel is from las vegas so you can see ball game. jimmy kemmel is from las vegas so you can see why he is upset. people keep saying this is not the right time to talk about it. when is the right time. i don't think anyone will understand how the civilian can get that much weaponry,
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that arsenal, and do that. as trevor said, the worst time is that one time for each family affected. 59 families were that today. let's now talk with a mother and son who were four rows from the front of the stage at the route 91 harvest festival when the gunman started shooting. dana rushing is a registered nurse — she and her son 0wen searcy both helped the wounded at the scene. also in california is sam peredes — the executive director of the gun owners of california — who thinks that a tragic event like this will only cause more americans to defend their rights to carry a gun. the sound was the most confusing part. when they grabbed jason and pulled him back, it sounded like a storm. i don't know if it was the sound off of the buildings or whatnot, it was hard to identify where to go. the masses were going to the back and my immediate thought
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was to push us to the front because we are so was to push us to the front because we are so close to the front, we we re we are so close to the front, we were running through the entire crowd if we went to the back. i have witnessed other shootings and you see that the gunman stands and waits by the exit and mows down people as they come out. that was not the direction i was thinking to go in. seeing the gunfire possibly coming from above, my first thought was to get people under the stage. you say get people under the stage. you say get them under the stage, it was not just you and your immediate family, you were herding lots of people and encouraging them to come your way? yes, when we first went over to the left side of the stage, they had this apron around the stage that smashed up and started piling people up. they were standing around the barrier and saying, guys, up. they were standing around the barrierand saying, guys, get up. they were standing around the barrier and saying, guys, get up.
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when the music stopped and the lights came on and it painted a perfect picture. you are sitting ducks out there. it resonated with a lot of people around, as soon as somebody came in and yelled to do something and they just somebody came in and yelled to do something and theyjust did it. i helped as many people as i could over the rails and was piling them onto the front of the stage. within a few seconds, the front of the stage was full. it was crammed with people. i was yelling to people move back, move back. you go grab as many as you can and then another wave of fire comes through. in all honesty, after the first, second wave, ijust kind of blocked out, i didn't hear any more gunshots and just went to doing whatever i could do. when i saw the first victim after getting people, i went over the barrier and saw one of the first guys down, i realised this was real. i went
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straight to my mother and grabbed her and threw her over the barrier, bruised her up pretty good.|j her and threw her over the barrier, bruised her up pretty good. i am a nurse. my mother is a nurse. when the first guy came on he will still breathing. i knewi the first guy came on he will still breathing. i knew i needed to get her to him as fast as possible. as a nurse, dana, did you start going into work mode and start assessing the situation and helping people?- soon they came up and started screaming at me, ma'am, come on, this is real, this is real! he just grabbed me and ijumped over the rail with him, he grabbed me and pulled me over. i went to another victim, not the one he intended me to go to and i thought, gosh, this guy is down. he had a gunshot wound through his right chest. i immediately went into nurse mode and held a pressure on the wound and telling everybody to keep calm and
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get him awake. then another round of gunfire came. we were right in the line of fire so i had a couple of guys and i said, look, we have to drag him around the other side of the stage because we are going to get hit. we dragged him around the other side of the stage and behind a concrete barrier. once i found a paramedic over there, i guess it was one of the little ent guys, there was an exit wound on his back and when he started trying to breathe, i said we have got to go, we have got to go and pick him up, we have got to go and pick him up, we have got to go. we got six guys to pick him up to go. we got six guys to pick him up and got him over. i saw another girlandl up and got him over. i saw another girland i ran up and got him over. i saw another girl and i ran over to up and got him over. i saw another girland i ran overto her. she was shot in the abdomen area but she was up shot in the abdomen area but she was up and walking towards me. that is when the police officer 's were in the left side of the stage and they said run, run, run behind the building, we are still in the line of fire. after we got over to the little triage area i went into panic
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mamma mode, where is my son? iwent over to the stage where they were firing. then the panic set in. but on the flip side of that, there were even more victims behind the tropicana that were hit in neck, hit in the leg, hit in the abdomen, broken legs, broken ankles. we were just triage and people, who needed to be gone first. who could i start an iv on, help the ents, get the more critical patients to the hospital 's and do as much as i could to stabilise everybody. i was just so proud of him for him going into fight mode and just going over in the middle of the gunfire and running up to as many people as he possibly could, to see where they we re possibly could, to see where they were hit, if they were hit, if they we re were hit, if they were hit, if they were breathing, if they were not
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breathing. he saw quite a bit more thanl breathing. he saw quite a bit more than i did, because how many victims did you run up to? the first time i came back to get her ready the barrier, because one of the first quys barrier, because one of the first guys i saw was a friend of a friend andi guys i saw was a friend of a friend and i did not know this when i saw him, we went back over some footage and found out it was a friend of a friend. he was good. when i left him, he was breathing. he could not speak to me. i told him my mum is a nurse, i will get her, i will be back, stay with me. by the time we got over the barricade, there was already another guy down and that is what she was talking about, the first guy. at that point, what do you do? you don'tjust run past another guy. another person was down. just in that immediate area there were quite a few casualties. i saw things i would just never wish
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on anyone. she helped him. i went back to the original guy and he was gone. you could look in his face and he was still breathing but you could tell it was just too little, too late for him. i went to person—to—person as fast as i could 90, person—to—person as fast as i could go, trying to check a pulse, repeatedly yelling for ents to get to patients. then we got separated and when the lights went out, that is when i went back to try and find her. i went into similar panic. i left her here with a patient and i came back to the same place and she is not there, he is not there, what do you do? owen, i can tell by the way you are recounting this, you are clearly still in shock. i guess for neither of you you have had the time
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to process the horrors of what you saw on that night, and what you experienced yourselves? no, i haven't slept. i tried to sleep and i cannot explain it, it... every little noise. we went to the beach and had a little bonfire. there was and had a little bonfire. there was a big group of 30 people who went with us and the heroism of all the people who were in our group, they have been all over the news. taylor winston, he was one of the ones who took the truck that everybody has seen took the truck that everybody has seen all over the news, he was with our seen all over the news, he was with u seen all over the news, he was with ourgroup and he seen all over the news, he was with our group and he took a lady's truck and got people to the hospital. casey thompson has been all over the news. when i went to the triage area behind the tropicana, he walked up and he was there with me when we we re and he was there with me when we were putting to one case on and putting pressure on and cutting
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boots of broken ankles and trying to keep everybody as calm as possible. we we re keep everybody as calm as possible. we were locked down in the tropicana until around 5:30am on monday morning. from what you have said, you have saved a great number of people and you were incredibly thoughtful in the way you pulled so many people to safety and from your work as well, dana. inevitably, after such an horrific tragedy such as this, conversations are beginning in the united states and around the world about gun control in your country. even president trump has said it is not a conversation for now, but obviously, it is something which might need to be looked at. what are your thoughts on that, dayna? what are your thoughts on that, dayna ? —— what are your thoughts on that, dayna? —— dana. what are your thoughts on that, dayna? -- dana. my thoughts are this isjust a tragedy. dayna? -- dana. my thoughts are this is just a tragedy. there are dayna? -- dana. my thoughts are this isjust a tragedy. there are so many people who are trying to politicise it, they are trying to turn it into
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a race issue, a political issue. the issue is it wasjust a race issue, a political issue. the issue is it was just a a race issue, a political issue. the issue is it wasjust a man a race issue, a political issue. the issue is it was just a man who planned this, planned to do mass destruction to a bigger group of people as he could, knowing he could not survive but was going to try and do as much damage as he could. nobody knows what is going through this man's mind. nobody could understand why it happened and there have been interviews with his neighbours, his brother, everyone. sometimes you just don't know. and all the gun control in the world is not going to stop those type of people getting ahold of weapons, no matter what type of weapons they are, to do this type of destruction. this guy also had explosives, according to reports. i think like she said, if you think back of a lot of tragedies in our history, there is no substitute for someone being a
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violent person, there is no substitute for crazy. there is no substitute for crazy. there is no substitute for crazy. there is no substitute for someone decided to do something and finding the right tool to do it. i really appreciate you talking to us and i cannot begin to comprehend what you have been through, but i am really grateful to both for taking the time to speak to us, andi both for taking the time to speak to us, and i hope you take some time to try and come to terms with what you have witnessed and to get some sleep. i win and dana, have witnessed and to get some sleep. iwin and dana, thank have witnessed and to get some sleep. i win and dana, thank you for speaking to us. i want to bring in sam peredes, the chief executive of the gun owners of california. i know you the gun owners of california. i know you were the gun owners of california. i know you were listening to that discussion. inevitably conversations are being held about gun control, do you accept that this is the time to discuss this? first, right now, what the world needs to know, the millions of listeners of the bbc need to know that you have heard the
