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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 9, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a landmark moment after decades of child abuse allegations in children's homes in rochdale. a national inquiry begins hearing evidence for the first time to investigate an alleged failure to prosecute the late mp cyril smith, amid claims of a cover—up. good morning, it's monday the ninth of october. also this morning: theresa may will tell the eu today that it's time to show some flexibility in the brexit negotiations, saying that the ball is now "in their court." viva espana! after hundreds of thousands gather in barcelona for a pro—spain rally, signs that catalonia's leaders may stop short of making a formal declaration of independence. from the national college of
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high—speed rail aid ran new education centre designed to help close and engineering skills gap. i will talk to some of the students a little later. in sport, scotland say goodbye to their hopes of playing in next year's world cup in russia. they needed a win in slovenia to guarantee a place in the playoffs, but could only manage a 2—all draw. that result for scotland means northern ireland are through to the play—offs, despite losing to norway in oslo. what do you think is your better film? godfather one or what do you think is your better film ? godfather one or godfather what do you think is your better film? godfather one or godfather to? that is a true story. dustin hoffman talks to us about his new film, fatherhood, and being mistaken for al pacino. and sarah has the weather. good morning. bit of a great start to the day to day. some drizzly rain moving eastwards that some of us
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will see glimpses of sunshine in the mix. details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse begins detailed hearings today, to examine the allegations of child sexual abuse in two rochdale children's homes. the cases date back to the early 1960s. the inquiry will investigate an alleged failure to prosecute the late mp cyril smith, amid claims of a cover—up. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. the child abuse enquiry‘s planning to go back nearly 60 years and delve into the dark past of two children's homes. this one, knowl view, and cambridge house. the claims, that children were abused, that staff knew, that no one was brought to justice and that the scandal was covered up. the larger—than—life liberal mp cyril smith, who died several years ago, was a governor of knowl view. do you want a man to represent you or a party robot? the claim was he used his position to get access to children. the first allegations
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against him date back to 1961. police investigated but in 1970 prosecutors said the evidence was stale and his accuser is not reliable. by the early 1990s, experts reported growing concerns children were being abused at the knowl view home. little action was taken. last month finally rochdale council apologised for failing children. today the public enquiry will begin taking fresh evidence. the reason that this matters is we cannot have a situation in this country were powerful people are able to abuse children and get away with it because other powerful people are protecting them. that cannot be allowed to happen and that's why we have to investigate what happened with cyril smith and that's why we have to learn the lessons from it. the enquiry takes evidence like at court but can't prosecute. its job is to discover what happened and who covered it up and provide ways of preventing it happening again. tom symonds, bbc news. theresa may will tell the eu today
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it's time to show some flexibility in the brexit negotiations, saying that the ball is now "in their court." the fifth round of talks get under way in brussels today, as the prime minister updates mps at westminster on the progress so far. reports from catalonia suggest the regional government there may not declare independence from spain this week. last weekend's referendum, which was deemed illegal by the national government, returned a 90% vote for independence. but yesterday saw more than 300,000 people marching in barcelona to show support for a united spain. iam i am worried that independence will happen in 48 or 24 hours and i don't think i have heard a clear explanation of how things will work. we love catalonia and we love spain. 0ne country. i am excited about the
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idea of creating a new country but i am worried as well. my parents are very, very worried. 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee is in barcelona this morning. gavin, will the catalan government declare independence this week? there is no clear indication at all. 24 hours away from a big speech from the catalan president where he will set out his intentions that had been suggested last week and up into the weekend. 0ne suggested last week and up into the weekend. one member of the government, has told the bbc that, actually, it will not now happen. what will happen instead is that this he will set out a path towards independence and asked the government to listen to the population and have a legal referendum in the future. 0ther,
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more seniorfigures referendum in the future. 0ther, more senior figures close to carles puigdemont say there is actually still a big consideration here. all options are on the table for tomorrow. it boils down to three factors. one, the fact that some of the banks and businesses will have a potential reaction and the likelihood of madrid to block this. 24 hours of thinking time for the leaders here. the snp says scotland is suffering because of the cuts in public spending made by the conservative government at westminster. at their party conference in glasgow today, they will call for the chancellor, philip hammond to use next month's budget to invest in public services. but their opponents say the party has the power to raise taxes in scotland and make different political choices, rather than simply blame westminster for tight budgets. and we'll be speaking to the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, just after half past seven this morning. a foster carer is asking the employment tribunal to rule that she should be classed as a worker —
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giving entitlement to rights such as paid leave. sarah anderson is bringing the case against hampshire county council. the local authority says the law is clear — that foster carers aren't workers. but if she wins, it could have significant implications for tens of thousands of other carers. we'll be speaking to sarah after 6.30. universities must take tougher action against students who cheat by buying essays online, according to the higher education watchdog, the quality assurance agency. the universities minister, jojohnson, says the trade in essays undermines academic standards. the national union of students says that overwhelming pressure to get good grades is driving the use of these websites. universities will be telling students that anyone caught buying essays could face being expelled and failing their degree. the us vice president mike pence has
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been accused of staging a publicity stu nt. been accused of staging a publicity stunt. mr pence left the game in indiana because he would not dignify an event that showed disrespect for the us military underflag. president trump tweeted to say he was proud. the hollywood film producer harvey weinstein has been fired from the company he co—founded amid multiple claims that he sexually harrassed female employees. the 65—year—old issued an apology for his behaviour but was sacked last night by the board of the weinstein company, in light of new information about misconduct. but his lawyers later denied many of the allegations against him. weinstein‘s films include shakespeare in love, the king's speech and the artist. you may remember yesterday that this programme said you needed to rummage through your wallet for old power
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and coins because next week they cease to be legal tender. but of you still have too many to spend, then fear not, some shops say they will still accept them until october fear not, some shops say they will still accept them until 0ctober15. after the deadline. after the deadline. pound land which says it will continue to accept the point until the end of the month and the trade association representing small shops as a live its members to keep using them as a useful community service to customers. it is interesting. it is a logistical conundrum, isn't it? how to get the old ones in and the new ones out.” had a dig around the money boxes. i have about 11 and they are my coat pockets. i am using them for parking, trolleys, all sorts. you don't drink coffee so...” parking, trolleys, all sorts. you don't drink coffee so... i have heard you can give them to charity. that is good news. thank you for that. our pound correspondent is
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with us this morning and bringing mixed news as well. it just feels a little fitting, really that scotland have to give up their place for northern ireland. 0ne home nation helping another. you cannot help but feel for them, can you? an inspired run of form with five unbeaten matches and so close to go into the world cup. scotland's hopes of playing in the 2018 world cup in russia are over this morning. gordon strachan‘s side needed a win in slovenia to guarantee a place in the playoffs, but could only manage a 2—all draw. slovakia taking their place. northern ireland knew they'd made the play—offs shortly before they lost their last group game, beaten 1—0 by norway. scotland's earlier exit had confirmed their place in the play—offs , but a chris brunt own goal meant they lost in oslo. england managed a win over lithunia but produced another uninspiring display. harry kane's first half penalty was the game's only goal and claudia fragapane picked up
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a bronze medal on the final day of the world gymnastics championships in montreal. her third place in the floor final means britain finish with two medals. brilliant from her to win raunds and of course for max whitlock and his pommel horse gold. eight good display in montreal. excellent news. will you do the papers with us?|j will. we have the weather for you now. sarah is with us. good morning. good morning to you. we have a lot of cloud across the good morning to you. we have a lot of cloud across the country good morning to you. we have a lot of cloud across the country today are so of cloud across the country today are so few are waking up to a little murky grey start to the day, bear with it because many of us will start to see sunny spells breaking through it will not be dry across the board, there will be patchy rain moving eastwards a cross there will be patchy rain moving eastwards across the country. i think this afternoon is bearing a little bit better in turns of sunny spells. looking at the weather this
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morning, but eight o'clock a lot of drizzly rain across much of scotland. the northern ireland, largely dry although they could catch alight spot of drizzle. across northern england, grey here as well. spot the difference is we had some. brighter down towards parts of wales with sunny spells breaking through towards the south—east. a lot of luke towards the south—east. a lot of lu ke lowd e n towards the south—east. a lot of luke lowden the south—west bringing light patchy rain. that should shift eastwards through the morning. in the south—east, actually start because you have clear skies across some parts of the south—east bursting. through the day, the cloud will push eastwards so any light drizzly showers moving eastwards across the country. a little more brightness is afternoon, particularly for parts of eastern scotla nd particularly for parts of eastern scotland and north—east england, down towards the south—east of wales. if you are lucky, a glimpse of sunshine with temperatures to 16 oi’ of sunshine with temperatures to 16 or 17 degrees. for the world cup qualifier tonight, wales versus the republic of ireland, it should be dry with temperatures around 14
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degrees. as we move through this evening and overnight, the rain arrives in northern ireland and then pushes across scotland, and northern england, so turning blustery across the northern half of the country with the arrival of the rain. that is down to this front which tomorrow will slip south across england and wales, fizzling out a bit. a band of cloud with a few showers brightening up cloud with a few showers brightening up behind the. case of the country tomorrow just up behind the. case of the country tomorrowjust odd shower around. persistent rain heads in from the north—west as we had through tuesday evening. low pressure driving weather into the middle of the week and that in the north. tight isobars meaning a windy spell of weather through tuesday night into wednesday. during the day on wednesday, a band of drifts south —— rain drifts south. still rather mild. through the week ahead, things
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will be turning windy and unsettled and autumnal. there will be rain at times, particularly towards the north—west, dry in the south—east. good news for you, things will warm up good news for you, things will warm up as we head into the weekend. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a national inquiry into child abuse begins hearing evidence for the first time today, examining decades of allegations in rochdale, and claims of a cover—up involving the town's late mp cyril smith. theresa may will give an update on brexit negotiations when parliament returns today, telling mps that it's time for the eu to show some flexibility. let's take a look at today's papers. kat is here to have a look at the back pages. starting with the daily telegraph, pound coin chaos as shops to five deadline, something we talked about earlier, lots of papers talking about theresa may and brexit
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—— five. theresa may leaving church yesterday carrying what were thought to be birthday cards, she was 61 last week. the daily mirror talking about what they're calling the great bin collections candle, saying some people are praying for private waste firms as pickup strop to every three weeks —— paying for. the daily mail says gender neutral sensors, declaring your sex in the next sensors will be optional and who is this? raquel were of. —— census daschle raquel welch —— census —— raquel welch. this is rather wonderful. a cargo ship ran aground at margate yesterday narrowly missing a sculpture by antony gormley. i love these, they have been all over, i've seen them in london. just missing the sculpture bya london. just missing the sculpture by a couple of metres. so close! the
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75 metre long dropped anchor and become stuck in front of the town's turner gallery. don't know if it is still there. come on, people of margate, let luis neto about that. what have you got, football? -- let luis neto. the guardian sums it up —— let louise no. is harry kane the best england striker since harry kane? all talks of —— all types of football bloggers will be talking about that today. the return will to include clinches fourth world title at the next race in texas if things continue to go badly for vettel. will strachan stay on as scotland manager after they failed to make it to the world cup? lots of talk about that in the papers. this one is interesting, we will hear more from it in the coming weeks, there's a
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call for a full parliamentary enquiry after it was claimed the football association was warned 22 yea rs football association was warned 22 years about links between heading a ball in football and dementia after a number of players who used to play a number of players who used to play a long time ago with the heavy leather balls have been diagnosed with neurodegenerative diseases. a p pa re ntly with neurodegenerative diseases. apparently baroness elaine murphy wrote to the fa in 1995 to say there may be something in this and the fa dismissed her, this says. there will be an enquiry into who knew what at the time. talking about documentaries, did you see the sir bobby charlton one? haven't seen it yet. i'm going to have to watch that one. the inside pages, talking about dining rooms. this is about an advert that dove published on its facebook page, it has now gone and you will understand why. a black woman removed her top to reveal a
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white woman supposedly after using dove body lotion. it has been removed. quite extraordinary, the campaign has been removed from facebook. they have given a statement saying... sorry? they say an image we recently posted on facebook missed the mark in representing women of colour thoughtfully. we deeply regret the events it caused. as part of campaignfor events it caused. as part of campaign for dove body wash a three second video clip was posted to the us facebook page, this didn't represent the diversity of real beauty, something dove is passionate about, is core to our beliefs, and it shouldn't have happened. possibly a three seconds they could have done without. it still managed to get through the marketing meeting! at least a solitary hand should have been thinking, i'm not sure this is the best idea ? been thinking, i'm not sure this is the best idea? death of the dining room, even mary berry eats in the kitchen would you believe? no! they
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are empty rooms in the house, far more people having open plan eating in the kitchen watching stuff in front of the television. in the kitchen watching stuff in front of the televisionlj in the kitchen watching stuff in front of the television. i can't believe it's only now the death of the dining room, how many people can have a room they don't use? at a table tennis table in it and you will use it everyday —— put a table tennis table. talking of changing patterns, apparently we spent an hour a day just looking patterns, apparently we spent an hour a dayjust looking for tv shows to watch. i can believe that. just searching for what to watch. hundreds of digital channels, online, tv addicts have never had so much choice. the wealth of options save 13% are watching the largest amount... taking the largest amount of time to choose what to watch and on average it's an hour a day deciding what to watch. and fighting with the various providers.” deciding what to watch. and fighting with the various providers. i only watch about an hour a day, it's all i've got time for. get a secondary
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one and i'd won down the side of the sofa so if someone is holding it then you can use a second —— hired one. “ then you can use a second —— hired one. -- higuita one. -- why did. losing a loved one is an experience we all have to come to terms with and the possessions left behind can become precious keepsakes i providing a link to the past. , providing a link to the past. now a new charity is working with hospice patients to give them the opportunity to leave behind a different kind of memento for their relatives, an audio recording of their life stories. brea kfast‘s graham satchell reports. what we do is we start with the beginning. we use this little machine to record your life story and you can carry on talking for as long as you want. suzanne is 56 and about to tell the story of her life. when i was 12 we moved to gloucestershire, which was quite traumatic for me at that stage... suzanne was diagnosed with cancer in 2013. she has two children that are 18 and 21. this recording a legacy
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for them and the generations to come. i always remember my grandmother, who i was very close to, she would try and tell me things andi to, she would try and tell me things and i wouldn't really listen and i would love to have an audio of her, her life. so i applied to the metropolitan police cadets, which didn't scare me because we'd lived in and around london really for most of my childhood. i think it's important for people to know what theirfamily important for people to know what their family background is, important for people to know what theirfamily background is, where people have come from, where they've come from, what you can achieve. barbra set up the charity has begat hospice by recruiters after an experience posted home —— set up up the charity hospice by rivers. experience posted home —— set up up the charity hospice by riversm experience posted home —— set up up the charity hospice by rivers. if i was to have a house fire plywood grabbed my original tapes —— hospice
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biographers. 0nce those people you record die, that is it. my mum died in 1992. the actor david suchet is supporting the new charity. this tape and answerphone message a prized possession. hello, i'm sorry there is no one here to take your call at the moment... the only recording of my darling mum's voice that i have. quite emotional. it's just automatically go into the police, although some people didn't, idid... police, although some people didn't, i did... over the next five years 400 volunteers will be trained to record people's life stories in hospices and the process of recording has, for many, been therapeutic. they're able to analyse how their life has been and maybe look back at some really good times in their life at a time when a lot of things are a challenge for them.
