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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 8, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and tina daheley. hurricane nate hits the us gulf coast. the storm has already killed at least 25 people in central america, and it is expected to bring torrential rain and flooding to at least four states. good morning, it is sunday 8 october. also this morning: sirjohn major becomes the latest senior tory to rally around theresa may, hitting out at what he calls self—absorbed behaviour in the party. a man has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving after 11 people were injured in a crash at london's natural history museum. spain's prime minister says he won't rule out sacking the catalonian government, as tens of thousands take to the street to call for talks. and in sport: it is a supercharged night for leeds rhinos. they win the super league grand
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final, and lift the trophy for a record eighth time. and sarah has the weather. good morning. well, today is the better day of the weekend for most places. sunny spells, just a few showers towards the north and the west. i'll bring you a full forecast throughout the programme. good morning. first, our main story: hurricane nate has hit the united states, causing torrential rain and powerful winds. people in parts of mississippi, alabama, florida and louisiana have been ordered to evacuate their homes. the storm has already caused major damage to several central american countries, leaving at least 25 people dead, before hitting the us as a category one hurricane. luxmy gopal reports. they watched it approach, and then it hit. the us is facing the full force of hurricane nate, winds of up to 150km/h, with storm surges.
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the category one hurricane has hit the gulf coast of the states, as torrential rain and flooding in parts of mississippi, alabama, florida and louisiana, where people have been ordered to evacuate. the central americas already felt it with deaths in honduras, el salvador, costa rica and nicaragua, where tens of thousands of people are now without running water. and scenes like these have become all too familiar in the last few months. after back—to—back hurricanes irma and maria, people in the caribbean have been left without homes, power or clean water. visiting the islands to see the damage for himself, the united nations secretary general had a stark message. this is something that we are seeing more and more. there is an increased intensity of hurricanes, an increased frequency, and devastation. and the origin is clear. we are facing the consequences of climate change. and, for those facing the immediate impact, all they can do is watch, wait, and prepare for the aftermath. the former prime minister sirjohn
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major is the latest senior conservative to publicly offer his support to theresa may to carry on as prime minister. writing in the mail on sunday, sirjohn said tory mps should reflect very carefully on what was at stake. it has been described as a dramatic intervention in the conservative leadership crisis. what difference if any will these comments make?” think it is pretty significant. if you think sirjohn major, a former prime minister, he knows what it is like to deal with backbench plotters who are trying to get rid of you and he is coming to the theresa may's defence, criticising those who have been disloyal. it will make a difference and certainly when he is pointing to the need for the tory party to reach out for the hearts and minds of people who they lost in
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the general election, people could end up going forjeremy corbyn next time around. i think that is pretty significant. but not just time around. i think that is pretty significant. but notjust this intervention byjohn major, but we have also heard from the prime minister today. she has talked about her resilience, and how during that conference speech which is beset with problems, she didn't think at any point that she was going to give up, that she was going to keep going. and really, isuppose, dealing with that precarious position she was in just a few days ago, when there were calls for her to stand down, it looks like the prime minister is in a much more sta ble prime minister is in a much more stable position. she has people like john major and even borisjohnson coming to her defence. so she is in a better position than she was in just a few days ago. a man has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving after a crash outside the natural history museum in london yesterday. 11 people were injured in the incident. a man in his 40s is in custody. our reporter simonjones is there.
