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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 9, 2017 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at two. theresa may says the ball is in brussels court. the eu hit back. will they or won't they? will catalonia declare independence? and we have the latest act which is the crown court regarding the parachute jump case. crown court regarding the parachute jump case. and we have all the sport. we have a huge world cup qualifier coming up for wales, cambrai beat the republic of ireland? their head coach kris commons as they have nothing to do —— chris coleman says they have nothing to fear, but they have got to do it without gareth biro. and the weather forecast? ——
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to do it without gareth biro. and the weatherforecast? —— gareth bale. this is what we have had this is what we would like, are we going to get? later, a face you would insta ntly to get? later, a face you would instantly recognise, but is day bright forecast for the artist behind it? —— is there a bright forecast. he will be here to talk about it later. good afternoon, this is afternoon live. theresa may is to tell mps it is time for the european union to show flexibility when she gives parliament an update on the brexit negotiations this afternoon. the prime minister will say the ball is in the court of the eu, although a spokesman for the european commission said the ball is entirely in the uk's court. we could have got
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oui’ in the uk's court. we could have got our tennis correspondent to report on this! staying put and ploughing on — theresa may arrived back in number ten this morning after a difficult few days, but ahead of her statement in commons on brexit later, cabinet ministers have denied rumours they are divided. i'm looking forward to the prime minister's statement, thank you. how long do you think she will last as prime minister? rumours are always destabilising, but the cabinet is not divided. we are behind the prime minister, you will hear a report in parliament today. the prime minister is to say we can prove the doomsayers wrong when it comes to brexit. she will say moving the talks on will require leadership and flexibility by both sides but the ball is now in the eu's court. it is bullish talk and the uk is currently frustrated about the eu's refusal to start negotiating until the basic terms of divorce — including the financial settlement — have been sorted out.
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in a speech in florence last month theresa may said eu countries would not lose money because of britain's exit. the uk will honour the commitments we have made... but the eu wants more details on this and other issues such as the rights of eu citizens in the uk before talks can move on. theresa may should take a more mature approach and realise that from the point of view of the remaining 27 members of the european union, the uk created this problem and we should bear the heaviest responsibility to come up with solutions to it. at a time when the cabinet is in such chaos, brexit negotiations are too important to end up being drowned by the chaos we are seeing. the eu chief negotiator has said it could be weeks or months until negotiations turn to trade and eu leaders will meet in a fortnight to decide whether enough progress has been made. so could the uk walk away without a deal? some of the most enthusiastic brexit
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supporters in the conservative party are urging her to keep it on the table and refuse to make any more concessions until the eu moves. either they come to the table and start to talk about long—term arrangements they want to have with the uk after we leave, or there is no point in continuing discussions at all. but the tory party is split on whether walking away without a deal is a viable route to take. no tory mp would want no deal. i haven't met a single colleague who would say that is a good thing to do, it isn't. but you cannot enter any negotiation not having the option to walk away. however painful that may be. from her position in the commons later theresa may will try to show mps she has a grip on the government and the plan for brexit whilst sending a blunt message to other eu leaders. we can speak to our chief
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correspondent. this is a negotiation and there was always going to be a certain amount of brinkmanship but what is happening, people are looking at both sides, thinking who has made the concession and have they made enough concessions and will be other side accept it, who is going to blink first and we don't know the answer. in the meantime theresa may has to keep her party onside and we know that within that party they have different views, we can discuss this with chris philp, the brexit negotiations are about to start, many people are talking about the british government being able to walk away, that no deal has got to bea walk away, that no deal has got to be a notch and in order to get the best deal. is that true? —— has got to be an option in order. what we are seeing, the british government have made significant overtures to the european commission and the eu,
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in the florence speech the prime minister was clear that we were looking for a transition deal that is in both interests and that contributions might continue in that period, she has made generous offers on mutual recognition of citizens rights and in a range of other areas, and be bald is in the eu's court to respond positively to that —— the ball. it is ridiculous that they are even saying today that they will not contemplate trade talks about the future arrangements, their current position is that michel barnier won't even talk about a transition deal, and that is clearly not reasonable and it will damage the national interests of france and germany and the other nation states because there are hundreds of thousands ofjobs because there are hundreds of thousands of jobs in because there are hundreds of thousands ofjobs in those countries that depend on trade with the uk just as much as theirjobs here that also on trade with europe so they are getting to the point where the european commission's unreasonableness is beginning to damage the economic interest of nation states and that is a message
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we will hear more in the coming days and weeks. some of your colleagues wa nt to and weeks. some of your colleagues want to go further, we have heard from bernard jenkin, very much on the brexit side of things, he said the brexit side of things, he said the eu is stinging us along, and he said we will leave if they don't wa nt to said we will leave if they don't want to talk —— stringing. are we ready to leave? it is the government's objective to find a strong and close and special relationship after we leave that includes a good free trade deal, thatis includes a good free trade deal, that is in our and their interests because they send more goods and services to us than the other way round and we are the biggest export market for german cars on the second—biggest for french wine. no deal is bad for everyone, so we want to avoid that, but i do think if the european union side of the table continues unreasonably in my view and damaging lead to themselves, they refuse to even discuss transition trade, as a matter of
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prudence and common sense can we have got to start preparing for all eventualities, but that is not the desired outcome, it would be bad for everyone , desired outcome, it would be bad for everyone, and that is why i think ultimately the europeans own economic self—interest will prevail, ihad, economic self—interest will prevail, i had, they will avoid doing anything which damages them as much as it damages us —— i hope. anything which damages them as much as it damages us -- i hope. theresa may will speak to the commons in a couple of hours, it will be interesting to see what tone she adopts after the florence speech, where she was more conservatory, will the language toughen up? —— conciliate tree. it appears that brussels is going to be bullying everything straight back, if you think that this is a tennis match. —— volleying. back, if you think that this is a tennis match. -- volleying. that is right, if you use that analogy, theresa may said the ball is in the court of the eu, but they have said
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the ball is in the uk's court, and the ball is in the uk's court, and the problem in this is the early phase of this negotiation really gives the european commission control of the process. what we're talking about in the phase, don't forget, they move towards a decision where there has been sufficient progress on issues like the financial settlement and the irish border to allow the talks to move on to trade, but the problem from theresa may's perspective is that that decision is entirely in the hands of europe and they have never defined what sufficient progress would be. so britain is moving towards a pass mark in these early phases of the negotiations without being sure what the pass mark is. the difficulty is, we have this going on in public, is there an
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assumption that behind—the—scenes negotiations are underway? in a way that people might be surprised at. there are intensive talks and they started again here short time ago, but without david davis present this time, we expect in here later in the week. progress in some areas is being made, for example the issues of citizens rights, but the problem is, the target is sufficient progress, but there is no definition on that level of sufficient progress, so you are in a situation where the british side will emphasise there is progress, and the europeans can sit back and know that they only have to sit back and say there is sufficient progress, and there is sufficient progress, and the point is this is a phase of the negotiation where the europeans have a great deal of control because they know britain wants to move the talks on to trade and they know that is a point where they can continue to extra ct point where they can continue to
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extract concessions from the british negotiators so it is in the european commission's interest and the interests of the member states to see what concessions the uk is prepared to offer in return for the critical move on to trade, and it does not seem that when there is a european summit at the end of october, that it will be judged that britain has passed the sufficient progress test and then the focus will move to the next summit in december. thanks forjoining us. the trial of the trial of an army sergeant accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute has heard more evidence about victoria cilliers jump over salisbury plain. mrs cilliers suffered multiple injuries when both her main and reserve parachutes failed to open.
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emile cilliers denies the charges. duncan kennedy is at winchester crown court. emile cilliers is accused of two counts of attempting to murder his wife, one, by sabotaging her parachute and the other by tampering with a gas fixture at their home. victoria and emile cilliers were both keen parachutists but the prosecution claimed he wanted her to die so he could claim insurance money and because he was having an affair with another woman. it was at this airbase in wiltshire that the alleged incident took place. the base sees around 25,000 jumps a year and victoria and emile cilliers were regular visitors. it was here she fell 4,000 feet when both her main and reserve parachute did not open properly and she suffered multiple injuries. the gentleman on the right here is the chief instructor of the base and today he gave more evidence about the accident. emile cilliers' defence barrister asked him if he actually saw the accident himself and whether victoria cilliers main chute had opened and he said he had not. he was also asked if he saw mrs cilliers cut away the main chute when it failed to open and again he said it was others
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who had seen herfall. the court has already been shown these pictures, the kitchen at their home. the prosecution said mr cilliers tampered with this gas fixture a few days before the parachute accident in a separate attempt to kill his wife. emile cilliers denies all the charges against him in a trial that is expected to last up to six weeks. there are signs that the catalonian government will not go as far as declaring unilateral independence from spain. hundreds of thousands of people were on the streets of barcelona yesterday in a huge solar support for the unity of spain. —— show of support. extra police have
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been asked to help at the parliament building in barcelona. we canjoin the bbc‘s tim wilcox, how likely is that? will they call for it? who knows, both of the political leaders are vulnerable, carles puigdemont relies on far left separation as groups. mariano rajoy is also vulnerable. the spanish prime minister says no dialogue and no negotiation, this is outside the constitution, if you declare independence we will impose article 155 which imposes direct rule from madrid and could quite possibly lead to the arrest of carles puigdemont, and imprisonment. we can speak to an >> studio:
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—— we can speak to a representative of one of the hard—line policies for the what do you think carles puigdemont is going to do?” the what do you think carles puigdemont is going to do? i don't think it will be financial ruin, we are in the south of europe, connected with france and the mediterranean, barcelona is one of the most important harbours in the area. eu word accept independence from you. yes, there is no country that has been in this situation before. venezuelan has also said they won't recognise it. of course, i think that the catalan government has made this diplomatic work. they will not dump into a poor without
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checking if there is any water. —— jump checking if there is any water. —— jump intoa checking if there is any water. —— jump into a uber. what do you think is going to happen? do you think he will declare independence? the parliamentarians wa nt independence? the parliamentarians want him to do that. i think it will be some sort of soft declaration of independence, leaving the door open. madrid have said no and no. if independence has declared, they will apply 155. the other problem, there isa apply 155. the other problem, there is a slight majority and there are cata la n is a slight majority and there are catalan to say —— who say they would like more independence but they would like to remain part of spain. i've heard from people who say they feel in —— intimidated because if
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they say they want to remain with spain they have been called fascists. that is not true. it is a minority who incite these people who wa nt minority who incite these people who want to remain spain for the i have friends who want to remain inside spain but we have joined together and we are still doing. i feel sad for these people, but they have been showing the brutality of the police. we will wait to see tomorrow, but a lot of pressure on carles puigdemont from the hard left to declare independence or allow himself some space to step back, otherwise spain, mariano rajoy says he will impose to rickroll from madrid. —— impose
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direct rule. theresa may tells the eu negotiators the ball is in their court but brussels says it is up to the uk to come forward with proposals. a tense 24 come forward with proposals. a tense 2a hours as catalonia's leaders decide whether or not to declare independence. a court is an army sergeant —— a court hears an army sergeant —— a court hears an army sergeant who has been accused of tampering with his wife's parachute was indifferent the following day. the castleford tigers fallback zak hardaker has been left out of the rugby league world cup squad —— fallback. he tested positive for cocaine and could face a two—year ban. kyle edmund is through to the second round of the shanghai masters after a straight sets victory. i will be back with more on those stories just after half past. there
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isa stories just after half past. there is a new artist in town. these are some of the pictures he has painted, insta ntly some of the pictures he has painted, instantly recognisable. will smith, there. he has turned his attention to other stars. i'm not going to tell you who this is. he hasjust tweeted, in fact. this has caught my attention and there he is. our own weather forecaster, he will be coming infora weather forecaster, he will be coming in for a chat about those portraits. a man of so much talent and there is even more for us to enjoy. don't forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet us on #afternoonlive — or email us. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. the independent inquiry into child
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sexual abuse has heard allegations against sir cyril smith failed to damage his political career. in the first public hearings, being fiery was told the prime minister at the time margaret thatcher was aware of the claims against the mp when she approved his night had —— the inquiry was told. in the 1960s, they called him mr rochdale. he became mayor of the town for labour but defected to the liberals, the forerunners of today's liberal democrats. do you want a man to represent you? but in the ‘60s it was never revealed he had been accused of sexually abusing deprived boys. after nearly six decades, what started as rumour has led to this — three weeks of public hearings
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at the child abuse inquiry to finally get to the bottom of it. the decision to embark upon this investigation was in part in response to the public concern that some politicians, including cyril smith, were involved in child sexual abuse and able to abuse with impunity because they were protected by the establishment. it is claimed cyril smith later abused boys at this school for troubled children but in 1970 police were investigating allegations about him at a hostel for young men, cambridge house, when he came to see them. a transcript of the meeting records a police officer saying... you want to see what we know. smith started laughing at that. fishing, i think that's fair comment. fishing because cyril smith was hoping to move from local politics to national. he told the police...