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so that ability to reflect back on what's happened through their life is definitely therapeutic. there's the king's cross fire, the poll tax riots, i'd really had some interesting times at the police, i have to say. storytelling is the old est m ost have to say. storytelling is the oldest most powerful art form. the memories collected here priceless poorfamilies memories collected here priceless poor families and loved memories collected here priceless poorfamilies and loved ones. graham satchell, bbc news.. —— for families. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: it's all systems go on hs2 but are there enough people with the skills to build it? steph‘s at a new national training college in doncaster. you don't often see a train in the middle of a college but there's a specific why and that's because this brand is buying new education centre is about training up the people of
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the future working on developing things like high—speed rail —— brands banking new. i'm going to grab claire fora brands banking new. i'm going to grab claire for a tour. —— brand spanking new. we've seen the train, that's a really important part of the learning experience. absolutely. the train is our virtual reality classroom so you've got in cab training that will take place and then you've got a separate virtual yellow teeth which will be our vr suite and then these stations are all different aspects of technology coming into the industry —— virtual reality. this is breakfast on the power lines and how you set up the power lines and how you set up the power lines, tensioning them, you've got a variety of tools —— this is set up. you've got the clamps. and you got a piece of track which is
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focusing on serving the track, its gps linked so then it sends the data into computers, where they can build a3—d into computers, where they can build a 3—d model and see where the faults are and work on repairing them —— servicing. how different is this to other colleges? it is different, focused on hands—on and the new technology coming into the rail industry and the fact we are primarily focused around apprenticeships and having apprenticeships and having apprentices in doing training in the industry, this gives us a chance to make sure they are using the cutting edge technology that will be required in the future. talking of future technology, there's a lot of people with head headsets doing virtual reality, quite comical when you watch it. we will be talking to them later. will be talking to you later. —— we'll be talking to you later. —— we'll be talking to you later. more from me later but first,
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the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. bbc london has found people having cosmetic surgery on their tongues by having it cut and split are being exposed procedures that are illegal and potentially dangerous. secret recording in islington, shows body modification artists like this one, injecting prescription only drugs so the procedure to give a lizard—like tongue can be carried out. anyone injecting the medicines is supposed to be a registered medical professional. the thought that in this unregulated environment where people are doing this without training and in circumstances which didn't look either clinical or sterile, it seemed to me extremely unsafe.
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and there's more on that story on inside out london at 7:30pm tonight on bbc one. a new study shows that the poorest 20% of londoners own just 0.1% of the city's wealth which includes finance and property. research by the charity trust for london shows over two million londoners are living in poverty. that's more than the entire populations of liverpool, newcastle and bristol combined. the trust is calling for increased wages for low earners and improved working conditions. an original work by the street artist, banksy, that was vandalised a decade ago, has been restored and returned to its original home in shoreditch. it's called snorting copper and it was thought to be lost forever. but two property developers who bought the building decided to restore the work by sending the wall to carlisle for restoration. it's now back on public view on curtain road. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the district line has no service between parsons green and wimbledon due to a signal failure. 0n the roads, in south east london,
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kidbrooke park road has finally reopened after several months of road works. up upa up a street in islington is closed southbound from liverpool road to city road for roadworks —— up a upper street. let's have a check on the weather now with. mostly dry with bright spells, we have this band of rain moving from west to east but it is like an patchy, many places are boarding it. a drier afternoon, still the chance of some light rain —— it is light and patchy. the maximum temperature around 17. could get some sunshine before it sets as the crowd thins and breaks and that will continue overnight, despite that the temperature stays very mild. in double figures, between 12 and 13. a
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bright start to tuesday but gradually the cloud will increase from the west and you will notice temperatures this week are staying very mild throughout, not only during the daytime but also these nighttime temperatures as well. turning rather windy as well as we had through thursday with a spell of rain overnight wednesday into thursday morning. va nessa vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london from 7pm with her breakfast show. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. the snp leader nicola sturgeon says she wants a brexit deal that's right for scotland, and it could mean a second independence referendum. but is her party's support falling? we'll speak to her just after 7.30. go yellow the words were dustin hoffman would like to meet you. he
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then drove over, park the car in front of where we lived and sat there. it took him over an hour to work up the courage to meeet hollywood superstar dustin hoffman. now years later, adam sandler is starring with him in "the meyerowitz stories". they caught up with charlie. and from cracking codes to unlocking the secret of the universe. blockbuster author dan brown will be on the sofa just before nine. good morning, here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the independent enquiry into child sexual abuse begins detailed hearings today to examine allegations of child sexual abuse into children's homes. the cases date back to the early 1960s. the enquiry will investigate the alleged failure to prosecute the late mp cyril smith amid claims of cover—up.
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there will also examine claims that staff were aware of what was going on. theresa may will tell the eu today that it is time to show some flexibility in the brexit negotiations, saying that the ball is now in their court. and fifth round of talks gets under way in brussels today as the prime minister update mps. talking out to our political correspondent. we have spoken about this so much but what is the significance of what will be said today. we will talk much more about it over the next few months as well. theresa may is back in westminster along with all the other mps today after her calamitous conference speech and half baked attempt to get rid of her. she is back, wanting to get a grip on her government, wanting to get a grip on brexit. six months of negotiations are gone. the negotiating period is only in nine years and the clock is ticking fast. her words in the
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commons today reveal irritation and frustration in westminster that the talks are not moving fast enough. the u.k.'s desperate to get onto talking about and negotiating a long—term future trading relationship. the position of the eu is that that do not happen until there has been significant process on sorting out the divorce bill, the right of eu citizens in the uk and uk residents in the eu and the ireland border. the eu was adamant that can be no trade talks until that can be no trade talks until thatis that can be no trade talks until that is wrapped up. you get the sense that theresa may is frustrated. she wants the talks to move on. it is up to eu leaders to decide next week whether that progress can happen so this week we see her put pressure on them, urging them to allow the talks to progress in the interest of both sides. there are signs that the catalan government. short of immediately declaring independence from spain, eight days after it held a
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controversial referendum on the issue. 0fficials controversial referendum on the issue. officials say the catalan president may make a symbolic statement tomorrow. that comes after one weekend of demonstrations across spain including a rally of around 350,000 people in barcelona, the capital of catalonia. the snp says scotla nd capital of catalonia. the snp says scotland is suffering because of cuts in public spending made by the conservative government at westminster. at their party conference today they will call for the chancellor, philip hammond, to use the budget next month to invest in public services. their opponents say the party has the power to raise taxes in scotland and make different political choices, rather than blame westminster for tight budgets. universities must take tougher action against students who cheat by buying essays online. the ministers, the minister said that the trade in essays undermines academic standards. the national union of
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stu d e nts standards. the national union of students is overwhelming pressure to get good grades is driving this business. universities will tell stu d e nts business. universities will tell students that anyone caught purchasing an essay could fail their degree. mike pence has been accused of staging a publicity stunt when he walked out of an nfl match after some players knelt during the national anthem. mr pence said he left the game in indiana because he would not dignify an event which showed disrespect for the us military and flagged. president trump tweeted to say he was proud of him. the beauty product brand does has a expressed regret for posting an online advert in which a black woman appeared to turn white after using its soap. the advert showed a black woman killing of her t—shirt to reveal why woman underneath. the company to be down after complaints and issued a statement saying they deeply regretted any offence caused.
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that is the latest news for you.” still can't quite get my head around how that got through. it is quite extraordinary, isn't it? possibly very damaging. it is not even sort of modern sensibility, it is just... it is about id. they have apologised. i expect they will be doing more talking about it later. we have been talking about pound coins lately. the need to rummage through your wallet looking for old coins. i found 11. i found 11 of the old ones. from next week they will no longer be legal tender. but if you still have too managed to spend, do not worry, some shops say they will still accept them. cumberland says it will continue to take the coins until the end of the month. the trade association representing
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small shops has advised its members to continue to use them as a useful community service to customers. some charities will also accept them as well, we were told earlier. so no need to panic. the problem is you do need to panic. the problem is you do need to panic. the problem is you do need to find the stores will accept them. i have 11. i am need to find the stores will accept them. i have 11. iam down need to find the stores will accept them. i have 11. i am down to a six now. i will keep one. just in case. for your supermarket trolley. the new ones take that. you can also get... have you seen the ones, the tax? but if he did not have one you would have to look in your first. at the £5. i'm sure —— i have five of the £5. i'm sure —— i have five of the pound coins down the back of my couch. the world cup qualifiers are the big story of the weekend. apart from lewis hamilton winning the grand prix injapan. everyone last night watching the football.
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u nfortu nately night watching the football. unfortunately is difficult for scotland, so hard to see them shattered on the pitch after coming so close to qualifying for their first world cup in 20 years. it looked like it was about to happen but my lung, it is not. —— u nfortu nately but my lung, it is not. —— unfortunately it is not. the equation is simple, the task was not. to foeticide who had yet to lose a single goal at home the entire campaign. but this is a new and improved scotland, a scotland unbeaten in five matches, a scotland with a celtic striker. clinical, but would it be crucial. the 4000 who celebrated dared to believe. the script was far from complete. 1—1, back to a knife edge. this was a moment yet another world cup dream looked to drift off into the night.
