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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 2.00pm: a gruelling day for theresa may at tory party conference, as she struggles through her keynote speech. coughing. the prime minister battled through repeated coughing fits. as the chancellor came to her rescue with a cough sweet. i hope you noticed that, ladies and gentlemen. the chancellor giving away something free. her speech was also interrupted after a prankster emerges from the audience and hands her a sheet of paper marked p45. the prime minister promised to build council homes for a new generation and apologises for not delivering the election victory her party had hoped for. i held my hands up for that. i'd
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ta ke i held my hands up for that. i'd take responsibility, i led the campaign andi take responsibility, i led the campaign and i am sorry. the other main news this hour: go that way. get out of here... video of the moment police react to first reports of a gunman in las vegas and the first responder who knew his daughter was only yards away. i cannot describe it as anything but carnage. there were bodies lying on the ground and there were people running around who were shot. spain's political crisis worsens — as catalonia says it will declare independence in a matter of days. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. theresa may has struggled
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to deliver a difficult keynote speech to delegates at the conservative party conference in manchester. the prime minister suffered coughing fits throughout the speech, repeatedly struggling with her voice. it was not the only difficulty for mrs may, who was interrupted by a well—known prankster, who handed her a piece of paper marked p45. in her speech, the prime minister apologised for her party's performance in this year's general election, saying the campaign had been "too scripted, too presidential." and she promised to build a new generation of council houses by investing £2 billion in affordable housing, as well as imposing a price cap on the domestic energy market. our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. some thought she might not make it to this point. after a tough election, it has been a tricky conference. is this a make or break speech,
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prime minister? on the day she hope to prove her authority, it was a tricky speech. the prime minister's dress wasn't a victory cried but a recognition of the challenge the conservatives face and the choices she has made. and for the election result, an apology. we did not get the victory we wanted, because our national campaign fell short. it was too scripted, to presidential and it allowed the labour party to paint us as the voice of continuity when the public wanted to hear a message of change. i held my hands up for that, i take responsibility, i led the campaign andi i take responsibility, i led the campaign and i am sorry. theresa may defended her party's record in government said they must set out ideas for the next generation. she suggested a change in approach to organ donation, a change in mental health policy and she said labour didn't have the monopoly on
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compassion. the agenda i laid out on day one as prime minister, still holds. it burns inside mejust the same, because at its core, it's about sweeping away in the barriers that mean for some, the british dream is increasingly out of reach. about saying what matters is not where you are from or who your pa rents where you are from or who your parents are, the colour of your skin, whether you are an man, woman, rich or poor, from the inner city or an affluent suburb, how far you go in life should depend on you and your hard work. then, an interruption from a prankster. he was bundled out of the conference hall, leaving the prime minister trying to pick up. i was about to talk to somebody i would like to give p a0 52 and that wasjeremy corbyn. next, she was plagued by a persistent cough, prompting the
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minister to give her a suite. it is in all our interests for the negotiations to succeed, but i know some worried if we are prepared in the event they do not. it is our responsibility as a government to prepare for every eventuality. let me reassure everyone in this hall, thatis me reassure everyone in this hall, that is exactly what we are doing. battling problems with her voice, the prime minister made a personal promise to help communities that felt left behind. there will be d raft felt left behind. there will be draft legislation to stop energy prices rising, and £2 billion for affordable homes to fix a broken market. a new generation of council houses to help fix our broken housing market. so whether you are trying to buy your own home, renting privately and looking for more security, or have been waiting on a council list, help is on the way.
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despite losing a letter from the slogan, theresa may eventually made it until the end, fittingly with a pledge not to give up when things get tough and a plea to the party to ditch infighting and division and shape of. let's fulfil our duty to the british people. let's fulfil our duty to our country. let's fulfil our duty to britain. and let us renew the british dream. thank you. the welcome here was warm, but this speech was far from smooth. the prime minister's vision for the country, overshadowed by a unplanned events. alex forsyth, bbc news. let's go to vicky young, live in manchester. whatever the content of the speech, it will be remembered for the prankster and the coughing. yes, we have had an update from
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greater manchester police who said the prankster who disrupted the conference speech did have legitimate accreditation but has been released after being arrested to prevent a breach of the peace. his name is lee nelson and we have some footage of him as he was bundled away from the conference centre having got incredibly close to the prime minister. move out the way right now. what is your name? 0ut way right now. what is your name? out of the way right now. are you a member? sir, you are speaking to the daily mail. what is your twitter handle?