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voices of two american heroes, among hundreds of american heroes who were there in a tragic, horrible, evil situation, who put their lives on the line to help their fellow man, their fellow the line to help their fellow man, theirfellow americans, the line to help their fellow man, their fellow americans, and they faced the danger in order to be hopeful and save lives. the world needs to understand that. that is the single most important message that the world needs to see. i win and dana, god bless you, what you did to save lives will be known and remembered forever in this country. with respect to the subject of gun control, the sentiments that owen and dana mentioned are the sentiments of americans. people and policymakers need to understand that evil walks amongst us. it is there, it is real. people would not disagree with that but what some people are scratching their heads over is there is a difference
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between someone wanting a rifle to go shooting at the weekend for a leisure activity, and somebody being able to amass over a0 guns, have a semiautomatic rifle and to be able to buy as much ammunition as they want. isn't there a difference? you are coming from a british perspective. a0 firings owned —— a0 firearms owned by one individual is not uncommon in this country. explained to our british audience why anyone person needs a5 guns. does not a matter of needs. it is not the place of any policymaker or any ruler to decide what people need or what they want. why this anyone need two or three ferraris and a porsche in their garage when we know more people die from the illegal use
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and high—speed use of automobiles than all the firearm tragedies in america? are you saying nothing needs to change? no, that is not what i am saying. what i am saying is as long as they continue to focus on the issue of gun control, where we have all the laws, we have background checks, we had done by the federal bureau of investigation, the federal bureau of investigation, the premier law enforcement agency in the world. i have been to a gun store and sat in on one of those fbi checks with a gun store owner on the phone doing a background check and it took less than 90 seconds. god matter you know why, because we have the technology to check every single criminal database in america in 30 seconds. we have the technology to make sure the person buying that firearm is not a criminal in any criminal database in america. that is why it takes only a few seconds. if you are a law—abiding citizen,
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why shouldn't you be able to purchase your firearm, complete a background check, prove to the government that you are a law—abiding citizen and walk out of that firearm. said to be clear, you don't want any law changes regarding guns in america? we have every conceivable gun law on the books in america, and it is not preventing. i live in california where our gun laws are almost as stringent as your gun laws in england. the only thing we don't have as an outright ban and still these laws have not been able to prevent tragedies from people with evil intent to commit these crimes, just like in your country. all the gun laws and gun bans you had did not prevent the ira are unable to bring in all manner of firearms and explosives. news reaching us from our colleagues
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in cambridge, we understand that ryanairflight in cambridge, we understand that rya nair flight has been in cambridge, we understand that ryanair flight has been diverted to sta nsted after a security ryanair flight has been diverted to stansted after a security incident, there are reports of it being escorted on by two fighters. essex police have set on twitter that they are aware of an incident at stansted airport and will bring more information when they can. the raf has released this statement. the raf can confirm quick reaction alert typhoon aircraft were launched this morning from raf colours be to intercept a civilian aircraft. the craft was safely escorted to sta nsted craft was safely escorted to stansted airport. craft was safely escorted to sta nsted airport. the craft was safely escorted to stansted airport. the typhoon aircraft were authorised to transit at supersonic speed for operational reasons, any inconvenience caused to local residents is regretted. but information about a ryanair flight diverted from luton to stansted after security incident. still to come. we will be hearing from housing
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association tenants who say they are being asked to overpay and rent when universal credit is introduced. the leader of catalonia says the region will declare independence within days. the king of spain has accused him ofand days. the king of spain has accused him of and president and disloyalty. we'll be speaking to a representative to the eu in a moment. first, the latest news with annita mcveigh. the leader of catalonia's devolved government has told bbc news that his region will declare independence from spain in a matter of days. the dispute of a catalan independence from spain is collated on sunday with violence and protests as voters went to the polls for a controversial referendum. in his first interview since the vote ca rles first interview since the vote carles puigdemont want madrid not to ta ke carles puigdemont want madrid not to take any action. the reuters news agency is reporting that a motorbike has exploded outside a building
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housing jordan's military attache in paris. it is not thought any staff or injured in this incident. theresa may will tell her party to shape up when she addresses the conservative conference in manchester this morning. she is expected to try to assert her authority by setting out her vision for the uk whilst emphasising the need to improve the lives of ordinary working people. police in las vegas say stephen paddock, the man who killed 58 people, plaited cameras inside and outside the room from where he carried at the attack. in a statement made overnight las vegas police say a7 weapons have now been recovered from three different locations. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. now let's get the sport with hugh. england all—rounder ben stokes will be withdrawn from the ashes squad if he remains under police investigation when the tour to
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australia begins. the vice captain was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after an incident outside a bristol nightclub last month. he has not been charged yet and police have not had a timescale on their inquiries. it could be one of the most controversial and important meetings in premier league history today. it is proposed to end the practice of sharing equal rights from overseas tv rights with billions of pounds. england and ha rlequins billions of pounds. england and harlequins prop persinger has been banned for seven weeks via gouging so banned for seven weeks via gouging so he will miss england's first two autumn internationals and luke gale of castleford was voted as the super league's man of steel at an awards event last night, having kicked a match—winning drop goal that took his side to the super league grand finaljust his side to the super league grand final just 16 his side to the super league grand finaljust 16 days after having his appendix out. i'll be back with more sports news just after ten o'clock. see you soon. thank you, hugh. the leader of catalonia's devolved government has told the bbc
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that his region will declare independence from spain in a matter of days. in his first interview since sunday's disputed referendum, carles puigdemont warned madrid not to take any action. he has been speaking to tom burridge. translation: we will declare independence a8 hours after the official results are counted. when will that be. this will probably finish when we have the votes in from abroad at the end of the week so we will act over the weekend or early next week. the week so we will act over the weekend or early next weekm the week so we will act over the weekend or early next week. it feels like you are delaying and trying to provoke the spanish government into acting so that they looked like the bad guys. we would always have liked this process to be driven by dialogue. they wouldn't have been the police violence. but we decided some time ago that it would be the cata la ns some time ago that it would be the catalans who should decide. you talk about a process including sunday's referendum. it's been going on for
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yea rs. referendum. it's been going on for years. it is akin to you taking the spanish constitution and tearing it up. how could spain ever accept that. no society should accept the status quo it does not want against its will through force and beatings. king felipe intervened in the crisis in the tv broadcast last night, describing the vote as illegal and accusing the authorities of an a cce pta ble accusing the authorities of an acceptable disloyalty. let's go to barcelona now. we can speak to the cata la n barcelona now. we can speak to the catalan government's representative to the european union. thank you for us. . to the european union. thank you for us..i to the european union. thank you for us. . i want to pick up on the point tom made, the spanish government have said this was an illegal referendum. do you think they are going to accept you becoming independent in a matter of days? well, i don't think they will accept. and actually, the stance that the spanish government has taken that the spanish government has ta ken recently is
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that the spanish government has taken recently is very clear. they have opted for repression first and foremost. judicial repression, also police repression on the ground which is counter—productive and cannot possibly serve their political objectives. what we would like to see some effort to bring this discussion to a normal european, let's say, negotiation. talks have not been possible in the past, and this is really u nfortu nate. past, and this is really unfortunate. it is worth pointing out to people that this is not a cut and dried case in the catalan region that everyone wants independence. the opinion is very split in the area and the turnout was in some places quite low for the referendum. indeed it is split. it happened also in scotland in 201a. it is only normal that there are different positions. yet they should find a way to express themselves in a
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democratic way, through a normal referendum process. unfortunately, the turnout was not as high as it should have been under normal circumstances. according to all reports carried out in recent months in catalonia, between 70 and 80% of the catalan population wants to decide on the future of catalonia in a referendum. the fact that the turnout was lower is essentially due to the brutal repression that took place, ina to the brutal repression that took place, in a climate and environment of permanent threats on citizens that want to express their intentions. let me ask you about this. reuters is reporting that the cata la n this. reuters is reporting that the catalan regional government says its leader will make a statement today. are we expecting more information to be given out later? i understand that president carles puigdemont
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will deliver a statement at 12 o'clock central european time, that's 11 o'clock for you. i cannot advance any elements of the statement, but one thing is clear. before the referendum and after it our commitment to engage in political dialogue remains absolutely the same. and if this is not possible by laterally, which is very u nfortu nate, not possible by laterally, which is very unfortunate, frankly, we would appreciate having some positive and constructive input from the international community, especially from the european union, as we belong to this political family which is europe. thank you so much for speaking to us. coming up, young people overwhelmingly rejected the conservative party at the election injune. conservative party at the election in june. now the conservative party at the election injune. now the tories are trying to win that put back. we've been behind the scenes to find out how they hope to do it. now, housing association tenants