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in three weeks i've got to give a decision on whether i'm going to fight the next parliamentary election as a liberal in rochdale. and if i'm going to be charged, i'm not going to accept, guilty or not guilty, it would be unfair to the party. he wasn't charged. years later the press started to get wind of the investigation that had taken place and now the inquiry has found new evidence of a cover—up. this inquiry made a request to mi5, the security service, to see if it had any information that was relevant to this investigation. it did. secret files from mi5‘s archives suggest in 1979 prosecutors lied tojournalists and denied smith had been investigated. smith was re—elected in greater numbers than before and far from diminishing him, the allegations appear to have had absolutely no effect whatsoever. cyril smith will be at the centre
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of these three weeks of hearings but the allegations are much wider, that paedophiles had easy access to children in rochdale and that it was covered up. the snp leader nicola sturgeon says she won't consider a second independence referendum until there is greater clarity on a brexit deal. she acknowledged the snp still has to build its case for a second vote. she suggested she will instead focus ona she suggested she will instead focus on a domestic agenda and hinted she would be prepared to raise taxes in scotla nd would be prepared to raise taxes in scotland to pay for public services. our correspondent is in glasgow. the focus of today's conference will be on westminster, there will be attacks on what the snp describe as tory austerity and the effect of spending cuts on scotland. the critics say the scottish parliament has more power to raise tax rates, so if the snp want better services they should raise taxes to pay for them and today the party leader strongly hinted
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she might do just that. in the light of further austerity the tories appear wedded to, the implications of brexit and changing demographics, yes, i think it's time to look at how we progressively use limited tax powers to protect our public services. the snp are the largest party in scotland and the largest party in the scottish parliament but they don't have an overall majority so, as i understand it, they will be entering negotiations with labour and the greens, not over whether to raise taxes, but which taxes to raise. but some of the delegates here are wary. it's a bit of a trap, i think, that we need to watch we don't fall into. some delegates say if nicola sturgeon increases income tax, she will give the leader of the scottish conservatives a powerful weapon. the first thing ruth davidson will say is, we are the highest taxed part of the uk,
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but she's forgetting about free prescriptions, free tuition. and other delegates complain scotland still doesn't have enough powers over its own finances. the scottish parliament doesn't have enough powers. 15% of the welfare powers, it's not enough. we want full powers, full independence. we want the power of looking after our own people and our own country. so far the snp have used their tax powers to stop a cut for those on the higher rate, but building a truly progressive tax system may prove a bigger political challenge. time for a look at the weather. isaid, i said, what are we getting, you said, rubber duck and a horse. i wa nted said, rubber duck and a horse. i wanted to illustrate a point, we asked viewers to send pictures
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income and this is a typical picture we get, but people get a bit bored —— send pictures in, but this is a typical picture we get. and this is what they send instead. you canjust about see a bit of cloud, but it is about see a bit of cloud, but it is a large picture of a horse. people in aberdeen are sending this in, as welcomer not even illustrative of the story —— as well, not even illustrative of the story. it has been a very dull monday morning, but the cloud is breaking up and the sunny spells are coming through and it won't be too bad in the afternoon. you will get warm in the sheltered eastern areas, maybe highs of 17-18, sheltered eastern areas, maybe highs of 17—18, but the cloud and rain gathers, an indication of what is to
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come, and more rain across northern ireland and scotland and eventually down across northern england. it wea ke ns down across northern england. it weakens substantially, and by tomorrow morning, just a band of cloud, and another dry story, so i will be sitting here tomorrow telling you about the sunshine and am sure simon will help me remember that one. however, in the far north of scotland, gales are expected at the end of the day. we see gales through the night, wednesday, heavy rain across scotland and northern ireland and northern england, but when that has cleared, and it will do so, we will see decent sunny spells and around 12—18, with the rain moving south, we will have clear skies and it will turn pretty chilly through the night. thursday morning, a touch of frost, but hopefully some decent dry sunny weather. many of you might have heard a rumour it will get pretty warm in the weekend. not for
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everyone, just for some, and the reason, the remnants of hurricane nate, the energy is going to reinvigorate the jet stream from the hurricane and it will send the area of high pressure, fairly significant, to greenland. and for england and wales, we could see highs of around 22—23, but let's not get too carried away about that just yet. concentrating on the here and now. strong winds. it should be turning warmer by the weekend. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the european commission rebuffs theresa may's claim that the ball is in the eu's court over progress in the brexit negotiations, saying it's up to the uk to provide solutions. to stay or to go — the two main spanish parties put
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pressure on catalan‘s separtist leader not to declare independence, saying leaving spells economic ruin. and the army instructor accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute — we'll have the latest from winchester crown court. sport now on afternoon live, with hugh. all eyes now and wales. yes, a massive game for wales tonight. they need a win but could come through with a draw if other results go their way. they host the republic of ireland in cardiff and both teams will be going for it. it will be a mouthwatering clash to see who can make at least the play—off spot. and any make at least the play—off spot. and a ny wales tea m make at least the play—off spot. and any wales team member does not have to look very far to see what defeat looks like? scotland last night. yes, truly dejected faces on the scotla nd yes, truly dejected faces on the scotland players last night and wales or the republic of ireland will not want to be feeling the same way later on. the wales coach chris coleman says they have nothing to fear, they will be playing at the cardiff city stadium in front of
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their home fans, but injured striker gareth bale will not be playing. he watched training yesterday. he will be at the stadium supporting his team—mates. wills could top their group with a when but defeat could send the irish into the play—offs at their expense. a fantastic atmosphere. so there is nothing to fear, nothing to worry about. the occasion is what it is, and it is great for us to be involved in, but we have to go, and we have a game plan, we always have a game plan, and our players have proved that they are very good at executing whatever game plan we put in front of them. there are also injury concerns for ireland who have lost their striker shane long to a hip injury. their manager martin o'neill says they will have to go for it. that injury will be a very big blow for them indeed. we will set out to win the game, and at some stage or another, whether it be after 15—20, 25 minutes, whatever it may be, they
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will have to go for it, and i assure the game, i predict it will be wide openin the game, i predict it will be wide open in the second half. big news in by open in the second half. big news in rugby league today. zak hardaker will miss the world cup after testing positive for cocaine. he was left out of the tigers squad after the defeat to leeds rhinos on saturday and that comes as england announce their world cup squad today earlier. i spoke to her correspondent who told me that hardaker has proved frustrating player to manage in his career so far ——i player to manage in his career so far —— i spoke to our cause pot—mac. yet at some of field indiscretions. this was a test he took after a game against leeds in early september where we now know that he proved positive for cocaine. we cannot prejudge mitigating circumstances he may put forward but that would normally trigger a two year ban. may put forward but that would normally trigger a two year banm not in the world cup squad now for obvious reasons but there is a surprise exclusion elsewhere? yes,
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the wigan full— back surprise exclusion elsewhere? yes, the wigan full—back sam tomkins is not included. johnny womack '5 of st helens is selected despite a slight hamstring problem. a couple of debuts. —— johnny lomax. it is an interesting selection. the british number three kyle edmund overcame an nervy start to ease pastjiri vesely at the shanghai masters. he suffered an early break in the first set before composing himself and composing 286—3, 6—2 win in china, which sets up a second—round meeting with the fourth seed and wimbledon runner—up marin cilic tomorrow. that is all the sport for now. thank you, simon. hugh, thank you very much. we will now take you to target where the green party co—leaderjonathan ba rtley is the green party co—leaderjonathan bartley is addressing the conference, and we willjust have a listen now to his speech. alison
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thewliss arrested for challenging the destruction of trees in sheffield and now nominated counselor of the year —— allison. consistent and powerful green voices speaking up when others are silent, speaking up when others are silent, speaking truth to power. our voices count and they counted injune's general election. today i want to thank you as well, every single one of you who worked so hard on our campaign, you were brave and uncompromising. you said that the environment must be front and centre. you said no means no to nuclear weapons. you said an emphatic yes to shaking up the archaic straitjacket of first past the fulls post, and you —— first past the post, and you championed our manifesto, truthful about the economy and about how to transform our country. thank you applause
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today, conference, it is a time for honesty. it isa honesty. it is a time for straight talking, for talking the truth. as you did at the general election, i am speaking from my heart right now. and i want to talk to you about electoral alliances. maybe, if the other parties had been willing to work with us, theresa may would not be sitting in number ten today. 22 local green party is bravely stood aside to change british politics. many more bravely stood as candidates to give our green vision of voice. this was never going to be an easy election. it was always going to be about the two biggest parties, and we suffered. we suffered at the hands of the 2—party system. it hurt, and i know many of us still feel that hurt. i do. but,
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conference, let's not forget what we have achieved together. our ideas and policies are now common currency, part of the mainstream. we achieved the party's second—best general election result, and we helped deny theresa may her majority and her mandate. the dementia tax, dead, the ban on fox hunting, safe, the extreme brexiteers in retreat and the tories in disarray. applause conference, i know that sometimes it may not feel like we're winning, but we're may not feel like we're winning, but we' re really may not feel like we're winning, but we're really —— where we lead others follow. our london assembly members forced a living wage, our mps stood up for refugees, in parliament we have consistently kept climate change on