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good morning to you. the key thing, i suppose, almost 2a hours on from this, is that it is not terror related. yes, police say it was a road traffic incident. but it did ta ke road traffic incident. but it did take them several hours to confirm that. overnight, officers have released a statement saying they com pletely released a statement saying they completely recognise the alarm and concern that was caused by the events here. you can see that one of the signs has been damaged. the car came up the pavement and careered gci’oss came up the pavement and careered across the road, ending upjust over there outside the museum. yesterday afternoon this area was hugely busy, particularly with families, because just up there was the national history museum and the science museum. so when people saw this happening, it was really panic for many people. some of them ran from the area, some were crying, some we re the area, some were crying, some were screaming, police able to determine eventually that this was a traffic incident. but what they are
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saying is that this shows just how they will respond to any incident, given what has happened in the past. now, 11 people were injured, nine of those taken to hospital, including the driver, who was a man in his 405. he has been released from ho5pital, 405. he has been released from hospital, as have most of those who we re hospital, as have most of those who were injured. but the driver will be questioned further today to try and a5certain exactly what happened here. thank you. spain's prime minister, mariano rajoy, says any declaration of independence by the catalan region will have no effect. a day of rallies has taken place around the country following last weekend's disputed referendum. president donald trump has tweeted that years of talks with north korea have failed, adding that only one thing will work. the two nations have been engaged in heated rhetoric over north korea's nuclear activities. president trump has previously
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warned that the us could destroy north korea, if necessary, to protect america's national interests and defend its allies in the region. mental health staff in the uk are working in a powder keg environment, as assaults by patients soar, according to a bbc investigation. figures obtained by 5 live investigates show there were more than 42,000 reported attacks on staff over the last year. they included a healthcare assistant who was stabbed to death, and a worker having part of their thumb bitten off. the department of health says it is supporting mental health staff, and plans to create 21,000 new posts by 2021. almost four tons of cocaine has been seized after a ship has been intercepted in the mid—atlantic. the spanish authorities acted on intelligence provided by the national crime agency in the uk to
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swoop national crime agency in the uk to swoop on national crime agency in the uk to swoop on the boat between madeira and the azores. if sold, the cocaine would have fetched £200 million. seven men have been arrested. a woman has been arrested after trying to climb the front gates of buckingham palace. the woman, thought to be in her 305, is being held on suspicion of trespass and is in custody at a central london police station. the incident is not being treated as terror—related, according to officers. the rapper nelly has been arrested after a woman accused him of raping her on his tour bus after a concert near seattle. nelly, whose real name is cornell hayneer, was taken into custody yesterday. in a statement, his lawyer said the claim was completely fabricated. the 42—year—old is currently on tour with the backstreet boys. if you are thinking of going out for a jog this morning, what about this for inspiration? these couples were taking part in the 18th annual north american wife carrying championship. it was a competitive race, with some thrills and spills,
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although as you see some wives chose to carry their husbands. they say the couple that exercises together stays together, but i think you would have to be quite resilient to get through this unscathed. it would certainly test the strength of your relationship. especially if your other half drops you in that. and we have been talking about winning the lottery. lots of you have been getting in touch about this. just a couple of comments that we have had. you liked this one. selina says that she won £168 million she would teach everyone to crochet, very specific. set up a charity to allow everyone to get creative, great for mental health, finally get tom hardy's number, and make gluten—free food the same price
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as regular food. martin make gluten—free food the same price as regularfood. martin and stephen said £169 million, because what is £1 million between friends? a charity trust could provide £50,000 a month for 30 years. no more cheap flights, they would do first—class and private all the way. and one more from gloria, who says that if she won that vast amount, i would hope to be able to have a residential care home built, dedicated to people suffering from dementia. her mother died from the disease four years ago and was lucky enough to be well cared for, but not eve ryo ne enough to be well cared for, but not everyone is lucky enough to have that experience. nice to hear people would do good. let us know what you would do good. let us know what you would do good. let us know what you would do with the money. you can e—mail us or tweet us. catalonia is one of spain's wealthiest and most productive regions, with a hunger for independence that has resulted in the country's worst political crisis for decades. after last sunday's disputed referendum on catalan independence, the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, has rejected any mediation to resolve the situation.
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our correspondent gavin lee is in barcelona. gavin, what sense are you getting from people where you are at the moment? joining us now is dr angel smith, a lecturer in spanish and catalan studies at leeds university. thank you so much for coming in. good a you tojoin us. thank you so much for coming in. good a you to join us. interesting point that we made there, that prime minister rajoy has said he will not go into mediation. he is playing hardball. what you have to take into account is from his perspective he seesit account is from his perspective he sees it as an illegal referendum. his party is a very spanish nationalist party. it puts the unity of spain above everything else. and that has been the case historically for the spanish right, effectively. and so i think that for his support base and for his party, for him now
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to negotiate would be very difficult. it seems strange that he would play such hardball, though. because there is a feeling that actually many people in catalonia are not in favour of independence. it was just those who were in favour who came out to vote. so there should be some room for conversations. you would have thought so. i think in a way though... you are right. polls have indicated that about 40% of catalans wa nt indicated that about 40% of catalans want independence. although it is more like three quarters, more like a referendum. in principle there should be room for negotiation. but i think the problem is that for the last few years now, really, we have this spiral of reaction and counter reaction, a situation in which both parties are poles apart. our correspondent gavin lee is in barcelona. it has been exactly seven days since