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a second for roman. fate sealed? almost. snodgrass provided a late hope. it has been an honour to work with these guys. at this moment it is disappointing that my disappointment is nothing compared to that of the players. i don't think i have seen a group of players that exhausted and that disappointed. for fans who travelled here it was horribly familiar. that is now ten campaigns and a full 20 yea rs is now ten campaigns and a full 20 years without a major final qualification. it hurtsjust years without a major final qualification. it hurts just as years without a major final qualification. it hurtsjust as much everytime. northern ireland knew they'd made the play—offs shortly before they lost their last group game, beaten 1—0 by norway. scotland's earlier exit had confirmed their place in the play—offs, but a chris brunt own goal consigned michael 0'neill‘s men to defeat in the match in oslo. england managed to win over
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lithuania but provided another uninspiring display. wales manager chris coleman said his side should have no fear for their pivotal qualifier with ireland tonight. injured striker gareth bale watched training yesterday and will be in the cardiff city stadium for the vital match. wales could even top their group with a win, but defeat would send the irish into the play—offs at their expense. it isa it is a fantastic atmosphere. there is nothing but fear, nothing to worry about. the occasion is what it is and it is great to be involved in it. we have a game plan, we have a lwa ys it. we have a game plan, we have always had a gameplan and our players have proven that they very good at executing whatever game plan we put in front of them. both sides have to win the game and at some stage or another whether it be after 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 25 minutes, whatever it may be, they have to go for it. at the beginning
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i predict it will be wide open in the second half. three games in the women's super league yesterday, sunderland beat yeovil while reading and birmingham drew two all. bristol almost pulled off the result of the weekend. 17—year—old lauren hemp scored this fantastic goal to give them a 1—0 lead over arsenal, who replied in the second half to snatch a one all draw. saracens have returned to the top of rugby union's premiership with a 38—19 defeat of wasps. jamie george scored three of sarries four tries at allianz park, the last securing the bonus point. tyrrell hatton says winning this year's dunhill links championship in st andrews was much more difficult than last year. he finished on 24 under par, three shots ahead of fellow englishman ross fisher, whose final round 61 set a new course record. hatton has become the first player to successfully defend the title. great britain have finished the world gymnastics championships with two medals after claudia fragapane added a bronze to max whitlock‘s gold.
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going in the women's floor final, commonwealth champion fragapane rebounded from an error at the start of her routine to confidently dazzle in the rest of her display. it's her second world medal following bronze in the team event in 2015. carolin garcia has overtaken britain'sjohanna konta in the race for the last place in the end of season wta finals. garcia beat the new world number one simona halep to win the china open — her second title in two weeks. konta is taking a couple of weeks off with an injury — and must then reach the final of the kremlin cup to regain her place at the season finale in singapore. the men's final in beijing was won by world number one rafael nadal who demolished nick kyrgios to win his sixth title of the season. the spaniard won nine games in a row on his way to a comprehensive 6—2 6—1victory to reclaim the trophy he last won in 2005. all sorts of excitement going on in china. how about this? the 19 time
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grand slam champion roger federer getting the event under way at on the weekend by engaging in some sort of bizarre dance off with mickey mouse. some of the things these poor people have to do to please their sponsors and earn their money. i mean... who would deny roger federer his millions after these pictures? he does have children...” his millions after these pictures? he does have children... i think it got more into it as it went along. i think having two sets of twins has helped him out. thank you very much for that. it is 642. thank you for being with us this morning. there are around 55,000 foster families in the uk looking after more than 60,000 children. although they are paid by local councils, foster carers in england are not entitled to benefits such as holiday or sick pay. that could be about to change as today a landmark legal claim is being launched to get foster carers recognised officialy as workers. sarah anderson has been a fostering children for ten years and is bringing the case. shejoins us from our
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london newsroom. thank you forjoining us. can explain, why are you bringing this case? well... i think that people have no idea what foster carers actually do. we get bad press, normally. we have lived in a climate of fear for normally. we have lived in a climate of fearfor a very long normally. we have lived in a climate of fear for a very long time, not being able to speak out or say anything and we have also spent a long time now getting more and more exhausted. we are highly skilled professional workers and i don't think anybody recognises that. i work 24 hours a day, seven days a week. i work christmas, evenings, weekends, bank holidays. this is an exhausting job looking after our wonderful children and we deserve more of a holiday than two weeks a year. we deserve some basic workers rights. i have a contract, i call it
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a contract, a fostering agreement. 0ur general secretary said he has never met such a vulnerable set of workers in all his life. we can be fired on wim we can... we are too worried to go off sick little loan gets sick pay. no pension, no protection and our pay can be slashed at any time. so we are bringing a claim for holiday entitlement as part of achieving the rights that we deserve as foster ca re rights that we deserve as foster care workers. give us a sense... you have foster children for ten years. what type of stories are you seeing from these children? it's getting more and more challenging year on year and that's a proven fact, the foster network have spoken about that.
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my my family myfamily and my family and i foster teenagers and a lot of people won't do that and we're a lot of people won't do that and we' re really a lot of people won't do that and we're really short of carers for teenagers. there are an incredible group of kids. these children have been through more in their short lifetimes at 15 when they arrive with us than many go through in an entire lifetime. we're dealing with, shall i give you an example? a young person will walk up my path with a iraq sheet from health, the referrer sheet, a black bin bag in one hand and a mobile in the otherjust looking defeated, sad, destroyed really —— bayrack sheet. 0ne young lady addicted to crack cocaine at 15 —— a rap sheet. those problems are becoming more evident. we've got sexual exploitation. unaccompanied asylu m sexual exploitation. unaccompanied asylum seekers, refugees. the level of mental health difficulties is
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getting worse with young people year—on—year. getting worse with young people year-on-year. sarah anderson, i know you're bringing that case today, good luck with it and thanks for joining us on breakfast. goodbye. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. ithink good morning. i think sunshine and fairly —— in fairly short supply today. a lot of cloud around in most parts to start the day and out of the cloud will be some like, patchy and drizzly rain. that will work slowly eased through the morning. some will see a bit more brightness late in the day —— light, patchy and drizzly rain. —— slowly east. in northern england, cloudy here with a few spots of drizzle here and there and across wales, mostly dry to start the morning, could be even a few brighter spells by around 8am in the south. a lot of low cloud for
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the south. a lot of low cloud for the south—west of england and a murky start for central and southern with a few showers. clearer spells towards the south—east, where it's a fresh start. through the day all that cloud brings light showers further eastwards and then we'll start to see a few brighter spells, especially in central and eastern parts of scotland, sunshine here, and in the north—east of england, through the midlands and eastern parts of wales so you could get some sunshine later, 14 to 17 our top temperatures today. we will see the next area of rain arriving from northern ireland later. as for the world cup qualifier this evening, wales against the republic of ireland, largely dry in cardiff and reasonably mild. moving through the rest of the evening and into the night, the rain initially in northern ireland works into scotland and northern england, so turning wet and northern england, so turning wet and windy for the northern half of the country. further south as we go into tuesday morning it will be rather cloudy with a few showers sinking south on that front, tending to fizzle out, not a bad day on
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tuesday. a return to sunnier skies, a few showers, brighter than today, although it will turn wet and windy in the north—west later on. temperatures around 14 to 18, pleasa nt temperatures around 14 to 18, pleasant enough in the sunshine during the day, but low pressure will dominate the weather into the middle of the week. here's the wet weather sitting in the middle of the country, tight isoba rs, weather sitting in the middle of the country, tight isobars, a windy speuin country, tight isobars, a windy spell in the wednesday. as the frontal systems things south we will see that spell of rain and brisk winds heading into parts of england and wales, followed by sunshine and showers from the north. that sets us up showers from the north. that sets us upfora showers from the north. that sets us up for a very unsettled week ahead, feeling autumnal, winds will be strengthening later in the week, some rain at times, especially in the north—west but good news, temperatures on the rise towards the weekend. let's talk infrastructure projects in europe. it's the biggest infrastructure project in europe, but are there enough people with the right skills to build hs2? steph's at one of five new national training colleges in doncaster, which is being
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launched today to help train the engineers of the future. we've already seen them at work. it looks really fun. good morning. good morning. you wouldn't think i was in the middle of the college with this scene behind me. good morning, everyone! good morning! these are some of the students and the teachers that will be training all of the young engineers, technicians and otherjobs we need for the infrastructure in this country. this couege infrastructure in this country. this college has been specifically built to help provide all the skills we need to build high speed rail. if you look at how many people we need for those jobs, you look at how many people we need forthosejobs, engineers you look at how many people we need for thosejobs, engineers generally, we need something like! million x 20 20, one million engineers and technicians to do the projects that need doing —— 1 million by 2020. if you take into account the other projects we are running, it is into the hundreds of thousands. this
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couege the hundreds of thousands. this college is dedicated to that. let's chat to some of the new recruits, you can see the guys doing their virtual reality stuff. jack, come on over, you are from doncaster, tell us over, you are from doncaster, tell us about your background and how you ended up here? i did an apprenticeship in doncaster, an nvq level two on a railway one, after that i went to work in the railway industry, for nearly a year now in january, this opened up and it was a great chance for me to better myself and improve and expand my life and experience... what do you think looking around, how does this compare to what you've seen in the industry? this is unreal, i haven't seen any industry? this is unreal, i haven't seen any technology anything like it. it's an eye—opener, something to learn about and i can't wait to get started. i bet you can't. jack is only 18 and already loads of experience. i'm going to grab naomi, these guys are project managers, you're at the other end of the spectrum, you are 34 and you wanted
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a bit ofa spectrum, you are 34 and you wanted a bit of a change in career. how did you end up here? i was previously working as a lifestyle support worker and i working as a lifestyle support workerand i did working as a lifestyle support worker and i did other various customer service worker and i did other various customer service roles and i decided i wanted to progress and self developed. i looked into becoming a project manager and i came across this. —— self developed. as it is groundbreaking i thought i would apply to help the economy. a great opportunity —— self developed. apply to help the economy. a great opportunity -- self developed. good luck with it all. this is all about creating jobs and susie is one of the bosses at hit tajiki rail, these are the young people you need coming through? -- hitachi rail. we have a maintenance centre across the road so we maintenance centre across the road so we have a chance to join the dots. we need people because we are building trains and these other students that will hopefully come and work with us. how serious is the skill gap? you mention the figures
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yourself, we are in a situation now where we are beginning to find it ha rd where we are beginning to find it hard to recruit. we've got the best of the bunch so we need to focus on developing a pipeline through and we're doing that by getting into primary schools and encouraging children and females especially into engineering and the stem subjects. this is a key part of that, this will make all the difference. i'm going to talk to you later on as well. that's it from me for now. fascinating to see these guys looking like they're doing some sort of morning yoga. it does look quite extraordinary. are we going to see what they're seeing at any point or are we going to have to imagine? you can, have a look at this screen, you can, have a look at this screen, you can see what they are seeing. they are looking at that. ok. thank you very much, steph. and then they can move things on it. they are in the car as well, the cabin of the train. brilliant, thanks very much. it has a touch of the walking did about it,
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doesn't it? just extraordinary! —— walking dead. we will be back with steph a bit later. it's notjust members of the public who get star struck, adam sandler almost missed the opportunity to meet hollywood heavyweight dustin hoffman because of nerves. luckily he managed to overcome them and now, years later he's starring with him in a new film the meyerowitz stories, which depicts the dysfunctional relationship between a father and his adult children. charlie went to meet them. warhol, it's kind of... there is a uniqueness in the family —— word. it's not a happy home. the director illustrates it in the writing and also in the interaction. yet there isa also in the interaction. yet there is a great love in the film. the sad pa rt is a great love in the film. the sad part of it is my guide, as many
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fathers do, and when adam and i talked about each of our families, we, you know, mentioned a few stories. and it's not spoken. kids, little kids, it's amazing what they can take in. that is the father does not want the kids to succeed him. i think if we think about it, it's either ourselves or people we know. we are all fathers here, i'm a father, you're a father, you're a father, you're a father, you're a father and grandfather, is that true, is their truth in that?” father and grandfather, is that true, is their truth in that? i want my kids to do better than me. i'd see them and say, it's not possible. they can't get to this. i didn't expect you to get so upset about it. lam. expect you to get so upset about it. iam.| expect you to get so upset about it. lam. lam expect you to get so upset about it. i am. i am upset about it. why do
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you care? i don't know. on the theme of the films you've made and the impact you've had on peoples lives, i don't know how many people see you in the street and come up to you, what is the moment when they say, dustin, thank you for... what's the one that happens most often? dustin, thank you for... what's the one that happens most often7m dustin, thank you for... what's the one that happens most often? it sets you in your place. many of us got golden globe awards for kramer and we we re golden globe awards for kramer and we were all living in new york, we flew out to the golden globes and there was marilyn, the director, the writer, myself, and we get to be honoured in this way but we have to go right back to new york, and this is the truth, and the guy escorting us is the truth, and the guy escorting us works for the airline and says, this is myjob, this is what i usually do. i'm told to be next to the celebrities and make sure that they're not bothered and i've never done this before but i have to ask you. isaid, done this before but i have to ask you. i said, go ahead. done this before but i have to ask you. isaid, go ahead. " done this before but i have to ask you. i said, go ahead. " what do you think is your better film? rod
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father won all godfather to. " a true story. —— godfather one or godfather to. i said," godfather one. i said, godfather to. i said," godfather one. isaid, me godfather to. i said," godfather one. i said, me too. he's coming out from the coast in a few weeks, he corresponded me about meeting for lunch. he has some wealthy clients coming over sunday to look at that's worked. they're both admirers of mine. we never hear from him and suddenly. i don't not know if you my me saying you've just turned 80. go on, charlie, take your best shot. for those people want you making more movies, you'rejust going to keep going. there's no slowing down. that's not happening, is it?” keep going. there's no slowing down. that's not happening, is it? i don't understand why that does happen because it's one thing to go through life having a job, it's another thing for we lucky few who do not
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call it a job. it's our work. i don't know how you stop doing what is in don't know how you stop doing what isina don't know how you stop doing what is in a sense your work. good point. just carry on. the meyerowitz stories, new and selected is on netflix from the 13th of october. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. bbc london has found people having cosmetic surgery on their tongues by having it cut and split are being exposed procedures that are illegal and potentially dangerous. secret recording in islington, shows body modification artists like this one, injecting prescription only drugs so the procedure to give a lizard—like tongue can be carried out. anyone injecting the medicines is supposed to be a registered medical professional. the thought that in this unregulated environment where people are doing
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this without training and in circumstances which didn't look either clinical or sterile, it seemed to me extremely unsafe. and there's more on that story on inside out london at 7:30pm tonight on bbc one. a new study shows that the poorest 20% of londoners own just 0.1% of the city's wealth which includes finance and property. research by the charity trust for london shows over two million londoners are living in poverty. that's more than the entire populations of liverpool, newcastle and bristol combined. the trust is calling for increased wages for low earners and improved working conditions. an original work by the street artist banksy that was vandalised a decade ago, has been restored and returned a decade ago has been restored and returned to its original home in shoreditch. it's called snorting copper and it was thought to be lost forever. but two property developers who bought the building decided to restore the work by sending the wall to carlisle for restoration.