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the agenda, and you know what? i believe we will be the most influential party in 21st—century politics. applause and i tell you why. we warned the system was unsustainable and then there was the financial crisis. in 2010 we were told by the tories, by labour, and the lib dems, that austerity was the only answer. we said no and we kept saying no. wejoined uk uncut on the streets, marched on downing street, we bravely beard to be different and seven we bravely beard to be different and seve n yea rs we bravely beard to be different and seven years later that agenda has changed. —— we bravely dared to be different. applause what we were saying then, that neoliberalism is dying and must be replaced, has become the mainstream. we have changed the minds of other parties and fracking, and we are changing the debate about the universal basic income. winning is
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about elections, and it is about the way we bravely and steadily speak truth all the time. other parties may flirt with changing the economy, or the welfare system. but we are the only party thatis system. but we are the only party that is honest about how much things need to change. we are the only party who will collectively design a future where we can all thrive and have a larger life. the only party prepared to stand up and tell it how it is. the only party consistently asking those big questions that matter, the only party of real change. conference, the tories are led by a zombie prime minister. but it isn't just zombie prime minister. but it isn'tjust theresa may. the conservative party has rot at its
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core, party desperately grasping for the hands of deniers, despots and dictators, that sells weapons to human rights abusers, that puts go home vans and seats, that has turned teachers into border guards, rotten to the core. —— go home vans on our streets. and that that courts a particular type of poison. it is called borisjohnson. ok, look, in many ways he is a joke. but when you listen to what actually saying, let's not pretend that boris johnson's comment about dead bodies in libya was an aberration. it wasn't. this is the man who calls ba rt wasn't. this is the man who calls bart obama "park kenyon with an ancestral dislike of the uk", who describes congolese people as having
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watermelon smiles, called commonwealth citizens flag—waving picking uses his telegraph wagon to cast doubt on climate change, suggests people are cannibals, run a magazine that accused liverpool fans of wallowing in it after hillsborough. this is not new bigotry. it is old, it is unacceptable and it is time the conservative party took collective responsibility for the human wrecking ball and kicked him out of the cabinet. applause speaking truth to power. i have something else i want to say to the tories. we are the only country in europe locking up refugees in detention centres with no time limit. it beggars belief that in 21st—century britain thousands fleeing war and
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persecution are shut away indefinitely, in conditions worse than prison. right here, right now. a few weeks ago i visited one of those detention centres. i heard first—hand the stories of those from eritrea, iraq, turkey, afghanistan, china, there are suffering at the hands of despotic regimes, and now how they suffer at the hands of our government. in britain. three crammed to sell. deprived of medical treatment, abused, beating, dropped, solitary confinement used as punishment. in our prisons there is a suicide attempt every three days, and enter detention centres despite the population 30 times smaller, it happens every day —— drugged, solitary confinement used as punishment. our detention system is a hallmark of this government's
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cruelty and it must end now. applause and hear this too. if you want to stop the refugee crisis then stop creating refugees. applause conference, it is time someone stood up conference, it is time someone stood upfor conference, it is time someone stood up for the uk's aid budget and made a case for trade rules that are genuinely fear. conference, we can use our wealth for good, it can transform lives, it is quite simply a matter of life and death. we can give communities around the world a chance to develop the resilience of need, the independence they deserve, the freedom and opportunity that is their right. let me be clear. i want
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to see ouraid their right. let me be clear. i want to see our aid budget expand, not strength. applause we believe that speech. if you want to watch it infill you can come on bbc parliament act 11:30pm tonight -- if bbc parliament act 11:30pm tonight —— if you want to watch it in full. the oscar—winning hollywood film producer, harvey weinstein, who's behind a string of hits including shakespeare in love, the king's speech and pulp fiction, has been sacked from the company he co—founded. he's been accused of sexually harassing women for nearly three decades. more now from david sillito. pulp fiction, shakespeare in love, the king's speech. harvey weinstein is a true hollywood bigshot. the boss of the weinstein company, the business he set up with his brother. and now, in the wake of multiple allegations of sexual harassment, his brother has, with the support of the board, sacked him. a statement was released saying: that is a very significant move they have taken, and certainly
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a damage control situation as well, to try to limit what could potentially happen with the company in the future. he has also lost his lawyer, lisa bloom, seen here on the left. she is best known for her work representing women, making claims of sexual harassment against powerful men such as bill cosby and donald trump. and talking of donald trump, he had this to say on the matter. i've known harvey weinstein for a long time. i'm not at all surprised to see it. the actress ashleyjudd was one of the first to speak out publicly against harvey weinstein. she has now beenjoined by many others but although harvey weinstein had admitted he has caused a lot of pain, many allegations are, according to the lawyer now representing him, false and defamatory. but, for the people who were closest to him in hollywood — his own company — they have heard
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enough to make their minds up. david sillito, bbc news. rachel's here — in a moment she will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. she will be telling us about airbnb. you're watching afternoon live. the headlines... theresa may tells eu brexit negotiators the ball is now in their court, but brussels says it's up to the uk to come forward with proposals. will they or won't they? a tense 2a hours as catolonia's leaders decide whether or not to declare independence. and the army instructor accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute — we'll have the latest from winchester crown court. we hear he was an emotional and bewildered when he visited the airfield the next day. —— and emotional. we are talking about making mistakes at work. the office for national statistics
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has had to correct a error on unit labour costs — that's a vital piece of data which tells the bank of england how much it costs employers in the uk to produce a certain amount of output. on friday they said annual labour costs were up 1.6% — today they're saying it's actually up 2.4% — analysts say that could push up inflation figures and strengthen the argument for an interest rate rise. royal mail says it will formally lodge a court application today to try and stop strike action. communication workers union members are set to strike for 48 hours from 19th october in a dispute over pensions, pay and jobs. prices could rise and home deliveries be slower because of brexit — according to the british retail consortium. it says the retail sector must retain access to all eu workers after the uk leaves the eu. eu citizens account forjust 6% of the industry's 170,000 workforce — but they work primarily in warehouse and distributionjobs. you're lucky you don't make mistakes
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at work! i make plenty. i was a of it. laughter so, airbnb, the latest multinational to be criticised for not paying enough tax? yes, the accommodation website. the company, founded in san francisco in 2008, has disrupted the hotel industry by linking travellers with landlords who generally want to rent out a spare room or an entire property for short—term stays.in the uk last year airbnb catered for 5.9m travellers and had 168,000 listings. for short—term stays.in the uk last year airbnb catered for 5.9 million travellers and had 168,000 listings. you would think that would generate quite a bit of money, but it generated £657 million in rental payments, but corporation tax last year, airbnb paid £180,000 in the uk. but rental payments are not the same as profits? that is exactly right and that is the distinction, simon, well done. obviously a lot of that was what they were paying to landlords, but people say, the size of the company, they should be paying a lot more attacks, and that is what we will talk to samira
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hussain about, about all those multinationals, many of whom people feel should be paying more tax and a lot of those companies are listed in new york where samira is. welcome to the programme. can you just remain us that of other big multinational companies criticised for their tax payments. if you look recently at what the eu commission has done, she has really gone after companies, the likes of apple and amazon, saying they are not paying the right and amazon, saying they are not paying the right out of taxes given how much money they actually make, so you are seeing a similar situation happening with airbnb, that they are really being criticised for making so really being criticised for making so much money but paying just although airbnb is not being traded publicly at the moment, it is certainly really being spoken about. it isa certainly really being spoken about. it is a massive company and has really been a big disrupter, but there are lots of cities that have been really frustrated with airbnb and the way it has been behaving in particular cities, like barcelona,
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paris, and even here in new york. airbnb have said they have paid all the amount of tax they believe is necessary , the amount of tax they believe is necessary, but does it feel there is starting to be more of a consumer backlash against these large multinationals who will say, we are sticking to the rules, doing what is required of us? is there are feeling more should be done by governments or perhaps companies to pay more towards consumers? so i think we are seeing less of a backlash happening at the consumer level, because consumers of at the consumer level, because consumers of course at the consumer level, because consumers of course really relish having all these choices, saw now a consumer can pick airbnb if they wa nt consumer can pick airbnb if they want a homey experience in a city, or they can choose a hotel, so it is really more of a fight between governments who want to see these big multinationals paying their fair share of taxes, and companies like airbnb, who believe that they are playing to exactly the letter of the law. and so this is really where we will be seeing a lot of these fights. we're already seeing it with the big american multinationals,
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internationally, and france isjust the latest tojoin internationally, and france isjust the latest to join that fight. samira hussain in new york, thank you. a story we will be talking about injust you. a story we will be talking about in just a moment. you. a story we will be talking about injust a moment. i have two pound coins here. how will i get rid of them for the weekend? well, if you get them, some people are saying you get them, some people are saying you probably shouldn't accept them, in shops, because you have to get rid of them again. yes, and the pound have a really tricky week last week. a lot to do political reasons, theresa may struggling at the conservative party conference, a lot of potential bids to get rid of her which really hit the pound last week which really hit the pound last week which is on a recovery now. i have put up bae systems because we have heard they could be getting the rate of about 1000 jobs, expecting that to be announced later, their share price up ever so slightly, and aviva, interesting, britain's biggest property company, warning about the death of the high street.