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the disputed referendum. it happened last sunday. thousands of people have been taking to the streets. what is the mood like they're now?” think as we have been hearing there isa think as we have been hearing there is a split. what the spanish government are saying today is the silent majority will come out in big numbers, bigger than we have seen in the past few days, where the majority are waving the spanish flag, and the spanish government is saying take to the streets of barcelona today and show that there is this huge swell of support for the government, for the unity of spain. yesterday it is worth saying there were lots of people in barcelona, in alicante, who were com pletely barcelona, in alicante, who were completely and white, saying they are not pro—or anti— independence, they simply want dialogue between they simply want dialogue between the two. that is interesting, actually, because mariano rajoy, the spanish foreign minister, has done an interview today in a newspaper. he is as an economising and insistent as he has been for weeks,
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saying that if the catalan government declares unilateral independence he will override that using any tools legally of the state, including the constitution, and he is also saying he wants the government to back down. so no sign of negotiation, and the plan is, we think, for next week the catalan government to declare independence. what do you think will happen if that happens? how will this play out? i think that. .. that happens? how will this play out? ithink that... i that happens? how will this play out? i think that... i think that happens? how will this play out? i think that. .. i think you need to take into account that even a declaration of independence, in a way, is a plea for negotiation, in the sense that it won't be recognised by the spanish state. it won't be recognised by the eu. so i think effectively what the catalan government is angling for as negotiation, and particularly a new referendum which is supported by the spanish state. it doesn't look as if thatis spanish state. it doesn't look as if that is going to happen. in, it looks pretty pessimistic at the moment. some commentators have
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talked, and people will know it is not that long ago that spain was racked with civil war. some people have suggested there could be a civil war. well, i think that is a little far—fetched, in the sense that no wants violence. the catalan government has led great emphasis on the fact that it should be a mass peaceful movement. i think certainly what you could get is there could be violence. there was last week, was in there? absolutely, and there could be violence again if there was a crackdown. and i think at the end of the day, if the central government has all the power of the central state behind it, if it wants to crack down, if it wants to break the movement in the short term, it can. but of course, in a democratic context, what are the medium and long—term consequences of that? and it is probably the case, i would have thought, that events last sunday actually strengthened the separatist movement. so if it turns out that because of events over last sunday and events that could take place over the next week or two, we
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go from 40% to 60% of catalans who wa nt go from 40% to 60% of catalans who want independence, and that is reflected there are elections in the cata la n reflected there are elections in the catalan parliament, then of course we are still at an impasse. thank you for that. this is brea kfast thank you for that. this is breakfast on bbc news. the main stories this morning. hurricane nate has hit the us gulf coast, bringing torrential rain and winds of 85 miles per hour. the category one storm has already killed 25 people in central america. sirjohn major has branded theresa mays critics "self—absorbed," but says the government must change or risk allowing jeremy corbyn into downing street. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning. it good morning. it is good morning. it is looking good morning. it is looking pretty good morning. it is looking pretty decent for many of us. today will be the better day of both. this was
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scotla nd the better day of both. this was scotland yesterday. similar skies today. most of the showers this morning will be in parts of northern ireland, the west of scotland, some in the north—east of scotland, some in the north—east of scotland, some in the north—east of scotland, and north—west england as well. it will not rain or morning. some dry and bright weather, especially in the south. the north—east of england, thicker cloud. lancashire and north wales as well. central and southern parts of wales, the south—west of england, most wales, the south—west of england, m ost pla ces wales, the south—west of england, most places dry with sunny spells. a few showers in the isles of scilly. the odd fog patch in central and southern parts of england. that should clear away quickly. it will the main break allowing sunshine. —— thin and break. a decent day for many parts. some showers in the west
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of scotla nd many parts. some showers in the west of scotland and north—west england. northern ireland, slightly drier conditions. temperatures, 13— 17. this evening, ending the day on a fairly quiet note. more rain in scotland. light and patchy with hill fog. that is courtesy of this weather front shifting east as we go through the early hours of monday morning. monday, a cold front in the west. not especially active. patchy rain in western areas on monday. further east, staying dry. patchy outbreaks of light rain going east. more persistent rain heading in the northern ireland in the afternoon. 14- 18. northern ireland in the afternoon. 14— 18. mild on tuesday. the weather front foot fizzle out as a goes to the east. quite breezy. —— as it goes to the. the week ahead is quite
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autumnal. the wettest weather in the north—west. driest conditions in the south—east. and now it is back to both of you. thank you very much. the duke of cambridge and prince harry have been very open about their own experiences with mental health, and set up their charity, heads together, to encourage people to speak out. now, they've announced the next phase of their mission, a £2 million investment fund to help improve the nation's mental health through technology. our royal correspondent, sarah campbell, has finding out more. in the run—up to the london marathon, the younger one's focus was almost exclusively centred on heads together, the campaign they founded to improve the health of the nation mentally. in april, thousands took up the challenge to run the 28 miles and in doing so helped to raise awareness of issues facing millions of people. this has been a