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it's now back on public view on curtain road. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the district line has no service between parsons green and wimbledon due to a signal failure. 0n the roads, in south east london, kidbrooke park road has finally reopened after several months of roadworks. upper street in islington is closed southbound from liverpool road to city road. a grey but mild start for this week and that a grey but mild start for this week and that trend a grey but mild start for this week and that trend will a grey but mild start for this week and that trend will continue a grey but mild start for this week and that trend will continue for a grey but mild start for this week and that trend will continue for the next few days. this morning, drive with mostly bright spells. mostly dry with bright spells, we have this band of rain moving in double figures, between 12 and 13. a bright start to tuesday
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but gradually the cloud will increase from the west and you will notice temperatures this week are staying very mild throughout, not only during the daytime but also these nighttime temperatures as well. turning rather windy as well as we had through thursday with a spell of rain overnight wednesday into thursday morning. new technology that warns drivers when a pedestrian using a mobile phone walks in front of them is being trialled out. more now on bbc radio london. a national enquiry begins today hearing evidence for the first time
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ofan hearing evidence for the first time of an alleged failure to prosecute the late mp cyril smith of the mid— claims of a cover—up. good morning, it's monday the ninth of october. also this morning: theresa may will tell the eu today that it's time to show some flexibility in the brexit negotiations, saying that the ball is now "in their court." viva espana! after hundreds of thousands gather in barcelona for a pro—spain rally, signs that catalonia's leaders may stop short of making a formal declaration of independence. iam inside i am inside the camp of a eurostar train that has been put in the middle of a college where they will
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be training at high speed rail who we will need —— the people we will need for the future. in sport, scotland say goodbye to their hopes of playing in next year's world cup in russia. they needed a win in slovenia to guarantee a place in the playoffs, but could only manage a 2—all draw. that result for scotland means northern ireland are through to the play—offs, despite losing to norway in oslo. what do you think is your better film? godfather i or godfather ii? that is a true story. dustin hoffman talks to us about his new film, fatherhood, and being mistaken for al pacino. and sarah has the weather. good morning. a bit ofa a bit of a cloudy and drizzly monday morning but some will see sunshine breaking through later. details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse begins detailed hearings today, to examine the allegations of child sexual abuse in two rochdale
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children's homes. the cases date back to the early 1960s. the inquiry will investigate an alleged failure to prosecute the late mp cyril smith, amid claims of a cover—up. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. the child abuse enquiry‘s planning to go back nearly 60 years and delve into the dark past of two children's homes. this one, knowl view, and cambridge house. the claims, that children were abused, that staff knew, that no one was brought to justice and that the scandal was covered up. the larger—than—life liberal mp cyril smith, who died several years ago, was a governor of knowl view. do you want a man to represent you or a party robot? the claim was he used his position to get access to children. the first allegations against him date back to 1961. police investigated but in 1970 prosecutors said the evidence was stale and his accusers not reliable. by the early 1990s, experts reported
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growing concerns children were being abused at the knowl view home. little action was taken. last month finally rochdale council apologised for failing children. today the public enquiry will begin taking fresh evidence. the reason that this matters is we cannot have a situation in this country where powerful people are able to abuse children and get away with it because other powerful people are protecting them. that cannot be allowed to happen and that's why we have to investigate what happened with cyril smith and that's why we have to learn the lessons from it. the enquiry takes evidence like at court but can't prosecute. its job is to discover what happened and who covered it up and provide ways of preventing it happening again. tom symonds, bbc news. theresa may will tell the eu today it's time to show some flexibility in the brexit negotiations, saying that the ball is now "in their court." the fifth round of talks get under way in brussels today, as the prime minister
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updates mps at westminster on the progress so far. let's talk to our political correspondent ben wright. good morning, ben. we spoke about it so much before and we will continue talking about it but what is significant about today in particular. parliament is back today after three weeks of break for the party conferences. theresa may had hoped to come back full of them and vigor after the conservative's trip to manchester. in fact, she is on the back foot and struggling to get a grip on her government. brexit is theissue a grip on her government. brexit is the issue on the table today as it will be for months on end. what we're hearing from theresa may the comments today is irritation and frustration at the pace that these negotiations are going. the talks resume again today in brussels but she will tell mps that the uk has made enough concessions for now. she
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would say that in her speech in florence a few weeks ago she said she made it clear that the eu was prepared to guarantee a writes and pay money and they really want talks to move on to the critical issue of trade, that future relationship between britain and the eu. but the eu believes not enough progress has been made. there is a stand—off and we are hearing belligerence and irritation from the uk making it clear that they will not make any further concessions for the time being. reports from catalonia suggest the regional government there may not declare independence from spain this week. last weekend's referendum, which was deemed illegal by the national government, returned a 90% vote for independence. but yesterday saw more than 300,000 people marching in barcelona to show support for a united spain. let's get the very latest on this now from our correspondent in barcelona. good morning once again, gavin. is that the feeling? is that your soul, that there may be a
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pullback from a full declaration? your soul, that there may be a pullback from a full declaration7m is confusing and right now there is a lot of working out going on about the possible implications. it is almost like someone has decided that they will jump into almost like someone has decided that they willjump into the water from a great height that given that they have not jumped immediately, great height that given that they have notjumped immediately, that they are thinking, the more it sounds like within the government that they may not go ahead. 0ne member of the party told the bbc last night that carles puigdemont, when he gives an address tomorrow evening in parliament, last week we we re evening in parliament, last week we were expecting he would declare unilateral independence, that suddenly may not happen. he may instead talk about a declaration of a path towards independence, an appeal to the madrid government saying that there should be a legal referendum. 0thers, close to carles puigdemont say the options are still on the table. three points to remember. financial situations, if banks and businesses leave, what
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impact will that have? the madrid government say they will legally ta ke government say they will legally take over and, also, how about the situation on the ground as they declare it? how will that shape in terms of decisions? ultimately, the leaders now have 24 hours of thinking time. the snp says scotland is suffering because of the cuts in public spending made by the conservative government at westminster. at their party conference in glasgow today, they will call for the chancellor, philip hammond to use next month's budget to invest in public services. 0ur correspondent is in glove go for as at the moment. nicola sturgeon will speak later, what are their priorities? good morning. nicola sturgeon will be speaking tomorrow and today we will hear from scotland's finance secretary. he will talk about public sector pay rises. make no mistake, the snp has been facing challenges. they lost 21
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seats in the general election and they lost momentum. nicola sturgeon admitted that talk and plans for a second independent referendum were undoubtedly a factor in that result. they will use this conference to focus on the domestic agenda, and the finance secretary here will be talking about his plans to lift the 196 talking about his plans to lift the 1% pay cap on public sector workers but he says it will go so much further if the government in westminster lifted the cup as well. nicola sturgeon will be speaking to us nicola sturgeon will be speaking to us later. we will hear from the first ministerjust us later. we will hear from the first minister just after us later. we will hear from the first ministerjust after half past seven. i think she will speak to us from precisely that point there. and elsewhere this morning, a foster carer is asking an employment tribunal to class her as a worker.
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sarah anderson is bringing the case against hampshire county council. the local authority says the law is clear — that foster carers aren't workers. but if she wins, it could have significant implications for tens of thousands of other carers. we deserve some basic workers rights. i have a contract, i call it a contract, a fostering agreement. the union, our general secretary said he has never met such a vulnerable set of workers in all his life. we could be fired on a whim we can be... we don't have sick leave, we are too worried to go off sick. universities must take tougher action against students who cheat by buying essays online, according to the higher education watchdog, the quality assurance agency. the universities minister, jojohnson, says the trade in essays undermines academic standards. the national union of students says that overwhelming pressure to get good grades is driving the use of these websites. universities will be telling students that anyone caught buying essays could face being expelled and failing their degree.