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they believe the main high street retail shops will die out because of the ongoing rise of online shopping, so they are down a fifth of a percent. more from you later. rachel, thank you very much. thank you. let's return to our pound, the new and old. from monday the old one will belong to be legal tender, although a lot of businesses and shops are expected to ignore that deadline to give people more time to spend the coins. over to our financial correspondent, simon gompertz. the days of the old round pound are numbered. from next monday shops will not have to accept them and they will not be allowed to give them in change, but some shops like poundland are unhappy about the customers being encouraged to think they can't come and spend their old pound if they still have them. and here is the cause — the new 12—sided pound coins
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being struck in their hundreds of thousands at the royal mint. the royal mint and the treasury wanted a clean switchover between the two. poundland is rejecting the idea of a sharp cut—off, saying it will accept the old pound until the end of the month, something businesses can do if they want to. the shop is well within its rights to say, it is no longer legal tender and they will not accept the coins, but they do have this question for a brief period where, if they want to, the owner can accept them and give them to their bank instead. the treasury said... another problem is that in some places and with some parking machines, for instance, if you try to use the new pound coin, itjust gets rejected because they haven't adjusted the machinery yet. hammersmith and fulham council in london said it will have the job done later in the year. meanwhile, tesco still
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have some coin—operated trolleys which have to be modified with just days to go before the deadline. however, if you have old pounds left over afterwards, banks are saying they will accept them indefinitely from their own customers and when that stops, the bank of england will take them forever. the best thing to realise is that there is no need to panic. so some shops will still take them — and if not, take them into your own bank and pay them in and you will be able to get credit for those coins. one niggle for businesses is that hsbc, lloyds and some other banks want customers to sort the old and new coins into different bags, before paying them in, so it is bye bye to the round pound. but not without some nuisance and destruction. simon gompertz, bbc news. television's favourite weather
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forecaster tomasz schafernaker has a hidden talent. the bbc weatherman is a talented portrait artist and has just secured a deal for a children's picture book. tomaszjoins me now. let's have a chat, not in the usual way. these are stunning, and you have just finished the one about will smith. literally just a have just finished the one about will smith. literallyjust a few days ago. this talent, tomasz, when did you realise you could do this?” a lwa ys did you realise you could do this?” always could draw, ever since i was always could draw, ever since i was a little boy. when i was about three are used to draw sharks and my mother's wallpaper. laughter and over the years ijust carried on drawing, and! and over the years ijust carried on drawing, and i remember looking at the clouds and drawing clouds keeps, andi the clouds and drawing clouds keeps, and i think that is what led me into meteorology, the drama in the sky, the colours —— are used to draw cloudscapes. let's show this. this shows you in action, doing the portraits. just explain this process. every artist has a
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different way of drawing, and i have to say that i recently discovered that i enjoy drawing portraits, so i wouldn't necessarily call myself a portrait artist by any means, and use the word artist very loosely, because an artist isn't somebody... it is not going to how many pixels you can put on a square inch, it is about constantly producing volumes of beautiful art, which i haven't got, but my process is using various techniques, certainly fine detail, things like scalpels, there is some white ink they are, graphite, colouring pencils, and also trying to texture the paper to get the desired effect, as many porous, for example, and as possible. almost inevitably, the weather? there it is. look at that. that was about 20 yea rs is. look at that. that was about 20 years ago. it's not bad, tomasz. i'm not sure i could do it. i think it is just the drama of working with
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colours, and you don't really know what is going to happen, a bit like the weather, to be honest. so you have a full—timejob the weather, to be honest. so you have a full—time job doing the weather and this is part—time, but i know it is something you want to ta ke know it is something you want to take a lot further, isn't it? and you're looking at children's books? yes, this is a passion. i am just as passionate about art as i am about meteorology, and anyone who knows me knows that i am obsessed with the weather and i absolutely love it, and that is why do the job. there you are onset. that is a little snippet of the cape's book that is coming, a project still in progress. still a little way to go, but i will keep you posted on that one —— the kids' book that is coming. everybody in this building thought, who knew? you have kept this... everyone has a little hidden talent, and i'm sure you have. laughter look, we wish you well. i know you are on later. can i do something really cheeky? can you throw to the
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weather? can you say, here is the weather? can you say, here is the weather with louise lear? 0k. and now it is over, for the weather, to louise lear. laughter thank you! you did a much betterjob than simon. this is my own tribute to simon. scrappy, as much as i can do in terms of trying to illustrate for you the story. in terms of weather today, quite a cloudy scenario, the best of the breaks and brightness in the east of scotland and one or two coming through. we have seen highs of 70 degrees in the london area, to the west of london and heathrow, but generally speaking —— rise of 17 degrees. but generally speaking a dry break affairfor some, and these fronts will tend to intensify through this evening, heavy bursts moving to scotland, northern ireland and eventually into northern england, but is that front sink so that it will be quite a week
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there, so no significant rain to come tomorrow across england and wales. >> anchor—2—mac: of cloud and the odd spot of rain, maybe a few sharp showers. more sunshine for all of us, i expect, the —— a few bits and pieces of cloud and odd spot of rain. we are likely to see deals into wednesday morning. we are likely to see gales into wednesday morning. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3. your serve: theresa may tells eu negotiators the ball is now in their court. brussels quickly volleys back: if you want to break the deadlock — it's up to you to come forward with proposals. will they or won't they? a tense 2a hours as catolonia's leaders decide whether or not to declare independence.
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and the army instructor accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute — we'll have the latest from winchester crown court. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. all eyes on wales. they take on the republic of ireland in cardiff and both teams know a win would go a long way to giving them a play—off place ahead of the world cup and both managers said they will be going for it. louise has all the weather. it is dreary? pretty dismal start, rain and gales through the middle of the week, but we could have highs of 22 at the weekend. also coming up. a blast from the past. more than 30 years after it dominated the bbc one evening schedules we're going to be returning nationwide. hello, everyone.
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this is afternoon live. theresa may is to tell mps it's time for the european union to show some flexibility, when she gives parliament an update on the brexit negotiations this afternoon. the prime minister will say that the ball is in the eu's court — though a few hours ago, a spokesman for the european commission hit back — saying the ‘ball is entirely in the uk's court'. our political correspondent ben wright reports. staying put and ploughing on — theresa may arrived back in number ten this morning after a difficult few days, but ahead of her statement in the commons on brexit later, cabinet ministers have denied rumours they are divided. i'm looking forward to the prime minister's statement, thank you. how long do you think she will last as prime minister? rumours are always destabilising, but the cabinet is not divided. we are behind the prime minister, you will hear a report in parliament today.
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the prime minister is expected to say, "we can prove the doomsayers wrong when it comes to brexit". she will say moving the talks on will require leadership and flexibility by both sides but the ball is now in the eu's court. it is bullish talk and the uk is currently frustrated about the eu's refusal to start negotiating until the basic terms of divorce — including the financial settlement — have been sorted out. in a speech in florence last month theresa may said eu countries would not lose money because of britain's exit in 2019. the uk will honour the commitments we have made... but the eu wants more details on this and other issues such as the rights of eu citizens in the uk before talks can move on. theresa may should take a more mature approach and realise that from the point of view of the remaining 27 members of the european union, the uk created this problem
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and we should bear the heaviest responsibility to come up with solutions to it. at a time when the cabinet is in such chaos, the brexit negotiations are too important to end up being drowned by the chaos we are seeing. the eu's chief negotiator has said it could be weeks or months until negotiations turn to trade. eu leaders will meet in a fortnight to decide whether enough progress has been made. so could the uk walk away without a deal? some of the most enthusiastic brexit supporters in the conservative party are urging her to keep it on the table and refuse to make any more concessions until the eu moves. either they come to the table and start to talk about long—term arrangements they want to have with the uk after we leave, or really there is no point in continuing discussions at all. but as ever the tory party is split on whether walking away without a deal is a viable route to take.
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no tory mp would want no deal. i haven't met a single colleague who would say that is a good thing to do, it isn't. but you cannot enter any negotiation not having at least the option to walk away. however painful that may be. from her position in the commons later theresa may will try to show mps she has a grip on the government and the plan for brexit whilst sending a blunt message to other eu leaders. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster for us. whatever theresa may says, the a nswer whatever theresa may says, the answer seems to be back at you. that's right, the tone will be interesting after the speech in florence, where she was seen to be more emollient and the government said they were making concessions, but no one thinks that has worked as we go into the fifth round of negotiations, so she will speak to mps, and it will be interesting to see what her backbenchers have got to say. we are joined by tom brake
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of the lib dems, what would you like her desire? to announce that she will ring—fence the issue of eu citizens in the uk and vice versa -- what would you like to hear her say? i would like to hear something about the irish border, which is the most intractable problem the government are facing and there has been no solution. the third think i would like her to hear that she is going to sack borisjohnson, she can't have him sniping against the government when they in the middle of the most complex negotiations they have faced in 50 years. the government is right to say they are going to prepare for a no deal, because unless you show you are prepared to walk away, you will not get a good deal. i wonder whether those who are advocating a no deal have spoken to business and the port of dover and two bmw and any company that imports and exports to the uk
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because if they were to do so, they would be told that crashing out of the european union is going to be catastrophic for british jobs, and the european union is going to be catastrophic for britishjobs, and i hope that is not something the government are seriously pursuing. many mps would say no deal is bad for eu countries, as well, so they should be working as hard to find a deal, but they don't seemed become demise in, they would say. it is very much eu with the greater power here, the uk has chosen to leave, we are the smaller partner, 65 million versus are the smaller partner, 65 million versus 430 million in the eu, and the eu in terms of the percentage of their market that we represent, we're rosol percentage of their market than we are of their stash we are a smaller percentage of the market than we are of theirs. it is incumbent of the uk to come up with answers to difficult questions like the question of northern ireland because the eu will want to maintain
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its border, understandably, they won't want to allow something that puts at risk the border controls they have within the eu to facilitate what the uk government have triggered in relation to northern ireland. you say the eu has the upper hand but we also contribute billions of pounds and we have done for many years, and they will miss that money. surely there is some incentive for them to do a deal. clearly there is an incentive for them to do a deal, and we have seen, if there is something that i welcome in terms of the government, the prime minister's willingness in terms of the need to settle, but when >> studio: -- there was a need for the government concede on that, and sol for the government concede on that, and so i think that's a positive point, the most positive thing that came out her florence speech will stop tom brake thanks forjoining
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us. theresa may is trying to reconcile some very different views within her own party, of course. she will be speaking at 430 and we think it might go on for some time, because there's a lot of interest in this subject so she could go longer than one hour and a half, maybe two hours. live coverage on what programme? bbc news? no, afternoon live. you failed at the last. our brussels correspondent said the early phase could be problematic when it comes to the negotiations. the problem in this is the early phase of this negotiation really gives the european commission control of the process. what we're talking about in the phase, don't forget, a move towards a decision where there has been
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sufficient progress on issues like the financial settlement and the irish border to allow the talks to move on to trade, but the problem from theresa may's perspective is that that decision is entirely in the hands of europe and they have never defined what sufficient progress would be. so britain is moving towards a pass mark in these early phases of the negotiations without being sure what the pass mark is. the difficulty is, we have this going on in public, is there an assumption that behind—the—scenes negotiations are actually underway? in a way that people might be surprised at. there are certainly intensive talks and they started again here a short time ago, but without david davis present this time, we expect him here later in the week. progress in some areas is being made, for example the issues of citizens rights,
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but the problem is, the target is sufficient progress, but there is no definition on that level of sufficient progress. so you are in a situation where the british side will emphasise there is progress, and the europeans can sit back and know that they only have to sit back and say there isn't sufficient progress, and the point is this is a phase of the negotiation where the europeans have a great deal of control because they know britain wants to move the talks on to trade and they know that is a point where they can continue to extract concessions from the british negotiators. so it is in the european commission's interest and the interests of the member states to see what concessions the uk is prepared to offer in return for the critical move on to trade, and it does not seem that when there is a european summit at the end of october, that it will be judged that britain has passed the sufficient progress test and then the focus will move to the next summit in december.
