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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 7, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and mega munchetty. "put up or shut up". the leader of the scottish conservatives wades in on the row over theresa may's premiership. ruth davidson urges the party to "knuckle down" and get behind the prime minister, after she faced calls to step down. good morning, it's saturday the seventh of october. also this morning... police in las vegas admit they still don't know what motivated a gunman to kill 58 people — despite chasing more than a thousand leads. the best way for your child to sleep safely to dig a debate over baby sleep positions continues. in sport, wales take a big step towards next yea r‘s world cup. what a time for tom lawrence to
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score his first goal for his country. stargazers are in for a treat this weekend — with the annual draconid meteor shower set to light up our skies. we'll find out the best ways to spot them. and sarah has the weather. good morning. it is a fairly cloudy, breezy day today with some outbreaks of rain but some of us should see a bit more sunshine tomorrow. i will bring you will all the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first our main story. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, has become the latest senior figure to rally round the prime minister — telling her critics to "put up, or shut up". her intervention came after cabinet members rebuked the former party chairman, grant shapps, after he revealed around 30 mps wanted a leadership contest. ms davidson is viewed by some as a potential contender to lead the party in westminster. our political correspondent iain watson reports. we can talk now tojonathan blake in
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oui’ we can talk now tojonathan blake in our london newsroom. there are questions about whether or not this list would lead to a leadership contest. it appears to have been brushed aside, has it? for now, yes, this potential plot to full street are made to stand aside has fizzled out, i think. are made to stand aside has fizzled out, ithink. —— are made to stand aside has fizzled out, i think. —— to force theresa may to stand aside. but senior conservative figures are feeling we have two address these moves, so ruth davidson coming out, saying the rebel mps who would like to see the back of theresa may sooner rather than later should get back in their box. she has problems them to either put up or shut up. i've got not much time for them. having a cold when you give a speech does not have anything to do with whether or not you have the fundamentals to leave the country. some people in our party needs to settle down. this is one of the names that pops up when you ask a good follow theresa may as
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leader of the party. but she says she does not want the job and importantly she's not an mp at westminster, she's a member of the scottish parliament. she is respected within the party and there isa respected within the party and there is a called the calm that will have something of an impact on now, but the fact remains that the prime minister ‘s position is precarious and there has been ever since the disastrous result of the general election earlier this year. a direction that did not need to have them, only did happen because theresa may called it. it will not ta ke theresa may called it. it will not take much for those few frustrated mps who would like her to stand aside sooner rather than later, for their frustrations to flare up once again. thank you. we're going to talk to nigel evans in top minutes. police investigating the las vegas shooting say they have yet to establish the motive of the gunman, stephen paddock. he killed 58 people at a country music festival
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in the city last sunday. the police say they have examined more than 1,000 leads since then but still don't have any clear explanation for his actions. luxmy gopal reports. six days on from stephen paddock killing 58 people and injuring hundreds at a music festival in las vegas, and police still don't know why he did it. the 64—year—old opened fire from his hotel room before turning the gun on himself. at a press briefing, the las vegas metropolitan police department said they've gone through more than a thousand leads in the investigation. we have looked at everything, literally, to include the suspect‘s personal life, any political affiliation, his social behaviours, economic situation and any potential radicalisation that so many have claimed. we have been down each and every single one of these paths, trying to determine why, to determine who else may have known of these plans. the police have ruled out
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the possibility that there was another shooter in the room with paddock. but they haven't established what he was planning to do with the 50 pounds of explosives found in his car at the hotel. meanwhile, officials from las vegas airport say a bullet fired during the shooting pierced a jet fuel storage tank 2,000 feet from the gunman‘s hotel window. there was no fire or explosion and the authorities won't speculate on whether paddock was aiming to hit the tank. it leaves yet more questions at a time when the nation wants answers, when those grieving for loved ones are trying to make sense of this senseless loss of life. luxmy gopal, bbc news. the us government has imposed more tariffs on imports of new planes made by the canadian firm, bombardier — one of northern ireland's biggest employers. it's part of a dispute with the american firm boeing, and would massively increase duties paid on the c—series model to almost
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300% the wings of the jets are built in belfast, where bombardier employs more than 4,000 people. ryanair‘s chief operations officer is to resign at the end of the month, following mistakes over pilot rotas that led to the cancellation of more then 20,000 flights. michael hickey worked at the airline for 30 years and was responsible for the scheduling of pilots' shifts. he's the first executive to leave in the wake of the flight cancellations which have affected more than 700,000 passengers. oil and gas companies in the gulf of mexico have shut their operations as tropical storm nate approaches. it has killed at least twenty—four people in central america and damaged thousands of homes. nate is predicted to become a hurricane by the time it hits the united states on sunday. the mayor of new orleans has ordered evacuations and a mandatory curfew in some parts of the city. travel firms often aren't giving consumers accurate information about whether their holidays are protected, new research suggests.