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i was once asked by a lecturer if i had purchased an essay.” i was once asked by a lecturer if i had purchased an essay. i have written it myself! it was that good? i think it was a routine check. my assessment was that i must have written a very good essay but still got a mark for it. in my day, i would never have done it. i would never have done it. the hollywood film producer harvey weinstein has been fired from the company he co—founded amid multiple claims that he sexually harrassed female employees. the 65—year—old issued an apology for his behaviour but was sacked last night by the board of the weinstein company, in light of new information about misconduct. but his lawyers later denied many of the allegations against him. weinstein's films include shakespeare in love, the king's speech and the artist. we have been talking for the last
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week also about the deadline spend all of your old pound coins. we had all of your old pound coins. we had a rummage around the office and found one of those supermarket replica coins that you can use, two and, only two... and someone also has an isle of man pound note. basically, do not panic because some shots, if you still have the pound coins,... look how young the queen looks. sorry, iam coins,... look how young the queen looks. sorry, i am slightly distracted here. if you still have old pound coins, these ones, you can still spend them in some shops. some shops say they will accept them after october 15 deadline. cumberland says it will continue to ta ke cumberland says it will continue to take the coins until the end of the
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month and the trade association has advised its members to keep using them as a useful community service to customers. let us know what you think about that. get in contact via the usual means. this is bbc. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse has so far been hampered by the resignations of three of its chairwomen, and victims‘ groups saying they've lost faith in the process. but today, it will begin detailed hearings into allegations of what happened at two childrens homes in rochdale, and claims of a failure to prosecute the late liberal democrat mp cyril smith. the first allegations against him date back to 1961. police investigated these, but prosecutors said the evidence was ‘stale' and his accusers were not reliable. by the 1990s experts reported growing concerns that children were being abused at the knowl view residential school, where cyril smith was a governor. again, police decided not to act. more people came forward to say they were a victim of cyril smith but in 1999 the crown prosecution
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service decided for a third time not to bring charges, due to "insufficient evidence". in 2010, cyril smith died, and two years later greater manchester police and lancashire police reopened their investigations. last month rochdale council apologised for failing children. joining us now is nazir afzal, the former chief crown prosecutor for the north—west of england. thank you forjoining us. is an important investigation, not just for victims but right across the uk. it isa for victims but right across the uk. it is a significant moment. has not yet been a public hearing, the enquiry has had a chequered history so far. certainly as far as the victims are concerned, the alleged victims, this is an opportunity for them to say in public what they have never been able to say in the cool
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room. in december 2012! looked at the allegations against cyril smith myself and came to the view that he should have been prosecuted. the evidence was there. decisions were made that were clearly wrong and, in my view, was not saying he was guilty, there was certainly a strong enough case for a jury to here. the opportunity for the victims in the next few weeks to talk about their experiences and relations to miss the smith is a pivotal moment. being trialled out. more now on bbc radio london. from your point of view do you think it can help... can lessons be learned by having this out in the public for the future? my my concern around the enquiry has been and continues to be that it will be several years before the final report and every agency needs to know now what they need to do differently. i'm hopeful when you hear the evidence being given in public that the chair of it and others will send out some interim
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reports and that will give you learning which people can put into practice. 0bviously there's been a sizeable about of learning over the last five years and things are better, we prosecuting more child sexual abuse than ever, but the point is there are people in the past that never gotjustice and this is their chance for them to be able to talk about their experiences. it's important from both sides, those who are victims need to know that if... that there's end to this for them and child abusers, or those who might become child abusers, need to know they can't get away with it. when i was prosecuting we did many cases, many more than ever, but that said, all the research says there's hundreds of thousands of victims and very few ever got the chance to go to court and talk about their experiences. this enquiry is like a truth and reconciliation commission e. truth and reconciliation commission e, talking about what happened and
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maybe we can find some reconciliation as a result of that —— truth and reconciliation committee. when you have perpetrators who have passed on, at the very least we should give victims the chance to talk about what happens so we can learn about the experience. -- what happened. is there a concern about safeguarding people who should have been doing the safeguarding, there are issues which we have just mentioned, rather than those who are doing the abusing. both has to be looked at. clearly people responsible for safeguarding, rochdale council have already apologised prior to today's hearings, people who should have done the safeguarding need to put their hands up to see what they've learned and act accordingly. perpetrators can't get away with it either. i'm hopeful the enquiry will do more than savings were bad and things are being fixed, but also who was responsible. people need to know there is accountability. good to
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talk to you and thanks very much, i'm sure we'll talk to you another time. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. sarah has the weather. now the sun is out we are getting great pictures from our weather watchers, including this one, showing the sun over the english channel. quite cloudy skies across most parts, some clear spells around first thing but we keep with the grey skies through the morning, a bit patchy rain around too but for some at least the weather will brighten up later in the days. a bit of rain in parts of the west of scotland, not especially heavy but certainly a damp morning to come here. northern ireland, northern england, fairly cloudy with the odd spot of drizzle and a mild start. across wales there will be some brighter skies developing this morning, particularly in south—eastern parts of wales, less brightness in south—east england where we have a lot of low cloud bringing light, patchy rain this
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morning drifting east. some clear spells in the south—east of england and east anglia first thing. during the day this area of cloud drifts eastwards, bringing those drizzly showers further east and then a bit more sunshine develops, especially in eastern scotland and towards the north—east of england, through the midlands and eastern wales, anywhere to the east of higher ground seeing the best of the brightness, lifting temperatures to around 14 to 17 before more rain arrives from the western later. as for the world cup qualifier this evening in cardiff, should remain dry as wales play the republic of ireland. —— from the western later. quite windy with the arrival of the rain —— from the west later. not particularly heavy because it moves through quickly on the breeze. through the day tomorrow, as the weak weather front goes south in will fizzle out but bring in more cloud and a few showers in england and wales. brighterfurther showers in england and wales. brighter further north across the country, more sunshine and today but the next weather front is waiting in
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the next weather front is waiting in the winds to give us wet and windy conditions later in the day. —— waiting in the winds. but the temperatures not feeling too bad. the big area of low pressure heads to the north of the uk and that drives the weather to the middle pa rt drives the weather to the middle part of the week. on wednesday, we have this frontal system shifting south bringing wet and windy weather, followed by sunshine and blustery showers from the north—west a behind that front. still reasonably mild at 14 to 18. i think through this week it's been in quite autumnal through the middle of the week, turning windy with rain at times, especially through the north and west. it looks like we'll see brighter weather and some warmer weather by the time we get to the weekend. we'll be looking for the warm weather. thanks very much! let's look at some of the front pages on this monday morning, let's start with the guardian, tori brexiteers turn theirfire on with the guardian, tori brexiteers turn their fire on treasury. it's
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the fifth round of brexit talks starting today. they are logistical talks in some ways, david davis will be there. huge crowds marched in barcelona, something like 350,000, these are people supporting keeping spain as one nation. we'll be talking about that this morning. the times talks about theresa may and saying the ball is in your court. this photograph is a cargo ship running aground in margate, just missing the antony gormley sculpture, they've been all around the country, just missed by a couple of metres. the cargo ship has been refloated. the daily express: nigella lawson on that one and some life insurance cover coming out. and some very life insurance cover coming out. and some very nice trousers for £9 99. desperate brits pay for private
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waste firms as pickups drop to every three weeks. the daily daily mail says your gender could be optional in the next census to try to recognise tra nsgender people. in the next census to try to recognise transgender people. you may have seen this, it's been making the headlines over the last few hours, dove had a campaign on us facebook, an advert showing a black woman removing her top to reveal a white woman after using dove body lotion and the reception hasn't been positive. they've been positive, they have removed it. they said the post has been removed and they have not published any related content and we apologise deeply and sincerely. maybe not the smartest move! talking about pound coins? we've been hearing for the last few days the old pound coin, you've got
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to find them and use them by a certain date, but they may not be as numerous as we thought. some shops like poundland and say they will still accept them after the october the 15th deadline. leg speed to alan from the association of small businesses. —— let's speak. what are you advising your members to do on this one? many of our members for the last few months have been preparing for this deadline that's been coming up, they've been helping the royal mint by separating out in their tails the old coins from the new ones and banking the old ones to get them out of circulation. many small businesses... tills. ultimately we are coming to this ha rd ultimately we are coming to this hard deadline on the 15th of october next sunday —— tells. many consumers still don't know about it so we think it's important businesses know this. —— tills. they can still
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choose to accept the old pound coins for a brief transition period in the couple of weeks after the deadline as long as they're prepared to bank them if that means they don't have to turn away a customer. isn't it irresponsible to tell shops they can still accept the pound coins? the treasury is saying that will cause chaos. this is in line with what the royal mint have had as their plan all along. i think a lot of small businesses don't realise that the plan. it's perfectly normal when a coin ora plan. it's perfectly normal when a coin or a note goes out of circulation that businesses, and consumers, can still take those to the bank for a transition period after they've technically ceased to become legal tender. that's what's going to happen this time. the difference with the pound coin is that because it's used so commonly in machinery as well as in change, this is going to be a really big switchover and it's going to be a fairly short transition period. therefore, yes, the deadline is in
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place, there is no obligation on shops to accept the coins after the 15th of october, but if they can the royal mint has already said that it is fine for them to still take them for a brief period and put them in the bank afterwards if it means a customer who doesn't realise turns up customer who doesn't realise turns up with a few old coins in their purse and wants to use them. what is your advice for customers hunting for the round pounds as we have been doing so in the office today, we found two in the handbags and the man bags of the office today. get hunting through those man acts and those piggy banks! why not do it in the next few days before the deadline and why not treat yourself and go to your local small independent retailer and spend your few remaining old round pounds before the deadline next sunday. you manage to answer that and get in and advert! —— managed to. the treasury say they have collected 1.2 billion old pound coins so far. people do
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know about it. he's right, go and treat yourself and have a cup of coffee. you got an extra £2 then! and an isle of man pound note! it is all systems go for the hs two train line, but are there enough skills people to build it? —— hs two. steph's at a new national training college in doncaster. it's about getting all of the right people trained up to do the jobs we need them to do for our infrastructure. behind me you can see a setup of a track, you wouldn't think this is in the middle of a college. good morning! we are slap bang in the middle of doncaster in a brand spanking new college where they will be training up the people needed to do the jobs needed. claire is the chief executive, good morning. what have we got here? this is our really exciting workshop. let's have a walk around. we have
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our virtual reality classroom housed inside the euro star train and obviously it sits on top of some track and we've got our inspection pit so people can get underneath the train and have a look what's going on “— train and have a look what's going on —— eurostar. then the rest of the workshop is a demonstration of the technology coming into the railway industry and the things we will be training on, we have a whole section around power and how you set them up and do the tensioning on them and then we have virtual reality inside then we have virtual reality inside the train driver cap. a cake as well? -- driver cap. we thought we would keep the drivers‘ energy up —— driver cab. the new technology is interesting, you can see the virtual reality stuff. what we've been trying to do is make sure we in bed within the college future technology and the latest advancements so we can really demonstrate how engineering is changing and technology is becoming a key feature —— embed —— college. you have
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augmented reality where they look at the train and how they are running on the lines, they are looking at panther grass and hydraulics. we have different exa m ples panther grass and hydraulics. we have different examples of remote monitoring. these guys are seeing what‘s behind them on that screen. more from me later but first, the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. bbc london has found people having cosmetic surgery on their tongues by having it cut and split are being exposed procedures that are illegal and potentially dangerous. secret recording in islington, shows body modification artists like this one, injecting prescription only drugs so the procedure to give a lizard—like tongue can be carried out. anyone injecting the medicines is supposed to be a registered medical professional. the thought that in this unregulated environment where people are doing
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this without training and in circumstances which didn‘t look either clinical or sterile, it seemed to me extremely unsafe. and there‘s more on that story on inside out london at 7:30pm tonight on bbc one. an original work by the street artist banksy that was vandalised a decade ago has been restored and returned to its original home in shoreditch. it‘s called snorting copper and it was thought to be lost forever. but two property developers who bought the building decided to restore the work by sending the wall to carlisle for restoration. it‘s now back on public view on curtain road. when we first saw the piece it was in very bad condition, the whole wall had been painted white. there we re wall had been painted white. there were these areas here where you can see the lines, the vertical lines, where someone had tried to remove the faces of the bricks of an angle
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grinder. this area had beenjet washed away at one point and painted back over with whitewashed. it seen better days. there have been several attem pts better days. there have been several atte m pts to better days. there have been several attempts to destroy it? several attem pts attempts to destroy it? several atte m pts to attempts to destroy it? several attempts to destroy it? several attempts to destroy it? several attempts to destroy it and steal it. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. the district line has severe delays between parsons green and wimbledon due to a signal failure. 0n the roads, delays at waterloo bridge, bus lanes are closed north and southbound because of pavement works until christmas. upper street in islington is closed southbound from liverpool road to city road for roadworks. let‘s have a check on the weather now with. good morning. it‘s a rather grey but very mild start to this week and it looks like that trend is going to continue for the next few days. back to this morning, it‘s mostly dry with some bright spells. now, i say mostly dry, we have this band of rain moving from west to east but it‘s very light and it‘s patchy. many places are avoiding it.
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a dry afternoon, still the chance of a spot of rain but some brighter spells as well and in the light winds, it‘s been in quite mild. the maximum temperature around 17 celsius. could get a bit of sunshine before it sets as the cloud thickens and breaks and that‘s going to continue overnight. some clear spells, the wind remains light, but despite that the temperature stays very mild, in double figures, between 12 and 13 celsius. a bright start to tuesday but gradually we‘ll see the cloud increasing from the west. and you‘ll notice the temperatures this week, they are staying very mild throughout. not only during the daytime but also these nighttime temperatures as well. turning rather windy as we head through wednesday but a spell of rain overnight wednesday into thursday morning. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london until 10am with her breakfast show. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. good morning, here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories
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from bbc news. the independent enquiry into child sexual abuse begins detailed hearings today to examine allegations of child sexual abuse into children‘s homes. the cases date back to the early 1960s. the enquiry will investigate the alleged failure to prosecute the late mp cyril smith amid claims of cover—up. it will also examine claims that staff were aware of what was going on. the former chief crown prosecutor told the bbc breakfast that this was a significant moment. it is a significant moment. there has not been a public hearing so far as you just outlined, the enquiry has had a chequered history so far. as far as the victims are concerned, the alleged victims, this is an opportunity for them to say in public what they have never been able to say in a court room. theresa may will tell the eu today that it is time to show some flexibility in the brexit negotiations, saying that the ball
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is now in their court. and fifth round of talks gets under way in brussels today as the prime minister updates mps. there are signs that the catalan government will stop short of immediately declaring independence from spain, eight days after it held a controversial referendum on the issue. officials say the catalan president may make a symbolic statement tomorrow. that comes after a weekend of demonstrations across spain including a rally of around 350,000 people in barcelona, the capital of catalonia. a foster carer who is asking the employment tribunal to rule that she should be classed as a worker has told bbc breakfast the current rules are unfair because they often no protection. the local authorities say the law is clear, foster carers are more workers. if she wins, it could have significant implications for tens of thousands of other
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ca re rs for tens of thousands of other carers who are currently not entitled to holiday leave or sick pgy- entitled to holiday leave or sick pay. we have, we deserve basic workers rights. the secretary of the union said he has never met such a vulnerable set of workers in all his life. we can be fired on whim, we cannot go off sick... firstly we are too worried to go off sick. duff has admitted regret for posting an online advertising which showed a black woman appearing to turn wide after using their soap. the advertised in shows a black woman peeling off to t—shirt showing a white woman underneath. in just a few moments time, cat will have the sport and we will have the weather
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for you as well. but let‘s talk about brexit, nhs look to dominate the snp conference this week. the snp lost almost one third of its westminster seats during the last general election. we‘re joined westminster seats during the last general election. we‘rejoined now by nicola sturgeon. thank you very much for coming on the programme. i think this is the first time we have spoken to you since the general election. perhaps we could start broadly by talking about the popularity of jeremy corbyn, the rising profile of ruth davidson and the success that the conservatives have been enjoying in scotland. with that in mind, do you think 2015 is as good as it is going to get for the snp? the 2015 general election result happened after the scottish referendum. it was an exceptional result in exceptional circumstances.