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have you got a message to send to theresa may? 0ut out of the way. turn this way. are you a member, sir? are you a member? 0ut you a member, sir? are you a member? out of the way. incredible scenes outside the conference centre. so much to talk about, i am joined by a conservative peer and a commentator for the times. you have been on the inside of these things, what will they be thinking? it takes so long to produce these speeches. you don't wa nt to produce these speeches. you don't want to have scenes that can be used asa want to have scenes that can be used as a metaphor for decline and what
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happened with the stage set, they will be angry. you cannot help the coughing, the prankster, there will bea coughing, the prankster, there will be a security question, but the lettering on the stage, they will be angry. they will be feeling, we got the content right, the attitude for the content right, the attitude for the conference announcements right. there is a chance if you do those things you can shift the dell. they will be happy about that, but then they will be disappointed. then the delivery was confident and strong and then you got the series of mishaps. obviously you don't want that. there are things you can say, humanised her, she showed very good spontaneity in responding to it. but if you ask the question, would you wa nt if you ask the question, would you want those things if you could planet, you would say no. the tories will be irritated. they wouldn't wa nt will be irritated. they wouldn't want anyone else to see the co nfe re nce want anyone else to see the conference speech being spoiled by something out of her control. but
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when you laugh at ed miliband eating a sandwich, or trips on the stage, if you give it out, you have got to ta ke if you give it out, you have got to take it. how will she be feeling? it hasn't been easy the last few months, she talked about a sense of duty and why she is in it, she must be thinking now, why am i in it? she's good keeping going. she will find she found a voice. i would regard myself as a liberal conservative in my outlook. this was a congenial turn in her speech, quite outward looking, it was moderate. i felt there was an understanding the conservative party knows that brexit mustn't tip over the economy. she will feel she got that right. i know her quite well, she will be feeling a sense of frustration and she will be wondering if there was anything she could have done to avoid that. she is an experienced politician and these things happen and you move on from them. does it really matter?
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yes, they do a bit. people do pay attention, they act as a metaphor. people remember these weird things rather more than the rhetoric. but it is what they do on brexit, on housing and other things. inevitably, the theatre of this, because this is a theatrical event anyway, you cannot complain it is cove red anyway, you cannot complain it is covered in that way, because it is. but you have also got to look, was it the right message? will this but the conservative party with a chance to try to respond to the national feeling? looking at the contents, the energy cap, tuition fees, will they be accused that it didn't go far enough? you have to respond to
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the elections. the conservative party in 2015 for to an election when national incomes were going. in 2017 it fought an election when they we re 2017 it fought an election when they were going down. you have got to respond to the national mood and think to yourself why are certain demographic groups moving away? does it reflect something wrong with the country that the government needs to respond to? they have concluded it does. you cannot let yourself get worried about the analysis of ed miliband or certain policies he had. i wrote this a lot at the time, there was an wrong with individual elements of ed miliband's policies, but it is whether they had control of where public expenditure and intervention would take them. i am uncomfortable with the conservative government implementing some of those things, i am not always against them. personally, this is better to take it on the chin and do
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it if you think it is the right thing rather than say we cannot do it because ed miliband said it. cabinet ministers putting a brave face that theresa may showed how determined she is and getting through it under the most difficult circumstances. let's get the latest on the prankster who interrupted the speech. june kellyjoins on the prankster who interrupted the speech. june kelly joins me on the prankster who interrupted the speech. june kellyjoins me now. we have heard on this from the police in manchester? yes, we had a statement from the greater manchester fours which is responsible for security at the tory conference. they say this man was arrested for a breach of the peace and released a short time later. he did have legitimate accreditation to get into the conference. we have been told he was accredited as a journalist which will explain why he was down in the front of the hall with a posse of photographers. we
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have had reports is simon which is a well—known prankster. so when he applied accreditation, what checks we re applied accreditation, what checks were done on him and how did he get it. greater manchester police are saying everyone who goes into the hall has to go through airport style security so the measures to get in are very strict. they are also saying they are reviewing the hole at accreditation process with the conservative party. there are wider security implications because he was at the prime minister's podium for quite a number of seconds? yes, this isa quite a number of seconds? yes, this is a question about security in the hall so once he got in and got in the pen in the front he was able to move forward. in terms of security in the hall, we are told that is the job of a private company. we are waiting for a statement from them. the security of the perimeter of the venue the security of the perimeter of the venue is done by the well—known security firm, gas. the prime
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minister would have had personal protection officers from scotland yard. it is unclear how close they we re yard. it is unclear how close they were to her, but there will be massive concern is this man was able to get so close to the prime minister. june kelly, thank you very much. one of the key parts of that speech by the prime minister, a plan for a major programme of council house building. andy moore has been to leeds to meet social housing tenants in one development there. mehdi and his family have been in their new home with the housing association for seven months. but they were looking for a roof over their heads for three years. every week we are looking, just maybe one or two houses and lots of people in the queue in front of us. the council said lots of people are waiting. they have no houses. actually it is nice to be doing some new houses because lots of people out there have no houses to live. many people homeless.