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the atol scheme means people won't lose money or become stranded abroad if their provider collapses. the consumer group which made dozens of calls to eight travel firms including british airways and thomas cook. they found in eight out of ten cases, staff couldn't confirm whether customers were atol—protected, while others exaggerated the extent of the cover. thousands of people are expected to gather in madrid for a rally in favour of remaining a unified spain. opponents of catalonia's push for independence have called for demonstrations to be held in several spanish cities, including barcelona. 0ur europe correspondent james reynolds has travelled from madrid to barcelona and is now in alicante. james, what have you made of the developments over the last 6 days and how can this be resolved? bring us up to date, we are now, we are expecting an address from the
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cata la n are expecting an address from the catalan president on tuesday. we are expecting to hear a report on the political situation, to go back to your question of where we are now, we are exactly here. each side has a potentially dramatic step to think about taking. barcelona has to think about taking. barcelona has to think about taking. barcelona has to think about taking the dramatic step of declaring independence, madrid for its part, the capital of the country, has the dramatic step of dissolving self rule in catalonia. each side, if each side were to take those steps, that would take this country into a constitutional crisis and there are some signs over the last 2a hours that each side wants to pull back a bit, to pause, before taking any of those dramatic steps. the catalan leader, in his statement on tuesday, says he will give a report about the political situation. he did not mention declaring independence. 0ne situation. he did not mention declaring independence. one of his key advisers has said that essentially their side wants a ceasefire with madrid. we know there was a lot of criticism that the
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spanish government did not apologise for some of this heavy—handed tactics during the voting process. have we heard anything since then? yes, yesterday for the first time, the spanish government representative in catalonia apologised for the police actions on sunday. i think that's deeply significant in terms of the tone of this debate. an apology is what a lot of demonstrators in barcelona felt there were looking for, they we re felt there were looking for, they were disappointed that the king of spain did not mention that in an address he gave during the week on nationwide television, but nevertheless the fact the madrid authorities have not chosen to issue an apology for their officials may go some way towards each side having a pause before taking dramatic unilateral steps. thanks very much. people across the uk could be treated to the sight of dozens of shooting stars, when the draconid meteor shower peaks this weekend. it is most likely to be clearest in the direction of the constellation of draco —
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the dragon — in the northern sky, in the early evening. it's one of two meteor shows that can be seen during october. if you are in the east on high ground, according to sarah who will be giving us the weather later, those are the best places to spot it. theresa may says she has the "full support" of her cabinet after a difficult week for the prime minister, which ended with a former conservative party chairman calling for a leadership contest. the mp nigel evans is an executive on the powerful backbench conservative 1922 committee — which decides whether there will be a ledership election. hejoins us now. what have you made of this so—called list that's been put together, headed by grant chaps?|j list that's been put together, headed by grant chaps? i can't get my head round it. it seems to have fizzled out within 2a hours, that's for certain, like one of those fireworks you like and it goes with three seconds then dies. that's what
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this tantrum turned botched plot has been. i cannot understand it, as it seems, looking at grants to feed, at the beginning of theresa speech he was using his thumbs to tweet that there was a good start, apologising for the election, time to move on. then like one of these roman emperors, his bum then went down, simply because of cough it. to be fair, he said this list has been in existence from before the speech. he said he had been speaking to cabinet members and made them aware of the list, did not want a bit made public, said the tory whip sleep it to the times newspaper. the question is, not so much about the actual limits, the fact that existed in the first place. there is discontent in the party about theresa may's leadership. the time to express that
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the straight after the general election, there are 318 conservative mps and don't forget she did score 4296 mps and don't forget she did score 42% of the vote in 2017, one and a bit million more votes than david cameron got in 2015. what he is saying by his own admission is that he has a list of up to 30, could be 12 people, could be ten, we don't know. but there are 318 mp5. grant was trying to get the prime minister to resign without going through the proper procedures. he knows what they are, he has to have 48 people within the parliamentary party, who wa nt within the parliamentary party, who want a leadership election. what we saw yesterday quite clearly, and there is only two ways to reasonable goal, one is the 48 letters, then the leadership battle, or she decides to resign. quite clearly yesterday she came out fighting. the cabinet came behind and the vast majority of tory mps i read in the newspapers backstairs well. i do not think she will have any problems reading today's newspapers. if i was
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an chaps, i would really keep a wide berth of them. he has not done us any favours. any talent he think he has got, he should we be now direct towards backing theresa may on the difficult negotiations on brexit which is a constituency voted for, and also supporting hair on domestic changes she announced in her conference speech. others talk about those negotiations were brexit. clearly there was a lot facing the country now. how long will the patience of voters last?|j country now. how long will the patience of voters last? i don't know the answer to that. as far as i can see, the prime minister and david davis are doing the negotiations as they should be, they are delivering on the brexit vote of over 17 million people in this country, and if you are looking for any difficulties at all, i should start to look at michel barnier and the way he is behaving in these negotiations. that is the point, isn't it? apologies were interrupting but we need a leader of