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in england and scotland have told this programme they are being asked by housing associations to overpay rent because universal credit is being introduced. when someone switches onto universal credit there is a 5—6 week wait for claims to be assessed and the money to arrive. the department for work and pensions is speeding up the roll—out of universal credit at a pace of more than 50 job centres a month. let's talk now to kelly millar who says she was forced to agree to overpay her rent in preparation for universal credit coming in, ian blackford who says his constituents in scotland are being "hounded to make advanced payments" and brian comley who moved on to universal credit injune and says it's the reason why he has an eviction hearing after this programme. thank you all for speaking to us. kelly, let's start with you. explain, why are you having to overpay on your rent? because when universal credit roll since there is
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going to be six weeks of no housing benefit payments. which we cannot claim back —— when it rolls in. so we have to pay the extra out of our own pockets to make sure there is no 93p- own pockets to make sure there is no gap. are you saying you will never get that money back orjust that gap. are you saying you will never get that money back or just that you won't get it for five or six weeks. a housing benefit we won't be able to claim that back at all. how easy is it for you to over — pay your rent at the moment, how much are you paying. before i moved in i had to paying. before i moved in i had to pay £111 up front before they would accept me, it was a real struggle to find andi accept me, it was a real struggle to find and i am having to pay £20 a month every month extra which is difficult because we are on a minimum, already struggling. you are not working at the moment and you have a young child so it's not possible for you to work more and get that extra money. yeah, i have a
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two—year—old and i can't get childcare until january. two—year—old and i can't get childcare untiljanuary. nothing i can do at the minute, wejust childcare untiljanuary. nothing i can do at the minute, we just have to struggle. kelly, iwant can do at the minute, we just have to struggle. kelly, i want to introduce you to brian. you moved on to universal credit in june. introduce you to brian. you moved on to universal credit injune. you we re to universal credit injune. you were given an advance loan. how did that yes. i knew this would be a long wait for money, i've already been without money for two months until then so i was really struggling. when i did find out about this upfront payment, i phoned them and they said i could have half of £814, which is £407. a fast track to that into my account. and that was it. —— they fast tracked that into my account. i cause i have to pay that back every time i get paid
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on the first of every month and i have one more payment to pay and then it's finished and i will have it back. what does that leave you with if you are paying back the loan ata with if you are paying back the loan at a rate of £67 a month, when you had to take the loan to transfer on to universal credit what does that leave you with to spend on essentials. i have other things coming out of that benefit besides that. so about £200 for a month. can you survive on that. not quite, i still use food banks. i'm using one at the moment. it is still a struggle. you've just got to put money by and try and spread it out a bit. i want to bring in ian blackford. how common are these stories? very common and very alarming. this is why notjust myself but other people, 24 charities in scotland for instance have asked this to be stopped. it's
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pushing people into poverty. the fa ct pushing people into poverty. the fact that people like brian have to go to food banks. it is notjust the use of food banks, it is people going to money lenders. this is cruel and inhumane, what the government is doing. they really need to recognise the damage that's been done. when the stories that we are hearing about housing debt being crude, let me tell you about east lothian. east lothian council has an average housing debt of £390 from the people on housing benefit. those who have moved on to universal credit, it's increased to £1220. that is what is happening as a consequence of this policy, quite simply something that is wrong—headed. it came from iain duncan smith. it is an experiment that has gone badly wrong. we hear about the government recognising that people are struggling. they need to recognise that people are struggling with universal credit and this must be brought to a halt. struggling with universal credit and this must be brought to a haltm
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is worth pointing out what the housing associations for both kelly and brian say. one says that they are working with tenants to identify the pitfalls of this system and that includes advice such as encouraging te na nts to includes advice such as encouraging tenants to pay a bit extra into their rent account to build up funds to cover the shortfall. the other says that they advise customers wherever possible to pay a little extra into rent accounts, it is a financial safety buffer, should they need it. do you think, kelly, that the housing associations should be taking the hit on this, rather than people like you? ijust don't think i just don't think it should be enforced at all. i don't think anybody should have to suffer for this. what do you think, brian? i think the same. i am lucky because i have got christians against poverty helping me with this and helping me
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at about the debt and they are trying to get this held up for a little bit longer so we can look into it more. i am very disappointed that they are still rolling this out and they should look into it and stop it and sort the problem out. brian, thank you for speaking to us and good luck with that eviction hearing and thank you to kelly and in blackford as well. the department for work and pensions told us that it's wrong to treat claimants differently because they are on universal credit rather than housing benefit and they have worked closely with landlords to make sure safeguards are in place. they added: "the majority of people are comfortable managing their money but advances are available for anyone who needs extra help and arrangements can be made to pay rent direct to landlords." let me bring you this. we were talking about rya nair and let me bring you this. we were talking about ryanair and the flight which had to be diverted into london's stansted.
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which had to be diverted into london's sta nsted. we which had to be diverted into london's stansted. we have a statement from ryanair. the flight from lithuania to london luton was diverted to london stansted in line with procedures after lithuanian authorities received a suspected hoax security alert. the aircraft landed normally at stansted and customers will be transferred to luton by coach when cleared to do so. the tories have a problem — young people overwhelming rejected them at the general election injune — and they need to secure their votes in order to stay in power. that's why you've heard various policies at the party's annual conference in manchester over the last few days to try and win over young voters — such as freezing university tuition fees in england, and help getting on the property ladder. but is it enough? we've been behind the scenes at the so—called "tory glastonbury" to find out what else they could be doing. there is no doubt that the last election was a bit of a wake—up call.
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somebody famous and clever said that the conservative party only knows two modes, you know, complacency and panic, and we're definitely in panic. the conservative party has to find new ways to engage and reach out to younger voters, of course, but it's also got to win back the 30 to 40—something segment, generation y. those people i promise you are not suddenly at the age of 50 going to decide that feminism and the internet and the green movement are a bad thing after all. so unless the conservative party aligns its values in response to that, it is going to die. the tories have a problem. atjune's general election, three times as many young people voted forjeremy corbyn's labour than for them. in fact, polls suggest you have to be over 50 before you are more likely to vote conservative. they might have won the election, but among the under 30s, their support plummeted and some in the party sense trouble. so, in a field on an estate
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in berkshire, they organised a festival, perhaps unfairly labelled the tory glastonbury, to work out what they should do. this is not glastonbury. this is really an ideas festival. it's more akin to hay—on—wye and glastonbury. 31—year—old bim afolami is one of their party's younger mps. it's pretty obvious it's a problem if you've got huge sections of the population who don't appear to be sort of positive towards you, your party or your message. the party generally collectively realises that this is a problem. the chancellor, i know, when he was talking to conservative backbenchers a couple of weeks ago was talking about how we need to address housing, we need to address student debt. the chancellor himself was talking about his children and his god children in particular in that context. it's something the party really
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recognises and i think this ideas festival is just one way in which we're trying to understand the different ways we could deal with it. use the fact that we've created a more dynamic economy to put more money, thought and time into solving problems like the housing crisis. every single councillor, every single mp should go back to their own local area and see how they can build more housing in their area for our next generation. where you can relate to people, talk their language and get to their level, talk about the issues that matter to them, young people will turn out more for the conservative party. i don't pretend to have all the answers but those are the kind of things we've got to be looking at and we've got to be seen to be looking at, otherwise we won't get a hearing from some of the younger voters that we need to win over. it is a big enough problem that we didn't win an overall majority, so we need to address that, but that said, you've got to remember we got 13 and a half million votes, nearly 42% of the electorate supporting us, so we are not on our backs and i think that result was a bit of a warning shot. it told us what we need to continue
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doing what we're doing right to maintain support, but also gave us an idea of what we need to look at to build on that. so i think, and maybe i'm just a hopeless optimist, i think we're in a good place. we have got to have a message that people want to be a part of the conservative party. we've got to have values that people say, this is the tent i want tojoin, rather than the labour tent, and for that, we mustn't lie to people, but we must say that if you join the conservatives, if you vote conservative, we will try and help you do the best you can in your life. so, as the tories head to manchester for their annual conference, what should the party do to stem the flow of young people to labour? they one big thing we have got to really look at is housing. it matters up and down the country but it's not only building more houses, but being brave and building the kind of houses people want to live in. the conservatives need to talk about how if we get the economy right, we can look at socialjustice
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issues like trafficking, unemployment, fairness, equality and education. it's an important role of the government to ensure young people are educated in media literacy so they can engage with politics and share their thoughts. the government should be more ambitious in championing environmental policies. it's an area all voters care about, but especially younger ones. you have to look at what the labour party have done and whether you're in support of it or not, they appeal to young people. they related to young people. that's something that the conservative party didn't do. they didn't display diversity, they didn't display an appeal to the young voter. you have to tap into young people's interests. and here he is, jeremy corbyn! cheering. chanting: oh, jeremy corbyn!