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personal mission, with the princes opening up more than ever. we hope to make an impact at a younger age. i think we are making good progress. so, has it worked? in a high—tech suite in imperial college london, prince william was shown data showing their campaign has encouraged more people, especially men, to talk about mental health issues. and evidence from partner charities which make up heads together suggests a significant impact. the health charity mind had its busiest ever day—to—day after the marathon with 54% more calls. the same happened with places2be. and a 15% increase in calls to young minds. the campaign was about starting the conversation on meta— health. now it is moving on to phase
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two, keeping the conversation going. starting with a £2 million grant from the royal foundation to make digital ways to open up. from the royal foundation to make digitalways to open up. it is from the royal foundation to make digital ways to open up. it is about the timescale. if you have people struggling late at night with mental health, it is difficult for some services to stay open. could the digital world help in that space so there is always someone to talk to. as well as digital projects, heads together will focus on men to help in schools, workplaces, and the military, with this issue remaining at the top of the agenda of the royals. sarah campbell, bbc news. the work being done by the two princes. and now for the papers. reverend sally hitchiner is here to tell us what's
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caught her eye. good morning. justine greening has an idea to get more teachers in.” am excited about it. i could change profession myself! if graduates want to go into a career working as science teachers, modern languages, they could have less student loans. a huge advantage for those people. many people would consider it if it comes into play. student loans are so high and crippling. i work with stu d e nts so high and crippling. i work with students every day at the university who are concerned about how they will pay back student loans. who are concerned about how they will pay back student loansm will pay back student loans. it is an issue with what labour has said about wiping out that at the moment and the conservatives with a similar thing with freezing them. why those
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two subjects? there is a lack of teachers. it is indicative of the larger issue in britain. we are not taking foreign languages seriously enough. we don't understand the need to travel and engage. i think in the global economy, and even post brexit, i think modern languages, even languages like mandarin, farsi, not the standard european ones taught in school, we need to focus on those. we need to engage in the global market. a huge incentive. tell us about mother care in the sun on sunday. this story. what is it about? they have started doing a set of gender neutral babywear. it follows jon lewis. he of gender neutral babywear. it followsjon lewis. he stopped last month having separate sections for
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boys and girls with clothing. a lot of it is grey and black and white. babies don't care if they are in pink or blue. i think it is important we stop focusing on this. be for a baby is born we focus on whether it is a boy or a girl and all of those gender stereotypes. —— before. we should allow children to develop as they are. many young people are saying they do not identify with the gender assigned at birth and of the psychological damage that comes from that. it is more important than ever we allow babies to have the opportunity and parents to choose gender neutral clothing if that is what they want. many people will welcome it. but there will be a lot of people who will not be happy about this happening. of course, and many
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within my church, i imagine. we have to talk about why it is important. this is not political correctness gone mad. it is notjust for the sake of it, to make a political point. it is about nurturing children as children and allowing them to grow up as they are. i grew up them to grow up as they are. i grew up in the early 80s. girls could wear whatever they wanted. there was no focus on pink. now it is princess is and yet i loved my lego sets. —— princesses. girls need to engage with things outside of that. how much would it be different if we stopped this heavy pressure to be the pink princess, those stiff upper lip man stereotypes. children are children. i remember growing up in
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the 705 with lots of horrible brown clothes. moving on. let's talk about coin. if you are like me, having lots of coins around, down the back of the sofa, etc, lots of loose change, pull it out and use it in the next week. you have seven days to use them before they become obsolete. next sunday they cease to be legal tender. it doesn't say... with the £5 notes, it could still go to the bank. they could have a grace period. i think you can take them to banks but cannot use them in shops. yes. businesses are not obliged to accept them that you can exchange them at a bank. 0h, accept them that you can exchange
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them at a bank. oh, yeah, it says that. i read this at half past three this morning. a wine cellar in la. a divorce battle and he is worried about his wine. he has six 19th century wines sold for £175,000. he has all of it and yet he is teetotal. would you drink it if it is worth that much? i know many people are very savvy wine investors. the issue is it has to be ke pt investors. the issue is it has to be kept at a certain temperature. sorry. thank you. i did not mean to huack sorry. thank you. i did not mean to hijack your segment. we will speak to you later. the andrew marr show is on at nine this morning on bbc one. what's coming up, andrew? iam here i am here in glasgow for the start of the scottish national party
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conference. it is a moody and beautiful dawn that is breaking. i am here to talk to nicola sturgeon, the first minister of scotland, about independence, indy ref two, and ruth davidson, the scottish tory leader, to talk about the aftermath of what happened recently with theresa may. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. stay with us. we'll have a summary of the news injust a moment. hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and tina daheley. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: hurricane nate has hit the united states, causing torrential rain and powerful winds. people in parts of mississippi, alabama, florida and louisiana have been ordered to evacuate their homes. the storm has already caused major damage to several central american countries, leaving at least 25