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this country who appears stable within her own party, settled enough to be able to challenge any comments that come from the eu. this is a negotiation, it's not going to be easy? you make a good point, that sniping from people like grant chaps is then going to be used by people like michel barnier to point out divisions within the government, maybe we can offer them a worse deal on to stabilise their government, this does no favours whatsoever. ruth davidson has got it right, you either put up all you shut up. as far as either put up all you shut up. as farasi either put up all you shut up. as faras i can either put up all you shut up. as far as i can see, the momentum he was rather hoping with his bandwagon has not materialised. the bandwagon, if anything is now rolling over grant shapps. he needs to start supporting her illness difficult negotiation that we are going to have. —— in this difficult negotiation. i'm excited about the brexit negotiations, about delivering a sovereign parliament back to the british people. that's
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what theresa may once and what he should want. are we going to get backin should want. are we going to get back in the net is so much unrest and turmoil within the party that supposed to be negotiated less than getting at is the best deal for the country? all the focus now is an theresa may and not brexit. during the party conference, grant spent the party conference, grant spent the day touring tv studios on sniping at theresa may. it's not just grant shapps though, is it? he has other mps supporting him including reportedly five former cabinet members. the coalition of the disappointed as it has been termed. people who have had their greatness overlooked. look, i've been an mpv 25 years, you don't see moaning and whingeing. i see her performing the dispatch box, outperforming jeremy corbyn, that's another thing grant shapps needs to come clean about. who does he actually want to see labour party if not theresa may? who will be better at leading us? his answer to that
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was that the party pics that, it's not for him to say. 0n defending him because he's not here to defend himself. to put the other side of the argument across that he says there is unrest in the party, cabinet is aware of this unrest and people are not happy with theresa may's performance and he has brought that up. the cabinet came out solidly behind theresa may yesterday. if there's any unrest, he is the one that is causing it. it's his botched coup that has caused the instability yesterday. it has fizzled out completely. when the party gets back to westminster on monday, quite frankly they will want to show their support with theresa may. i look forward to seeing grant chaps at the 1922 on wednesday, we will have an opportunity to the proper channels to show his discontent if he's got any. we are not up to the 48 names needed a much less, after 30. but that number could be much higher if there was someone could be much higher if there was someone waiting in the wings to take thejob. the concern is someone waiting in the wings to take the job. the concern is there someone waiting in the wings to take thejob. the concern is there is no one who could take thatjob right
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now and that's why the list is not bigger. there a recognition that she scored well over 13 million votes at the election in 97. normally that would have given her a landslide victory but because of the polarisation of the votes between the labour party and the conservatives and the lib dems falling away, that meant sadly we did not get the majority we wanted. we asked theresa to make some changes after the election to get rid of those within downing street who had not helped with a manifesto, and that's a really decent people emoji has done. from what i can see, there has been absolutely no change since that period. —— and put some really decent people in, which she has done. whilst he was sniping at theresa may during the conference, which he did regularly, attacking the party chairman asking him to resign, same speech, different person, then asking the prime minister to resign... i think your
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views on grant shapps are clear, we have not got much time. theresa may was there putting herself around the conference, she got the legendary conference, she got the legendary conference code, you do not hand them a pearl handled revolver. boris johnson, undermining the prime minister? no. he's a great foreign secretary. i believe the entire cabinet now wants to see the prime minister are getting on with the job, and they want all the sniping doorstop. he's had his time in the sunshine, time to shut up, grant. it's been a pleasure talking to you, thanks forjoining us. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. lots of cloud to start the day, this is how things are looking in sterling. 0ut the day, this is how things are looking in sterling. out of that cloud comes some showers for many of us cloud comes some showers for many of us through the day. it will be a
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slowly improving picture. cloud filtering in from the north—west overnights, sitting across much of the country but we will see it tend to break up. 0utbreaks the country but we will see it tend to break up. outbreaks of rain this morning across the south—west, bit of drizzle further east, but it should up later on. further north, a few brighter spells across the midlands, central wales in north—east england. still showers to come the north—west england, northern ireland and scotland. not a wash—out, showers will be passing through quite quickly. quite heavy in the north—west, possibly a rumble of thunder in north—west scotland. further south in the rain will ease away. lingering for the longest the devon and cornwall, down towards the channel isles. a soggy day. sunny spells further north, scattered showers, temperatures between 1a and 17. into the evening, if you are hoping to catch a glimpse of the dragon made media shower, you might
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be lucky across east scotland, north—east england, parts of southern england, south wales, towards the north—west though, cloudy skies with some showers continue overnight. a bit hit and miss tonight. headington tomorrow, that when france gets out of the way. image of high pressure builds in from the west. the sunday, a different feeling day in that we have fewer showers, a bit more sunshine and lighter winds. still a chance for a bit of rain for the west of scotland, perhaps a few showers. elsewhere, in the sunshine, lighter winds and 1a to 18 degrees, not a bad autumnal day. next week, an unsettled theme as low pressure moves in from the atlantic on monday, another one on tuesday. into next week we will see the wind is picking up, and also some rain, particularly towards the north—west, dry in the south—east but all in all its autumnal over the next week or
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so. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time for a look at the newspapers. public relations executive and formerjournalist, paul horrocks is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to paul in a minute. first let's run through the front pages. we ‘s got with the telegraph. as we've been discussing, pressure on theresa may. but the story that is highlighted is the eu stepping up talks with the labour. it says negotiators in the eu have what they cold significantly increased their backroom talks with labour because they are becoming concerned that theresa may's administration could colla pse theresa may's administration could collapse before brexit is completed. they have been speaking tojeremy corbyn about what could happen next. the guardian, front page, taking a look at the comments about the prime