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are putting things into context, the most are putting things into context, the m ost rece nt are putting things into context, the most recent opinion poll in scotland has the snp 17 points ahead of our nearest rivals as we are in front of both the labour party and the conservative party who have slipped back into third place in pulse in scotland. in a westminster sense, yes, the 2015 result was exceptional but let‘s look at our performance in the broad sweep. when i became snp leader three years ago, we had six mps in the house of commons. today we have 35 in the house of commons. by we have 35 in the house of commons. by any measure, the snp is a strong position. we have been in government for ten years and the responsibility i have, that we have is a party overall is to make sure that we continue to move the country forward , continue to move the country forward, taking the right decisions to support our economy and public services so that we are building up public services for those who depend
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on them. you mentioned the latest poll. there was one over the weekend that said 42% of scottish voters we re that said 42% of scottish voters were disapproving of the snp‘s record so far. on record, one of the things you have been accused of it since the last general election talking so much about independence that you neglect things like education and health. do you see that as a fair assessment? how do you defend yourself on that?” that as a fair assessment? how do you defend yourself on that? i do not think it is fair. i can understand why some people would say that. i do not think the evidence stacks that up. looking at health, our health service, we face the challenge of an ageing population so we have invested more, 12,000 more people working in the health service. we have taken a big step in reforming health and social care to make it fit for the future. right now, al emergency departments are the best performing in the uk by
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some considerable distance. in education i have said very clearly we have work to do to close the attainment gap that here in glasgow, in the city i am in this morning, ten yea rs in the city i am in this morning, ten years ago when we took office, of young people left school with a—levels, today that number is 30% and rising. a record number of young people are going to university, including those from deprived communities. governments everywhere, we have challenges and work to do but our record over the last ten yea rs but our record over the last ten years is a good one. we have unemployment lower than any other nation in the uk, under 4%. employment is at a record high. across all of these issues, i think it is fairto across all of these issues, i think it is fair to say that our record is a strong one but we now want to build on it. the issue that looms large for everyone is that of retford and for yourself and for the scottish voters, how that may affect
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theissue scottish voters, how that may affect the issue of independence. do you have a date in mind as to when he will address that issue again? we had a mandate to give people a choice within this scottish parliament but equally i have recognised, and it was clear to me during the election, that was all of the uncertainty caused by brexit, people are not yet ready to set a date for making another big decision. i said date for making another big decision. isaid i date for making another big decision. i said i will not consider this issue further into we have more clarity around brexit. later next year, hopefully, we will start to see some of the clarity emerged. that is the time at which we can look again at the issue in light of circumstances at the time. that does not mean we do not continue to make the case for scotland to be independent because we see the chaos thatis independent because we see the chaos that is engulfing the uk and is damaging brexit that looms ahead of us. damaging brexit that looms ahead of us. i think the case for scotland being more in charge of our own future, more a charge of the decisions that shape the future is growing stronger by the day. on that
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issue, you have been looking closely at what has been happening in catalonia in spain in the last few days and weeks. do something like that influence the decisions that you are making? no. catalonia is not scotland, scotland is not catalonia. 0bviously all of us watch what is happening in catalonia with interest. the scenes of violence we saw last sunday were shocking and appalling and should be condemned by everyone. i certainly hope now we see a process of dialogue in catalonia to replace the confrontation that we saw up until now, so that way can be found that respect democracy and the rule of law but allows the people of catalonia to choose their own future. essentially, catalonia and scotla nd future. essentially, catalonia and scotland are different, we are two different countries and different circumstances will determine our future. to return to brexit, mrs may says she will sit down with you to discuss how the uk gets the best dealfrom brexit in
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discuss how the uk gets the best deal from brexit in the future. do you think that when that comes around she will still be prime minister, that she will be the person having the discussions with you? i don't know. that is the honest answer. i work on the basis that she will be but that is not something i am in control of. theresa may clearly has a weakened authority and she is presiding over authority and she is presiding over a deeply divided party on the issue of brexit and on other issues as well. that is a problem for the conservative party but a bigger problem for the country. i want to see great clarity around brexit negotiations. my view is that yes, the uk is leaving the eu. i regret that i accepted. i believe we should stay in the single market and the customs union because that is the best way to protect jobs and customs union because that is the best way to protectjobs and living standards and livelihoods. nobody voted to leave the eu in order for the country to become poorer. i hope common sense comes to the fore in these negotiations, whether that be theresa may or anybody else within
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the conservative party. perhaps the most worrying thing just out is even if theresa may was not pro— minister, who would be? iam not sure anybody relishes the prospect, certainly not in scotland, of boris johnson as prime minister. will be on thejob longer? johnson as prime minister. will be on the job longer? gordon strachan or theresa may? i wasjust on the job longer? gordon strachan or theresa may? i was just asked that question by another channel and i dodged it there so i will try and do the same here. a big fan of gordon and i have been sent to you to play for scotland. being the manager is a tough job. perhaps even more responsibility on the shoulders than a first minister or prime minister, such as the importance of football to the nation. the result last night was disappointing but people of scotland will continue to love their football and gordon‘s future as manager is a matter for him to decide. if i had to make a decision, i would him to decide. if i had to make a decision, iwould back him to decide. if i had to make a decision, i would back at gordon over theresa. we will watch that one closely. thank you very much,
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nicola. what a quote to take us to the sport. i was really hoping you are going to ask her about that because what heartbreak for the scottish players last night. failing to make it through to the play—offs. gordon strachan, it does look like it will be his choice about whether he stays or goes. he has had a brilliant run of form, the thinking is there will be up to him to stay. whether he can cope with the pressure on the. they came so close but their hopes of playing at the 2018 world cup in russia are over after they drew with lavinia in the qualifier yesterday. the scottish had to win in order to get a play—off place and they went ahead but two goals for the home side meant that gordon ‘s men needed to themselves in the final 20 minutes. while snodgrass did get one back, u nfortu nately while snodgrass did get one back, unfortunately that was not enough. my unfortunately that was not enough. my disappointment is nothing compared to the players. i do not think i have seen a group of players
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that exhausted at the end of the game and that disappointed. as i said to them, you can go away and be really proud because you pushed yourselves to places people thought yourselves to places people thought you could not go. north ireland knew they made the play—offs shortly before they lost their last game, defeated by norway. the earlier exit of scotla nd defeated by norway. the earlier exit of scotland confirmed their place in the play—offs. a goal meant they lost the match in the final few minutes. we should not be too down on ourselves to be our objective was achieved and even one would have been enough for us since lavinia. when we look at the campaign as a whole it has been a successful campaign. 19 points, we thought that would be enough. that is probably the case. we can look forward to a massive game in november with a massive game in november with a massive prize at the end of the. england in the meanwhile managed a win over lithuania but it was an uninspiring display. the early goal came in the first from harry came. the manager of wales says that his
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side should have no fears for their qualifier with the republic of ireland‘s night. gareth bale washed training yesterday and he will be in the stadium for that vital match. wales could even top their group with a win, a defeat would send the irish into the play—offs. with a win, a defeat would send the irish into the play-offs. you will a fantastic atmosphere. there is nothing to fear, nothing to worry about. the occasion is what it is and it is great for us to be involved. but we just need to get involved. but we just need to get involved. we have a gameplan, we have always had game plan and our players have proved that they are very good at executing whatever gameplan we put in front of them. both sides have to win the game and at some stage or another, whether it be after 15 minutes, 20 minutes, whatever the case may be, they have to go for it. i predict the game will be wide open in the second half. three games in the women‘s super league yesterday, sunderland beat yeovil while reading
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and birmingham drew two all. sunderland beat yeovil while reading and birmingham drew 2—2. bristol almost pulled off the result of the weekend. 17—year—old lauren hemp scored this fantastic goal to give them a 1—0 lead over arsenal, who replied in the second half to snatch a 1—1 draw. saracens have returned to the top of rugby union‘s premiership with a 38—19 defeat of wasps. jamie george scored three of sarries four tries at allianz park, the last securing the bonus point. it‘s the first time since 2014 that wasps have lost four consecutive league matches. terol hatton said winning the dunhill was more different, difficult than last year, he finished three shots ahead of ross fisher, whose final—round 61 set a new course record. he‘s become the first player to successfully defend the title. great britain have finished the world gymnastics championships with two medals after claudia fragapane added a bronze to max whitlock‘s gold. going in the women‘s floor final, commonwealth champion fragapane rebounded from an error at the start of her routine to confidently dazzle in the rest of her display. it‘s her second world medal
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following bronze in the team event in 2015. carolin garcia has overtaken britain‘sjohanna konta in the race for the last place in the end of season wta finals. garcia beat the new world number one simona halep to win the china open, her second title in two weeks. konta is taking a couple of weeks off with an injury and must then reach the final of the kremlin cup to regain her place at the season finale in singapore. the men‘s final in beijing was won by world number one rafael nadal who demolished nick kyrgios to win his sixth title of the season. the spaniard won nine games in a row on his way to a comprehensive 6—2 6—1victory to reclaim the trophy he last won in 2005. while nadal was sweating on court in that final, look at what federer was up that final, look at what federer was up to. 19 time grand slam champion
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shared a little bit of his dignity off the court promoting the shanghaied tennis masters over the weekend —— shared. they get them to do some bonkers stuff, don‘t they? —— shared no one can see mickey‘s face under the mask so he has no shame. here‘s sarah with a look at this morning‘s weather. take a look at this beautiful sunrise, this is the view in east sussex at the moment. we have some clear skies around some parts of the country, especially in the south—east, but for most of us the sunshine will be shorter supply so a cloudy start to the day and a bit patchy, light and drizzle around shifting its way slowly east.
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looking at the weather this morning at 8am if you‘re heading out the door, a bit of rain in western scotla nd door, a bit of rain in western scotland and a few showers in the east but they should clear. northern ireland and northern england, mostly cloudy with the odd spot of drizzle and as we move south, a largely dry start to the morning in wales. brighter spells developing in the south. still quite cloudy with low cloud and hill fog in parts of the south—west, drizzly spots of rain into central england but in the south—east we have clear spells and it‘s quite a fresh start here. through the morning the cloud edges further eastwards, bringing its patchy showers in across eastern parts. some brighter spells develop, especially in central and eastern scotland, north—east england and a few spells of sunshine in east wales and the midlands, lifting temperatures to around 14 to 17 before the next batch of wet weather arrives in northern ireland later this afternoon. as for the world cup qualifier later, wales against the republic of ireland, it looks fairly
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cloudy in cardiff but it should remain dry. into the evening, the rain initially in northern ireland works into scotland and northern england. shouldn‘t be too heavy because it‘s moving through quite quickly on the breeze, still some showers to start tuesday. through the day tomorrow this front sinks further south across england and wales but it is tending to fizzle out so reallyjust wales but it is tending to fizzle out so really just a wales but it is tending to fizzle out so reallyjust a band of cloud with the odd shower on it, then a return to brighter conditions, more sunshine tomorrow compare the two today with temperatures very similar, 14 to 18. more wet weather works into the north—west later in the afternoon —— compared to. things u nsettled the afternoon —— compared to. things unsettled in the north on tuesday night into wednesday, low pressure in charge and tightly packed isobars indicating a windy spell of weather as we head to the middle of the week. on wednesday, as the front pushes south, there will be a spell of wet and windy weather working across the country, quite a blustery day. either side of that band of
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rain, dry and bright weather, 18 degrees. the low pressure means an autumnal feel to the middle of the week, turning quite windy, some rain at times, especially in the north—west, but when we get over the area of low pressure, things will be turning a bit warmer, especially in the south during the weekend. turning a bit warmer, especially in the south during the weekendm turning a bit warmer, especially in the south during the weekend. it did feel really autumnal this weekend! it‘s the biggest infrastructure project in europe, but are there enough people with the right skills to build hs2? steph‘s at one of five new national training colleges in doncaster, which is being launched today to help train the engineers of the future. good morning, steph. good morning. that‘s exactly right, here is where they want to train 1000 students every year ready for all of those jobs that will be created by high—speed rail production. you‘ve got some of the new students and the teachers showing them what to do and they‘ve got a massive eurostar train and inside of that they‘ve got lots
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of virtual reality things where you can have a go at driving that train as well. liam is one of the new students. good morning. you were a footballer and you decided to change career, tell us about it. formerly played for doncaster rovers for a few years and i changed to a different club and i saw this as a more long—term career. i decided to get into this now and hopefully progress into the career long—term. you are 23, can you see a long career in this industry? definitely, hopefully this is the right place and time to progress with h52 and all going well it's a job for the re st of all going well it's a job for the rest of your life. good luck with it. it's rest of your life. good luck with it. it‘s not just rest of your life. good luck with it. it‘s notjust the engineering jobs, so many differentjobs are connected. 0ver jobs, so many differentjobs are connected. over here we have guys training to be project managers, they are doing the art this morning, good morning, brad. tell us about your background and how you ended up here. i finished a levels a year ago —— the our. the original intention
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after a gap year was to go to university —— vr. i did an apprenticeship to get stuck in and up apprenticeship to get stuck in and upa apprenticeship to get stuck in and up a level into the world. i did a project management course at the college. is this the kind of industry you wanted to work in? college. is this the kind of industry you wanted to work mm is, it's really interesting, a growing industry with h52 and there will be lots of opportunities here with an organisation. looking the pa rt with an organisation. looking the part as well! factory much. this is all about filling those jobs for the future and we can talk to a couple of experts —— thanks very much. richard from kpmg, we talk about infrastructure and how important this is, why do we need this? this is the country looking ahead and realising we will need engineering skills for the next 20, 30, 40 years and we've got a huge pipeline of infrastructure and construction projects coming up in this country, more than £500 billion of projects.