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in leicestershire, the first two people's houses are ready... harold macmillan was the last senior tory politician to spearhead a programme of public house—building. his task as housing minister was to deliver hundreds of thousands of new council homes every year. but in the 1980s, many of those same houses were sold off to their tenants under the premiership of mrs thatcher. the stock of public housing has been going down ever since. the housing charity shelter has welcomed today's announcement. we need some serious money behind this. we need policy change to support it and we also need theresa may to hold her nerve because not everybody is going to love this. research shows housing is an issue for the millions of people who cannot afford to buy their own homes. at the last general election there was a big swing to labour among private tenants who turned out to vote. this is a small development being built in leeds.
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theresa may says many more homes are needed. we have seen a big announcement from the prime minister and the chancellor about help to buy scheme and supporting that further, to help more first—time buyers on to the ladder. but there is a whole load of people who will not benefit from that and this today shows there is something for them as well. these will be homes next year for around a dozen families. the pace of construction will need to rise rapidly if mrs may's vision is to become a reality. the headlines on bbc news: a gruelling day for theresa may at the party conference as her keynote speech is interrupted by a coughing fit and the prankster. las vegas police released footage of the first responders to sunday's mass
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shooting. they said the gunmen set of cameras around his hotel suite so he could see them approaching. in spain's political crisis deepens as catalonia says it will declare independence in a matter of days. in sport, we understand premier league clu bs sport, we understand premier league clubs have failed to reach an agreement on a new plan for sharing its overseas tv earnings. it had been proposed they would end 25 yea rs of been proposed they would end 25 years of equal sharing of that income. jack burnham has been banned for a year after testing positive for a year after testing positive for a year after testing positive for a recreational drug. the club says it will support him. and the former featherweight world champion carl frampton has named his opponent for his homecoming bout in belfast next month. he will face the mexican, horatio garcia. i will be back with more on those stories later. police in las vegas say they're no nearer to finding a motive for the attack on a concert on sunday which left 58 dead
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and hundreds injured. overnight the girlfriend of the gunman returned to the us. media reports say marilou danley, who was in the philippines at the time of the shootings, is being questioned by the fbi as a "person of interest". bodycam footage from officers who were among the first on the scene has been released. our north america correspondent laura bicker reports from las vegas. go that way! get out of here, there's gunshots coming from over there. go that way. gun shots. amid the chaos and confusion, the officer keeps his instructions clear. this way, this way. go, go, go. that way, that way. he ushers others to safety as he runs towards a hail of bullets. everybody stay down, stay down. police desperately try to find out where the shots are coming from as the barrage of gunfire rains
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down on concert crowds for over nine minutes. the mandalay bay, it's coming out of the window. among those trying to stay alive was trainee paramedic kaitlyn rogers. first she ran to the medical tent to help. then she called her dad. i don't remember saying it, but supposedly i said, daddy, they're shooting us. the emergency crews already present were employed by kaitlyn's dad brian. now his staff and his daughter were being shot at and he had to help. he rushed to the scene. i cannot describe it as anything but carnage. yesterday... i don't think any hour went by that i was awake that i didn't cry. i've been doing this a long time and thought i'd seen everything. but i have to say, i'm one of the lucky dads. because there was 59 other people and then multiple people in the hospital that their lives are changed forever. and my heart goes
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out to all of them. all of them. because i do know i'm one of the lucky ones. i really do. it could have very well been her in a heartbeat. in such a tragic situation you see people come together. and if that's what we did on a day—to—day basis, our world would be different. this is just one of the weapons found in the room of the 32nd floor of the mandalay hotel which killer stephen paddock had used as a base. so far police have failed to find a motive for the massacre. bearing in mind that the investigation is dynamic, ongoing, continuing, i don't have a lot of answers for you yet. and clearly understanding that nobody wants answers to why more than the police and the victims' families. we have a responsibility to get it right and so that's why it's going to take time and that's why we're going to take that time. america is once again grieving the victims of another mass shooting. president donald trump will visit the city later today amid calls for stricter gun laws.