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minister, saying the foreign secretary boris johnson minister, saying the foreign secretary borisjohnson growing anger as the plot to oust theresa may gains momentum. wealthy families are using £7 billion government schemed aimed at first—time buyers, being misused by a families, according to the daily mail. paul, that's look at what you've picked out. this is something that outrages pa rents. out. this is something that outrages parents. people who do not have children avoid going on holiday during school holiday times. it's a regular discussion. should school holidays, half terms and summer brea ks holidays, half terms and summer breaks be staggered, to avoid the great holiday rip—off which is what this is. this is an investigation by the time is looking at prices. it says that flying off for half term, just about to come up in october,
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costs british families, just airline tickets, seven times more. none flying the other way round. so if you were flying from europe to the uk, a lot cheaper. 0n you were flying from europe to the uk, a lot cheaper. on average, british 0ctober half term travel pay 120% more than europeans coming here. the biggest mark—up from uk to barcelona which was a70% more expensive than the other way around. a lot of people say, why not change the half times? that's what they do in scotland. actually, the cheapest place to fly from according to the survey is glasgow, because the same hiked up charges do not apply there because the school half terms staggered. who do you blame, the travel operators all the schools? the travel operators, straightaway. it's a fair market. but it's a rip—off really, there should be some kind of agreement between the operators not to cash in on the very
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people that they want to then support the airlines and their holidays. it's the same thing with holidays. it's the same thing with holiday prices as well, i think it's not right. speaking of things that really bug people, this is another one annoys me. broadband firms that advertise the up to speed. you might get a really fast one, but chances are you'll get a slow one. that's if you're are you'll get a slow one. that's if you' re clever are you'll get a slow one. that's if you're clever enough to measure your broadband speed. what, are saying is that broadband firms have got to tell their customers, by law, the real internet speed. —— what, are saying. 0therwise customers whose speeds slower than they paid for and ditch their contract halfway through. if you have signed up in them realise it's rubbish, you are stuck with it the 12 months, 2a months, they try to get you on these contracts so you can't move. most broadband services never actually reach the top speeds they advertise, particularly at peak times,
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lunchtimes, offices, and evening the home. a happy story. this is wonderful. this is a story about a war vetera n wonderful. this is a story about a war veteran celebrating his 70th wedding anniversary with the belgian bride that he saved from shrapnel from a nazi bomb on the front line. percy from a nazi bomb on the front line. perchohnson, 93, met ileana when his tank broke down in herfrozen village back in 19114. he went and knocked on the door and asked her mum if he could spend the night there because he was so cold. she said yes, some days later he protected the daughter from shrapnel when a bomb went off, and they fell in love. 70 years on! fantastic. ironically, willian, was only there at the house because her then boyfriend who she was engaged to said it was safer to go to her mums. then she meets this soldier. but
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have you noticed, in the background, i don't think you'll focus on this, there's another interesting visitor at this photo. that's the queen. looks like the queen!” at this photo. that's the queen. looks like the queen! i thought it was the queen on tv but i think it must just be was the queen on tv but i think it mustjust be a great photograph, u nless mustjust be a great photograph, unless she was really there of course. sure it's notjust a photo on the shelf? no it's not, queen was really there! this is an interesting story. new england rugby kit. we should say, the eighth in three yea rs, should say, the eighth in three years, is already criticised for being a bit of a moneymaking venture but apparently it's being a bit of a moneymaking venture but apparently its special. being a bit of a moneymaking venture but apparently it's special. this is a case of now you see me, now you don't. the makers of the new rugby union strip which will be worn for the first game against argentina have developed an artificial intelligence, which we hear lots about, a way to actually shade the shirts so it goes red towards the
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sleeves and can dazzle the opposition so they can't see you as well. don't get me wrong, that doesn't look invisible to me. it's pretty clear. these variations. it's pretty clear. these variations. it's pretty obvious. the telegraph cannot tell either. maybe it's just pretty obvious. the telegraph cannot tell either. maybe it'sjust a good oh pr story. how many languages other than english do you speak? spanish a little. french. similar. but i wish i could speak more. ifind it quite similar. but i wish i could speak more. i find it quite frustrating and embarrassing on holiday. it's typical brits, we don't do very well with languages. now there might be a sign —— a solution, earbuds you can put in yourearlink sign —— a solution, earbuds you can put in your ear link to your phone, and gets translations in real—time. it's a partial solution offered by google. and supports live
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translations, the google pixel by despair with the handset and tap into an artificial intelligence voice assistant, google assistant, all you have to say is help me speak french. it just translates, all you have to say is help me speak french. itjust translates, does not help you speak. i'm sceptical, i've seen those things we can hold your phone over the menu and it tra nslates phone over the menu and it translates it, but it's rubbish, it comes up translates it, but it's rubbish, it comes up with all sorts things. translates it, but it's rubbish, it comes up with all sorts thingslj think the worrying thing is if it goes wrong, and you get the wrong translation back. there could be all kinds of catastrophes. this is an interesting initiative mentioned here though, arsenal football club running this double club languages programme which basically involves sessions watching a football match, so i'm presuming they commentate on the match... practice makes perfect, exactly, in that language. whatever works. great talking to you, we will speak again in the next hour. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning...