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that was kevin connelly talking to us from brussels. there are signs that the catalan government will refrain from immediately declaring independence from spain, eight days after it held a controversial referendum. officials in barcelona say the catalan president will make a "symbolic statement" tomorrow, recognising that a majority of voters want to secede, but stopping short of declaring independence. hundreds of thousands of people were on the streets of barcelona yesterday in a huge show of support for the unity of spain. catalonia's high court has asked for spanish national police to provide extra security at the court building in case the catalan parliament goes ahead with a unilateral declaration of independence. let's cross over to barcelona where we can join the bbc‘s tim wilcox. what you were saying, you should watch this space, because the question is, how madrid and the spanish by minister mariano rajoy
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response to what the catalan president carles puigdemont says tomorrow —— spanish prime minister. we can speak to a mother of three children, you have lived here on and off for 30 years in catalonia, do you think carles puigdemont will refine from declaring independence? —— refrain. surely that is what he has to do question up he will follow the catalan law which was passed in december, which says if there is a yes result, we will declare independence. what happens next? mariano rajoy says he will then use direct rule. i hope that spain will reflect the voice of the 215t—century, the people demanded a referendum, the referendum is held, and they braved the violence of
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spanish police in order to be able to vote and they vote in favour of independence. it was a turnout of 43%, and many said they did not vote because they did not want to take pa rt because they did not want to take part in this anyway, and they feel ca rles part in this anyway, and they feel carles puigdemont got this through bya carles puigdemont got this through by a wafer thin majority, not according to the roles as laid down by him originally. if you bring out the spanish police and beat the people who are trying to vote, you can't complain that there weren't enough people, that seems unfair. they also arrested catalan officials and the compass gated campaign posters and ballots and they tried to find the ballot boxes but were not able to. the question is, if mariano rajoy has been saying there was no mariano rajoy has been saying there was no referendum and there will be no ballot boxes and no ballots, but now he is saying the referendum will not have any effect and there will be no independence, it seems to me he has very little credibility. he could not even keep us from ballot boxes for the wouldn't this be
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economically ruinous for catalonia? big businesses have said they will leave. i think it will be economically advantageous and that is what the leading economists have said, it will be one of the wealthiest countries in europe, the fa ct wealthiest countries in europe, the fact some spanish owned businesses are using this and moving their headquarters which is not a big deal out of catalonia as a threat, another example of spain responding with threats, instead of answering the call the mediation which is what needs to happen. many would say you have a language and the history and your culture and ministers for education. so what more do you make? is this down to money? you want to be rich? —— what more do you need. it is about self—determination, about spain not overturning laws in
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catalonia that it thinks are perfectly fine elsewhere, in 2010, the catalan government voted against bull—fighting, but spain change the law and they made bull—fighting part of the national heritage, to impose it on catalans, but catalans are like, excuse me, we voted to not have bull—fighting, and that is the problem. catalans want to choose the way they are governed and chrissy is based on the consent of the government and spain does not have catalonia's consent —— and democracy is based. we will hear tomorrow five o'clock uk time what carles puigdemont has to say, and then the crucial thing is to see how madrid mariano rajoy, the prime minister, reacts. fax. -- thanks forjoining us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. theresa may tells eu brexit negotiators the ball is now in their court, but brussels says it's up to the uk to come forward with proposals.
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will they or won't they? a tense 24 hours as catolonia's leaders decide whether or not to declare independence. and a court hears an army sergeant accused of attempting to murder his wife by tampering with her parachute, was "unemotional and bewildered" when he visited the airfield the following day. nothing to fear, the wales manager chris coleman rallies his side ahead of their crucial world cup qualifying match with the republic of ireland in cardiff tonight. the castleford tigers play at zak hardaker has been left out of the england rugby league world cup squad after testing positive for cocaine and he could face a two—year ban. kyle edmund is into the second round of the shanghai masters after a straight sets victory. i will be back with more on those stories after 330. nationwide became a staple of the
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bbc 50 years ago. we are going to be doing something very similar today. roger will bejoining us in salford very shortly. the trial of an army sergeant accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute has heard more evidence about victoria cilliers jump over salisbury plain. mrs cilliers suffered multiple injuries when both her main and reserve parachutes failed to open. emile cilliers denies the charges. from winchester crown court, duncan kennedy reports. emile cilliers in the blue suit is accused of two counts of attempting to murder his wife, one, by sabotaging her parachute and the other by tampering with a gas fixture at their home. victoria and emile cilliers were both keen parachutists but the prosecution claimed he wanted her to die
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so he could claim insurance money and because he was having an affair with another woman. it was at this airbase in wiltshire that the alleged parachute incident took place. the base sees around 25,000 jumps a year and victoria and emile cilliers were regular visitors. it was here she fell 4,000 feet when both her main and reserve parachutes did not open properly and she suffered multiple injuries. the gentleman on the right here is the chief instructor at the base and today he gave more evidence about the accident. emile cilliers' defence barrister asked the instructor if he actually saw the accident himself and whether victoria cilliers main chute had opened and he said he had not. he was also asked if he saw mrs cilliers cut away the main chute when it failed to open and again he said it was others who had seen herfall. the court has already been shown these pictures, from the kitchen at their home.
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the prosecution said mr cilliers tampered with this gas fixture a few days before the parachute accident in a separate attempt to kill his wife. emile cilliers denies all the charges against him in a trial that is expected to last up to six weeks. and now i'm afternoon live we can see what is going on in the newsrooms around the uk. roger johnson is not in salford, but we can go to stuart first. going well so far! let's talk about what happens when you are looking at building a wind farm and it doesn't go according to plan, but you find something very special in the process. this is to do with an kaka logical dig, 400 archaeologists poring over 20 miles of pipe ——
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archaeological dig. 50 different locations for these trenches and the archaeologists digging up all sorts of things at the moment, taking the opportunity while the ground is being turned over and so far they have found bits of pottery, and they say they will discover a great deal about the history of this region and the whole country from what they find in the ground. stuart, thanks. and now we can go to salford, roger is therefore us, but that is stuart ain! is therefore us, but that is stuart again! laughter there he is. you can't have too many helpings of stuart. you are right. roger is the just is. your programme is dominated by bad news on the jobs front? yes, potentially, although no confirmation yet from bae systems
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who have a big factory here in lancashire near preston, and they employ several thousand people here. and there has been a slowdown in orders for their typhoon fighter and there was a memorandum for 24 of them from qatar, but the deal has not been done and we understand up toa not been done and we understand up to a thousand jobs might be at risk. we are expecting an announcement from the company tomorrow, and that would be a big blow. notjust to bae systems across the country but all people involved in the supply chain is and people in the local area who are affected when localjobs go. pa rt are affected when localjobs go. part of the problem with the eurofighter, there are four countries involved, the uk, germany, france and italy, the country that gets the sales order gets the job of putting the planes together, and there are planes being put together for kuwait in italy at the moment, for kuwait in italy at the moment,
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for example, but they are coming to the end of most of the orders at whalton and potentially these qatar orders might come in for 24 planes, but they are not a done deal. they are hoping to bring it through, but there is a lot of uncertainty for people, 4000 people across the country involved directly in the eurofighter project, so a lot of uncertainty. roger, thanks. you would have been the first person we would have been the first person we would have been the first person we would have come to on this new slot, but stuart beat you to it. always the way. it is. if you have a feeling of deja vu over that name, nationwide, there is a good reason for that. michael barrett, former presenter of
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the bbc programme nationwide from 1969 until 1977, proving there is no new idea in television. that is true, but congratulations on your. when you were doing it, live tv was far harder than it is now. it was quite difficult, we were pushing technology all the time which did not always help us. we started in black and white, of course, and then went into colour, but all the things went into colour, but all the things we tried to do, talking with all the regions at the same time, where really beyond what the bbc was capable of at the time, but we did this nevertheless. we got into trouble as a result at times. what springs to mind? the very second programme we did, we had a story
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about a man who drank 24 pints of beer every day of his life.” sympathise. i introduced this programme and said now we go to meet britain's biggest loser and turned to the big screen and their in regalia was the chief constable of essex who sued us afterwards. —— biggest boozer. laughter that has completely thrown me. what is it about the concept question not it isa is it about the concept question not it is a uniquely bbc thing —— concept? people are interested in what is going on elsewhere. what has never been understood before or since, the loyalties of people to their own region are so strong and a
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lot of them live outside their own regions, and so it's no use to say, we are giving you the opt out programme, that is what it is called at the bbc. but those are always opt out, and nothing is opting in, and thatis out, and nothing is opting in, and that is the one thing we did and has never been done again since which in my view is very sad. is it a secret that you are nearly 90? it isn't now. it didn't have to be a secret. well, it isn't. what have you been doing since? lots of things, i started my own company, started reducing videos and god knows what, all sorts of programmes. —— producing. now, of course, i'm nearly 90, and maybe it's a bit late for being too picky, but i've got
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quite a lot on. after—dinner speeches, i do a theatrical round with my friend laurie holloway, the musician. to be honest, at the moment, my wife and myself are trying to work out what to do for the 90th part of the —— 90th party. maybe you could direct ridge our producer has gone for a lie down —— maybe you could direct? the thing about nationwide, viewers regarded you as part of the family. maybe you have heard that story. there was a reporter down in bristol called amanda tennyson and she had a baby. that was very nice. she was down the street with a pram and a lady sidled up street with a pram and a lady sidled up to herand street with a pram and a lady sidled up to her and said, what a lovely
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baby. mr barrett must be so proud. amanda said, but it's not his. the lady said, i know you television people, you're all the same. michael, it's a pleasure. it's a great idea. probably yours question —— probably yours? great idea. probably yours question -- probably yours? no. iwill happily steal it anyway. don't forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet us on #afternoonlive — or email us. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. now, if you still have some old pound coins in your purse — a warning that in a week's time, businesses will be able to refuse to accept them. from next monday, the old pound will no longer be legal tender — although many shops and businesses are expected to ignore the royal mint‘s deadline, to give people more time to spend the coins. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz reports. the days of the old round
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pound are numbered. from next monday shops will not have to accept them and they will not be allowed to give them in change, but some shops, like poundland, are unhappy about their customers being encouraged to think they can't come and spend their old pound if they still have them. and here is the cause — the new 12—sided pound coins being struck in their hundreds of thousands at the royal mint. the mint and the treasury wanted a clean switchover between the two. poundland is rejecting the idea of a sharp cut—off, saying it will accept the old pound until the end of the month, something businesses can do if they want to. the shop is within its rights to say it's no longer legal tender and they will not accept the coins but they do have discretion for a brief period where, if they want to, the owner can
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accept them and give them to their bank instead. the treasury said... another problem is that in some places, and with some parking machines for instance, if you try to use the new pound coin, itjust gets rejected because they have not adjusted the machinery yet. hammersmith and fulham council in london said it will have the job done later in the year. meanwhile, tescos still has some coin—operated trolleys which have to be modified with just days to go before the deadline. however, if you have old pounds left over afterwards, banks are saying they will accept them indefinitely from their own customers and when that stops, the bank of england will take them for ever. the best thing to realise is that there is no need to panic. some shops will still take them. and if not, take them into your own bank and pay them in and you will be able to get credit for those coins. one niggle for businesses is that
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hsbc, lloyds and some other banks want customers to sort the old and new coins into different bags, before paying them in, so it is goodbye to the round pound. but not without some annoyance and disruption. simon gompertz, bbc news. i've got a pressie for you. i felt inadequate with tom coming in and showing off. are you ready? i thought anybody could do this. this is you, simon. i'llautograph thought anybody could do this. this is you, simon. i'll autograph it for you later! friday, 13th that reminds me of. he's not grumpy. he isjust a little bit stressed hence the reason why it isa bit stressed hence the reason why it is a sad face! stressed! i wonder why i'm stressed? anyway, what's the weather doing? the weather is cheering up. it was
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grey and miserable this morning. there isn't much of it around, but not too bad in north yorkshire. through the afternoon what's left of it, we will be lucky if we see too much in the way of sunshine. the favoured spots have been across wales and north—east england and a little bit into northern ireland, but the cloud and rain is coming. it is pushing into northern ireland and north—west scotland as we move in through the evening and overnight. it will start to weaken off. through the day tomorrow, it will be a band of cloud first thing in the morning, but it the slip south. maybe pepping up but it the slip south. maybe pepping up and bringing showers which are a nuisance down to the south—west. but for most of us, there will be more sunshine around tomorrow. i will be able to show you some great weather watchers pictures. some of the rain really heavy for scotla nd some of the rain really heavy for scotland and northern ireland.
