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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 6, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 3.00pm. theresa may and fifth she has the cabinet support after former party chairgrant cabinet support after former party chair grant shapps calls her to step down. what i think is necessary for the country now is calm leadership, that's what i'm providing, and i'm providing that with the full support of my cabinet. the fact is he doesn't speak on behalf of any who he sees as potential candidates in the cabinet. they support theresa may, so do i, now is the time to shut up and behind her. ab a father loses a claim for damages against an ivf clinic — after his ex—partner forged his signature to use frozen embryos. the catalan parliament will defy madrid and press ahead with the debate that could trigger a declaration of independence. raison d'etre and a final farewell.
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the funeral of the coronation street actor, liz dawn. and ben stokes will not go to australia with the rest of the ashes squad after his arrest last month. good afternoon. theresa may has said she's providing "calm leadership" as she responded to moves to oust her by grant shapps, former chairman of the conservative party. he claims up to 30 tory mps — including five former cabinet ministers — want to force a leadership contest that would unseat the prime minister. mrs may's allies have dismissed it as a plot that is fizzling out.
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our political correspondent leila nathoo reports from westminster. away from westminster, an attempt to clear the air. seemingly unphased by questions over her authority, a message to those who want her out. what i think is necessary for the country now, what the country needs is calm leadership. that's exactly what i'm providing and i'm providing that with the full support of my cabinet. he's been revealed as the ring leader of a plot to oust theresa may from downing street, former party chairman, grant shapps. he claims up to 30 mps, including five former cabinet ministers are in favour of telling her, her time is up. over a period of time since the general election that went badly wrong, there are a lot of colleagues who feel we could be better served by having a leadership election sooner rather than later, this was to gather those people together, in order to be able to say that to her. under the party rules it takes 48
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tory mps to officially register their discontent to trigger a leadership contest. at the moment, the current group of rebels falls short. they had planned to approach the prime minister directly to express concerns, but now their intentions are out in the open it is unclear if they can still mount a challenge. theresa may's critics have been spurred on by the calamitous conference speech but her cabinet colleagues are rushing to her defence. i think that the prime minister's been doing a fantasticjob. i think that the conservative party and mps, the supporters in the country and the voters are focussed on just one thing: making sure that the prime minister can be supported. she has no obvious successor and her mps don't want to risk another election but she must tighten her grip on her party. this plot may fizzle out but her opponents are circling. earlier i spoke to nigel evans who
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sits on the executive of the 1922 committee. i asked sits on the executive of the 1922 committee. iasked him how sits on the executive of the 1922 committee. i asked him how serious was the plot against the prime minister? not serious at all it is irritating, frankly. it started off asa irritating, frankly. it started off as a pathetic attempt, i see it more ofa as a pathetic attempt, i see it more of a tantrum than a coup. it started off below the 30 numbers. it could be ten. we don't know how many he's got. we know it is not a8, that is needed to trigger a leadership election. we don't want an early leadership election, we don't want an early general election. we have heard theresa may is providing the calm leadership, which she is. what grant shapps has to do is calm down. theresa may had the legendary conference cold, when you get a cold, you take strepsils, not a
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revolver. grant shapps, had the opportunity, post the general election, it was a disaster but she still got a3% of the vote, getting way better than david cameron two years earlier, and she got rid of key people that let her down badly during the campaign, that was the opportunity for grant to speak up but he didn't. he is sniping from the sidelines now. he is providing ammunition forjeremy corbyn. and we have to remember that theresa may and david davies are going into the difficult communications over brussels, and he is using these issues for stalling discussions and making it more difficult. so grant is helping that. he had his best chance at this. he complained during the party conference about the party chairman. then he switched to the prime minister. he's had his go. the bandwagon he has been trying to push
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over the prime minister is now rolling over him. the problem is that grant shapps is not the emperson questioning theresa may's leadership. questions have been going on since her election, months. they are not helping anything of the things you mentioned? grant is not helping the prime minister, he is not helping the country. is her leadership helping? yes it is. i see the prime minister performing at the dispatch box every wednesday. she is amazing. she knocks spots offjeremy corbyn. she is a great performer. she is now providing what 17.5 she is a great performer. she is now providing what17.5 million voted for during the referendum and indeed grant shapps‘ own constituency voted to leave the european union so, grant shapps has to get behind the prime minister in order to deliver for his constituents. but in all the newspapers over the mornings, there have been questions over her leadership, herauthority, how