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this might one day come to be seen as a defining moment in the reinvention of your party, but the defining moment in the summer wasjeremy corbyn at glastonbury, thousands of people chanting his name. can you foresee a conservative leader getting that reaction at glastonbury festival? look, i have no idea why people at glastonbury felt the need to chantjeremy corbyn's name. i have no idea why they felt the need to do that. glastonbury isn't the country. the electorate is a lot broader than that. i think his appeal to young people is important. i mean, i'm ex—labour. ijoined the tories after having been in labour for years. i think this is the kind of thing actually about intellectual renewal of the conservative party. can the conservatives ever be hip? no. no, that's not on the cards. that's not on the cards and look, being hip, being popular, being cool, that's really easy until you have to make tough decisions and when you have to make tough decisions, that veneer of coolness comes off real quick, so the better thing
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to do is to be right. to be doing the right things for the right reasons, rather than trying to be cool, popular and saying things that will get you headlines or a big cheer at glastonbury. let's hear how the prime minister plans to attract more young voters. she's been speaking to radio 1 newsbeat‘s politics editorjim connolly. is part of the problem is that, for young people, it's just not cool to be tory? i think there's a real problem with our society. we've got to the point where people feel they are not able to identify themselves as supporting a mainstream political party. it's partly because of some of the nasty intimidation we've seen and saw around the election. some of the conservative candidates have reported behaviour to me that really has no place in our political life. i think it's important for young people to have the arguments, have the debates, decide which political party they want to support, where they stand on issues. to be able to do that openly and freely without feeling intimidated and without feeling
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that they dare not say they are a supporter of a particular party. i have some statistics i would like to run through with you, if that's all right. a government report out last year said the hourly rate for young people was 15% lower than it was in 2008. the minimum wage, for example. if you're under 21, it's £2 less than if you're 25. you've got housing benefit cut for 18 to 21—year—olds. you've got student fees under your government, £9,250. under labour, they say they're going to scrap it. can you see why young people are flocking towards labour and have abandoned you because frankly you're not doing anything for young people? one of the things we've been doing at this conference is showing a number of areas in which we are taking action for young people. i recognise the need to look at the issues that young people are particularly concerned about and young people who fear
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they will be worse off than their parents' generation in the future. this conference is about helping them in a number of ways. let me give you a couple of examples. you mentioned tuition fees. we're going to look again at the whole issue of student finance and university funding. while we do that, we're going to scrap the intended increase in fees and raise the threshold at which people have to pay them back. how much you earn before you pay them back. from 21,000 to 25,000. that puts a bit of money, a bit of extra money into graduates' pockets every month. on housing, we're going to increase the support on help to buy, helping people actually get their foot on the housing ladder. also, so many more people rent now. so we're going to increase the security for people who are renting. we want to try to incentivise longer term tenancies because it's unsettling if you're going from six month tenancy to six month tenancy. two thirds of young voters in the past election voted labour. is part of the problem you're not connecting yourself and as a party with young people? you've gotjeremy corbyn hanging out with grime stars. he's got three times as many twitter followers as you. they've got a massive youth
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movement behind them. it's notjust about policy, it's about message getting to young people and them understanding it, isn't it? you're right, of course. it's not good enough for a party just to have policies. we have to show people what the policies are. we have to talk to them about those policies. certainly, yes. we've got a job to do as a conservative party in getting our message across to young people. the other thing i would say is this. government isn't about gimmicks. government is about getting on and doing stuff for people. jeremy corbyn can promise all he likes at his conferences and elsewhere. but you have acutally got to be able to deliver that, to do it. i know when we stand up to say we are going to do something, we are able to do it. we take a balanced approach to our economy and that means we can deliver what we say we will. are you a little bit jealous of what he has got? what i'm very clear about is that actually being in government isn't about things like that. we want to encourage young people to be interested in politics. we want to excite young people about politics but actually
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being in government is about doing. it is about doing stuff for young people and for people across the country. what i'm talking about here is about building a country that works for everyone. that means across the whole of the country and it means all ages. let's get the weather update. matt taylor is here. hello. there is a definite autumn chill in the air. the strongest winds are across orkney and shetland at the moment. they will ease down a little bit. the driest weather further south you are. in between central southern scotland, northern ireland and later northern england, rain becoming quite extensive. it will be a thoroughly wet evening rush hourfor some of will be a thoroughly wet evening rush hour for some of you. will be a thoroughly wet evening rush hourfor some of you. at will be a thoroughly wet evening rush hour for some of you. at the top and tail of the country things area top and tail of the country things are a little bit drier as we finish the day. temperatures are not far
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off what we expect that this time of year but the wind is adding to the chill at the moment. this area of rain, it is a developing area of low pressure which will push across the country from west to east tonight. across england and wales, the strongest wind, widespread gales, we could see winds gusting at 50 or 60 mph for one or two. the rain becomes confined to southern parts of the uk as we finish the night. turning chile but clearer in the north. we will still have strong winds as we go through thursday. we start on thursday with outbreaks of rain. those will gradually clear by mid—morning. one or two showers dotted around to the north—west. the wind will still add to the chill. hello.
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it's wednesday, it's 10 o'clock. i'm chloe tilley. theresa may will set out her vision at the tory party conference in just over one hour, hoping to improve conditions for working people. theresa may's big day but boris johnson again accused of stealing the limelight, comments deemed crass asc the limelight, comments deemed crass as csaid the limelight, comments deemed crass as c said that the bodies should be cleared away in libya to make space tourist development. northern spain region of catalonia which includes barcelona could do declare independence in days, says its leader. we will declare independence 48 leader. we will declare independence a8 hours after the official results are counted. and one of the world's biggest film festivals kicks off in london today and we will be speaking to two in british directors whose films are being shown for the first time. good morning.