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it's know for its glossy fashion pages and lifesyle features but as glamour becomes the latest magazine to cut back its print edition in favour of online, we'll find out what it means for the industry. what are you going to read at the hairdressers, that's what i want to know? not me, you! stay with us. we'll have a summary of the news injust a moment. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and naga munchetty. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson has become the latest senior figure to rally round the prime minister — telling her critics to "put up, or shut up". her intervention came after cabinet members rebuked the former party chairman, grant shapps, after he claimed around 30 mps wanted a leadership contest. ms davidson is viewed by some as a potential contender to lead the party in westminster but, speaking to the bbc, she insisted the pm should be allowed to govern. speaking to breakfast a little
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earlier, nigel evans, one of the backbench committee members, said speculation about the pm's future was not in the national interest. the sniping from people like grant shapps is then going to be used by people like michel barnier and jean—claude juncker to say there people like michel barnier and jean—claudejuncker to say there is divisions in the government and maybe we can offer them a worse deal or drag things out and destabilise their own government. he has done us absolutely no favours whatsoever. police investigating the las vegas shooting say they have yet to establish the motive of the gunman, stephen paddock. he killed 58 people at a country music festival in the city last sunday. police say they have examined more than one thousand leads since then — and are looking into every aspect of paddock‘s life — but still don't have any clear explanation for his actions. and i get it, we all want answers. we've looked at everything, literally, to include the suspect was my personal life, any political
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affiliation, his social behaviours, economic situation and any potential radicalisation that so many have claimed. there are fears that british jobs at the aerospace company bombardier could be at risk, after the us government imposed more tariffs on importsit‘s part of a dispute with the american firm boeing, and would massively increase duties paid on the c—series model to almost 300%. the wings of the jets are built in belfast, where bombardier employs more than 4000 people. of new planes made by the firm. ryanair‘s chief operations officer is to resign at the end of the month, following mistakes over pilot rotas that led to the cancellation of more than 20,000 flights. michael hickey worked at the airline for 30 years and was responsible for the scheduling of pilots' shifts. he's the first executive to leave in the wake of the flight cancellations which have affected more than 700,000 passengers. oil and gas companies in the gulf
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of mexico have shut their operations as hurricane nate approaches. it has killed at least 2a people in central america and damaged thousands of homes. the catagory one hurricane is predicted to hit the united states on sunday. the mayor of new orleans has ordered evacuations and a mandatory curfew in some parts of the city. a 15—year—old boy has been arrested after a stabbing in north—west london. the 18—year—old victim was found badly injured in brent yesterday afternoon. scotland yard said he died from multiple stab wounds at the scene. the teenager, was arrested, is being questioned on suspicion of murder and detectives are for witnesses. thousands of people are expected to gather in madrid for a rally in favour of remaining a unified spain. opponents of catalonia's push for independence have called for demonstrations to be held in several spanish cities, including barcelona. spain's government representative in catalonia earlier apologised
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to those hurt during police efforts to stop the referendum. hundreds of people were injured by police, trying to enforce a court ban on the vote. now, we know when your little, even when you're grown up, you have your fairshare of when you're grown up, you have your fair share of trips and tumbles. these pictures show that animals, they are no strangers to tumbles either. i like these pictures, from toronto zoo. i like these pictures, from toronto zoo. it has released a compilation of their giant zoo. it has released a compilation of theirgiant cups, zoo. it has released a compilation of their giant cups, or their worst bits, so basically falling over, to celebrate their second birthday. far from hurting them all being sold by showing their worst bits! researchers believe these tumbles are normal during adolescence and contribute to their development. i could watch these pictures all day. we could arrange that! there is your panda news. the time is coming up to
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8:35am on bbc breakfast. mike is here with the sport. good morning. you like those pictures as well?|j you like those pictures as well?” love pandas! for someone that takes a lot more falls when those pandas. it looks like our training session! johnjoins us, it looks like our training session! john joins us, thank it looks like our training session! johnjoins us, thank you it looks like our training session! john joins us, thank you for coming in. ina john joins us, thank you for coming in. in a way cutting that you are here because if it wasn't for a drop goal, st helens could be in that final, possibly. 28 seconds from being at the grand final, which is devastating to be sat next to you now! you have already held this beautiful thing in 2006? yes, now! you have already held this beautifulthing in 2006? yes, long time ago now. the super league trophy? yes. that's what it's all about. solid silver, really heavy. for me and my profession, it's an incredible honour to be able to live that trophy. talk us through your memories of 2006, 11 years ago but something you will never forget?