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should she restore that authority? it was missed at the conference, bad luck but how can she do it now? she just needs to carry on. the cabinet is 100% behind her. when parliament gets back on monday at westminster, we will have the opportunity to realliy around her. and grant has to ensure had eproperly calms down. he has had the opportunity to phone around people to see how many discontented people he can get. i understand why he feels his greatness has been overlooked by the prime minister but let's be fair, the vast majority of the parliament, 318, are not elected into the government. we get behind the government. i know that grant three weeks ago, told the bbc, when asked, would he like to be the prime minister, he said "yes", who would not want to be the prime minister, well, grant, you
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are not going to be the prime minister. we have theresa may. we have somebody we endorse as the person who has won over 13.5 million votes at the last general election. just get behind her. quite flankly, the time has come to shut up. is that the problem, he has no idea who should be there instead? there is no natural? is that the problem? no it is not. theresa may announced she has the support 100% of the cabinet. soh is grant speaking on behalf of? some people? we is have heard of five former cabinet ministers being sacked. there are people that are bitter but he does not speak on behalf of any who he sees as potential candidates in the cabinet. they support theresa may, so doi, cabinet. they support theresa may, so do i, now is the time for grant to shut up and get behind her. in many instances i don't want to
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touch my child but i love my child. that then fills me conversely with this deep profound levels of guilt asi this deep profound levels of guilt as i can't reconcile the fact that i don't want the child. the child is not responsible for its being. butl...| not responsible for its being. but i... i can't square that circle. it's very, very difficult. now, the father had been seeking for man £1 million in damages to pay for things like his daughter's private education, for a gap year, even for decorating her bedroom and a generous wedding. now this claim was dismissed. although the clinic had been negligent, although the clinic had breached contract, it had not been negligent. ivf hammersmith said it had tightened its procedures. we are pleased that the judge ruled
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in ourfavour we were we are pleased that the judge ruled in our favour we were not negligent and dismissed the case against the clinic it is matter of law if she forced the signature. we didn't have his written consent but moving forward as a clinic, we should a lwa ys forward as a clinic, we should always contact both parties, so this should never happen again. so, thejudge said should never happen again. so, the judge said that the father should be seen as a complete personal and moral vindication of his position. this year's nobel peace prize has been awarded to the international campaign to abolish nuclear weapons — ican. the norwegian nobel committee praised the organisation's effort to achieve a ban on nuclear weapons. ican said the award sent a message to president trump and to north korea that having nuclear weapons and threatening to use them was illegal. i spoke to our diplomatic correspondent paul adams. it is interesting, if you look at
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their record, about once every ten yea rs their record, about once every ten years they pick out nuclear campaigners for this kind of accolade. so they have picked one that most people, frankly, will never have heard of, as they have been around for ten years but they we re been around for ten years but they were behind this move to get this treaty signed in the summer, 122 countries that have signed on to that. crucially, of course, they are not nuclear powers and that, i think, highlights the fundamental problem here. the possession of nuclear weapons has become so crucial in geopolitical terms, in terms of national, international status, position on the un security council, all of that, that it is not going to happen tomorrow. that countries with nuclear weapons are suddenly going to decide to get rid of them. but for the nobel committee, they look around the world today, they say it is probably about as dangerous as it has been for a long time. you venal to look at the last few months of the north
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months at the north korea's tests, and that there are real dangers and in this environment it is not a bad idea to highlight the issue. so with trump, with north korea, everything that has been rumbling on, what else has been talked about? it is interesting, there would have been aen pointed gesture by the nobel committee, a rebuff to donald trump had they appointed another committee. it was asked by a journalist, was this a message to the situation, a message to trump
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but it is very much a message to those at the centre of the current nuclear row, if you like, trump is clearly one of those. then a statement from ican, they spoke about fiery rhetoric being part of the problem, and we know what that is, donald trump's fire and fury remarks. so the timing is crucial. it is about every ten years that we see the nuclear campaigners coming up. but some would say this is as good as any to have that particular focus. the catalan leader has asked to address the region's parliament on tuesday, a day later than planned, when he may declare independence from spain. it comes as the senior spanish police officers issued an anonymous mouse letter of apology for the police violence last sunday. we have this report from barcelona. v0|ceover: another day, another development in the crisis.
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swiss authorities confirmed they have contacted the spanish government, offering to help as negotiator. but there seems little chance of that, spain's prime minister refusing any dialogue, he is clear that separatist parties have broken the constitution, unless plans to break off are cancelled. across the spectrum of left and right wing newspapers, in spain catalonia, headlines are the same, banks leaving, other companies threatening to do the same, a countdown to crisis. in three days' time, the catalan government is set for separation, and there is desperate planning for what happens next. 0ne catalan workers union is calling for people to take to the streets and close businesses next week. on tuesday next week, after the declaration, we are calling for a general strike for five days. from tuesday. because we saw last week, the violent police crackdown accosting the rights of the workers.