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people dead, before hitting the us as a category one hurricane. the former prime minister sirjohn major is the latest senior conservative to publicly offer his support to theresa may to carry on as prime minister. writing in the mail on sunday, sirjohn said tory mp5 should reflect very carefully on what was at stake. he said the country had had enough of what he called the self—absorbed, disloyal behaviour seen in recent weeks. a man has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving after a crash outside the natural history museum in london yesterday. 11 people were injured in the incident. a man in his 405 is in custody. police say the incident is not terror related and they are appealing for witnesses. spain's prime minister, mariano rajoy, says any declaration of independence by the catalan region will have no effect. a day of rallies has taken place around the country following last weekend's disputed referendum. in an interview with a spanish
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newspaper, mariano rajoy said he rejected any mediation to resolve the crisis. translation: have the absolute reassurance that the government will prevent any declaration of independence from turning into something. spain will continue to be spain, and it will continue being spain for a long time. a woman has been arrested after she allegedly tried to climb the front gates of buckingham palace. the woman, thought to be in her 305, is being held on suspicion of trespass and is in custody at a central london police station. the incident is not being treated as terror—related, according to officers. the rapper nelly has been arrested after a woman accused him of raping her on his tour bus after a concert near seattle. nelly, whose real name is cornell hayneer, was taken into custody yesterday. in a statement, his lawyer said the claim was completely fabricated. the 42—year—old is currently on tour with the backstreet boys. and it is all about the rugby league
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and the formula one. we havejust been told that lewis hamilton has won the japanese grand prix. before i walked into the studio he was still driving, but he has now won it. we were doing the maths downstairs and he is closing in on his fourth world championship. he does not need to win necessarily another race this season. all he has to do is keep in touch with sebastian vettel and he could win it next week at the american grand prix in texas if sebastian vettel retires and he wins it. a perfect day. championship leader lewis hamilton started from pole, and made the perfect getaway. he will be confident of claiming
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that fourth world title, thanks to problems for sebastian vettel. the german had problems on the grid, and a spark plug was changed before the start, but on the first lap he dropped from second to sixth place. leeds rhinos have cemented their standing as the most successful side in super league history by winning an eighth grand final. they beat castleford, the team that finished top of the league during the regular season, by 24—6. but, as adam wild reports, castleford couldn't produce their best when it mattered the most. the biggest team for the very biggest occasion. leeds rhinos — super league champions once again. but this was a title hard—earned. at old trafford, it was their neighbours who arrived as favourites. just 20 miles separates leeds from castleford. in recent years, on the field, these clubs have been much further apart. still, the tigers have been the team of the year. that was, until the moment it really mattered. their first grand final, leeds' tensed, experienced a toll right at the start. tom briscoe's try and the first half.
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castleford's fairytale ending, as another is beginning. danny mcguire now leads leeds, after 16 years as a player. this was some parting gift — two tries for him, two for briscoe. leeds dominant, ruthless, and ultimately unstoppable. so castleford leave here bitterly disappointed. they say there is no substitute for experience. leeds have proved that they are super league champions once more. max whitlock has become the first british gymnast to retain a world title, by taking gold in the pommel horse in montreal. the olympic champion was competing in his first final since rio. he now has six world championship medals — more now than beth tweddle and louis smith. i didn't even think about it. it didn't even come into my head that it would be history to do that, until i saw — i think
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it was your tweet this morning. and it made me feel a bit nervous, and it put things into perspective a bit more. so ijust tried to put that to the side. i try and focus on what i do, like i always do, focus on myjob. and myjob was to go there today and perform as good as i possibly can. i mean, that's what sport is all about. champions exeter are back on top of rugby union's premiership table, after a bonus—point win over newcastle. the closest game of the round, though, was at the madejski stadium, where leicester just inched their way past london irish to win by a single point. 28—27 the final score, withjonny may scoring his sixth try in six games. there were also wins for gloucester and bath. johnny sexton became leinster‘s all—time leading points—scorer after they beat munster 23—17 in pro14 yesterday. rory o'loughlin scored both of leinster‘s tries, but it was the boot of sexton that really made the difference. elsewhere, scarlets beat ospreys by a point. chelsea ladies have maintained their excellent start to the wsl
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season with a 1—0 win over liverpool. chelsea have now scored 13 goals in their three wins so far this season. manchester city also won. they beat everton 3—2. england may have made sure of their place at next year's world cup, but a route to russia via the play—offs remains a possibility for the rest of the home nations heading into the crucial final round of qualifying matches. wales and northern ireland are second in their respective groups, as are scotland, who are in slovenia ahead of their match at 5:00pm today. after victory against slovakia on thursday, the scots know another win will secure their playoff berth. as soon as we walked off the pitch, as soon as we walked in the dressing room, i could sense it already. there was no singing and dancing, anything like that. we realised they're a good side. we have to play another good side. as a group of individuals, we know how important it is to everybody. we know how important it is, because we're all getting texts from all ourfriends,
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wishing good luck, and e—mails, and people we've not heard from in a wee while. so we know that. northern ireland are expected to field their strongest team for the world cup qualifier in norway today. they are already guaranteed to finish second, and could be assured of a play—off place before the game even starts, if other results go their way. we've been good in the doubleheaders to date. and again, you know, as i say, we come into this game knowing there's a huge amount at stake. we have neverfor one minute thought it was anything other than that. and you can tell already that the players are looking forward to the game. but they know that, particularly, they have to try and make sure they win the game as well. there is no pressure on england, of course, after they secured their world cup place on thursday, but manager gareth southgate will be hoping for a much improved performance when they travel to lithuania. southgate has opted to replace goalkeeperjoe hart with jack butland — a chance for butland to challenge for a more regular spot in goal.