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he says now is not the time for that discussion. but others here ask if not now, then when? laura bicker, bbc news, las vegas. we can go to las vegas now — and rajini vaidyanathan is following the developments. the girlfriend of the gunmen has now returned to the united states. for the police, in the search for what was the motive of this mass shooting, that would be a key person to talk to? absolutely. law enforcement officers said yesterday, there are still more questions than a nswe rs there are still more questions than answers when it comes to trying to work out the motive of stephen paddock. marilou danley, as you say was his girlfriend. she lived with him ina was his girlfriend. she lived with him in a property in nevada, about i9 him in a property in nevada, about 19 minutes from here. she holds an
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australian passport, but is originally from the philippines and describes herself on social media as a casino professional, mother and grandmother. as you say, she has returned to the us, she landed in los angeles airport overnight. we understand she is with the fbi and will be talking to police officers from las vegas. there will be a number of questions they want to find out, at not least may be a bit more about what we have heard that stephen paddock wired as much as $100,000 to an account in her name in the run—up to his attack and also he used identification with her name on to check into the hotel behind me from where he carried out his brutality. president trump about to visit las vegas amid, you know, as ever after these mass shootings, calls for stricter gun control is? absolutely. as you say, every time
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there is a shooting in the united states, advocates the gun—control say now is the moment for change. it isa say now is the moment for change. it is a difficult path for president trump to navigate. during the election he described himself as a true friend of the national rifle association, the gun lobby here. he received as much as $30 million for his presidential campaign from them. after the attacks in paris and san bernardino, he said when he was a candidate, the way to deal with these mass shootings was to make it easierfor people to these mass shootings was to make it easier for people to have their own weapons, so they can defend and protect themselves in these circumstances. but i have spoken to a number of people in las vegas who have come from all over america, many of whom voted for donald trump and many of them who own guns. they are more nuance in the wake of what happened. the couple i spoke to focused on the idea that there needs
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to be better protections if people have serious mental health illnesses. to prevent them from getting access to weapons. but it is worth pointing out, earlier this year, worth pointing out, earlier this yea r, two very little worth pointing out, earlier this year, two very little fanfare, president trump reverse the regulation brought in by barack obama, which actually made it harder for those kind of people who have serious mental health illnesses, to get a ccess serious mental health illnesses, to get access to guns. so that is one area. another area a lot of people i have been speaking to have been talking about, is modifications of guns. police recovered a total of a7 firearms belonging to stephen paddock at three locations, including his suite at the hotel behind me. 12 of those guns had been modified so they could fire as automatic weapons. basically, pulling the trigger once and firing a barrage of bullets. it is legal to modify guns in that way, some people i have spoken to, who do have guns say, why is it necessary for people
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do have these assault style rifles and more needs to be done to control that as well. thank you very much indeed. it's spain's biggest political crisis for a generation, and it's getting worse, with the leader of catalonia's devolved government saying his region will declare independence from spain in a matter of days. in his first interview since the disputed vote on sunday which saw violent scenes and protests, carles puigdemont said his government would "act at the end of this week or the beginning of next". but spain's king felipe has accused the vote's organisers of putting themselves "outside the law". our europe correspondent damian grammaticas reports from barcelona. this is a country teetering on the brink. a constitutional crisis looming after 2 million here voted for independence. something spain simply won't countenance. last night the catalan regional prime minister who is leading the bid for separation told the bbc
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a formal declaration of independence will be made in the coming days. translation: is obvious that we're part of spain, but we can and we do have the right to create our own state. and there is a very clear popular desire, which i don't think anyone can argue with now, for us to decide our own future. that desire was in evidence yesterday, tens of thousands on the streets of barcelona and other cities in this autonomous part of spain. but not all taking part favour catalonia becoming independent, though. this was more a protest against the harsh tactics used by police trying to prevent sunday's referendum. and spain's national leaders absolutely dispute catalonia's right to independence, the spanish constitution does not allow it. spain's king addressed the nation last night, only the second time a monarch has done this in four decades. he blamed the catalan separatists for plunging spain into crisis. translation: those authorities
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in catalonia have disobeyed all democratic principles of the rule of law. and they have undermined the harmony within catalan society itself. unfortunately managing to divide it. and in madrid todayjust as across much of spain, that message, tough and uncompromising, towards catalonia, has widespread support. translation: it was very good, it is what we need. i think this kind of separatism is ridiculous in the 21st century. but for catalan's separatists the fact that king offered no olive branch simply poured fuel on the fire. meeting today, they said they want to target next week for their independence bid. and if catalans act it's certain that spain will respond to stop them so the question, can anything avert the crisis that is now unfolding? damian grammaticus, bbc news, barcelona. let's go back to the prime
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minister's speech which was interrupted by a prankster handing her a interrupted by a prankster handing hera p interrupted by a prankster handing her a p a5, or interrupted by a prankster handing hera p a5, ora piece interrupted by a prankster handing her a p a5, or a piece of paper that appeared to be a p a5 but also by the coughing fit. she has just tweeted this. we don't know if these are medicines she is taking, but you can see a packet of throat lozenges next to her ministerial case. we note the chancellor handed her a suite at one stage to help her through it. there is also an anaesthetic throat spray. some decongestant and some cough syrup.