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we are standing up for the rights of the workers in the country. today, a group of senior spanish police officers wrote an anonymous letter of apology for the police violence during the referendum and said that they were ashamed and that it was a difficult event. here some talk about feeling intimidated to work on their streets, given the public backlash and worry about the days ahead. translation: i do not see civil war, somebody who declares independence does not want to be part of spain, that could cause confrontation on the streets. the divide has even spilled over into sport, it has affected the spanish football team playing in alicante tonight, just days after gerard pique was booed in training for supporting the rights of catalans to vote for their future. in the past few minutes, carles puigdemont has quested
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to appear before catalan parliament to make an announcement on tuesday, suggesting there is a chance that any declaration on independence could be delayed by 2a hours. the headlines on bbc news. theresa may makes it clear to tory rebels she intends to stay at number ten despite claims of a plot to oust her, saying she's providing "calm leadership". a father loses a claim for damages against an ivf clinic — after his ex—partner forged his signature to use frozen embryos. the catalan parliament will defy madrid and press ahead with its debate, it could trigger a declaration of independence. ben stokes will not travel with england and the wreathes of the squad to australia at the end of the month. the ecb says that a final
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decision on the ashes tour is to be made. and the games federation extended the deadline, describing the bid as not fully compliant. and the funeral of liz dawn, coronation street's vera duckworth for 3a years, is being held today at salford cathedral. liz dawn died last week at the age of 77. simonjones is in salford for us. simon, a finalfarewell to a woman loved by millions. millions of people tuned in.
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watching liz dawn playing the iconic character of vera duckworth. the service has been well under way for an hour. hardly surprising as part of it involves liz dawn's son, looking over her career. it started off as she was sing in clubs, to forge a career. then getting bit parts in television programmes. she got a major role for a play today based in leeds. that brought her to the attention of the producers for coronation street. that offered her the part of vera duckworth. but over the part of vera duckworth. but over the years that part became important especially when her on—screen husband, jack duckworth was introduced. the pair of them became iconic figures in coronation street. loved by millions of people. that went on for years and years. now people questioned why as characters they stayed together, because there we re they stayed together, because there were lots of rows. but there was also lots of laughter too. that very
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much sums up the life of liz dawn. the message that we are getting from the congregation is that when she met people they were left with a sense of laughter. as well as her acting, we are hearing about her charity work, she actually received an mbe for her charity work, raising money for local hospitals. she became ill. she was diagnosed with emphysema. after that, after she left the soap in 2008 she began raising awareness of lung disease. she wanted people to be aware of the consequences of it. she put it down, her suffering from it to smoking from an early age. also the fact early in her career in the pubs and clu bs early in her career in the pubs and clubs she played to smoke—filled rooms. here amongst the congregation, many stars of coronation street past and present are taking part in the service.
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0utside are taking part in the service. outside of the cathedral quite a few people have gathered. they didn't know liz dawn but felt that they new the character of vera duckworth. she came into their homes night after night over a 3a year period. one woman i spoke to her, she was in tea rs, woman i spoke to her, she was in tears, she didn't know her but wa nted tears, she didn't know her but wanted to come to pay her respects to an amazing actress who gave so much to so many people. thank you simon. simonjones at thank you simon. simon jones at the thank you simon. simonjones at the funeral of liz dawn, taking place at salford cathedral. more from him later. several uk retailers have stopped selling baby sleep positioners also known as baby nests —— because of concerns about their safety. a us health regulator said they can cause suffocation and have been linked to 12 infant deaths in america. the products are aimed at babies under six months old and are designed to keep them in the same position while they sleep. adina campbell reports. known as baby nests or baby pods, these sleep positioners have become increasingly popular with parents worldwide.
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but now there are safety fears, described as dangerous by the us health regulator, the fda. it's now advising parents not to use them, claiming they can cause suffocation, resulting in death. babies are safest lying on firm flat surfaces. they can and do move but they don't necessarily have as good control of their bodies at young ages as adults so they can easily get into trouble and not be able to get out of that again. the move has caused some of the uk's biggest retailers to also take action. tesco, which sells baby nests on its website, has now made them unavailable. john lewis says it's now withdrawing the one it sells as a precautionary measure. mothercare has told us it's doing the same. ebay has also announced it will no longer be selling them on its websites.