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it weakens as it pushes south. highs 12 to 18 celsius, but once we see the rain clearing away, the skies will clear and the winds will fall lighter through wednesday night and into thursday morning. it could be a chilly start and we could see frost on thursday. things are set to warm up. if you have been hearing a rumour we could hit 22 celsius into saturday, it's all tied in to ex—hurricane nate that's driving in a lot of warm air out of the states and across the atlantic. and the energy is just reinvigorating the jet stream which is deflecting a large area of low pressure up around greenland. stays wet and windy to the north—west of the uk, but it is responsible for this warm air. temperatures in spain and portugal could be a good 7 to ten celsius what they should be for the time of
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year. so it's a grey start for our week. we will see wet and windy weather through the middle of the week, but the warmth arrives, not for all, but for some into the weekend. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the european commission rebuffs theresa may's claim that the ball is in the eu's court over progress in the brexit negotiations, saying it's up to the uk to provide solutions. to stay or to go — the two main spanish parties put pressure on catalan's separtist leader not to declare independence, saying leaving spells economic ruin. and the trial of an army sergeant accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute has heard more evidence about victoria cilliers jump over salisbury plain. and stay with us because this half hour, we'll cross live to westminster where the transport secretary chris grayling is due to give an emergency statement on the future for the passengers stranded by monarch airlines. sport now on afternoon
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live with hugh. a big game coming up for wales. the republic of ireland know they need all three points if they are to reach the play—offs. wales need to win, buta reach the play—offs. wales need to win, but a draw could mean they win the group. scotland felt the same this time yesterday, but they fell at the last, last night? wales, won't want to fall at the final hurdle wales at the final manager chris coleman said his side have "nothing to fear" ahead for their crucial qualifier with the republic of ireland tonight. injured striker gareth bale watched training yesterday and will be in the cardiff city stadium for the vital match. wales could even top their group with a win, but defeat could send the irish into the play—offs
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at their expense. . the fantastic atmosphere. so there is nothing to fear. nothing to worry about. the occasion is what it is and it's great for us to be involved in it, but we have got to go and, we have got a game plan. we always had a game plan and our players have proved that they're very good at executing whatever game plan we put in front of them. well, there are also injury concerns for ireland, who have lost their striker shane long to a hip injury. manager martin o'neill knows they'll have to go for it, so that injury will be a big blow. both sides have to win the game and at some stage or another, whether it be after 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 25 minutes whatever the case maybe, they'll have to go for it and the gamel they'll have to go for it and the game i assume and predict will be wide open in the second half. harry kane's year keeps on getting better.
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the tottenham striker has been named on short—list for the 2017 ballon d'or award which is given to the world's best player. he is one of five premier league players including philippe coutinho and kevin de bruyne named so far. the full list will be announced later on today. the castleford tigers and england full back zak hardaker will miss the rugby league world cup after testing positive for cocaine. he was left out of the tigers‘ squad for the grand final defeat to leeds rhinos on saturday. it comes as england announce their world cup squad. earlier i spoke to our rugby league correspondent dave woods who told me hardaker has proved a frustrating player to manage. he has had a career what's been defined by some off field indiscretions. this is a test he took in early december. we can't prejudge his mitigating circumstances that he may put forward , circumstances that he may put forward, but that normally would trigger a two year ban. he isn't in the world cup squad now for obvious
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reasons. but there is a surprise execution elsewhere as well? one or two might have been surprised that sam tomkins is not involved especially in the absence of zac ha rd especially in the absence of zac hard acre. there is a couple of debuts. alex walmsley. it is an interesting selection. british number three kyle edmund overcame a nervy start to ease past jiri vesely at the shanghai masters. the 22—year—old suffered an early break in the first set before composing himself and cruising to a 6—3, 6—2 win in china. the result sets up a second—round meeting with fourth seed and wimbledon runner—up, marin cilic, tomorrow. that's all the sport for now. you think it is,ment hang on a minute, have you seen the pictures of roger federer? he should stick to
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tennis! what on earth is he doing in the pictures? a little dance with mickey in china. they get the players to do some ridiculous things. anyone that's been to the bbc news christmas party... hey, stop there. that's like mccoy in his heyday. we haven't seen mccoy's heyday. we haven't seen mccoy's heyday yet. he is a father of four and nailed the dad's dancing...m that's nailing it, i will stay off the dance floor. you haven't seen my dad dancing. i haven't and that won't change! thank you very much, hugh. the oscar—winning hollywood film producer, harvey weinsteen, who's behind a string of hits including shakespeare in love, the king's speech and pulp fiction, has been sacked from the company he co—founded. he's been accused of sexually harassing women for nearly three decades. david sillito's report contains some flash photography. pulp fiction, shakespeare in love, the king's speech. harvey weinstein is a true hollywood bigshot.
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the boss of the weinstein company, the business he set up with his brother. and now, in the wake of multiple allegations of sexual harassment, his brother has, with the support of the board, sacked him. a statement was released saying: "in light of new information about misconduct by harvey weinstein that has emerged in the past few days, his employment with the weinstein company is terminated, effective immediately." that is a very significant move they have taken and certainly a damage control situation to try to limit what could potentially happen with the company in the future. he has also lost his lawyer, lisa bloom, seen here on the left. she is best known for her work representing women, making claims of sexual harassment against powerful men such as bill cosby and donald trump. and talking of donald trump, he had this to say on the matter. i've known harvey weinstein for a long time.
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i'm not at all surprised to see it. was this an open secret in hollywood? the actress ashleyjudd was one of the first to speak out publicly against harvey weinstein. ashleyjudd was one of the first to speak out. she has beenjoined by many others. and while weinstein's lawyer says many of the allegations are false and defamatory, the people who were closest to him in hollywood, his own company, have heard enough to make their minds up. people have been evacuated in california's wine region after a massive wildfire broke out. there were ten fires in total which sparked late sunday in the state's north—west. strong winds saw them quickly grow to more than 200 acres across the napa area.
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home and an historic barn were destroyed, as drivers were forced to abandon their cars in the streets. authorities have forced residents in several rural neighbourhoods to evacuate, and worked to clear out hospitals and senior centres. a foster carer is asking the employment tribunal to rule that she should be classed as a worker — giving entitlement to rights such as paid leave. sarah anderson is bringing the case against hampshire county council. it says that the law is clear — that foster carers aren't workers. but if she wins, it could have significant implications for tens of thousands of other carers. are we saying that promoting foster ca re are we saying that promoting foster care is a more professional, skilled specialist industry that's unionised and protected and that foster carers can come in feeling they have got a standing, they have got rights and they have got some protection. are you telling me that's going to get the wrong people in? it is a full—time occupation these days. does that mean that we don't love and adore and care for our children? of course, it doesn't, but we want to be recognised for what we do do and be protected. universities must take tougher
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action against students who cheat by buying essays online, according to the higher education watchdog, the quality assurance agency. the universities minister, jojohnson, says the trade in essays undermines academic standards. the national union of students says that overwhelming pressure to get good grades is driving the use of these websites. let's go live to westminster where the transport secretary chris grayling is about to make a statement about the collapse of monarch airlines. the response since last week has been swift and substantial. this is the largest operation of its kind ever under taken and it has meant the caa set—up one of the uk's largest airlines to conduct this operation. we have put arrangements in place to bring back 110,000 people to the uk. we have had a maximum of 35 aircraft in operation at any one time. the caa are working to secure planes from 27 different
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airlines, more than 200caa staff working on the project and there are thousands more in partner organisations taking part. 40 airports involved in the uk around the mediterranean and beyond. it has required 267 coaches carrying over 13,000 passengers, so far there have been over 39,000 calls to our customer service centres, all swiftly a nswered customer service centres, all swiftly answered by more than 250 call centre staff. there have been over one million visitors to a website and seven million paid views. more than one million people have been reached through our facebook page. i have seen at first hand the work being done across government and the caa to make this operation a success. i have seen some of the passengers and spoken to some of the passengers and spoken to some of the passengers and spoken to some of the passengers that returned to the uk on government flights and i have been impressed by what i have
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seen and we have had strong supportive response from the passengers affected. many praising the caa and all the government departments involved in such an enormous operation. normally the caa's responsibility of bringing passengers back would extend to customers whose trips are covered by atol, there wof been insufficient capacity in the commercial aviation market to enable passengers to get home on other airlines. so the danger, mr speaker, is we would have had tens of thousands of passengers abroad and no easy means of returning to the uk. that's why i instructed the caa to ensure those abroad were offered an alternative flight abroad were offered an alternative flight home. as of last night 80,000 passengers have returned to the uk. three—quarters of the total number abroad at the time of the collapse. we have had teams of government officials at overseas airports providing advice and assistance to passengers. mr speaker, despite the plans and robust plans and a smooth operation so far, this is a hugely
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distressing situation for all those concerned. obviously, it has been a priority to get people back to the uk, our hearts go out to the people who lost bookings as a result of the collapse, but in addition to supporting passengers, bef been focussed on working to ensure that the almost 2,000 monarch employees receive the support they need. i'm pleased to report that airlines have been appealing to those former employees, so for example, virgin atla ntic employees, so for example, virgin atlantic are offering a fast—track recruitment process, easyjet invited applications for 500 cabin crew and members of mine team spoke to the airlines once it was becoming clear what was happening to help secure their help in getting the opportunities for the staff and i'm pleased to see that coming to fruition now. and easyjet r calling for direct entry captains or fi rststers for direct entry captains or firststers who meet captain qualificationings. all former monarch employees will receive information from jobcentre plus.
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jobcentre plus pulled together a list of 6300 vacancies across the major uk based airlines, more than three times the number of people being made redundant. the aviation minister has been in contact with members whose constituencies are ha rd est members whose constituencies are hardest hit by the job losses. and they all have our assurance that we will work work with the industry and them to offer whatever support we can. iam them to offer whatever support we can. i am aware the duty this government has to the taxpayer. whilst affected passengers have been told they won't have to pay to be flown back to the uk, we have entered into discussions with several third parties with the aim of recovering costs of the operation. the atol provides cover for those with atol protection. we are having similar discussions with other travel providers through which passengers may have booked a monarch
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holiday and i would like to thank those that we have been holding the discussions with for a constructive and realistic approach. mr speaker, the initial response to this unprecedented situation would not have been as successful as it was if it was not for the support and co—operation of many players. the loss of a major british brand which was close to celebrating its half century is a really sad moment. however, this should not be seen as a reflection on the general health of the uk aviation sector which continues to thrive. we never had the collapse of an airline or holiday company on this scale before. we have responded swiftly and decisively and our efforts are focussed on getting employees into newjobs and passengers home. we need to look at the options notjust atol, but whether it is possible for airlines to wind down in an orderly manner and look after their customers without the need for the government to step in and we will be
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putting a lot of effort into this in the months ahead. our prime task has been to get those people home and i'm grateful to those who have taken pa rt i'm grateful to those who have taken part ina i'm grateful to those who have taken part in a smooth and successful operation. thank you, mr speaker. studio: you can continue watching that debate. it is on bbc parliament. parliament. we will be talking about that later. that's because rachel is here and will be talking about the issues surrounding monarch later. now on afternoon live, the headlines: theresa may tells eu brexit negotiators the ball is now in their court, but brussels says it's up to the uk to come forward with proposals.