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we're all after the same shirt, but we're all keen to push each other, and make sure that we're all performing to a high standard, because ultimately that means success for us as a nation. so there is brilliant rivalry there, but also great friendship between all of us. and we supported joe excellently the other night, and he obviously went on to make some great saves, and put in a really good performance for us, which is what we want. and i'm sure it would go the opposite way if it was someone else in the goal. tyrell hatton has a five—shot lead going into the final round of the alfred dunhill links in scotland later today. the defending champion pulled clear of the field yesterday at kingsbarns, shooting seven birdies in total. the final round will take place at the old course at st andrews. simona halep has surged to number one in the world for the first time, after reaching the china open final. the romanian defeated latvia's jelena ostapenko, 6—2, 6—4, in theirsemi—final. her ousting of spaniard garbine muguruza as the world's top woman player will be officially confirmed on monday when the latest rankings are released. halep will play caroline garcia in the decider.
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garcia beat petra kvitova in the other semi. garcia must win the final if she is to have a chance of replacing britain'sjohanna konta in the end—of—season wta finals. and finally, some dramatic pictures from the tour of lombardy, in italy. it is kind of one of those things you can't take your eyes off. 40km from the finish, belgian laurens de plus somehow managed to escape serious injury after this frightening crash. the 22—year—old was taken to hospital, and was said to be ok. his team confirmed he suffered no serious injuries. the race was won by italy's vincenzo nibali. hgppy happy endings all around. lucky to walk away without any problems. they
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we re walk away without any problems. they were riding high on the 2015 general election, winning their highest share of votes in the party's history. however, the green party failed to add a single mp in the most failed to add a single mp in the m ost rece nt failed to add a single mp in the most recent general election, and saw its vote share fall. this week the party has gathered for its annual conference, promising to say things other parties won't, in an effort to increase its appeal. so what will that message be and how will it get through to voters? lets speak to the co— leader. good morning to you, jonathan. day two of your conference, what is the green party offering its members and eve ryo ne party offering its members and everyone else? as you say, we are telling the truth and saying things that other parties are not prepared to say. we want to depoliticise the issue of climate. the devastation of the hurricanes mean that 2017 will mark a turning point when we cannot go around messing around with this
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issue any longer. it has contributed to the sea is warming up and huge devastation and intensity of those hurricanes. also over brexit, we wa nt to hurricanes. also over brexit, we want to say clearly that we want people to be able to enjoy the freedom of movement that we have enjoyed for decades. i want my children to enjoy it, many people watching this programme will want their children to enjoy it. we haven't got an effective opposition of this issue so we want that to happen. and we are in a situation where we are running out of ideas from the government to fix our cost of living crisis for people who will be looking at their bills this weekend and wondering how they will meet them. we can rethink the way we work and our whole economy. you say there is no effective opposition when it comes to brexit. you are still fighting for membership of the eu, which means you are refusing to listen to the majority who voted to leave. i am absolutely passionate that the whole country must be involved in this process. and that is why we are saying that the referendum should have been the
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start of our involvement. there are 50 studies the government admit it has done over the consequences of brexit but we have not been given access to that information. we are going in blind. we need to have full participation in that process and we need to have a ratification referendum at the end of it so that we can see what the final deal will be. if the government has accepted that parliament has to have a vote on it, why shouldn't the whole country have a vote on it? you wa nted country have a vote on it? you wanted the single market, that means freedom of movement. many people wa nted freedom of movement. many people wanted to leave because they want control of borders. you can't have that with the single market.” control of borders. you can't have that with the single market. i think many of us were projecting onto the referendum our aspirations for the future. we were not given that option, and that is why we need a debate over what that will look like. we were told a lot of... let's call it lies during the referendum process. we are saying it is time to be honest and truthful. we want to say this is how people really feel. what people really want is schools that work, hospitals at work, a
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secure future, a welfare state which will give them that safety net. in the winds of change that we are all experiencing at the moment, that is what we all want out of that process. let's have a conversation about it, let's have the fact is on the table. you say that leaving the single market is incompatible with ending austerity but the four—day working week you are proposing is also incompatible with ending austerity. what a lot of big businesses are saying, like facebook and amazon, they are saying there is and amazon, they are saying there is a lot of wealth around, automation coming, working patterns changing. think about the changes that will happen with driverless cars and how it will impact the taxi trade. we will have to rethink radically how we work and our working patterns, and we can have a shorter working week. 100 years ago we were discussing whether we would even have a five—day week, moving from a six—day week to a five—day week. no one said it was possible. now it is commonplace. we need to be thinking