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the sleep positioners have high sides, designed to keep babies under significance months secure. six months secure. but parents are divided about them. they are just perfect. because they can't move. you can close it here. it keeps them warm. i like it, my sister likes it. i notice if you know how to position the bar at the bottom where the legs are supposed to be supported, otherwise the baby hunches and you can see it could obstruct breathing. this isn't the first time a warning has been given about these baby nests. in 2010, the fda advised people not to buy them following reports of 12 infant deaths linked to the products. it and the nhs recommends that babies sleep in cots, considered to be the safest place. the sale of almost all ivory,
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including "antique" items, would be banned under plans set out by the government to help end elephant poaching. the environment secretary michael gove has announced a three month public consultation on the proposals. trade in musical instruments and some cultural objects would still be allowed. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh reports. a bonfire of tusks, taken from 6000 elephants, slaughtered in kenya for their ivory. their number has declined by almost a third this decade and almost 20,000 are killed each year. the government says they want to ban ivory sales in the uk and has launched a 12 week consultation on its plan. thousands of elephants are being killed every year simply to fuel the illegal ivory trade, we have to act.
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i'm announcing consultation on a total ban for every product, to ensure that we stamp out this evil trade and make sure that one of the most iconic and beautiful animals in the world is there for the next generation. chiswick auctions sells ivory objects more than 100 years old. the current rules allow the trading object created before 19a7, such as these 18th—century miniature portraits of these figures. under new proposals, their sale would be banned, that is something the antiques industry thinks is unfair. if you criminalise something, this underground market may appear, a black market, and you cannot control that. will it stop the trade at large of illegal ivory and current poaching? i don't see it. these objects are not inexpensive, they are being sold as antique artworks, they are paid for, as objects of that type. the new proposals will still allow the sale works of art, objects of cultural or historic value. there is some concerns that such exemptions could become loopholes for the antiques industry but overall, conservation
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groups are pleased. we want to see this in place within a year, so that when the conference is hosted next year, they can demonstrate they are a global leader in tackling the trade. britain willjoin the us and china, if it bans ivory trade, who have made recent moves, which could save elephants from extinction in parts of africa. cricketer ben stokes will not travel to australia with the rest of the ashes squad at the end of the month. he is under investigation after being arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm last month. 0ur sports correspondent joe wilsonjoins me now. i guess that they are keeping options open. they are not saying he won't go to the ashes at all but he won't travel with the rest of the team later this
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month. we expected that. to a certain extent, this is out of the ecb's hands. they have their internal investigation but of course there is a criminal investigation ongoing. it is seen for a long time, in an ethical sense, in a practical sense, it is impossible for ben stokes to go to the ashes with this hanging over him. they also announced that ben stokes has had his contract renewed, so he is still an england player. andrew strauss is trying to bring clarity to the situation but what they have done is named steve finn, the fast bowler in the ashes squad, he was not initially, there, so they have named a replacement, even though ben stokes is still in the squad, they have not suspended him yet, even though they have said that ben stokes and alex hales are not
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available for selection. there has been an outcry about this? yes. many people asking why ben stokes was out on a night out until 2.00am in the morning when on tour. we have had confirmation from the ecb of different disciplinary proceedings, going into the behaviour of that squad. behrenger behrehoundougou, liam ball and liam plu nkett behrehoundougou, liam ball and liam plunkett have been fined and warned for unprofessional conduct is what the ecb are saying. ——jonny the ecb are saying. —— jonny bairstow. they relates to the behaviour of that squad at that
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time. so when you look at this, is this damaging to their chances? well, a lot of people would say that ben stokes is not only england's best player but one of the best players in the world. but other matters have to come into play, the image of the team, and above all else, the criminal proceedings that are ongoing against him. thank you very much. more news with holly at the sport centre in a moment. but first, the weather news. to the other side of the studio, where we will find chris rich. —— ben rich. up —— ben rich. up to the north—west things are starting to go downhill. there are clouds and outbreaks of rain spreading in. through the evening, the wet weather sinking south and east. some heavier bursts over the hills and the west. milder than last night. up to 11 celsius. saturday, a drab start to the weekend. mostly cloudy. 0utbreaks drab start to the weekend. mostly cloudy. 0utbrea ks of drab start to the weekend. mostly cloudy. outbreaks of rain. rain over the southern and south—western areas. rain pushing from the north—west with cloud. spots favoured to see brightness, perhaps
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south wales, central and southern england and north—east england and eastern scotland. breezy but the temperatures no so bad. up to 17 celsius. sunday on balance is the better day of the weekend. a fair amount of cloud but bright spells in the east. in the west a little more cloud. a few showers at times. lighter winds and highs of 13 to 17 celsius. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. theresa may has responded to some back bench calls for her to leave office by insisting she is providing "calm leadership" with the full support of the cabinet. a father has lost a damages claim againstan a father has lost a damages claim against an ivf clinic after his former partnerforged his against an ivf clinic after his former partner forged his signature and had his baby without his consent. the funeral of coronation street actress liz dawn