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will they or won't they? a tense 24 hours as catolonia's leaders decide whether or not to declare independence. and a court hears an army sergeant accused of attempting to murder his wife by tampering with her parachute, was "unemotional and bewildered" when he visited the airfield the next day. making mistakes at work — the office for national statistics has had to correct a error on unit labour costs — that's a vital piece of data which tells the bank of england how much it costs employers in the uk to produce a certain amount of output. on friday they said annual labour costs were up 1.6%. today they're saying it's actually up 2.4%. analysts say that could push up inflation figures and strengthen the argument for an interest rate rise. royal mail says it will formally lodge a court application today to try and stop strike action. communication workers union members are set to strike for 48 hours from 19th october in a dispute over pensions, pay and jobs. the accommodation website aianb paid just £188,000 in corporation tax in the uk last year, despite taking in more than £600 million in rental payments. aianb says it follows the rules and pays all the tax it owes. the eu has been closely scrutinising the tax affairs of tech giants. prices could rise and home
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deliveries be slower because of brexit, according to the british retail consortium. it says the retail sector must retain access to all eu workers after the uk leaves the eu. eu citizens account forjust 6% of the industry's 170,000 workforce, but they work primarily in warehouse and distributionjobs. the story for the office of national statistics, that helps the bank of england. when mark carney said he was going to bring an interest rate rise. i'm going cynical, am i? the bank of england may have put themselves in a corner by saying... this helps get them out of it if the ons say they got it wrong. that could strengthen the argument for an interest rate rise. ok. right.
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nobody at home can see this. you can. this one is going to be worth a pound next week. this one isn't. this one is going to be worth a pound next week. this one isn'tm is if you bring it to a bank, but not a shop. the new one came out in march. by next monday we are not supposed to be allowed to spend it in shops. lots of confusion. lots of ticket machines at stations won accept the new one pound coins. lots of trolleys won't accept them. lots of trolleys won't accept them. lots of parking meters won't accept them and then you have got some retailers likelb land who said they will continue to accept the old ones all the way to the end of october. the director keeps saying, "show us on camera two." it is a ridiculous shot. he is trying to humiliate me so he has done it again! have you got rid of your old one pound coins? no. it's things like old money boxes that you keep for holiday. we have got the ten places you are most likely to find your old one pound
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coins. you have a think about what is in the top ten places and i'm going to have a chat with chris from the association of convenience stores, an organisation that represents lots of local shops. chris, thank you for i thinkjous on afternoon live. what have your local shopkeepers been saying to you? our members have been telling us that the transition has been smooth. we have had the last six months where retailers had the opportunity to make sure that they change their machines and train their staff to acce pt machines and train their staff to accept the new one pound coin, but there will be some retailers that feel it is necessary to still accept the older £1 coin after the deadline of the end of this week. land are saying lb they will accept it and maybe somebody goes into one of the shops that you represent, and they refuse, that creates confusion. the
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royal mint are trying to get everyone using the new £1. there are some consumers that are in rural or isolated areas and they will want to go to their local shop to spend their old pound coins. and those are areas that wouldn't necessarily have areas that wouldn't necessarily have a bank or post office. some retailers might take it upon themselves to take the old £1 coins and keep using them as currency. do you think there is enough publicity about the fact that the old coin is not legal tender from monday? have you gone through your pockets and through your car and got rid of all your old one pound coins?” through your car and got rid of all your old one pound coins? i have not seen an old pound coin for a few weeks. all of the change i have been getting has been in new pound coins andl getting has been in new pound coins and i suppose it is important to define the two deadlines. so thes ha rd define the two deadlines. so thes hard deadline of the end of this week is when coins will, old coins will be given out in change and in machines. from next week, you shouldn't receive old pound coins in
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change, but you still can take those to the bank and you can take those to the bank and you can take those to the bank and you can take those to the post office and some retailers will be able to accept them and really just retailers will be able to accept them and reallyjust to make the transition as smooth as possible. chris, thank you. simon, have you thought of where you can find your old pound coins? in my wallet which hasn't been open. piggies banks! there are old pound coins in those. then you have the ones that you have to break open to get into. get rid. spend it. and you, where did you find? i have been efficient. i have cleared all mine out. of course, you have. we just heard from chris grayling, theissue we just heard from chris grayling, the issue with monarch, haven't they sorted out people who were supposed to be stranded abroad, they are coming home, but there is a wider issue about the jobs and everything else? yes, so monarch went into administration a week ago at 4am
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because they had to go into administration at a time when there we re administration at a time when there were no planes in the air. so that's when the announcement came out and as you say most of the workforce, 90% of the staff were made redundant, 110,000 passengers had to be brought home and the civil aviation authority stepped in. 60% of the people on holiday are back. they reckon the repatriation would have cost £60 million, but what's really interesting, what chris grayling was saying a few minutes ago in the house of commons, he was talking about the loss of monarch as a sad moment, and not a reflection of uk's aviation industry, but he said they need to ensure that passengers don't find themselves in this position again and look at what happened, if you look at big airlines they managed to continue trading even when they had gone into administration and with monarch that wasn't possible. monarch‘s chief executive said they were sad they
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couldn't put together a deal. yes, it is interesting to see if we will see any change in how administration laws work in the uk in the future. 0k. laws work in the uk in the future. ok. shall we look at the markets? well, i think we should. the ftse is down because the pound is up. if the pound is stronger against the dollar, that brings down the value of what they are banking. bae systems we put in there because we have been hearing they are expected to announce 1,000 job cuts and the share price is up 0.5% and aviva are warning about the death of the high street because of online shopping. we talked about this in the previous hour and we talked about this in the previous hourandi we talked about this in the previous hour and i have had lots of people tweeting and saying the death of the high street... slow down. the have the is not ready! slow down. high street... slow down. the have the is not ready! slow downm high street... slow down. the have the is not ready! slow down. it is not due to an increase in online shopping, they are saying it is the cost of parking in town centres and rising rates. lots of factor at play
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there, simon. do you play conkers speak soak them in vinegar and put them in the oven! yesterday, conker enthusiasts descended on the the village of southwick in northamptonshire to take part in the annual world conker championships. there were 230 competitors from 14 countries taking part. two top prizes were up for grabs — the man crowned the "conker king" was 85—year—old chelsea pensioner john riley, who hadn't played the game for 70 years! and his "conker queen" wasjulie freeman, an animal charity owner from rutland. there they are. they couldn't be happier! let's have a look at the weather. on the other side of the newsroom is louise lear. i hope you're enjoying the show. the weather is dull out there. it has been a grey start so far this week. we're going to see rain and gales through the middle of the week from wednesday onwards, but warmer across
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england and wales by the weekend. 22 celsius is not out of the qet. there has been a little bit of brightness coming through, favoured spots northern ireland, north—east scotland, not bad across yorkshire and into wales, but there is a lot of cloud around and the cloud has been thick enough for the odd spot or two of light drizzly rain and that's set to continue into western scotla nd that's set to continue into western scotland and through this evening, we will see more significant rain arriving by the end. so for the end of our afternoon we are looking at mid to high teens, but through this evening, we will start to see the rain and the cloud and the wind starting to strengthen. we are not going to see much in the way of a cold start to our tuesday. a dry one with sunny spells coming through for many and highs again of 18 celsius. hello, you're watching afternoon live.
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i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm. your serve: theresa may tells eu negotiators the ball is now in their court. brussels quickly volleys back: if you want to break the deadlock — it's up to you to come forward with proposals. will they or won't they? a tense 24 hours as catolonia's leaders decide whether or not to declare independence. and the army instructor accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute — we'll have the latest from winchester crown court. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. all eyes on wales. yes, it is a big night to come. wales against the republic of ireland in the crucial world cup qualifier. victory for either would guarantee them a play—off spot and a route to russia next year. louise has all the weather. anything to look forward to? some
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sunshine in the north of yorkshire, we have seen some sunshine, but limited. all the details coming up. on afternoon live later. a face you will instantly recognise. is there a bright forecast for the artist behind it? what do you think? do get in touch. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. theresa may is to tell mps it's time for the european union to show some flexibility, when she gives parliament an update on the brexit negotiations this afternoon. the prime minister will say that the ball is in the eu's court — though a few hours ago, a spokesman for the european commission hit back — saying the ‘ball is entirely in the uk's court'. it's a bit like tennis. our political correspondent ben wright reports. staying put and ploughing on —
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theresa may arrived back in number ten this morning after a difficult few days, but ahead of her statement in the commons on brexit later, cabinet ministers have denied rumours they are divided. i'm looking forward to the prime minister's statement later, thank you. how long do you think she will last as prime minister? rumour is always destabilising, but the cabinet is not divided. we are behind the prime minister, you will hear her reporting in parliament today. the prime minister is expected to say, "we can prove the doomsayers wrong when it comes to brexit". she will say moving the talks on will require leadership and flexibility by both sides but the ball is now in the eu's court. it's bullish talk and the uk is clearly frustrated about the eu's refusal to start negotiating trade until the basic terms of divorce — including the financial settlement — have been sorted out. in a speech in florence last month theresa may said eu countries would not lose money
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because of britain's exit in 2019. the uk will honour commitments we have made... but the eu wants more details on this and other issues such as the rights of eu citizens in the uk before talks can move on. theresa may should take a more mature approach and realise that from the point of view of the remaining 27 members of the european union, the uk created this problem and we should bear the heaviest responsibility to come up with solutions to it. at a time when the cabinet is in such chaos, the brexit negotiations are too important to end up being drowned by the chaos we are seeing. the eu's chief negotiator has said it could be weeks or months until negotiations turn to trade. eu leaders will meet next week to decide whether enough progress has been made. so could the uk walk away without a deal? some of the most enthusiastic brexit supporters in the conservative party are urging her to keep the option
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on the table and refuse to make any more concessions until the eu moves. either they come to the table and start to talk about long—term arrangements they want to have with the uk after we leave, or really there is no point in continuing discussions at all. but as ever the tory party is split on whether walking away without a withdrawal deal is a viable route to take. no tory mp would want no deal. i haven't met a single colleague who would say that is a good thing to do, it isn't. but you cannot enter any negotiation not having at least the option to walk away. however painful that may be. from her position in the commons later theresa may will try to show mps she has a grip on the government and a plan for brexit whilst sending a blunt message to other eu leaders. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster for us. what do we reckon she will be saying
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and when? 430, and it will be going on for quite some time, she will be taking questions from many people, so she could be on her feet for 90 minutes or so. the toner she adopts will be as interesting as what she has to say —— the tone. after the florence speech, many people feel she made concessions, warm words, she made concessions, warm words, she made concessions, warm words, she made the tone more emollient, but the response from the eu has maybe not being what they would expect. what would be in trading will be what her backbenchers say —— what would be in trading. —— what would be intriguing. the prospect of ano would be intriguing. the prospect of a no deal scenario, even though she has said that is not what she wants mac, although it is better than a bad deal —— wants some mps are mindful of the david
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cameron approach, when he did not get much of a deal it from his talks, and many say that is because he was not prepared to walk away from them. ultimately, though, britain needs to be prepared for all eventually is the won —— eventualities. you hope that behind the frippery and fluff, that people are actually is till sitting down and talking. i think they are, but the problem is, you don't know what is going on behind the scenes because it is in both party's interests to put their case forward ina public interests to put their case forward in a public way. we are into the fifth round of these negotiations and there seems to be movement on the rights of eu citizens and the rights of british people living abroad but there is no final deal on that. we know that on the very thorny issue of the money, that seems to be an ongoing issue, the
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border between northern ireland and ireland we have not heard many concrete solutions to that pretty intractable problem, and those things are preventing the eu from saying we are able to go on and talk about the future arrangement. many conservative mps are saying there is nowhere they are going to talk about handing over any more money if they are not willing to talk about the future trade relationship, and at the mammoth we are still stuck there. —— but at the moment we are still stuck there. the prime minister is speaking at? 430? on? afternoon live with simon mccoy. she got it wrong the first time! our brussels correspondent kevin connolly explained how the early phase of the negotiations could be problematic for the british government. the problem in this from the british
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point of view is the early phase of this negotiation really gives the european commission control of the process. what we're talking about in the phase, don't forget, is a move towards a decision when there has been sufficient progress on issues like the financial settlement and the irish border, to allow the talks to move on to trade. but the problem from theresa may's perspective is that that decision is entirely in the hands of europe and they have never defined what sufficient progress would be. so britain is moving towards a pass mark in these early phases of the negotiations without being sure what the pass mark is. the difficulty is, we have all this going on in public, is there an assumption that behind—the—scenes negotiations are actually underway? in a way that people might be surprised at?