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people talk about h52 because its high profile but that's only 10% of all the engineering and construction we need to do over the next ten or 20 years. susie from hitachi, this is new for you guys because there is a skills gap? absolutely, we've got a skills gap? absolutely, we've got a maintenance centre across the road so a maintenance centre across the road so we've got a chance to join the dots. we are keen to promote a pipeline through from primary schools to university and technical coueges schools to university and technical colleges and colleges like this because these are our colleagues of the future, we're hoping to bring them overand the future, we're hoping to bring them over and get them involved as soon as we can. them over and get them involved as soon as we can. richard, you and i we re soon as we can. richard, you and i were talking earlier about this being an opportunity, we should be proud of the fact we have these jobs. it's a fantastic opportunity because it will give lots of people in the country the skills they need notjust to build in the country the skills they need not just to build the in the country the skills they need notjust to build the uk's infrastructure but it becomes an export for us, the world is building more infrastructure than we've seen
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in decades so those skills will be transferable abroad as well. a brilliant opportunity. what about attracting young people, that‘s part of the problem, susie, isn‘t it? attracting young people, that‘s part of the problem, susie, isn't mm is. i was thinking about my exterior is, i've been in the rail industry three years and i remember going to might interview and thinking this will be like phil's garage in eastenders vas my experience. when you get in its like a formula! pit lane. —— my experience. it is high—tech, we got amazing and exciting technology and that's what we need to do as an industry, work on that perception. fascinating, lovely to speak to you. we will be here through the morning and they have cake, that‘s the kind of couege have cake, that‘s the kind of college i want to go to, serving ca ke college i want to go to, serving cake in the morning! see you later. formula 1 pit lane is an cake, what more could you want? exactly! -- formula 1 pit lanes. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. the former libdem leader encouraging
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voters tojoin the the former libdem leader encouraging voters to join the conservatives or labour, we will speak to nick clegg about why he thinks... it says brea kfast about why he thinks... it says breakfast clearly doesn‘t mean brea kfast. breakfast clearly doesn‘t mean breakfast. it does here. i was a bit confused by that. have you ever been starstruck? when i met angelina jolie. the only time? pretty much. we will meet dustin hoffman, adam sandler has done a film with him, adam sandler stayed in the car because he was nervous about meeting dustin hoffman for the first time and dan brown will be here after 8am to talk about his new thriller. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. bbc london has found people having cosmetic surgery on their tongues by having it cut and split are being exposed procedures that are illegal and potentially dangerous. secret recording in islington, shows body modification artists like this one, injecting prescription only drugs so the procedure to give a lizard—like tongue can be carried out.
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anyone injecting the medicines is supposed to be a registered medical professional. the thought that in this unregulated environment where people are doing this without training and in circumstances which didn‘t look either clinical or sterile, it seemed to me extremely unsafe. and there‘s more on that story on inside out london at 7:30pm tonight on bbc one. a new study shows that the poorest 20% of londoners own just 0.1% of the city‘s wealth which includes finance and property. research by the charity trust for london shows over two million londoners are living in poverty. that‘s more than the entire populations of liverpool, newcastle and bristol combined. the trust is calling for increased wages for low earners and improved working conditions. an original work by the street
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artist banksy that was vandalised a decade ago has been restored and returned to its original home in shoreditch. it‘s called snorting copper and it was thought to be lost forever. but two property developers who bought the building decided to restore the work by sending the wall to carlisle for restoration. it‘s now back on public view on curtain road. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. the district line has minor delays between parsons green and wimbledon due to a signal failure. 0n the roads, delays at waterloo bridge, bus lanes are closed north and southbound because of pavement works until christmas. upper street in islington is closed southbound from liverpool road to city road for roadworks. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. it‘s a rather grey but very mild start to this week and it looks like that trend is going to continue for the next few days. back to this morning, it‘s mostly dry with some bright spells. now, i say mostly dry,
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we have this band of rain moving from west to east but it‘s very light and it‘s patchy. many places are avoiding it. a dry afternoon, still the chance of a spot of rain but some brighter spells as well and in the light winds, it‘s been in quite mild. the maximum temperature around 17 celsius. could get a bit of sunshine before it sets as the cloud thickens and breaks and that‘s going to continue overnight. some clear spells, the wind remains light, but despite that the temperature stays very mild, in double figures, between 12 and 13 celsius. a bright start to tuesday but gradually we‘ll see the cloud increasing from the west. and you‘ll notice the temperatures this week, they are staying very mild throughout. not only during the daytime but also these nighttime temperatures as well. turning rather windy as we head through wednesday but a spell of rain overnight wednesday into thursday morning. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london until 10am with her breakfast show. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a landmark moment, after decades of child abuse allegations in rochdale. an enquiry hears evidence for the first time over the alleged failure to prosecute the late mp cyril smith, with claims of a cover up. good morning, it is monday the 9th of october. theresa may will tell the eu today it is time to show some flexibility in the brexit negotiations saying the ball is now in brussels‘s courts. after hundreds and thousands gather in barcelona for a probe spain rally, there are
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signs catalonia‘s leaders. short of making a full declaration of independence. good morning from the national courage of high speed rail, these guys are training up to fill all thejobs of the these guys are training up to fill all the jobs of the future. so more from me a little bit later. scotla nd from me a little bit later. scotland say goodbye to their hopes of playing in next year‘s world cup. they needed a win in slovenia to guarantee a place in the play—offs but could only manage a 2—2 drawer. that means northern ireland are through to the play—offs, despite losing in norway. what do you think is your better film? godfather one what do you think is your better film ? godfather one godfather two bastion map that is a true story. dustin hoffman says he is often mistaken for al pacino. dan brown will be joining
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mistaken for al pacino. dan brown will bejoining us on mistaken for al pacino. dan brown will be joining us on the sofa to tell us about his latest thriller, 0rigin sofa to tell us about his latest thriller, origin and sarah has the weather. a few clear, sunny spells this morning but the most places it is a cloudy start. i will bring you the details in 15 minutes. good morning. the independent enquiry into child sexual abuse begins detailed hearings to examine historic allegations of abuse in children‘s home and residential school in rochdale. the cases date back to the early 1960s. the enquiry will look at failure to prosecute cyril smith. the child abuse enquiry‘s planning to go back nearly 60 years and delve into the dark past of two children‘s homes. this one, knowl view, and cambridge house. the claims, that children were abused, that staff new,
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that no one was brought to justice and that the scandal was covered up. the larger—than—life liberal mp cyril smith, who died several years ago, was a governor of knowl view. do you want a man to represent you or a party robot? the claim was he used his position to get access to children. the first allegations against him date back to 1961. police investigated but in 1970 prosecutors said the evidence was stale and his accuser is not reliable. by the early 1990s, experts reported growing concerns children were being abused at the knowl view home. little action was taken. last month finally rochdale council apologised for failing children. today the public enquiry will begin taking fresh evidence. the reason that this matters is we cannot have a situation in this country were powerful people are able to abuse children and get away with it because other powerful people are protecting them.
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that cannot be allowed to happen and that‘s why we have to investigate what happened with cyril smith and that‘s why we have to learn the lessons from it. the enquiry takes evidence like at court but can‘t prosecute. its job is to discover what happened and who covered it up and provide ways of preventing it happening again. tom symonds, bbc news. theresa may will tell the eu it is time to show flexibility in the brexit negotiations. the talks get underway in brussels today as the prime minister updates mps at westminster on progress. let‘s talk to ben wright. what is expected? the prime minister's comments we expect her to make later, reveal irritation that has existed for weeks, about the pace of these negotiations. they are being conducted in brussels between uk officials and the european
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commission. theresa may will save the uk has already made a few concessions, saying they will pay into the eu budget for the two years after the uk has left and guarantee the rights of eu citizens in the uk. britain is looking for a transitional deal to keep things the way they are for the first couple of yea rs way they are for the first couple of years after the uk has left. but there are massive sticking points in these negotiations. the eu is adamant, until the terms of the divorce have been sorted out there cannot be a meaningful discussion about the future trading relationship between the uk and the eu. the uk are desperate for the negotiations to crack on with that now. eu leaders will meet in brussels next week to decide if talks can move on to that stage. what theresa may is doing, is laying down a red line and urging eu leaders to move these talks on and making it clear they should not expect any more concessions from the
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uk. by saying the ball is in the eu's uk. by saying the ball is in the eu‘s courts, i am not sure how that will go down in brussels. it is the eu that determines the rules and the pace at how these talks can progress. it‘ll be interesting to see if this will produce a shift that theresa may is looking for. scotland‘s first minister has told this programme common—sense needs to prevail if the uk is to get the best brexit deal. the snp will call on the chancellor to use next week‘s budget to invest in public services. lorna gordon is in scotland. good morning. another thing theresa may said, she expected gordon strachan to be in thejob longer than said, she expected gordon strachan to be in the job longer than theresa may? yes. nicola sturgeon did have a view on the football. i think she watched it last night, she was very supportive of gordon strachan
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despite scotland‘s defeat. she did have strong views on theresa may and of course on the issue of brexit. in scotland, the majority of people voted to stay in the european union. this is what she said earlier.” wa nt this is what she said earlier.” want to see greater clarity around the brexit negotiations. my view is, the brexit negotiations. my view is, the uk is leaving the eu, i regret that but i accept it. we should stay in the single market and the customs union because that is the best way to projectjobs, living standards and livelihoods. nobody voted to leave the eu to see the country get poorer. i have leave the eu to see the country get poorer. i have common—sense comes to the fore in these negotiations, whether that is theresa may or anybody else leading the conservative party. brexit, the backdrop to this party conference season and the snp conference in glasgow. but the snp of course are a
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party of opposition at westminster, but a party of government in scotland. they have been in power now for ten years. their theme today will be public sector pay rises. they have confirmed they will lift the 1% cap in scotland but they will call on philip hammond to go further and hopefully release more money to scotla nd and hopefully release more money to scotland to bumper pay up further here as well. there are signs the cata la n here as well. there are signs the catalan government will refrain from immediately declaring independence from spain. last week‘s referendum, which was deemed illegal by the national government, returns and 98% of vote for independence. last night, thousands of people were marching in barcelona to show support for a united spain. it is unclear what the catalan government is going to do and there is support on both sides for this, ? is going to do and there is support on both sides for this,? not clear
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to others and not clear to the cata la n to others and not clear to the catalan government as well. tomorrow, the president of the region will report. 0ne tomorrow, the president of the region will report. one member of the government has told the bbc, it is off, there will not be a unilateral declaration of independence tomorrow. what they will be is a symbolic one which sets out a path to independence and calls on madrid to negotiate for a legal one. but at the moment madrid is saying there is no dialogue and it is against the constitution. there are other members in the party who are other members in the party who are saying all options are on the table, it could still happen tomorrow. they have 24 hours of thinking time. thank you very much. a foster carer who is asking an employment tribunal to rule she should be classed as a worker has told this programme current rules are unfair because they offer no protection. sarah anderson is bringing the case
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against hampshire county council. they said the law is clear, foster ca re rs they said the law is clear, foster carers are not workers. if she wins comic could have implications for tens of thousands of other carers who do not get sick pay or holiday pgy- who do not get sick pay or holiday pay. we do deserve some basic rights. the union, the general secretary said he has never met such a vulnerable set of workers in all his life. we can be fired on a whim, we don‘t go off sick. too worried to go off sick. we have been talking about these old pound coins for a while. a lot of you have been rummaging through your wallet and you have found a few. i found about 11,! you have found a few. i found about 11, iam you have found a few. i found about 11, i am down to seven. they won‘t be legal tender next week. but if you still have too many to spend, don‘t worry because some shops are saying they will still
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accept them after the october the 15th deadline. pound and says it will take the coins until the end of the month and the trading association representing small shops has advised their members to keep using them. a representative for small businesses says the changes is confusing small businesses. among customers, there isn‘t that much awareness that they only have a few days left to spend their old £1 coins. it is important for customers and businesses to note that even beyond the deadline, there is no obligation for a business, beyond next sunday for a business to accept the old £1 coin. that is when they officially go out of circulation. but perhaps there could be a transition period where business feels they could accept the odd £1 coin, if they wanted. they will still be able to put them in the
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bank. they won‘t be able to give them out as change. that is important for businesses to know. don‘t worry, you can still spend your pound, go and spend them. handy advice. we found two in the office. that is all we had. you have a look in your handbag. you are watching breakfast. losing a loved one is an experience we have to come to terms with at some stage and possessions left behind can provide a link to the past. a new charity is working with hospice patients to give them the opportunity to leave behind a different memento for their relatives. an audio recording of their life stories. graham satchel reports. start from the beginning. i will use this little machine to record your life story and you can carry on talking for as long as you want. suzanne is
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56 and is about to tell the story of her life. when i was 12, we move to gloucestershire. she was diagnosed with cancer in 2013 and has two children aged 18 and 21. this recording is a legacy for them and for the generations to come.” remember my grandmother, who was close to. i would try to listen to have things and i would love to have an audio of her life. i applied to the metropolitan police cadets, which didn‘t scare me because he had lived in and around london for most of my childhood. i think it is important for people to know what theirfamily important for people to know what their family background is, important for people to know what theirfamily background is, where people have come from, what they have come from. barbara set up the charity after an experienced close to home. i started to become an audio biographer when my dad was suddenly proclaimed terminally ill.