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so quite a cocktail of medicines and sweets to help her condition. we have heard she has been struggling with a cold from her officials, but it is clearly a difficult day for the prime minister, very hard for her to get through that speech and this is her taking a bit of water. that went on for quite awhile. the prime minister the sweet, and a picture of all those medicines. i don't know if she is trying to make light of it or to show what kind of treatment she has been giving herself. maybe that will become clear later in the day. a homeless man has beenjailed for life for a minimum of 30 years for murdering a mother and son who had helped him. 2a—year—old aaron barley admitted murdering tracey wilkinson and her 13—year—old son pierce.
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ben ando reports. tracey wilkinson aged 50 and her 13—year—old son pierce were knifed to death in march. the killer, aaron barley and she had seen sleeping in a cardboard box in stourbridge with the help of home—cooked meals, cash and kindness, he got back on his feet but earlier this year, things went wrong. he'd lost his job and been thrown out of his flat, we believe. he might have been back on the streets and he decided to come and take his misfortune out on the people who tried to give him a lift in life. cctv at the family home showed aaron in dark clothing and a bala clava showed aaron in dark clothing and a balaclava lurking in the garden. when mr wilkinson left to walk the dog, he went inside. he stole the family car in attempt to get away. their daughter lydia was away at college. they were such givers in life, they helped people, they loved people. the fact they've now gone
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and at the age of 19, i'll never get to see my mother or my little brother again, is heartbreaking, it's indescribable pain. aaron barley has a borderline personality disorder and his parents who died when he was very young were related to each other as uncle and niece. thejudge was told to each other as uncle and niece. the judge was told there were no grounds for a plea of diminished responsibility. only aaron knows why he launched such a ruthless attack. he was sent to prison for at least 30 years and after that time is still considered a risk to the public, he may never be freed. a comfort perhaps to those who feel they've lost everything at the hands ofa man they've lost everything at the hands of a man they tried to help when he had nothing. just gone to 30 pm, you are watching bbc news, we will get the latest weather prospects from elina jenkins. cloudy and breezy but mainly dry.
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rain arriving in northern ireland, western and southern scotland and northern england. tonight, sinking slowly eastwards and south, persistent rain and also heavy gales. parts of wales, the midlands and into east anglia. a blustery but milder night. quite unsettled start to the day across central and southern parts of england, strong winds and rain for a time, clearing southwards anderson should come out for many. a few blustery showers. despite any sung—jin, given the strength of the wind, it will feel fairly cool. the sky is becoming clear and perhaps a touch of frost in more rural spots. bright with some sunshine and much of the day cloud increasing from the west through the afternoon. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines — a gruelling day for theresa may at the tory party conference — as she struggles through her keynote speech with a cough and is interrupted by prankster offering her a pa5 letter. police in las vegas say they're no closer to finding a motive behind the attack on a concert on sunday which left 58 dead and hundreds injured. overnight the girlfriend of the gunman returned to the us. media reports say marilou danley, who was in the philippines at the time of the shootings, is being questioned by the fbi as a "person of interest". the head of the catalan police force has been summoned to testify as a suspect before spain's high court, as the battle over the region's disputed independence referendum heats up. it comes as pro—independence catalan leaders are pressing ahead with plans to declare independence "within days" despite an emphatic warning from king felipe vi.
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a homeless man who murdered a mother and son who'd tried to help him has been jailed for at least 30 years. 2a—year—old aaron barley pleaded guilty to stabbing tracy wilkinson and her teenage son pierce at their home in stourbridge in march. he also attempted to murder her husband, peter. bit more reaction to the speech of theresa may, in rather troubled speech, interrupted by a prankster handing her what seemed to be a pa5 but also a coughing fit which went on for much of the speech. foreign secretary boris johnson on for much of the speech. foreign secretary borisjohnson who has widely been seen as many observers as seeking the leadership for himself, says that two may delivered quote, a brilliant speech. he also said that she had a cold but did a
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fantastic job of said that she had a cold but did a fantasticjob of getting over a crucial message. boris johnson called the speech inspiring and said most important thing is that she set out her vision of how to renew the british dream. boris johnson out her vision of how to renew the british dream. borisjohnson who's often been accused of undermining theresa may's authority, saying it was a brilliant speech, saying she had a cold but did a fantasticjob of getting your message across. we also getting a statement, i should add, from the conservative in response to the arrest that followed that man handing the promise to what looked like a pa5. they say in the light of the arrest, during the speech, we are working with the police to review the accreditation process and the security arrangements for the party conference. we were talking to our home affairs correspondent about
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that and about questions inevitably for security at the tory party conference so the conservatives are saying they are working with the police to review the accreditation process and the security arrangements for the party conference. more on that as it comes into us. let's catch up with all of the gay‘s sport news. premier league clubs have been meeting today to discuss how to share money forfuture international broadcasting rights. we understand now and agreement has been arrived at, despite pressure from the leading teams. richard scudamore, the executive chairman, has proposed ending the 25 years of the equal sharing of that income. the so—called big six want their greater global appeal to be reflected in the division of money and they want more finances awarded for higher placed finishes in the table. leicester city's appeal
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to register adrien silva has been rejected by fifa. the foxes and the football association had asked fifa to ratify the midfielder‘s transfer after the paperwork for the £22 million deadline day move from sporting lisbon was submitted 1a seconds late. but it's been denied and silva, who helped portugal win euro 2116, will now not be registered to play for leicester until january. the former england batsman marcus trescothick says it will be a "huge blow" for the side if ben stokes does not travel to australia for the ashes. the test vice captain will be withdrawn from the squad if he remains under police investigation when the tour begins. stokes was arrested following an incident outside a bristol nightclub last month. no charges have yet been brought, with police putting no timescale on the inquiry.