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grand final night at old trafford, a fantastic stadium. walking out of the sloped tunnel onto the field on a wet 0ctober night is a spectacular feeling. for those guys tonight, what an opportunity to make some history. what fun it is, castleford have never been on a grand final. first time in 91 years they have finished top. in a way, poetic justice, even with your neutral hat on? yes, an exceptional season they've had, they have set the pace all year. they have really dominated from start to finish. they deserve their opportunity to play in the grand final. we were talking about castleford and the big and emotional story for them, leeds finished bottom of the table last year and have got to the grand final. a huge story there as well. there is a lot going on. the coach with saying it's like going to the moon and back, a long journey for them. you say you we re long journey for them. you say you were gutted to be here and i understand that, what was it like that moment and 28 seconds to go, st
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helens, you were up and then the drop goalfrom the man of helens, you were up and then the drop goal from the man of steel himself. talk us through it, the emotions at that moment in meet of the battle, such tension in extra starter as experienced as i am... you start to celebrate. in that 28 seconds we conceded a penalty, it went to extra time and he kicked the drop goal. he has had an exceptional year, gale. is she allowed to lift the trophy? i was told i was allowed. it's so heavy. you are meant to be wearing the little grabs. i was told by the special person they can clean it afterwards. it's the only time i'm going to hold something like this. quite impressive. shall we pass it round? my goodness, it's every. this
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is the closest i'm getting to it this year! don't, i'm not touching! is it bad luck? i don't know, ijust don't want to touch it, just in case. we will look after it. important for castleford, much will miss zak hardaker? he has breached the rules, how much will he be missed? joint nominee for still saw a huge miss the castleford but is someone else's opportunity. someone else can step in and tonight is the night for somebody to make a name for themselves and why not someone stepping into zak hardaker's shoes. where is your money, being a neutral. there is so much going on this week, so much drama and emotional palsied per side. i would've said castleford at the start of the week but with things unfolding... ifancy start of the week but with things unfolding... i fancy leeds, two of their most senior guys retiring or moving on. what a story for them, to be bottom of the leak to go to the top and then win it. the score? it
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will be tight, as a 28—26 to leeds. and we can listen to you on five live. what time? the build—up from five o'clock? five o'clock, that's right. all the best, thank you. it will be a cracking final. and a trophy will get there safely, i promise! it is safe here. let's talk about the football. wales can still qualify automatically, for the world cup, after they beat georgia 1—0 in tblisi last night. it's set up a thrilling final match, against the republic of ireland in cardiff, after the irish beat moldova. one of them needs to win on monday, to have any chance of going straight through as serbia, still lead the group. but serbia loss last night. patrick gearey watched the action. so it is all down to monday. wales and ireland, separated by the narrowest of channels. and one match between them still to go. in the battle of georgia and the dragon, this time the dragon had to win. without the individual brilliance of gareth bale,
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this was a test of wales the collective. they did plenty in the first half without a goal. and every passing minute grew more edgy. in the key moments of this qualifying campaign, new welsh heroes have emerged. tom lawrence of derby county had never before scored for his country. qualifying is all about timing. and in dublin, not even two minutes were on the clock when stephen ward went hurling. in there with the crucial touch was daryl murphy, a 34—year—old striker in something of a hot streak this season. it took murphy until his 24th game to score for ireland but when ward kicked him out again he showed he had the hang of it. effectively all over for moldova. against the team ranked 156 in the world, goals should be on offer. shane has not managed once in february. the definition of a long wait. that did not matter. but in cardiff on monday, everything will. so, with serbia losing in austria, wales can still win the group — it all comes down to monday night
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in cardiff. that will be some atmosphere, i'm sure, going back home now, for the final game with it all to play for. that's what we wanted to do. we've put ourselves in this position. hopefully we can enjoy that evening and have something to celebrate at the end. josh 0nomah scored a stunning goal, for the england under—21s, as they beat scotland 3—1, in qualifying for euro 2019. 0nohmah is on loan at aston villa from tottenham — and he kept the young lions‘ winning streak, in tact — they haven't lost a european qualifierfor six years. earlier then and naga were suggesting he didn't mean that, it was just a punt from distance. suggesting he didn't mean that, it wasjust a punt from distance. but he meant that, didn't he, dan? yes. good morning. it's wait a bit of a
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chance, isn't it. he is physically very skilled. i think he's thinking, this is an here, a little dink into the corner. did very well. leeds united —— leads us nicely into football focus. we won't be talking about that goal but we will be talking about international weekend. you mentioned about wales and republic monday night, building up to bea republic monday night, building up to be a huge game, john hartson will be talking about that. wales can win the group, republic of ireland could get through, serbia loss last night put themselves in a difficult position, even though they are one point clear of wales at the moment. also in northern ireland, who tomorrow take on more weight. a really good chance for them to reach the play—offs. point is virtually guaranteeing them a place in the play—offs. they could still go through as one of the senior teams, so through as one of the senior teams, so it's important for them. scotland need to win against slovenia, that is on monday. so it could be a fantastic few days for all be home
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nations. reaction to england getting to russia, which was a bit damp... 0nly to russia, which was a bit damp... only one goal. when you convert your very —— when you compare it to the euphoria when david beckham scored that free kick... it was like tumbleweed. i think that's where england are at the moment. you will love this story today. at the start of the year tom broadbent was officially still in the army. decided to try his hand at football. he is now a professional at bristol rovers, toward afghanistan in 2015. we went to see him this week. have a look. can we talk about afghanistan, the guys you are playing within your team, they would never experience or haven't experienced what you have in life so far. i haven't really been through a lot, to be honest. i think because i speak about it and lots of people don't get to speak about their experiences, it seems like i have, but i haven't done a lot. i