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is taking place today — her former co—stars are in attendance to pay their respects. and a us health regulator says baby sleep positioners are not safe, because they can cause suffocation, some, but not all, uk shops have stopped selling them. a former army intelligence officer has won substantial damages after his computer was hacked by private detectives working for the defunct news of the world newspaper. 0ur legal affairs correspondent, clive coleman, is outside the high court, and can tell us more about the case. tell us more about what happened. this is a long and complicated but extraordinary story. it concerns a man called ian hirst. he worked in military intelligence in northern ireland between 1980 and 1991. his
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job was to infiltrate the ira in order to gain intelligence. in 200a he co—authored a book called ian hurst. that was the codename for the ira's head of security. in 2006 the news of the world became interested in this story and through private investigators, proved the newspaper management, private investigators we re management, private investigators were hired. a man called jonathan rhys who ran an investigation agency and a man called philip campbell smith. through those private detectives a virus was put onto ian hirst‘s computer and it was effectively hacked. his e—mails were intercepted. ian hurst was
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com pletely intercepted. ian hurst was completely unaware of this until 2000 -- 2011when completely unaware of this until 2000 —— 2011 when panorama made a programme about it and told him about the fact his computer had been hacked. he started a legal action back then but the news of the world had always denied any unlawful activity. it was only today that his statement was read in open court in which the publishers of the newspapers admitted there was this hacking, but it took place during a three—month period during 2006 and possibly beyond that, and they have agreed to pay ian hurst and his family substantial damages. they've undertaken this activity will never happen again. one of the extraordinary aspects is that in 2006 the serious organised crime agency became aware of this hacking. they took that evidence and information to the metropolitan
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police but they did nothing with it. they didn't tell ian hurst about it. in that respect this case has some echoes of the phone hacking scandal because the metropolitan police were in possession of information but that wasn't then passed on to victims. today is a vindication of that 2011 panorama programme which brought this to light and which the news of the world and its publishers had consistently denied that the wrongdoing had taken place. it's a vindication of the panorama programme, it opens questions about why the metropolitan police didn't pass the information on to ian hurst. today after a legal battle that spanned six years, ian hurst is going to receive substantial damages, as is his wife and daughter because the hacking also involved their e—mails, and the publishers of
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their e—mails, and the publishers of the news of the world have undertaken and ensured the court this sort of behaviour will never happen again. thank you. now for a look at the sport. ben stokes will not travel to australia with the rest of the ashes squad at the end of the month. the ecb says a final decision is yet to be made on whether he will be involved in the series at all, but if he is, he will join at a later stage. stokes is under investigation after being arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm last month. but he is among the eight test players awarded contract by the ecb today. the policing investigation is paramount, that's the more important
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of the investigations. 0nly paramount, that's the more important of the investigations. only when that happens will be ecb disciplinary process kicked in as well. i would suspect that if stokes we re well. i would suspect that if stokes were to be charged by the police would make it difficult for him to tour. all indications are that he's not going to stop the tour so i would suggest that's the way it's looking. steven finn has been added to the ashes squad. he will stay in australia for the full five match series. jonny bairstow and liam plunkett have been given written warnings for their conduct. an investigation began today. the ecb says these are not connected to the stokes incident. there is "an increasing political risk that qatar may not host the world cup in 2022", according to a confidential report obtained by the bbc. the study looks at the impact of the current diplomatic crisis between qatar and its neighbours — the authors claim that tournament insiders and regional experts have told them it is far from certain doha will actually host the tournament. however, the qatar 2022 delivery committee say there is absolutely no risk to the project.
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there's been a worrying development in birmingham's bid to host the commonwealth games in 2022. the deadline forbids has been extended to the end of november after the application fully compliant. they say they are seeking clarification and there will be talks with the federation over the next few weeks. i think they are annoyed and surprised over how this has been handled. but i think realistically the games will end up going to birmingham in 2022 for the first time. simply because even though this has happened today and the deadline has been extended until the end of november, it's not certain that any other cities will bid, and if they do, they won't be able to match birmingham's. kris commons says his side can win
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their crucial world cup qualifier without gareth bale. wales are in georgia this afternoon and says they must win if they are to have any hope of qualifying in russia next year. gareth bale has a calf injury. the quality we've got is good enough to play against any team. it's disappointing because if you take some one of this quality away it will be disappointing for anyone. we've got enough of a game plan, it's not going to change without tim. double 0lympic silver medallist jazz carlin is taking up 10k marathon swimming in a bid to become the first woman in history to win medals both in the pool and open water at the same games in tokyo 2020. carlin was second in the a00m and 800m freestyle at rio 2016 but struggled to find a direction after the games and withdrew from this summer's world championships. she says open water swimming has "revitalised" her love for the sport.