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it was fantastic to kind of capture everything he had done in his life. i think, if i was to have a house fire, i would grab hold of my original tapes. i really would. they are so original tapes. i really would. they are so precious, original tapes. i really would. they are so precious, once original tapes. i really would. they are so precious, once those people that you record die, that is it. my mum died in 1992. the actor, david suchet is supporting the new charity. this tape, an answerphone message is a prized possession. the only recording of my darling mum's voice that i have. we will bring you on our return. quite emotional. automatic to go to the police... 0ver automatic to go to the police... over the next five years, 400 volu nteers over the next five years, 400 volunteers will be trained to record life stories in hospices and the
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process has been therapeutic. they are able to analyse how their life has been and maybe look at good times in the life at a time when a lot of things were a challenge for them. so that ability to reflect back on what has happened to their life is definitely therapeutic. the king‘s cross fire, the poll tax rise. i have had some interesting times in the police. storytelling is the oldest and most powerful art form. the memories captured here, priceless for families and loved ones. it‘s a wonderful idea. it's a wonderful idea. why haven't we thought about that before? thanks to suzanne for telling us our story and taking time to talk to graham satchell as well. it is 6.16am. good morning. would you like to know what‘s happening with the weather? yes. well, here is sarah.
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this scene is typical this morning. there are some breaks in the cloud. so the odd spell of sunshine here and there. but through this morning, for most of us, it‘s set to stay grey with patchy, light rain and drizzle as well. so any spots of light rain drifting their way eastwards as we head through the course of this morning then things will start to brighten up as we move into the good afternoon before the next batch of wet weather heads into northern ireland later on in the afternoon, but there should be sunshine across central and eastern parts of scotland. still drizzly down towards the south—west of scotland. some drier and brighter weather for a scotland. some drier and brighter weatherfor a time for scotland. some drier and brighter weather for a time for northern ireland before the next batch of wet weather moves in. across northern england the best of the sunshine will be out towards the east of the pennines. further west, will be out towards the east of the pennines. furtherwest, cloudier with the odd light shower. towards wales you could catch a few glimpses of brightness particularly in the
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south and the east too. still cloudy towards the far south—west of england, but central and eastern england, but central and eastern england, mostly dry. just the odd light shower here and there. as for the world cup qualifier tonight, wales taking on the republic of ireland, should be a dry game, i think in cardiff with temperatures around 14 celsius. now through this evening and tonight the rain initially across northern ireland and then works its way eastwards into scotland, northern england too, turning windy with the arrival of the wet weather. further south you have got a drier night to come and it is going to be mild wherever you are. through the day tomorrow we have got this weak weather front and it drifts south. it is tending to fizzle out, not much rain on it. the odd light shower and band of cloud. to the north of that, things will start to brighten up. more sunshine tomorrow compared to today and temperatures a degree or so tomorrow compared to today and temperatures a degree or so warmer, around about 14 to 18 celsius. some wet weather into western parts of scotla nd wet weather into western parts of scotland later in the afternoon, courtesy of this area of low pressure. so this is going to dominate our weather through the
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middle of the week. a frontal system slips south and we are going to see a wet and windy spell of weather through the day on wednesday. pushing out of northern ireland and scotla nd pushing out of northern ireland and scotland in across england and wales later on in the day. some wet weather and brisk winds either side of that band of rain, it will be brighter. an unsettled picture. through the week, it is turning windier. there will be rain around especially towards the north and the west. drier in the south east, but for all of us, temperatures should be on its rise which is good news just in time for the weekend. it has been dubbed the angelina jolie gene. scientists in manchester have developed a test to give women who carry the gene a greater idea of how great the risk is. if proved successful it could be rolled out across the nhs. this report by our
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health correspondent begins with flash photography. angelinia jolie brought the world‘s attention to the bra ca brought the world‘s attention to the braca gene mutation. charlie and annie also chose to have mastectomies. they have a history of breast and ovarian cancer and they we re breast and ovarian cancer and they were told they were at risk. 7% is high. i were told they were at risk. 7% is high. i wanted to get rid of them as soon as high. i wanted to get rid of them as soon as i could. had the risk been lower i would have thought twice about it and been calmer about the situation and gone for regular screening as opposed to such drastic surgery. screening as opposed to such drastic surgery. i always thought they would kill me so i wanted them off. so that, it was all to do with mindset. no, it is a big operation and it is something that's life changing. new test could give other women a
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much more personalised of their likelihood of having breast cancer. it looks at 18 other genetic variants that affect a woman‘s risk alongside factors such as lifestyle and the age of puberty. and the scientists behind it plan to extend the test to include up to 300 genetic variants. they want it made available to all women and plan to use their research to understand how our genes affect our chances of developing other cancers. we will talk about that now with a co nsulta nt we will talk about that now with a consultant surgeon. and wendy and becky. it is not an easy decision to go through this operation. why was it that you wa nted operation. why was it that you wanted to do that? it was an easy
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decision to make. my cousin was 28 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. i saw mum when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. i saw mum have when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. i saw mum have the preventative surgery and come out and feeling liberated and empowered ina way, and feeling liberated and empowered in a way, but of course, all of these things, everything that‘s been moved forward by leicester and the tea m moved forward by leicester and the team who do such fantastic work is offering more options for women. wendy, you were one of the first to have the preventative surgery. was that a tough decision?” have the preventative surgery. was that a tough decision? i had nine relatives with breast cancer and i was battling against doctors saying there was no such thing as a hereditary factor and it was only when i researched my family fully as idid and when i researched my family fully as i did and found there were actually nine relatives then i thought, this is definitely got a hereditary factor. i came up with the idea that i have got to do something to
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prevent myself from developing it and that's when i came up with the idea of having the surgery before i got the breast cancer. so what are you hoping with the new test then? it is important for two reasons. first of all, because the test has something really positive to offer a woman like becky and wendy who have a family history of breast cancer. to help them make the very difficult decision about whether or not to go for preventative surgery. secondly, the test is important because prevent breast cancer research team who have helped develop the test think it is the first of a new type of gene test. the next generation of which will help women who don't have a family history of breast cancer, giving ordinary women early warning that they may carry a genetic risk. could it be rolled out for other cancers elsewhere eventually? well, the great thing about genetic research and breast cancer, it often
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leads the way. so, the new type of gene testing is known as snip testing and it is giving women both with a family history and now the next step is women without a family history without breast cancer warning, that will be the next step after this particular set of gene tests has come into practise.“ there had been a test, how would things have changed for you, do you think? it's a difficult one to think about really because with my cousin being so young i still think it would have been something that i did at that time. my big thing and like leicester was saying about moving forward with stuff was the ovarian side because we have a higher risk of getting ovarian cancer as well and you are told that your risk factors a re and you are told that your risk factors are between 35 and 40. i didn‘t have my little boy at that time. i kind of felt really under pressure to have the next baby.
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0bviously i‘m delighted he‘s here, but it took over my life because once you have the his ter recognise comy you are making a decision not just for you, but your partner as to whether or not you are going to have any more children. for things that, moving forward would be a relief. you must have talked about when you found out wendy that you passed on if the gene mutation to becky. how did you approach that having looked into the family history? well, i didn't keep anything from becky. there was a lot of media interest in me because i was there was a lot of media interest in me because i was one there was a lot of media interest in me because i was one of the first or if not the first. we don't know. but so if not the first. we don't know. but so there was a lot of interest in my story. so becky knew about it all the way along and i think actually that made it easier in the end because there was never a moment when i thought i'm going to have to explain to becky about this because... it was out there anyway? yeah. yeah. how far away is the
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testing for people with a history of this particular gene for example? well, the particular test that has been announced by the prevent broadcast cancer research team is coming into nhs clinical practise early in 2018 and later in 2018, we are putting into clinical trial actually here in manchester, the second generation of this testing which is then going to be used within the nhs screening programme for ordinary women without a family history. so what happens, if one was to be tested and for example you found, what are you likely to find? what do you tell women? it puts them in very difficult situations. knowledge can sometimes put you in a difficult place, can‘t it? knowledge can sometimes put you in a difficult place, can't it? that's the great thing about this test, it will help women with the difficult decision because they carry and angelinyjolie gene
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decision because they carry and angeliny jolie gene do decision because they carry and angelinyjolie gene do i i or do i not need to have a mastectomy. we would offer them check—ups plus maybe a preventative tablet which is available on the nhs. extremely interesting. thank you. it is a game changer. thank you, wendy, becky. thank you very much, everyone. it is time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you‘re watching us. good morning. a bit of a grey start,
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a few patches of mist around first thing for eastern england. we do have patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle as we move through this morning. as we go through the day, we will continue to see them working eastwards with dry weather around. brea ks eastwards with dry weather around. breaks in the cloud to allow for brighter intervals or sunny spells. the best of those for eastern parts of scotla nd the best of those for eastern parts of scotland and england. temperatures around 14, 15 celsius. further south, more in the way of cloud, patchy outbreaks of rain persisting. temperatures reaching a maximum of 18 celsius here. there will be a lot of dry weather around, a few breaks in the cloud to allow for the odd glimmer of sunshine in the south—west, plenty of cloud and outbreaks of rain. maximum temperature 15, 16 celsius here. in wales, it will brighten up with a few bright intervals and for northern ireland, cloud will increase and patchy outbreaks of rain, pushing infrom increase and patchy outbreaks of rain, pushing in from the west into
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the afternoon. the rain will work across towards the south and east as we move through the night, so northern ireland, scotland seeing outbreaks of rain. further south, are largely dry picture with patchy cloud. 0vernight lows of 13 and six celsius. a fresher and brighter start to the day in the north. there will be sunny spells to begin with and one or two isolated showers. the brightness not lasting very long the scotla nd brightness not lasting very long the scotland with more in the way of rain pushing into the north—west later. temperatures reaching a maximum of 11 and 18 celsius. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. 0n the move — businesses in catalonia relocate their hq to avoid isolation if the region declares independence from spain. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday the 9th of october. one of the country‘s
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biggest banks has already relocated out of the region, with others hot on their heels. also in the programme... is this one of the biggest pr disasters?
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