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one minute past ten. let's get the news with annita theresa may will tell her party to shape up when she addresses the conservative conference in manchester this morning. she is expected to try to assert her authority by setting out her vision for the uk whilst emphasising the need to improve the lives of ordinary working people. the leader of catalonia's devolved government has told bbc news that his region will declare independence from spain in a matter of days. the dispute over catalan independence from spain escalated on sunday, with violence and protests as voters went to the polls for a controversial referendum. in his first interview since the vote, carles puigdemont warned madrid not to take any action. translation: we will declare independence a8 hours after all the official results are counted. when will that be? it will probably
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finish when we have the votes in from abroad at the end of the week. therefore we will act over the weekend or early next week. ryanair says one of its flights from lithuania to luton has been diverted to sta nsted airport lithuania to luton has been diverted to stansted airport following what it has called a suspected hoax security alert. raf typhoon planes we re security alert. raf typhoon planes were scrambled and escorted the craft safely to the airport. stan said said the borders open operating as usual, ryanair said said the borders open operating as usual, rya nair says said said the borders open operating as usual, ryanair says that passengers will be transferred to luton airport by coach. reuters reports that a motorbike has exploded outside a building housing jordan's military attach in paris. it is not thought that any staff we re it is not thought that any staff were injured in the incident. police in las vegas say stephen paddock, the man who killed 58 people, planted cameras inside and outside the room from where he carried at the attack. in a statement made overnight las vegas
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police say a7 weapons have now been recovered from three different locations. word came to our dispatch centre about shots being fired. we know now that the suspect fired off and on, somewhere between nine and 11 minutes. we know that the suspect fired over one dozen or so volleys. we know that firing by the suspect seized at 10:19pm. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. notice board with hugh. ice dancers penny combs and nick buckland johnny, they've been selected for the winter olympics next year, this comesjust 15 months the winter olympics next year, this comes just 15 months after penny shattered her kneecap and was told she would never compete again. in fa ct she would never compete again. in fact you registered a career—best score to qualify. let's start with
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that horrific injury, tell us about it and your recovery. last june nick andi it and your recovery. last june nick and i were training as normal, creating a lift, and i wanted to do something spectacular, i was upon his shoulders and i gave it a bit too much bush ended up falling off his shoulders and landed directly on my knee. my knee burst into eight pieces. it was a mess. very swollen. very painful. i don't have much memory of it. i think adrenaline just kicked in. you just get on with it. it has been a tough year and a half. lots of blood, sweat, tears and frustration, and some happy moments as well. definitely grateful and appreciative to be back. you registered a ca reer—best and appreciative to be back. you registered a career—best score. and nick, you've had a heart complaint in the last couple of years, so how does it feel to make it through. fantastic, it has been such a long
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road, ups and downs all the way. to finally make it and qualify and be selected to go to our third games is amazingly special. many people at home may not be familiar with ice dancing. one familiar name is christopher dean, of toro and dean, you have been working with him, what has not been like. like two kids at disneyland! all our careers we have looked up to him and jane, they have been huge inspirations to us, so to work with him on a piece that they used themselves, it is their music that he has choreographed for us, for us to come is a dream come true. we are privileged, it went down well so we are privileged, it went down well so it is very special. there is a political aspect to games coming up in pyeongchang next year. plenty of athletes from around the world have said they don't want to go if
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tensions are still at a critical point. what would your view be? the same as always, go point. what would your view be? the same as always, go and concentrate on our sport. we've got important preparation to the games. we want to get their fit and ready to go and get their fit and ready to go and get our personal— best get their fit and ready to go and get our personal—best scores. let the decisions be made by the ioc. i am sure, we have always felt extremely safe at the olympics, we've been to two olympic games and security is never better. we will leave that to the ioc. when you get there what will the target being. leave that to the ioc. when you get there what will the target beinglj wa nt there what will the target beinglj want a medal. we have both worked too hard not to give it everything. i think it's possible, our score from last weekend puts us in the mix with the best in the world and that is what we wanted to do for our comeback and we definitely did. so now we are riding on our best case scenario, we are back and aiming for
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that medal. and you are a couple in real life, has not made things easier or harder. it's made things much easier because we get on so well. we have the same goals and aspirations. that allows us to train well and work well together. you enjoy every minute of it. guys, congratulations on the qualification, we will wish you the best when you get to south korea next year. back to you, chloe, in london. thank you hugh. theresa may will close the tory conference with a speech urging her party to go forward. we can go now to norman smith in manchester. thank you, chloe. theresa may's big day, we are told it will be a much more personal speech than before, stressing the determination to go on. also a bit of a rebuke to the likes of boris johnson, on. also a bit of a rebuke to the likes of borisjohnson, saying that cabinet ministers must and focus on their own ambitions that on the
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ambitions and aspirations of ordinary people —— that they must not focus on their own ambitions. but you guessed it, boris has again stepped into an almighty row after a fringe meeting last might when he was talking about libya. he suggested that the city which has seen some suggested that the city which has seen some of the worst fighting as isis has been driven out, mrjohnson suggested that all that needed to be done and i was the bodies to be cleared away and it would be a prosperous business tourist centre. a lot of people have viewed that as a glib cross, and acceptable, and, frankly, as if the foreign secretary was almost making light of a terrible bloodshed there has been in that city. this morning when we caught up with mrjohnson he really didn't want to talk about it. mr johnson, two tory mps say you should be sacked because of what you said
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about clearing the bodies in libya. is that appropriate language for foreign secretary? you regret what you said? take care, have a good one. mrjohnson, was that appropriate language? have a good day, have a good day. had the chance for a brief chat with the foreign secretary. he said he didn't want to add to a couple of tweets he wrote last might. his argument was, basically, that many of the bodies in the city have been connected to improvised explosive devices by isis. he was trying to make a serious point about clearing away the bodies. a lot of people don't see it that way. his cabinet colleaguejeremy see it that way. his cabinet colleague jeremy hunt says see it that way. his cabinet colleaguejeremy hunt says he won't defend those comments. other tory mps say mrjohnson should apologise
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and quit. let's get the thoughts of ourjustice minister. what is the u pta ke ourjustice minister. what is the uptake on this saga. norman, you have made the point, i think the comments were unfortunate given the history of what has happened in that city. the british government has done a lot for libya, that should be at front and centre. i think there isa at front and centre. i think there is a wider point. as we present global britain and we want to be a player on the global stage, all politicians have to be more mindful of this comment. this isn't the first time that this has happened, there seems to be a series of these gaffes which other countries may see as profoundly offensive. yet this man is meant to be in charge of the diplomatic service. he's clarified his comments on a twitter. as you
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say, they are unfortunate, they were u nfortu nate say, they are unfortunate, they were unfortunate but we have to make sure we talk about good work we are doing. you don't feel there is a case for him to at least apologise? one tory mp sarah wollaston said he should do that this morning. actually more interested in knowing what theresa may will be saying in the conference hall. she is the prime minister. the country wants to hear from her. the prime minister. the country wants to hearfrom her. the mps and prime minister. the country wants to hear from her. the mps and the party wa nt to hear from her. the mps and the party want to hear from hear from her. the mps and the party want to hearfrom her. she will be setting the direction of this government and i want to hear from her. ok, let's talk about theresa may. people are filing in to share her speech. we always say it is a massive task, the leader's speech but visit it really is. notjust because her position. to be honest this party is in the dumps. although you won the election, there is a sense of, what we fall? you have your way. this is a big speech. i was parliamentary private secretary
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to david cameron and i've seen how complicated it is to construct this kind of speech to speak to your party, your mps and to the country at the same time. the last election was a setback. the campaign did not go as well as it should have done. we have discussed that since then. despite what you say about the mood, it's always on the fringes, with about a00 listings of events, i think what theresa may will do is say, we have to focus on the things that matter. i can't remember the last time at the tory conference we would appealing to younger voters front and centre, which is what she's doing. let me ask you about that. you have a youth problem. the average age of the conservative party member is now 72! how on earth do you get young people to join the conservative party, to vote for the conservative party, to vote for the conservative party, to vote for the conservative party when your
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membership is so elderly and your policies seem to be geared to the elderly? our membership may be elderly? our membership may be elderly but most of our members have children and grandchildren. i call this generation of the northern rock generation. anyone whose political awakening began after the collapse and nationalisation of northern rock. we know what they want. better paid jobs. prospects for the future. to get on the housing ladder. something that any government should be able to deliver. it's notjust for the youth but for everyone in the country. you asked what we should be doing. at the last election we offered strong and sta ble election we offered strong and stable one clearly what people wa nted stable one clearly what people wanted was a change to the status quo and an end to politics as usual. we have to change our message. we also have to change the way we do politics. engage directly. 0n the fringe this year, we had 200 or more
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young people on. i think we have to make it clear that as tories we want to make the world a better place. thank you for your time. i know that we always build up these speeches as big ones but this one really is one of the crucial ones. i think there's been a lot of curiosity about theresa may's position, does she still wa nts theresa may's position, does she still wants the job and because she's looked a bit diffident. this is her moment to convince voters and viewers out there. norman, thank you. remember theresa may will be making her speech at 11:30am. you can find that life on the bbc news channel. "i'll do everything in my power to get people rehoused." that's what the new conservative leader of chelsea and kensington council has told this programme. over three months since the devastating fire which killed scores of people and left hundreds
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homeless. most residents who survived are still living in hotels. one organised a concert at the weekend for other residents to give hope and show that despite the huge challenges they will be able to rebuild their lives. our reporter had exclusive access to that concept. —— concert. this is a concert put on by a survivor of the grenfell tower fire as a gift to other survivors and local residents, the heart behind the event to show that there is hope, strength and unity amongst the grenfell residents. # come on, come on, come on. # i wanna sing. # i wanna shout. # put it in all of the papers. # don't be afraid. # of the fire at grenfell.