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in new ways, taking his ideas, and the green party is the only one asking these questions and saying we need to discuss this now. let's talk about where the green party is in 2017. you failed to add a single mp in this year's election. your vote share dropped. what went wrong? well, it was an unusual election where all the parties accept labour saw their share drop. it was a snap election in difficult circumstances. it was our second best general election result of. we made gains in council seats, which you have to make in order to win parliamentary seats in the future. and i am proud of the fact that we put climate change on the agenda. we said very clearly that we must stand up for freedom of movement. we were the ones raising the big questions about how we reform the welfare state, how we can work fewer hours, how we can spend more time with our families, and asking our questions about who the economy is really for. those are the economy is really for. those are the things we need to be discussing and that is what we want to discuss it is conference this weekend. can
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you really make a difference when two parties are dominating british politics at the moment? are you being squeezed byjeremy corbyn‘s labour? i think it is great, being squeezed byjeremy corbyn‘s labour? ithink it is great, some being squeezed byjeremy corbyn‘s labour? i think it is great, some of the ideas we have been proposing for seven years, and when we were the only ones saying that austerity was alight, now that has become centrestage. it is because of what we have done. where we lead, others follow. it is great that labour shifted to where they have been historically. we are the only ones putting forward a new way of thinking, asking what we should really be doing moving into the future. taking on those big questions. so i think we have something very, very important to say. we change the agenda over fracking, climate change, energy, raising questions about the commercial arms trade, a whole range of issues. we have been setting that agenda and that is why the role of the green party is as crucial now as it ever has been. good morning. breakfast. these are
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the main stories. hurricane nate has hit the us gulf coast. it has killed 25 people already in central america. sirjohn major has branded the critics of theresa may as self absorbed, but says they must change or riskjeremy corbyn getting into downing street. the weather. that looks like it could have been a nice early morning shot from somewhere. pitcher esque. this was ca ptu red somewhere. pitcher esque. this was captured by one of the weather watchers in the last half—hour. a serene watchers in the last half—hour. a serene start. decent weather on the cards. for many of us, it will be dry with sunshine. occasional showers. most of the showers are
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northern ireland. further south across northern ireland, dry and bright. brightness breaking through in central and southern parts of scotla nd in central and southern parts of scotland stretching down to the north—east of england. a fine start to the day in newcastle. cloud in manchester. the odd shower. one or two fog patches south in england and wales. equally, so to breaking through. cloud and fog patches. it should be an improving picture. we will continue to see some showers in the north and west. edging away from northern ireland. continuing in the west england and scotland. cumbria and cheshire, windy. elsewhere, dry and cheshire, windy. elsewhere, dry and bright. in the sunshine, feeling pleasa nt and bright. in the sunshine, feeling pleasant enough. 13— 17 degrees. lighter winds than recent days.
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cloud builds in from the west on sunday. patchy and light rain in scotla nd sunday. patchy and light rain in scotland courtesy of this weather front. tonight and the early hours of monday. this weather system goes east. this cold front in the west producing patchy rain. nothing heavy. you can see the showers, initially in western areas, dry and brighter in the east. more persistent rain in northern ireland in the afternoon. temperatures, 18 degrees. sunny. unsettled on tuesday. the weather front clearing to the south—east and fizzling out. breezy conditions with more rain working into the north—west. the working into the north—west. the working week, wet weather in the west of the country. dry in the south—east. feeling autumnal. back to you. thank you very much. see you
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later. eight o'clock. now it is time for the travel show. i'm on a voyage through the heart of the balkans, exploring the places that have grown up along the route of the river sava. it's a journey through four countries that just over 25 years ago were at war. my trip started at the source in slovenia and continued through to the wetlands of croatia. watch out! this week, i'll be following the river to bosnia and herzegovina, and then east into serbia. i'm meeting those who live along the river banks who want to move on from the conflicts of the ‘905 and show us what their part of the world is really like. the cascading waterfalls and historic cities of bosnia
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and herzegovina, now gaining more international attention. and here in gradiska in the north of the country, the river sava is on the tourist agenda too. it's here that the river takes on a new and important role as an internationally recognised border. because over there is croatia, and on this side of the river is bosnia and herzegovina, where i will be continuing myjourney. it's a far cry from the beleaguered war—torn image some might have of bosnia and herzegovina. during the 19905, the river here was the scene of some
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of the fiercest inter—ethnic fighting. sparked by the break—up of yugoslavia. but today, the people who live here are recognising the river's potential. during the war, the river was a physical barrier, separating opposing sides. attitudes towards the river might have changed since the war, but the natural environment is still feeling the effects. landmines and munitions were used extensively in the sava basin, which not only proved to be deadly, but also polluted the water and the problem has been compounded by industrial waste. but this group of young people are determined that their natural heritage will not be placed
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in any further jeopardy. there are people who think it's a war still in our country, but it's not. it's finished. thank you. when we were at war, or after the war, older generations didn't have time to think about nature, but now it has ended and i am the new generation that came with that sense that we need to help our nature, so that that same nature can help us. why is it important for you that the nature around here is protected ? we have an unused nature that tourists can... the potential. yes, potential that tourists can help us with that, because we need money. so tourism could be the answer to unemployment amongst young people?