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the team flies out to australia on the 28th of october. ben is such a key player. when you see the likes of jacques kallis of south africa, it makes such a difference to a team when you have the genuine all—rounder position. ben has been that for england for a couple of years now. i think it would be very tricky to go down there and really win the ashes, but you never know. you cannot rely on one person is to win any competition, but it would go a long way because of the role they play so it would be a big loss. stoke's team—mate jack burnham has failed a drug test. he failed the test after providing a sample in september. durham say he will receive their support as long as the professional cricketers association and the ecb. former two—weight world champion carl frampton has named the opponent for his comeback bout next month. he'll face mexican horacio garcia in belfast.
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the fight will be frampton's first contest since moving from away from long—time manager barry mcguigan to join promoter frank warren and first since losing his world featherweight title back injanuary. harry kane will captain england in their world cup qualifier against slovenia. he has been in great form. more on that in the next hour. let's ta ke let's take you back to the conservative party conference, more reaction to that speech by two may at the conference that was interrupted a few minutes and she had to be handed a cough sweet by the chancellor to help her get through it. but also by a prankster holding a bit of paper that said pas. this holding a bit of paper that said pa5. this was we now know a man, lea n pa5. this was we now know a man, lean nelson, a comic, real name
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simon bird kim, who wasjoking with borisjohnson simon bird kim, who wasjoking with boris johnson and asked simon bird kim, who wasjoking with borisjohnson and asked him to perform that prank during the speech. in the light of what happened during the speech, they say they are working with the police to review the accreditation process and the security arrangements for party conferences. there are some security questions about how that prankster could get so close to the prime minister before being led away. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in manchester. some questions for the organisers of the conference about how that prankster could get so close. that's the most serious thing i think in all of this, that he was able to get close to the prime minister. he did have accreditation which he had paid for but he seemed to be up there so long right next hour, close enough to hand her that paper. cabinet ministers i spoken to were clearly
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shocked. that he wasn't bundled out more quickly. we can see it happening, we could hear what was going on. he seemed to be saying, boris has sent me to give you all of this. it shook theresa may. after that, there weather problems with her voice, struggling to get through all of that. we have had a statement from borisjohnson saying afterwards that the prime minister had delivered a brilliant speech, adding she had a cold but did a fantastic job of getting over a crucial message. and we have also had a tweet from the prime minister. i don't know if you can see it, hopefully you can. the prime minister tweeting a picture of the prime ministerial red box with her papers in, surrounded by a number of cough remedies of which we have all been using because as ever, the
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conference cold has been going around. people are saying it is make or break, it's an important moment for her going into this conference, ina for her going into this conference, in a pretty weak position. who knows whether it is just sympathy that may be what reigns today. let's talk to lucy fisher from the times. it was ha rd to lucy fisher from the times. it was hard to watch, whatever your political beliefs, not watching that struggle of someone live on tv on the stage, it was really difficult. it was excruciating at times and i felt emotionally exhausted at the end of it. you were almost willing to the end. just wondering how soon it was going to end. it was quite painful. was there anything they could have done? the prankster getting in at one thing, her voice going was another, some have said they could have done more flair to cut down on the stuff she was doing this week. and then bits falling off the stage at the back, you've seen anything like it. the things she
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couldn't help, having a cold, the prankster getting in and getting close enough to her, a different thing, but the set falling apart, many questions for the national convention, it gives a very unprofessional look. people pretty unimpressed. the two big policy announcements, they are not without controversy themselves. this big housing announcement of 25,000 new homes is not the mass house—building programme many had hoped for. and a pledge to introduce the energy price cap was one of the conservatives' manifesto pledges. some clarification from number ten after, there might not be legislation after, it depends whether ofgem speed up their own regulations on that front so that might not be all it appears to be either. the question is, does the other stuff matter? that she had a cough, the stage was falling apart, is it
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because she was in a weakened position when she came into this, that's what makes this even worse thanit that's what makes this even worse than it might have been? absolutely and all those factors together, just one problem might have been forgiven but the fact this all came together, this conference was really about her authority. she came in in and incredibly fragile and precarious position and the public, the party, mps, activists, have been left with the impression of a party and leadership in freefall. downing street will be very much hoping that the headlines at some point will be about the policy is saying about housing and energy as well. i think we all know most people will be looking at that i'm seeing the other problem is that went on during that speech and that will inevitably at least get the cartoonists going i'm sure. i think it might. let's get more now on catalonia — where the leader of the autonomous region has told the bbc that independence could be declared within days.