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# the fire at grenfell. # oh, oh, oh, oh. applause 12—year—old tashundrei lived in grenfell tower with his grandmother. we've been following his story since the fire. good evening, everyone, ladies and gentlemen. it's a great pleasure to be here today amongst all of you, as a survivor from grenfell tower, to read to you one of the most powerful speeches in all of history. "i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed. to be self—evident that all men are created equal. i have a dream that one day on the red hills of georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.
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i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; and the glory of the lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together." unfortunately, martin luther king died at the age of 39 at the memphis hotel at atlanta. i have a dream. applause. this is leanne jackson—leblanc, the organiser of this concert. she lived on the second
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floor of g re nfell tower with her 18—month—old son and partner joseph jolly. leanne and her family escaped the tower during the fire where she was carried out of the flat window. # ifinally see... 0n the day before the big show, we caught up with leanne to hear her story and it's the first time she's spoken publicly. that night when i went to sleep, i could hear a sound, like some noise in the back, in the background. my son's dad came in and hejust said, there's some smoke, but the firefighter said everything is under control. something just wasn't settling right in me.
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so i got up. he was holding our son. and then we could just see the flames in the window. we could see lots of people around. just looking up, looking around at the building. and it wasn't even five minutes later, you could just hear people screaming. when he came back inside, he said, the fire's spread, we need to get out. i was too afraid to use the stairs because i can't use the stairs very well, i've had mobility issues for a while. he had to take my son through the window and hand him to a stranger and came back to pull me out of the window. we went to the outside of the station, latimer station, that's where we were moved to, and that's where we watched the rest of the horror unfold. listening to children screaming... and watching people dying...
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is the hardest thing... is the hardest thing i've ever been through. i felt an immediate guilt. really? how come? because i felt like i should have been doing more. i started thinking about the mattresses in my room. so i should have been able, we should have been able to bring the mattresses out and just bring them out into the walk for people tojump, to do something to help them. seeing children's faces afterwards... and not having had a chance to help them.
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and how is your son? he's 0k. he's safe. yes, ijust kept giving him kisses. i hold him so tightly because that could have been us. how's the council been in terms of finding you a permanent home? good question. i'm still in a hotel. i am not moving back in a tower block. they cannot put me back in a tower block. so i have no faith in them. these people are very cruel. they‘ re heartless. they're cold. and it's not about our well—being, it's about their pockets. leanne took us to see the hotel she's currently living in. whilst filming there, we spoke
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with the new conservative leader of kensington & chelsea council, elizabeth campbell, who was there meeting grenfell residents about their housing needs. you told survivors in july that a00 new social housing units would be acquired or built over the next five years. what work is under way to build those new houses? we haven't started building yet because one of the other things i said is, anything we do, has to be in conjunction with people, what they want. so what we said to the residents of the towers, is that we want to make that the best model of social housing in europe in the 21st century, but in order to do that, we need to talk to them about what they want. so it's not going to be us doing it to them, it's going to be doing it with them. some will be asking, there are loads of buildings standing empty in kensington & chelsea, why not take them over and give them to survivors?
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well, we are offering survivors temporary accommodation, everyone can move into the temporary accommodation in they would like to and we are also offering flats. so we have had 50 offers accepted so far and we are busy buying houses so i hope we won't have to, you know, use empty properties because we'll be buying our own. so we have bought about another a0 coming on stream and we hope to have another, well not another, but in total 300 by christmas. jeremy corbyn described the way people were being rehoused as social cleansing. is he right? do you know, i am not going to trivialise this and i'm not going to play politics with this. i'm getting on with the job which is meeting survivors here and seeing how i can help. i will do absolutely everything in my power to get them housed so they can begin their lives again. elizabeth campbell, have you seen an improvement under her leadership in terms of how the council's been responding to the needs of survivors? look, making people beg
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for the basic necessities will never be ok and these people, they ignore us. they make us beg. we walk around with our hands out all the time with them. if after three months the people who need their homes, a lot of families who're bereaved have not been rehoused, the whole system is designed to fail us. this is what i'm trying to say. the whole system needs to be redesigned. the whole cabinet needs to step down, they need to replace everybody in there. has the council let down grenfell residents both before and after the fire? well, before the fire, i think you have to wait for the inquiry, and the immediate aftermath of the fire i think i've been very clear that i've apologised for what i think that we did let people down, yes. in one of your first interviews as leader you confessed you had never been in a tower block.
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nearly three months on, how many tower blocks have you been in? ok, so number one, when ijust became leader, i suppose i wasn't thinking clearly and i had been in tower blocks but i hadn't been up to the 22nd floor because i was in charge of family and children's services, we had a children's home in a tower block, i visited that often, we also had a youth centre, and i also visited that often. and yes i have been in tower blocks since. but also, i think it's frankly ridiculous question because i think it's just identity politics and we are not human, you know, do i not feel, do i not care? i think i do. back in 2007 at the age of 20, leanne was diagnosed with severe post—traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety disorder. although she's working to move forward with her life, in the aftermath of the grenfell tower, she's faced fresh challenges with her mental health.
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how's your mental health been since the fire? honestly, my mind's like all over the place. erm... i try not to think about what's going on and how i'm thinking and feeling because the moment i stop to think about it is when i start to go downhill. i've lived moment to moment, literally minute to minute to fight everything that i'm battling with. everybody has their struggles. that's mine. that's my struggle. singing. tell me about the concert? it's amazing grace for grenfell,
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a concert fund—raiser, live music, food, drink, and it's an opportunity for people to come together, it's from me as a survivor to the survivors and it's a night to celebrate our lives, you know, life is a gift and we should appreciate it. it's about giving thanks to god that we are still alive. it's about honouring the people who we lost on the 1athjune. it's amazing, i'm so happy, very emotional about this and very excited as well because i see everyone around me, it's amazing. i want to show god that we appreciate him in our lives, that we still have something to do on earth. singing.
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the last three months have been... just we have seen a lot. but i thank god that we are here together today. i want to say to my grenfell united family, i love you. cheering and applause. singing. you know, i care about them and i love them so much. everybody‘s done something and this is my contribution. what can i do to put a smile on someone's face today — because in your pain you can still reach out and help somebody in your pain you can still do something positive to remain positive is to create hope, show people that there is hope, there is still hope,
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we have to getjustice, we have to support each other and that's the way we move forward. cheering and applause. singing # lean on me # when you are not strong # and i'll be your friend # i'll help you carry on # for, it won't be long # till i'm gonna need # somebody to lean on what have i learnt?