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yes, of course. like everywhere. how bad is unemployment? ah, very bad. so tourism may say that? yes. i think it's the only choice we have. just outside gradiska, on the flood plains of the sava, is the wetland. it's been recognised as an area of international importance because it supports a range of endangered species. but it's also under threat as some of the lakes have been drained and ploughed over for farmland. it's an issue the collective want to bring worldwide attention to by holding a music festival here. mirko was one of the djs. what is it about the land here that worries you, and what's happening to it? the thing that worries me is it will all disappear, all the lake — it was 11, now it's only two. la kes ? yeah. so tell me then — what is so special about this area that makes you and your friends
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want to come here and relax? nature, nature, especially nature because it is breathtaking. when you look at the sunrise and everything, it's beautiful. so we wanted to check, let's do a festival. maybe someone will, with the money, come and say, "stop that." more than 500 people from across the region came to the festival, and the eco—collective plan to hold more events here in the future. some people might say, how is playing music with a dj sound system helping the nature? because that's in right now. the festivals are in. but i suppose what i'm saying is people might comejust for the party, ok. they go, yeah, great party! and they go, not even knowing... when they come, when they see this beautiful place, they will stay.
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we are campaigning for saving this land. that is all. just the two. and the eco—collective aren't the only ones hoping to encourage people to visit this region. i'm heading through lush countryside to meet a man who wants to link up the whole of the sava route by bike. what is your grand plan for the whole stretch of this river? well, the grand plan is actually to connect first, to connect people along the sava river. it's connecting a few important cities. well, once you know sava river was a war line, we want to change this, to become more or less like a lifeline. he thinks the plan could unite all four countries with a common purpose, and he cycled the entire 850—kilometre route with his team to show it can be done. there are hurdles to overcome, like areas with undetonated landmines.
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but he says if the route succeeds, the rewards will be immense. this is just one of the answers that really could help people to think about a mutual future, not divided future. we finish our cycle ride in riverside city of brcko. brcko's position on the river near the croatian and serbian borders means it's been strategically important for centuries. its location also made it a huge sticking point in the 1995 peace talks that sought to end bosnia and herzegovina's ethnic conflict by setting up two political entities within the country — one representing bosnian muslims and croats, and the other, serbs. no—one could agree which region brcko should be part of — the federation of bosnia and herzegovina, or the serb republic. and so, they made a decision.
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it would be neither. brcko's been called europe's only free city. in official terms, it is a semi—autonomous district with its own multi—ethnic government and education system. but achieving harmony hasn't been straightforward. for example, the local assembly couldn't agree on a shared memorial for those killed in the country's war. so they built three. brcko is a fascinating place to visit. it's been called a microcosm of the country as a whole because here you can experience the culture of all the different groups that make up this complex nation. and that diversity is reflected in the music too. singing. this band specialise in performing
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folk songs from all the ethnic backgrounds that make up brcko. clapping. really, really good. fantastic. how do you do? thank you so much. that was brilliant. and tonight, i'm joining the band. can i ask you, first of all — how much of the music that you play is a combination of all the different cultures that are in this district? singing. of course, no—one's pretending that brcko is a utopia.
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it has a fiendishly compensated government structure and there is lingering resentment about which community effectively has the most power. but on nights like this, harmony reigns. singing. all of us are mixed. there are serbians, croatians, bosnians. we are all the same. i don't even remember if someone is that way or this way or anything. it doesn't feel... the atmosphere is very nice. and life goes on, and music goes on. yes. absolutely. well, in that case, shall we have a go? not good. power! wow! that's such a nice feeling! clapping.
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good morning. also this morning. sir john major becomes the latest senior tory to rally around theresa may, hitting out at what he calls self absorbed behave of the party.
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