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joining me down the line is dr uta staiger — co—founder of the european institute at university college london. thank you for being with us. what would you say are the implications, if they do declare independence, after this referendum and after that police crackdown that we saw during the referendum ? police crackdown that we saw during the referendum? the invitations would be huge. they are both domestic in nature and they would be international in nature. domestic, they would be going against the constitutional settlement and the spanish government would most likely ta ke spanish government would most likely take measures to go against the declaration of independence. even if they didn't which would be unlikely, they didn't which would be unlikely, the question is, would they internationally recognised and there is evidence they would. this has a lwa ys is evidence they would. this has always been a problem with it being
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always been a problem with it being a unilateral declaration. when you say take measures against independence, we saw what the police did the other day, during the vote and it was often quite bloody and forceful. are you anticipating there would be more force if they were to crack down on a declaration of independence? that's the worst case scenario of course. yesterday, the king made a televised address in which he used very forceful words, not specifying things but he called for the state to restore constitutional order. and the constitutional order. and the constitution does to some extent at least wa rra nt constitution does to some extent at least warrant the use of force to maintain unity of spain. whether thatis maintain unity of spain. whether that is the route they are willing to go down, given the international response, i would say, to the police riots and police violence we have seen, is questionable. but i wouldn't at this point rule it out. we have been told there isn't
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actually a majority in catalonia for independence but clearly the tougher the line from madrid and from the central government, the harder the crackdown. we saw that on sunday. the more it throws people in catalonia into the arms of the independence movement. absolutely. pa rt independence movement. absolutely. part of the issue, there has never been a majority for independence, there is a clear majority in favour of holding some sort of referendum thatis of holding some sort of referendum that is equally recognised to finally address this issue one way or another. but the results of this vote and the turnout were quite similarto vote and the turnout were quite similar to those in 201a when again it wasn't recognised by the spanish central government but it wasn't accompanied by any pressure. you would therefore say there is no majority for it. you've also got to consider that the latest elections
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we re consider that the latest elections were meant to give a vote beyond 50% for the lists aspiring to declare independence, that's the last official elections. and they fell just short of that. but there is a clear worry that whatever is happening right now, it'sjust going to exacerbate things, people very undecided about it and haven't made up undecided about it and haven't made up their mind. thank you. amazon has been ordered to repay more than £220 million in back taxes — after the eu said it had been given an unfair tax advantage in luxembourg. it's the latest big us company to be reined in by the eu competition regulator. we spoke earlier to our business correspondent theo leggett who explained what this sweetheart deal meant for amazon. amazon had set up a system where it
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was channelling its profits from its main european business based in luxembourg into another company where they were shielded from tax. in theory, these were royalty payments for using the amazon brand and the commission reckons that doesn't hold water, it was simply an artificial structure to reduce its tax bill. but it was authorised by the luxembourg government so as far as amazon was concerned, it was perfectly legal. the commission has decided it is an artificial substitute and other companies would be able to have this kind of deal so luxembourg have to go back to amazon and recover that money. ina in a moment, all the business news but our latest bbc news headlines before that. one of the most gruelling speeches of her career, as theresa may tries to unite her party at the conservative party conference. police in los angeles have released footage of the first responders to the mass shooting. the shooter set
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up the mass shooting. the shooter set up cameras around his hotel room to watch the police approach. catalonia will declare independence from spain within days, the region's leader tells the bbc, following sunday's disputed referendum. hello. this is the business news. shares in energy companies have been falling after theresa may promised a cap on energy prices. annual bills have doubled over the past decade to an average of about £1,200. mrs may said the energy market was "broken". profits at tesco soared in the first half of the year. that figure came in at £760 million — a rise of more than 20%. it's also paying dividends for the first time in two years. the new owners of yahoo say all three billion user accounts were affected by a major data hack in 2013 — three times the original estimate.