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she hopes to compete in the olympics in tokyo 2020. that's all the sport for now. plenty of build—up to wales' world cup qualifier. theresa may has said she is providing calm leadership and has the full support of her cabinet. it comes after a morning of intense speculation over her future following a former party chairman emerging as the ringleader of a backbench move to get the prime—minister to step down. grant shapps says up to 30 tory backbenchers want a leadership election, including five former cabinet ministers. we think theresa may is a very decent person, who took the gamble of that election which didn't pay off. we've not been able to relaunch since then. there have been mps who feel it would be right to have a
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change. they are trying to privately and ina change. they are trying to privately and in a way that wouldn't be embarrassing to her, be able to go and have that conversation and say that since she said she got us into the mess and would lead for as long as we wanted, that we would be able to have a conversation and say we think it would be better to have a leadership election at this time. 0ther cabinet colleagues jumped in to defend the prime minister. the home secretary amber rudd was one, writing in the telegraph that "the pm should stay". and the environment secretary michael gove also said he backed mrs may. i think the prime minister has been doing a fantasticjob this week, and she has the support of conservative mps and voters, who are focused on just one thing, making sure the prime minister is supported as she ensures that we spend more money on the national health service and fix the broken housing and energy markets, and as she leads the campaign, of which i am a part, to ensure that we deal with the illegal wildlife trade devastating parts of the world where some of the most iconic and beautiful animals live. it was just before lunchtime
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that the prime minister spoke to reporters from her constituency in maidenhead, where she addressed that plot to challenge her leadership. i have had a cold all this week, but i'm here at this fantastic event raising money forfamilies going through real difficulty. what the country needs is calm leadership. i will be updating mps next week on the florence speech which has given real momentum to the brexit talks, and i will also be introducing a draft bill to cap energy prices which will stop ordinary working families from being ripped off. do you have a message for those people in your party who don't support your leadership? what i think is necessary for the country now and what the country needs is calm leadership, that is exactly what i'm
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providing, and i'm providing that with the full support of my cabinet. thank you. the prime minister speaking to supporters in her constituency. a pharmacist who claimed islamic state were "not bad people" and showed a beheading video to children has been sentenced to six years in prison. 0ur correspondent, jeremy ball has been following the case at nottingham crown court. strong words from judge dickinson. he said that zameer ghumra committed a most shocking crime, a crime that has damaged two children and caused offence to the vast majority of law—abiding muslims. he said ghumra tried to turn a young child into a terrorist, by showing him dreadful beheading videos to radicalise him. he said ghumra hadn't shown any remorse. he said he spoke of taking both of these boys out to syria and hadn't shown any remorse. president trump is said to be planning to abandon the nuclear deal with iran,
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according to reports in washington. if he does, it could pave the way for congress to re—impose economic sanctions on iran. mr trump claims the iranians haven't lived up to the spirit of the agreement, as our correspondent richard galpin reports. after long painstaking negotiations, world leaders were finally able to announce injuly 2015 that a deal to curb iran's nuclear programme had been agreed with the iranian government. this historic agreement halting the growing crisis over suspicions that iran was building nuclear weapons. but right from his election campaign last year, donald trump has made clear he is totally opposed to what was one of the biggest achievements of the 0bama administration. he negotiated a disastrous deal with iran and then we watched them ignore its terms even before the i think was dry. iran cannot be allowed to have a nuclear weapon,
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cannot be allowed. remember that. cannot be allowed to have a nuclear weapon. and last night at a meeting with military commanders, the president spoke even more forcefully. signalling he is preparing to pull out of the iranian nuclear deal. we must put an end to iran's continued aggression and nuclear ambitions. they have not lived up to the spirit of their agreement. under the agreement, iran's nuclear facilities, like this one, have to drastically cut stockpiles of nuclear material. they also have to remove many of the centrifuges used. inspections of the sites by international experts have found that iran has met these demands. and donald trump's own defence secretary agrees with this assessment that the iranians have not so far broken the agreement. i believe at this point in time, absent indications to the contrary,
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it is something the president should consider staying with. despite this, us media is reporting that mr trump may make an announcement next week. if he does take steps to abandon the deal it will be up to congress to decide what to do next. in particular, whether to reimpose harsh sanctions on iran with all the consequences that could have. can 100 women solve four global problems in a month? sounds like a mammoth task for anyone, but that's the challenge for a selected group of women working as part of the bbc‘s 100 women season. challenge 0ne takes place in silicon valley in california where the team are battling to break through what's known as the glass ceiling of the tech industry. they've had just five days to invent, develop and deliver a prototype that tackles this gender—related problem. let's go live now to the computer
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history museum in san francisco, where our correspondent nuala mcgovernjoins us. how are they getting on? they are getting on really, really well. i have been so impressed by the work ethic, their determination and creativity. and also their ability to keep going with no sleep. these are two of the women helping us with the first ever bbc 100 women challenge to try and smash the glass ceiling. some of our viewers will have met them. you have something around your neck that looks very like the prototypes and designs i saw on your work desk. yes i am. it isa saw on your work desk. yes i am. it is a working prototype and we are going to demo it to the audience in a few minutes. why are you holding these motherboards? this is what's
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going to make it work. as a prototype lots of wires will be coming out and hopefully one day it will be more compact. this works? we've got it working and it's amazing, so i'm really excited. we we re amazing, so i'm really excited. we were up until three a. when it started working we were super excited. it's working, it's not going to be one of those moments where you go on stage without a prototype. these ladies are going onstage in about a5 minutes time it's very early morning here. we gave them one challenge to do and this is going to be something to do with connectivity? it's called collective sisterhood necklace. as i'm speaking i'm going to receive good vibes from my support network.