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got shot at, i was sat in an armoured vehicle, i was safe. there are armoured vehicle, i was safe. there a re u nfortu nate armoured vehicle, i was safe. there are unfortunate people who aren't. he'sa are unfortunate people who aren't. he's a really interesting guy. his manager says he brings something completely different to the dynamic of the dressing room. he said today they play away, northampton, said from tom's perspective, he says when you've been shot at in afghanistan, an away trip to northampton doesn't really terrify you. i bet he doesn't dive. that's a very interesting assessment that he is a centre half. they all... they don't all dive! laughter where are we going with this one now? i thought i would stir the pot. we have all that to talk about. international weekends are only half an hour but we are packed for half an hour but we are packed for half an hour, john hartson and alex scott with us. i have an idea for an interview on football focus. get in tom daley in two ss diving
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techniques. laughter 0n the pitch. techniques. laughter on the pitch. thank you for that. .. he does it five or ten metres they do it from the ground. if you want to do that, you can suggest it... as you know, the present has no power at all! laughter we're probably going to miss the netherlands russia and possibly argentina. they are in danger of out. fifth or sixth in their group at the moment and have to win their la st at the moment and have to win their last game and are playing at altitude, difficult situation. no world cup without messi!m altitude, difficult situation. no world cup without messi! it can't happen. qualifying for the japanese grand prix finished in the last half—hour — and it saw lewis hamilton claim the 71st pole of his career. the championship leader, broke the track record three times, to take his first pole position at suzuka. his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas was second quickest, but the finn has been penalised for a gearbox change, so hamilton's title—rival
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sebastian vettel will line up alongside him for tomorrow's race. that's it for now but in an hour we will be talking the new super league for women which starts later this month. important to have a good technique. i have a friend, the best actual footballer i play with. you cannot get the ball off him!m im proves cannot get the ball off him!m improves your skill base, doesn't it? when will we talk about that question ijust after nine o'clock? yes. good. and there is a meteor shower tonight as well stop you need to get tom daley on to talk about that. cam newton book tom daley to talk about the meteorite shower tonight? why not? ! master of all trades. quite cloudy during the day but i think you are in luck. we should see some clearer spells later on and particularly for the southern and
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eastern parts of the country, that is where you have your best bet of capturing a glimpse of the meter is. this is how this morning looks. a lot of cloud. showers in much of scotland and further south across the uk there is a weather front which is bringing rain initially to southern england and south wales. that should clear away gradually as we move into the afternoon. this morning, that band of cloud and risibly rain in the south. the devon and cornwall it will linger longest. further north, the cloud will tend to break up a little bit. still quite a great picture, particularly in north—west england and western scotland, northern parts of northern ireland but elsewhere some brighter skies working through. temperatures 15—16d for most of us. pretty grisly for much of the day in cornwall and the channel islands. brighter spells for hampshire, somerset. through the middle of the few brighter spells and the chance of a few showers as we make our way northwards. northern ireland seeing a few showers, particularly towards the scotland
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most of the showers will be in north and west. some brighter skies for fife and aberdeenshire. in the evening eastern scotland and england, some long and clear spells. and further south, the cloud will be reasonably well broken. across northern and western areas, more likely to see a blanket of cloud obscuring the skies for a time tonight. it will be quite mild, temperatures on the most part in double figures. to start the day tomorrow, and improving picture compared to today. fewer showers, lighter winds and a bit more sunshine. for parts of northern ireland, the west of scotland, north—west england and north—west wales, that is the areas where you will see some passing showers. elsewhere, looking drier and temperatures a degree also higher than today, 15—18. into monday and tuesday, low pressure dominates. it will be moving in from the atlantic, bringing spells of bloodstream wet weather, interspersed with some drier conditions. into next week, those winds strengthening, wettest
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in the north—west, a little dry towards the south and east but all in alla towards the south and east but all in all a pretty autumnal feel to things. thank you very much, autumnal feel, it is awesome. the bbc has confirmed details of changes to the government's flagship benefit universal credit, which will mean advance payments are offered to those in financial difficulties. the change was first announced at last week's conservative party conference but there was confusion about exactly how it would work. paul lewis from radio 4's money box programme has the details. you have been looking through all of this. just talk us through what these changes can mean for people. let mejust explain these changes can mean for people. let me just explain the problem first. people that go on to this new benefit called universal credit, which replaces jobseeker‘s allowa nce, which replaces jobseeker‘s allowance, if you go onto it for the first time you have to wait a long time before you are paid. there are seven days at the start before you are even assessed. there is a whole month when you are assessed and then
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there is another seven days before you are paid. you add those up and it comes to 45 days before you get a penny. yet these people are often an immediate need, they have lost their job or their marriage has broken down. you can get an advance payment to help you over that period, but there have been complaints that people haven't been offered these, they have been offered too little and many people don't know about them. what the secretary of state david gauke announced is that people would get off at the zone would be able to claim them or ask for them right away and they would always be offered the maximum, which is two weeks benefits, more money than some have been getting. the problem is, it's not extra money, it's your own money in advance. so you will get less for the next few months after that. so it is some progress, and we only got the full details yesterday afternoon, i have to say, from the department for work and pensions. it isa department for work and pensions. it is a help but it doesn't really solve all the problems.” is a help but it doesn't really solve all the problems. i wanted to ask you that, is enough to help?