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i've learnt that people from grenfell tower and the walkways are really good people, that they had a fantastic community, a well—knit community and that i will do absolutely everything in my power to get them housed so they can begin their lives again. cheering and applause ashley john—ba ptiste with that report. lots of you getting in touch with us while watching. one tweet saying, really pleased to programme has not forgotten grenfell and i am impressed with your sensitive coverage. another says, christmas, they can spend it out till christmas present, scandalous, these people should be in hands. another message says, there are flats and houses belonging to the ridge that are
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empty, why doesn't the government by them. vincent says, these people are all council tenants, they could be rehoused but they want a host on the road and they know they have the government of our battle. do get in touch. still to come we will speak touch. still to come we will speak to local residents in the hurricane affected island of puerto rico and getting their reaction to the president's flying visit yesterday. and we will speak to two and british directors whose films will be shown that the first time at one of the world's biggest film festivals which begins in london today. it's 1031. begins in london today. it's1031. let's get the latest news. the headlines on bbc news. theresa may will tell her party to shape up when she addresses the conservative conference in manchester this morning. she is expected to try to assert her authority by setting out her vision for the uk whilst emphasising the need to improve the lives of ordinary working people. the leader of catalonia's devolved
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government has told bbc news that his region will declare independence from spain in a matter of days. the dispute over catalan independence from spain escalated on sunday, with violence and protests as voters went to the polls for a controversial referendum. in his first interview since the vote, carles puigdemont warned madrid not to take any action. ryanair says one of its flights from lithuania to luton has been diverted to stansted airport following what it has called a suspected hoax security alert. raf typhoon planes were scrambled and escorted the plane safely to the airport. stansted said the airport is open and operating as usual. ryanair says that passengers will be transferred to luton airport by coach. reuters reports that a motorbike has exploded outside a building housing jordan's military attache in paris. it is not thought that any staff were injured in the incident. police in las vegas say
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stephen paddock, the man who killed 58 people, planted cameras inside and outside the room from where he carried at the attack. in a statement made overnight las vegas police say a7 weapons have now been recovered from three different locations. word came to our dispatch centre at 10.08pm about shots being fired. we know now that the suspect fired off and on, somewhere between nine and 11 minutes. we know that the suspect fired over one dozen or so volleys. we know that firing by the suspect ceased at 10:19pm. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. never spoiled with hugh. then sto kes‘s never spoiled with hugh. then stokes's chances of being on the ashes tour this winter are shrinking. he will be withdrawn from
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the squad if he remains under police investigation when the tour begins. he was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after an incident outside a bristol nightclub in september. no charges yet but police have put no timescale on the inquiry. it could be one of the most important and controversial meetings in premier league history today. the sixth richest clubs propose ending 25 years of the equal sharing of income from overseas tv rights. that is worth billions of pounds. the england and harlequins prop kyle sinckler has been banned for seven weeks by gouging. it means he will miss england's first two autumn international is stop luke gale of castleford was voted superman man of steel at an awards party last night after having kicked a drop winning goal that saw his final ridge the super league grand final at old trafford just six days after he had his appendix removed. we'll be back with more sports news later today on
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bbc news. thank you. the parliament in the spanish region of catalonia which includes barcelona will meet this morning to discuss the result of sunday's controversial referendum on independence. the catalan leader ca rles independence. the catalan leader carles puigdemont has told the bbc catalonia will declare independence within days. he warns that the spanish government should not intervene. cancelo we would always have liked this process to have been driven by dialogue. —— translation:. they would not have been the police violence. we decided some time ago that it should be the catalans who should decide. you talk about a process including the referendum on sunday that has been going on figures. it is a keen to you taking the spanish constitution and tearing at up. how could spain ever accept that? no society should accept the status quo it doesn't want against its will through force and beatings.
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king felipe of spain responded in a rare televised address the catalan leadership had behaved irresponsibly. translation: for sometimes some of the catalonia authorities repeatedly, consciously and deliberately disregarding the constitution and the autonomy statute which is the law that recognises and protects their historic institutions and self—government. with their decisions they have systematically disregarded the rules which have been approved legally, exhibiting disloyalty towards the state. those authorities in catalonia have disobeyed or democratic principles of the raw floor and they have undermined the harmony within cata la n undermined the harmony within catalan society itself, u nfortu nately catalan society itself, unfortunately managing to divide it.
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miguel is a political analyst and spanish journalist. is this brinkmanship or is it real. it is very real. the declaration of independence, as the catalan president says, is days away. the only question is that some people within the catalan leadership would like to stop things a bit, they are talking about a few days, because they want international support, they want international support, they can't expect recognition of a cata la n they can't expect recognition of a catalan republic now but they want some sort of european mediation. especially by the eu. we are expecting this declaration, i think by monday at the latest. the spanish government has always said this is an illegal referendum, they say
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under no circumstances can this go ahead. we've already seen violent steering the vote. how is this playing out. we have seen violence during the vote, almost all of it caused by the police, trying to stop the vote. it should be said, there's at least strong pressure on the other side as well. there's now a general strike in catalonia. lots demonstrations, lots of people on the streets, many people, sometimes hundreds and thousands of them, surrounding police stations and harassing the police. even if they are not violent directly this is an explosive situation. an incident could happen at any moment. as field questions after the creation of independence, it willact questions after the creation of independence, it will act in a forceful way. there will probably suppress catalan autonomy. there's a chance they will arrest catalan people and if things get out of control, which is likely, they will
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perhaps declare a state of emergency. very forceful measures. is there any room for dialogue and negotiation between catalan spain and the government? sadly i don't think so. the problem is that this is serious now. perhaps ten years ago they could of been more fiscal autonomy of the catalonia, but that didn't happen. and now it is too late. the catalan nationalists have seen late. the catalan nationalists have seen independence within reach, they arejust seen independence within reach, they are just days away from that, and they would not settle for anything that isn't either independence or a legally binding referendum with independence. which the government can't agree to. because the spanish constitution doesn't make it possible. someone will say, why don't you change the constitution. evenif don't you change the constitution. even if they were the political will to do so, the problem is that the spanish constitution is extremely
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difficult to reform. the process will be lengthy and complicated and probably would not result in the sort of reform that the nationalists want, because the stages of that process would be a countrywide vote in which all the spaniards would vote, given the mood that exists in the rest of spain and now, that's not possible. thank you, miguel-anxo murado, spanishjournalist. not possible. thank you, miguel-anxo murado, spanish journalist. let not possible. thank you, miguel-anxo murado, spanishjournalist. let me bring you this news reaching us from the afp news agency, the eu, did chief has ordered amazon to pay 250 million euros in back taxes. this is because of an illegal tax break that luxembourg granted the internet online retail giant. the statement says that amazon was given illegal tax benefits and as a result almost three quarters of its profits were not taxed. that is reaching us from
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the eu competition chief. still to come, which hunts injan zambia and life as a jehovah's witness in manchester. two films by young british directors shown at the london film festival which begins today. we will speak to both directors shortly. president trump has told residents of puerto rico that they should be grateful they did not lose thousands of lives as the hurricane katrina. he says that the aid has thrown the budget a little out of whack. 5% of people have power, less than a0% of mobile phone and less half of the residents have running water. less than half of the 3.a million residents. that's what the president said yesterday. now, i hate to tell you, puerto rico, but you've thrown our budget a little out of whack because we've spent a lot of money on puerto ricco and that's fine.
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we've saved a lot of lives. if you look at... every death is a horror. but if you look at a real catastrophe like katrina, and you look at the tremendous... hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people that died, and you look at what happened here with really a storm that was just totally overpowering. nobody has ever seen anything like this. what is your death count as of this moment? i7? 16 certified. 16 people certified. 16 people, versus in the thousands. you can be very proud of all of your people, all of our people working together. 16 versus literally thousands of people. it's worth noting that shortly after this conference, the death figure was revised up to 3a dead. let's talk now to some local residents. brenda reyes lives in the capital, san juan, but visted family in the rural north at the weekend. javier andres gomez gonzalez is an attorney who lives outside the capital in guaynabo.