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i can't wait to see it. she went to love anything until the reveal. stay with the bbc and it will be rolled out throughout the day. you decided to do more than one thing. we had fun last night in palo alto. you wa nted fun last night in palo alto. you wanted to raise awareness of bro culture, where young white men are dominating particularly the tech boardrooms in silicon valley. dominating particularly the tech boardrooms in silicon valleym we nt boardrooms in silicon valleym went really well. an exciting moment for me was that we used a symbolic outfit and once we got out of the car is someone said, rosie! it was really nice to get the reaction that immediately people recognised it. they got me to dress up in a jumpsuit! you will see all that as well. we also had to carry something that was incredibly big and made out of wood that they had been drilling
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and creating, it looks amazing. you can't see it just yet. and creating, it looks amazing. you can't see itjust yet. this is the teaserfor can't see itjust yet. this is the teaser for our can't see itjust yet. this is the teaserfor our big reveal can't see itjust yet. this is the teaser for our big reveal which can't see itjust yet. this is the teaserfor our big reveal which is going to be happening with the bbc‘s 100 women later today. has this week changed the way think about the glass ceiling? yes. i was really excited that we had an opportunity to create something and notjust talk it. it's different when you do something about it, even if it's small steps, it gets us closer to the solution. working together with another amazing woman really personalises the idea that we can come together and make a difference. we are going to be watching whatever is revealed. it's really exciting what they have created in such a short space of time. you can watch the progress on the bbc website, we'll be rolling out all of the
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designs in the coming hours. brilliant, thank you. looking forward to seeing more. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc news. theresa may tells tory rebels she intends to stay at number 10 despite claims of a plot to oust her, saying she's providing "calm leadership". a father loses a claim for damages against an ivf clinic — after his ex—partner forged his signature to use frozen embryos. the catalan parliament will defy madrid and press ahead with its debate that could trigger a declaration of independence. the productivity of uk workers has fallen for the second quarter in a row. hourly output fell 0.1% in the april—to—june period, the office for national statistics said. this follows a 0.5% decline in the first three months of the year. productivity has failed to grow consistently
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since the financial crisis. raising concerns for businesses and policymakers. the telecoms regulator 0fcom has announced plans to strengthen the hand of broadband customers. promising to improve speed, and strengthening the right of customers to end contracts if speeds fall below a minimum level, and to increase the number of customers who benefit from these rules. by expanding them across all broadband technologies. ryanair chief executive michael 0'leary has written to the airline's pilots to offer them better pay and conditions. the improved conditions came after the airline was forced to cancel thousands of flights in recent weeks. in a letter to pilots, mr 0'leary also apologised for changes that caused disruptions to their rotas and urges them not to leave the airline. about 25 years ago the bank of
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england governor complained modern consumers that lived by the notion ofi consumers that lived by the notion of i wanted and i want it now. it seems that culture is now paying a heavy price for its impatience. paying for faster deliveries, quicker service, is costing people up quicker service, is costing people up to £2000 a year. more than half of people admit to spending more than they need to for products and services because they are not willing to wait. to the financial services compensation scheme, which protects savers‘ cash when financial firms go bust. joining us now is rebecca 0'connor, from the financial services compensation scheme. when that was originally said, i wa nted when that was originally said, i wanted and i want it now, they were actually taking into account the idea of the cost of credit. but now we have a lot of extra costs. it's got worse. thanks to technology, pressure from social media, and
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having busy lives, we tend to be more impatient. more than 90% of people think we are becoming more impatient as a society because of these new things. we can get things insta ntly a nd these new things. we can get things instantly and so we factor that in and it's affecting how much we spend. what kind of people are most exposed? not everybody pays to get everything delivered instantly. that's true, although more than half of brits admitted to spending more because of their own impatience. the research revealed that the age category, 25—3a, 70 2% of people in that age range said they did tend to spend on quicker deliveries, ta keaways spend on quicker deliveries, takeaways and convenience basically -- 7296 takeaways and convenience basically -- 72% of takeaways and convenience basically —— 72% of people. the older generation are probably a bit more patient and perhaps we could learn from them. we call it impatience but actually we live faster lives. we do have deadlines, we do have to get