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but it is thought the stolen information did not include passwords or bank details. president trump says that investors may have to write off the huge debts owed by the us territory of puerto rico. it comes as the island tries to recover from the devastation caused by hurricane maria. earlier in the year, it declared itself bankrupt. samira hussainjoins us from new york. donald trump said that we should look at the entire debt structure of puerto rico, what did he mean by that? coupled with that comment, he really also talked about trying to race a lot of that debt so the question is whether or not the president would actually do that. the story is a little complicated because puerto rico is not actually
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a state but it is a territorial so it's not really allowed to declare bankruptcy. earlier this year, it's not really allowed to declare bankruptcy. earlierthis year, it did declare bankruptcy because congress passed a law that allowed them to do that. the current situation is that on one side other creditors, the other side, the puerto rican government and in the middle, a federal board that's been appointed to try to mediate both sides. they have been at a for quite a few months. there are some people that believe that perhaps mr trump could apply pressure to that federal board in terms of coming to some sort of agreement or getting rid of some of that debt. where does all of this leave investors? so that's the other question, especially now i'm here on wall street, a lot of investors are wondering where that leaves them. there are some investors that aren't very worried because this could just be more
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president trump bluster. but in terms of who the investors are, it's interesting because it is notjust those hedge funds and big—time investors that you would normally think of. there are also retail investors that have money in puerto rico. because it is really about the long game, you will see their retirement funds also involved in puerto rico. it could have an impact on regular everyday consumers. thank you. and in other business news — unite said it will take legal action on behalf of almost 2,000 workers who lost theirjobs when monarch airlines collapsed on monday. the union said it would lodge employment tribunal proceedings over the company's failure to consult the workers on redundancies, and said the employers had not given the necessary notice or statutory pay. topps tiles says that despite a moderate improvement in trading in ourfinal quarter, "market conditions remain challenging".
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the retailer now expects adjusted pre—tax profits for the year to september will be at the "lower end of the current range of market expectations". more news from the european commission — it is taking ireland to the european court ofjustice for its failure to recover up to 13 billion euros of tax due from apple. the ec ordered the us company in august 2016 to pay the unpaid tax as it ruled the firm had received illegal state aid — one of a number of deals the eu has targeted between multinationals and usually smaller eu states. centrica who owns british gas are down 6.5% following to reason made's vowed to cap energy prices. that's all the business news. alina jenkins has the weather. some wet and potentially windy
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weather for the next couple of hours. the rain will become persistent through northern ireland, western and southern scotland and northern england. more in the way of sunshine for northern and eastern parts of scotland but still some blustery showers. easing by the end of the day along with the winds. it will be quite a wet rush hour across western and southern scotland, northern ireland and england, the wind strengthening. some of the rain getting into the far north of wales and the midlands but by and large, the further south, should stay largely dry. more cloud than yesterday, the wind slightly stronger. it will feel cooler despite a few bright sunny spells. we keep our ion this low—pressure overnight. some strong winds and they could call some local travel problems through the early hours. it will be a milder night than the one
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just gone. the strength of the wind giving us some cause for concern, particularly through parts of wales, the midlands, into east anglia through the early hours tomorrow. could bring some branches down off the trees. a lovely day in central and southern england. the rain finally clearing southwards and behind it, some spells of sunshine and a few showers still feeding down. the strength of the wind making it feel quite cold. tomorrow evening and overnight, those winds losing some of their strength and with clearer skies, it will turn into quite a chilly night, perhaps a touch of frost in more rural spots. a chilly end to the week but a bright start to many, plenty of sunshine for a good part of the day but cloud increasing slowly from the west. it should stayjust but cloud increasing slowly from the west. it should stay just about but cloud increasing slowly from the west. it should stayjust about dry for most. as we go into the weekend, this frontal system toppling its way across the country which will bring some rain for many through saturday.
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not much to it but some damp conditions through much of the day on and off and a noticeable wind. a fairly cool feel given the strength of the breeze and the cloud and the rain. sunday looking to be the better day of the weekend, mainly dry and a bit more in the way of sunshine. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 3pm: a gruelling day for the prime minister at the tory party conference as she struggles through her keynote speech. theresa may battled through repeated coughing fits. and the chancellor came to her rescue with a cough sweet. i hope you notice that, ladies and gentlemen, the chancellor giving something away free! laughter her speech was also interrupted by a prankster emerging from the audience to hand her
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a sheet of paper marked pa5. security arrangements are being reviewed. in her speech, the prime minister promised a cap
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