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ian stevenson is an american who has lived on the island for over ten yea rs. thank you all for speaking to us. brenda, can you give us a sense of what it's like in the north. a lot of power lines were down on my way, it took me two hours to reach my family, a little more than usual, i've travelled to one town in the north—western part of the island. will provision is getting to these people? we have heard about people not getting access to water and food, the basics. my family didn't have any running water. they didn't have any running water. they didn't have any running water. they didn't have any electricity. the gas lines we re have any electricity. the gas lines were not possible. javier, you also
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visited an area in the mountains. did you witness similar scenes. yes, i witnessed houses, did you witness similar scenes. yes, iwitnessed houses, rocks did you witness similar scenes. yes, i witnessed houses, rocks and stuff, people getting mad their houses. —— getting mud out of their houses. it was devastated. a lot of people didn't have running water. yet at the same time we saw the community going out, helping each other, cleaning up the streets, and making sure that everyone was safe. did you get a sense that people feel almost forgotten. yeah. people feel that the government isn't doing enough. especially in the isolated areas of the island. brenda, did you get that sense as well? yes, i did. people feel abandoned. some of my relatives
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are ina feel abandoned. some of my relatives are in a very remote town. they said the same thing. help is not reaching us. the same thing. help is not reaching us. we are not getting any help. ian, do you think the response from president trump has been satisfactory? in the metro area it is much easier because the port is right here. i am in the cargo business and to have that much cargo arrived in eight days is amazing. the fact that it was not able to be distributed due to the lack of communication here on the island was definitely a large challenge. but we are getting through that now and it is getting to be better here in the metro area as the other folks mentioned. the mountain towns and
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people in remote areas, it is getting to be a real challenge for those people because the roads are still not clear, there are areas cut off by mudslides and flooding. still not clear, there are areas cut off by mudslides and floodingm still not clear, there are areas cut off by mudslides and flooding. if we are talking about the areas which we re are talking about the areas which were cut off, i would be interested to know what you think about this, when president trump makes comments saying you should be really proud you did not lose thousands of lives such as in a real catastrophe like katrina, do you find those comments helpful, ian? know, those types of comments are not helpful. they are insulting to all of us here. the fa ct insulting to all of us here. the fact that we lost so few lives that we know that this point is really a miracle. the level of devastation here is really beyond comprehension. i spent six months in new orleans after katrina doing relief work and i have never seen anything like what we are seeing here in puerto rico. javier, i saw you nodding when ian
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said they are an helpful comments and insulting? i am completely in accord with ian. i also think president trump seems to have problems expressing himself. i sure feel pity for him. he does not seem to say what he wants, or he just doesn't care. i think he doesn't care. today, i saw on the news that they may forgive the debt, that would be good news for us but really don't know what to expect from him. people feel insulted but as puerto ricans i think we should really feel pity for him. what about you, brenda, how did you feel when president trump made those comments? i think president trump does not
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understand the reality that puerto rico is living right now. thank you all for speaking to us. i am grateful for you all and all the best to your families. thank you. the 61st bfi london film festival kicks off today. over 12 days, more than 200 films will be screened, representing more than 60 countries as part of the official programme. alongside films starring big names like woody harrelson, kristen wiig and matt damon, it's a chance for less well—known actors and directors to make a name for themselves and see their work on the big screen. and here now with us in studio are rungano nyoni, whose first feature film, i am not a witch, is being shown at the london film festival. rungano was born in zambia, but moved to cardiff at a young age. and with rungano is danieel kokotajlo, who grew up as a jehovah's witness in manchester, and left the faith aged 23. his first feature film apostasy,
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also premieres at the festival. let's have a look at a clip. chanting. let's also take a look at danieel‘s film to get a sense of what that is like. i'm sorry, mum. i am sorry. but the
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eldest... no, theyjust i'm sorry, mum. i am sorry. but the eldest... no, they just want to i'm sorry, mum. i am sorry. but the eldest... no, theyjust want to see how you feel. they think they have a right over my whole life! just calm down. stephen, louise is feeling a bit tired and emotional. louisa, it is no one's fault. we just feel that you need time. it is nothing to worry about. i wasjust saying that it is amazing to have a big—name actress in your first film.|j it is amazing to have a big—name actress in your first film. i was thrilled to have shovel on board. i had to write her a nice letter, she read the script, and eventually she said yes. i am very happy to have siobhan. we were both nominated for a film—maker's award and they had a
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gala last night when they announced the winner and i was thrilled to find out it was me. now i have been given this bursary to help fund the development of a second feature film. 50 grand, how far does that go ona film. 50 grand, how far does that go on a film? i suspect it is not very far! it depends what you do with it. i think far! it depends what you do with it. ithinki far! it depends what you do with it. i think i can live for about a year or so i think i can live for about a year or so with this money and just to spend time working on the script. i also have other ideas of what to do with the money. i like to workshop with the money. i like to workshop with working—class actors in the north to develop scenes and i will also spend some time doing story wreck hiss defend a time —— to spend time in the location. rungano nyoni, presumably it is a long time to come up presumably it is a long time to come up with the idea to see it all the way through. are we talking years? for me it was 34—macro years. it took me three years to write it. you
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are both pretty young, i mean that asa are both pretty young, i mean that as a condiment, do people take you seriously in the film industry if you have a great idea and say you wa nt to you have a great idea and say you want to make a film? does not really work that way. it is a slower process. you work that way. it is a slower process. you earn work that way. it is a slower process. you earn your badge doing short films so people see that and you progress that way. i think they ta ke you progress that way. i think they take you seriously depending on what type of short film you make and it progresses from there. how many short films did you have to make? progresses from there. how many short films did you have to make7|j think short films did you have to make?” think i have done four or five, i can't remember! daniel, did you get into this in a weird way? where you filming in dog tracks? this has been blown out of proportion and! it is a job i had after school. i got a job asa job i had after school. i got a job as a cameraman at the bellevue greyhound stadium so i learned how to use a camera. and funding wise,
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how difficult is it to get funding for a feature film? i think it is to be. i for a feature film? i think it is to be. lam for a feature film? i think it is to be. i am lucky because i expected the worse that i would not get any funding, soi the worse that i would not get any funding, so i tried to make sure i had a script that was as tight as i could get when i applied for funding andl could get when i applied for funding and i was lucky that i got a yes the first time. that does not often happen. usually they give you notes and you work on it and reapply. it is usually really hard and i don't think it ever gets easier. let's talk about your films. tell us a little bit about what your film is about. my film is called i am not a witch. it is about as girl who was accused of being a witch and she is sent to a which camp to live with other witches and she is forced to choose between remaining a witch or turning into a goat. i shot it in zambia last year. the film has been
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out and it is on its festival tour. it will be screened at the bfi film festival. it took a long time for you to find your actress. how old was she? she was nine. i had auditioned nearly a thousand actresses. i had not found what i was looking for. we had gone for a recce the year before. my partner took a photo of the little girl. i thought she was interesting. we tried to find her. we did not have a name and we scoured the area but we managed to find her. she had never acted before? she had never acted before but she came to a workshop and she was perfect. is that luck or is it often better to work with people who are not actors?” is it often better to work with people who are not actors? i think it works either way. zambia is the type of environment which does not
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have a film industry so everyone is a nonprofessional. it is tricky of course but if you find someone who really suits it, it can be easier in filming it. it depends. danieel, tell us about your film ? filming it. it depends. danieel, tell us about your film? my film is called apostasy and it is a quiet sensitive drama about a family in manchester who are very religious, a jehovah's witness family. it is about what happens to them when one of the daughters of the family gets into trouble with some of the elders. it becomes about family versus faith. it is more about white faith still exists today and what it does for people. and based on your own experience when you decided you would not be a jehovah's witness?” was part of the faith for quite awhile. it was a big part of my life. and looking back at that part of my life and using it. it has influenced the story. but it is more
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about what if questions. when i was about what if questions. when i was a witness i used to talk about the issue and the issue of this fellowship in which is like being excommunicated. it is or to biographic but also dealing with the what if questions. if you can give advice to young people who want to get into film directing, what would be the one nugget of advice you could give them? for me it was about sticking to your guns and sticking to your vision. in order to do that you have to work out what it is you wa nt you have to work out what it is you want to say as a film—maker so you are confident enough to stick by that. so true to yourself in a way? i agree with that and also don't wait for someone else to value you. you have to be confident to go out
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there because you are going to get a lot of rejections. self belief. if you are not in london, where can you see your films, you are not in london, where can you see yourfilms, do you are not in london, where can you see your films, do you know? my film is being released in october nationwide from october and the 20th—century believed can see it locally. we have not got a release date yet but it will be in cinemas at some point next year. when we know, we will treat it out. thank you for your company today. bbc newsroom lives is coming up with live coverage of theresa may's speech at the conservative party conference. goodbye. hello, good morning. we have had a rather cloudy start to the day. one bright spells here and there. this isa bright spells here and there. this is a typical scene in kent. we also have some rain moving its way southwards across scotland. heavy
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rain moving into northern ireland and north—west england. eventually north wales seeing some rain as well. for the north—east of scotland, some brighter skies. there will be some brighter skies developing across southern parts. mostly cloudy. 12 or 13 celsius. it is through tonight that this area area of low pressure moving from west to east. it will produce and bails across central swathes of the uk into the early hours of thursday morning. during thursday it will be a dry day with some sunshine. temperature 13 or 1a in the north, 16 or 17 in the south. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are
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the top stories developing at 11. theresa may will tell the conservatives to "shape up" and "go forward together" as she closes their party conference — we'll bring you her speech live in the next half an hour. catalonia to declare independence from spain within days, the region's leader tells the bbc. las vegas police release footage of the first responders to sunday's shooting. they say the gunman set up cameras around his hotel suite to watch them approach. the homeless drug user who murdered
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the family who cared for him is jailed for life.

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