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things done more quickly than we had to 20 years ago. that's true. i think with a bit of forward planning and maybe just thinking about what thatis and maybe just thinking about what that is costing us, may be paying more attention to some of the smaller spends that we do automatically, the interesting thing is how much that can save you in the course of the year. £2000 in a year isa course of the year. £2000 in a year is a lot to put towards a first home ora is a lot to put towards a first home or a holiday, or anything you are saving up for. it's worth thinking about it in terms of the pounds and pence. thank you. that's all the business news. the funeral of liz dawn is being held at fulford cathedral this afternoon. she died at the age of 77. simonjones afternoon. she died at the age of 77. simon jones is afternoon. she died at the age of 77. simonjones is in salford for us —— salford cathedral. 77. simonjones is in salford for us -- salford cathedral. the service
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has just -- salford cathedral. the service hasjust ended. we -- salford cathedral. the service has just ended. we are told there we re has just ended. we are told there were tears and laughter, and many of the coronation street cast were present. sally and kevin, tell us how was it? it was an incredible service, really beautiful. the choir was stunning and the tributes were amazing. her son 's tribute told all about her life. even stuff we didn't know. the story about her winning £25 ina know. the story about her winning £25 in a singing competition and she gaveit £25 in a singing competition and she gave it straightaway to a kids charity so they could have holidays. that was lives. she would do that wherever she was. it's nice to remember herlike wherever she was. it's nice to remember her like that. what are you achieve memory is going to be? laughing a lot with lives, there was always laughter where liz was. her energy. her kindness, the way she
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would involve everybody, she was friends with everybody. she wanted to know what we will all doing. she cared about everyone. i think that came across in vera. the nation loved vera because i think they loved vera because i think they loved liz. she was such a caring person. the way they spoke about her, the way she was about her family, her grandkids, her, the way she was about her family, hergrandkids, her her, the way she was about her family, her grandkids, her great grandkids. we were young when we joined the show and she treated us like her kids. tick you under her wing. she was like a matriarch. i rememberwhen she went wing. she was like a matriarch. i remember when she went to meet the pope. she came back and she had all these little angel things which have been blessed by the pope for us younger members, just to bless us. to think of us while she's in the
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presence of the pope and getting blessed and all that sort of stuff, that's the selfless. over the years there's been a lot of iconic characters in the street but she was one of the strongest. she definitely was. she was such an iconic character. there will never be anotherjack character. there will never be another jack and vera. character. there will never be anotherjack and vera. the strength of coronation street. in it, it's the foundations of the shows. she did 3a years. the foundations of the shows. she did 34 years. yes. i can't believe it's been ten years since she left. it feels like she's still a huge pa rt of it feels like she's still a huge part of the show, she always will be. she's the heart of coronation street i think. not only will showbiz miss her but all the charity work, have patronage of different charities. she's going to be a
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massive loss. a chance to say today, ta—ra massive loss. a chance to say today, ta-ra yes, ta-ra chuck. the service has just included. the ta-ra yes, ta-ra chuck. the service hasjust included. the message people wanted to get across was how much laughter she brought to the people she came into contact with. thank you. time for a look at the weather. it's certainly not all bad news this weekend. some dry weather, a bit of brightness if you're lucky. generally will see quite a lot of cloud. that cloud showing its hand up cloud. that cloud showing its hand up to the north—west, bringing rain across northern ireland, scotland and then moving south and east overnight. western hills seeing the odd heavy burst. the further east not too much rain. a lot of cloud and a mild night to come. tomorrow
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quite a cloudy day for the most part. some outbreaks of rain, probably not raining all day long. rain hanging around the south west of england. not too much rain in the south—east. in northern ireland and northwest will see showery rain at times. especially in north—east england and scotland there is a chance of spells of sunshine. more of us should get some brightness on sunday, particularly in central and eastern areas. 0ut sunday, particularly in central and eastern areas. out west if you show was, the winds will be lighter on sunday. it won't feel too bad at 17 degrees. even this is bbc news. the headlines at a.00pm.
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theresa may insists she has the cabinet's full support. after grant shapps insists she should step down. what i think is necessary for the country now, what the country needs is calm leadership, that's exactly what i'm providing, and i'm providing that with the full support of my cabinet. a father loses a claim for damages against an ivf clinic — after his ex—partner forged his signature to use frozen embryos. harvey weinstien is taking a leave of absence, after it was reported that eight women made sexual harassment claims against him. a final farewell: the funeral of coronation street star liz dawn
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