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confusion aside, will it make a real difference for people?” confusion aside, will it make a real difference for people? i think it will help over those first 45 days. we can all imagine, if all the ways of getting money out of the bank we re of getting money out of the bank were taken away from us, could we live 45 days? i suspect none of us could. it will help people but it will mean they are worse off for a bit longer afterwards. the other problems with universal credit, which people point to ask, are you can't have your rent paid direct to your landlord, except in rare circumstances, certainly not in england and wales anyway, different in scotland. and you are only paid once a month in arrears and this can be very difficult for people. they may have been in a job where they we re may have been in a job where they were paid weekly or fortnightly. they may have been on fortnightly benefits previously. so having to wait a whole month for your money, when it really is a subsistence income can be difficult. what people are calling for is an end to these waiting days before it begins. i even spoke to the manor, one of the
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men, who devised universal credit and he told me that he thinks the government should put more money into help people get over these problems. he thinks it is a great scheme, of course, he thought of it and invented it but it was done on the cheap and in order to save money cuts were made. you would like those reversed. it is good to talk to you and good to know you are on the case. paul lewis from money box. one of the most popular women's fashion magazines is ditching its glossy exterior and diving into the digital world. glamour launched in 2001, but now says it needs to reflect how its readers are "living their life today". it will only produce two collectable magazines a year, while the rest of its content will be online. it is an age—old debate now. will you miss the smell and touch of a glossy mag or is it all about accessing up—to—date content on the move? we got some of your thoughts. i would rather have a physical copy,
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not a digital copy, i haven't got time to flick through it on my phone. it's easier and cheaper online and quicker. i get most of my beauty tips and whatever i need online, so i don't really get like a magazine, i feel it's a bit... unnecessary, to being honest. i don't actually buy a hard copy of the magazine, i'd check it online. i never bought one, ijust checked the fashion online. you get old magazines sitting in the corner that you never look at again. i think maybe it's a good thing.” you never look at again. i think maybe it's a good thing. i like the feeling of a magazine.” maybe it's a good thing. i like the feeling of a magazine. i do. it's like kindles, i prefera feeling of a magazine. i do. it's like kindles, i prefer a book. when i'm travelling i take loads of magazines on the bus. i don't think i'd like iphone, you don't get the visuals as much. and you can't get the perfume! some of your thoughts there. joining us now is maria malone, a lecturerfrom the fashion
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institu re at manchester metropolitan university and chyz samuel an online fashion vlogger. you work in the online world and digital, was always going to happen? i think it is inevitable but they have done it in a smart way. they are going online for the most part but will also have these two print editions each year, which is quite smart. i would say i probably by two year, so i think it's a good idea. i think there's a lot of potential for them to do something quirky and interesting within this online world. is it the same? if you are looking at a tablet or website or computer screen, it's not the same as flicking through a glossy magazine, men's or women's magazines, it's not the same? some people like to feel the magazines in the hand, i do, i do like that. but the hand, i do, i do like that. but the thing about having an online platform is it is so instantly accessible and it is really up to date. it's hard for anybody to keep
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up date. it's hard for anybody to keep up with the beauty and fashion worlds as they are at the moment, let alone a monthly edition of the magazine. the fact it will be an online platform for the most part means they can have the most up—to—date information and keep up with the vast amount of bloggers out there, people like me. maria, i remember when i was younger i looked forward to the publication date of the magazine, weekly or monthly, if it was part of my staple of reading. so when you go online it's always there, it doesn't field an appointment to read?” there, it doesn't field an appointment to read? i think there is still a market for a luxurious publication. you are thinking of something like vogue? vanity fair? to have it on your coffee table and pick it up and put it down throughout the month, there is a market for that. but the beauty of going online, from the point of view of the commercial sense, people can instantly link that through to what they want to buy. at the moment, people are having great success with going online. if you think about the way the catalogues have moved from a
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physical catalogue to purely online, people like shop direct, sales have rocketed in that area. so with an online glamour magazine, people can do what they want, click on it and it will link through to the website and you can buy it straightaway. that tells us how quickly that market has changed, doesn't it? it's all about advertising. they don't make a lot of money from the cover price of the magazine. it's that they can get those endorsements. so if you can't touch on the outfit you wa nt to if you can't touch on the outfit you want to buy nitwits in your shopping basket, that's where people make the money? absolutely. which is it inevitable? i think it is. something like vogue, perhaps, maybe. controversial! i think... i think with any online publication, any print publication going online, i feel like they can be successful but like anything going online now, it has to do something new, it has to
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do something different. there's so much information out there, especially with beauty and fashion. whether we are talking about a new blogger coming through or a traditional publication going online, they have to offer something new. isn't thatjust online, they have to offer something new. isn't that just for the cover person? doesn't that drives most magazine sales? the one interview they have? i think it's the cover but also that that magazine speaks to them. they can identify with it. if they are aspiring to be top fashionistas its vogue. glamour is not the first to do this, in style has already done this and had great success. has already done this and had great success. it will cut down cost and generate profit but mobile phones have gone bigger, people have mobile phones almost as big as tablets and zoom phones almost as big as tablets and zoom in and get the details and content. we are all above a certain age. i know at younger generation that doesn't watch television, they watch other thing on the tablet. they don't consume printed literature, everything is done on the tablet or on a screen. so we
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talk about it being a strange move but for the new generation, and those are the ones these advertisers wa nt to those are the ones these advertisers want to target, it is totally second nature to read everything digitally. absolutely. this is a young market that read this magazine, a younger market. good to talk to you about this, thank you very much. asummary of a summary of the news in just a moment, stay with us. hello this is breakfast, with ben thompson and naga munchetty. "put up or shut up". the leader of the scottish conservatives wades in on the row over theresa may's leadership. ruth davidson urges the party to "knuckle down" and get behind the prime minister, after she faced calls to step down. good morning, it's saturday the 7th of october. also this morning... police in las vegas admit
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they still don't know what motivated a gunman to kill 58 people — despite chasing more than 1,000 leads. the best way for your child to sleep safely — the debate over "baby sleep positioners" continues, as several retailers ban them from the shelves. in sport, wales take a big step towards next yea r‘s world cup.
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