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well, there are certainly intensive talks and they started again here a short time ago, but without david davis present this time, we expect him here later in the week. progress in some areas is being made, for example the issues of citizens rights. but the problem is, the target is sufficient progress, but there is no definition on that level of sufficient progress. so you are in a situation where the british side will emphasise there is progress, and the europeans can sit back and know that they only have to say there isn't sufficient progress, and the point is this is a phase of the negotiation where the europeans have a great deal of control because they know britain wants to move the talks on to trade and they know that is a point where they can continue to extract concessions from the british negotiators.
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so it is in the european commission's interest and the interests of the member states to see what concessions the uk is prepared to offer in return for the critical move on to trade. and it does not seem that when there is a european summit at the end of october, that it will be judged that britain has passed the sufficient progress test and then the focus will move to the next summit in december. that was kevin connelly talking to us from brussels. there are signs that the catalan government will refrain from immediately declaring independence from spain, eight days after it held a controversial referendum. officials in barcelona say the catalan president will make a "symbolic statement" tomorrow, recognising that a majority of voters want to secede, but stopping short of declaring independence. hundreds of thousands of people were on the streets of barcelona yesterday in a huge show of support for the unity of spain. catalonia's high court has asked for spanish national police to provide extra security at the court building in case the catalan parliament goes ahead and declare independence. earlier i spoke to the bbc‘s tim wilcox who is in barcelona, who told us what to expect in the coming days.
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the real question is going to be, how madrid mariano rajoy, the spanish by minister, responds to what ca rles spanish by minister, responds to what carles puigdemont says tomorrow. we can talk to the mother of three children, educated here, voting here in catalonia, you have lived here for 30 years, you are a writer and publisher. do you think ca rles writer and publisher. do you think carles puigdemont will reference from declaring independence because surely within catalan law that is what he has to do —— will refrain. exactly, i believe that he will follow the catalan law that was passed by this majority in the parliament in september which says if there is a yes result we will declare independence. what happens then? mariano rajoy says he will impose direct rule from madrid, even arrest ca rles impose direct rule from madrid, even arrest carles puigdemont.” impose direct rule from madrid, even arrest carles puigdemont. i don't know, but what i hope will happen,
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spain will act like a 21st—century democracy and it will respect the voice of the people. people come together and they mobilise and they elect a pro—independence parliament and the referendum is held and they braved the violence of spanish police in able to vote, and they vote in favour of independence, and i think that... vote in favour of independence, and i think that. .. there are many people who say they did not vote because they did not want to take pa rt because they did not want to take part in any way and they think ca rles part in any way and they think carles puigdemont got the referendum through a wafer thin majority. carles puigdemont got the referendum through a wafer thin majoritym seems to me, if you bring up the spanish police and beat the people who are trying to vote, you can't complain that there weren't enough people, that seems unfair. not only did they do that, but they arrested catalan officials and they confiscated campaign posters and ballots and they tried to find the ballots and they tried to find the ballot boxes but will not able to. the question is, if mariano rajoy has said there will be no referendum all this time, there will be no ballot boxes and no ballots, and now
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he is saying the referendum will not have any effect and there will not be any independence, it seems to me he has very little credibility, how will he impose that many could not keep us from having ballot boxes? wouldn't this be economically ruinous for catalonia? big business have said they will leave because of the uncertainty. who would recognise the uncertainty. who would recognise the independence like? it will be economically advantageous and that is what the leading economists say, catalonia will be one of the wealthiest regions in europe, and that seems like that is what is going to happen, but the fact some spanish businesses are using... moving their headquarters, which is not a big deal, out of catalonia, thatis not a big deal, out of catalonia, that is a threat, another example of spain responding with threats instead of answering the catalan president's call for mediation. you have the trappings of statehood, a language and history and your culture, ministers for education and health system. what more do you
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need? is this down to money, you wa nt to need? is this down to money, you want to be rich? it is not about money, it is about being able to choose 1's own future and self—determination, spain not overturning laws in catalonia that it rings are fine elsewhere, in 2010 when the government voted against bull—fighting, spain said they are going to make bull—fighting part of the national heritage, to impulse bull—fighting on catalans, who are like excuse me, we voted not to have bull—fighting —— to impose for the catalans want a voice and want to choose their own political... the way they are governed, and democracy is based on the consent of the government and spain simply does not have the consent of catalonia. thanks forjoining us. we will hear tomorrow, six o'clock local time, five o'clock uk time, what carles puigdemont has to say, and then the crucial thing is to see how madrid, mariano rajoy, the prime minister, reacts. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines.
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theresa may tells eu brexit negotiators the ball is now in their court, but brussels says it's up to the uk to come forward with proposals. will they or won't they? a tense 24 hours as catolonia's leaders decide whether or not to declare independence. and a court hears an army sergeant accused of attempting to murder his wife by tampering with her parachute, was "unemotional and bewildered" when he visited the airfield the following day. the big night in cardiff, wales and the republic ireland play their big world cup qualifier, and a victory for either side would guarantee a play—off spot, but both sides are without key players. harry kane has been named on the short list for the 2017 world player of the year award. the castleford tigers player zak hardaker has been left out of the england rugby league world cup squad after testing positive for cocaine, he could face a two—year ban. more on those stories that for 30. ——
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430. don't forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet us on #afternoonlive — or email us. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. any tweets will come onto our carousel. we were speaking to michael barrett earlier, who presented nationwide many years ago, and we have at this response on twitter. —— we have had. someone else we have had on the programme this afternoon. there he is. our weather forecaster came in to talk about his fantastic artwork, a real surprise for many people. you are all commenting on our twitter feed. we will try to replay the interview late on, but we are
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waiting to hear from theresa may who will be making her brexit statement at 430. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. tweet us on #afternoonlive — or email us. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse has heard how allegations against the late liberal mp, sir cyril smith, failed to damage his political career. in its first public hearings into historic allegations of abuse in rochdale, the inquiry was told the prime minister at the time, margaret thatcher, was aware of the claims against the mp when she approved his knighthood. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. in the 1960s, they called him mr rochdale. he became mayor of the town for labour but defected to the liberals, the forerunners of today's liberal democrats. do you want a man to represent you? ordo you want
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or do you want a party robot? but in the ‘60s it was never revealed he had been accused of sexually abusing deprived boys. after nearly six decades, what started as rumour has led to this — three weeks of public hearings at the child abuse inquiry to finally get to the bottom of it. the decision to embark upon this investigation was in part in response to the public concern that some politicians, including cyril smith, were involved in child sexual abuse and able to abuse with impunity because they were protected by the establishment. it is claimed cyril smith later abused boys at this school for troubled children but in 1970 police were investigating allegations about him at a hostel for young men, cambridge house, when he came to see them. a transcript of the meeting records a police officer saying... you want to see what we know. smith started laughing at that. well, yes, fishing, i think that's fair comment.
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fishing because cyril smith was hoping to move from local politics to national. he told the police... in three weeks i've got to give a decision on whether i'm going to fight the next parliamentary election as a liberal in rochdale. and if i'm going to be charged, i'm not going to accept. guilty or not guilty, it would be unfair to the party. he wasn't charged. years later the press started to get wind of the investigation that had taken place and now the inquiry has found new evidence of a cover—up. this inquiry made a request to m15, the security service, to see if it had any information that was relevant to this investigation. it did. secret files from mis‘s archives suggest in 1979 prosecutors lied tojournalists and denied smith had been investigated. smith was re—elected in greater numbers than before and far
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from diminishing him, the allegations appear to have had absolutely no effect whatsoever. cyril smith will be at the centre of these three weeks of hearings but the allegations are much wider, that paedophiles had easy access to children in rochdale and that it was covered up. the trial of an army sergeant accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute has heard more evidence about victoria cilliers jump over salisbury plain. mrs cilliers suffered multiple injuries when both her main and reserve parachutes failed to open. emile cilliers denies the charges. from winchester crown court, duncan kennedy reports. emile cilliers in the blue suit is accused of two counts of attempting to murder his wife, one, by sabotaging her parachute and the other by tampering with a gas fixture at their home. victoria and emile cilliers were both keen parachutists but the prosecution claimed he wanted her to die so he could claim insurance money
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and because he was having an affair with another woman. it was at this airbase in wiltshire that the alleged parachute incident took place. the base sees around 25,000 jumps a year and victoria and emile cilliers were regular visitors. it was here she fell 4,000 feet when both her main and reserve parachutes did not open properly and she suffered multiple injuries. mark bayada on the right here is the chief instructor at the base and today he gave more evidence about the accident. emile cilliers' defence barrister asked the instructor if he actually saw the accident himself and whether victoria cilliers main chute had opened and he said he had not. he was also asked if he saw mrs cilliers cut away the main chute when it failed to open.
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and again mark bayada said it was others who had seen her fall. the court has already been shown these pictures, from the kitchen at their home. the prosecution said mr cilliers tampered with this gas fixture a few days before the parachute accident in a separate attempt to kill his wife. emile cilliers denies all the charges against him in a trial that is expected to last up to six weeks. some breaking news on the metropolitan police, they have said a 40—year—old woman has accepted a caution for causing a nuisance on a school property, the school which is attended by prince george, and this incident happened on the 12th of september. she was arrested on suspicion of attempted burglary after she gain access to the school and she returned on bail to a south london police station today and has accepted a caution. prince george of course attending school for the first time this incident happening
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within a week of his first day. we are used to seeing his talents at the weather map. but our weather forecaster tomasz schafernaker has a hidden talent. the bbc weatherman is a gifted portrait artist and has just secured a deal for a children's picture book. a little earlier tomasz was here with some of his portraits and we had a chat about his breathtaking art. ican i can always draw when i was a little boy, i used to draw sharks on my mother's wallpaper. and over the yea rs i my mother's wallpaper. and over the years i carried on drawing and i remember looking at the clouds and rory mcleod scapes. —— and drawing cloud scapes. that is what drew me m, cloud scapes. that is what drew me in, the drawing and the covers. this shows you in action, doing the portraits. explain this process.
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every artist has a different way of drawing, and! every artist has a different way of drawing, and i have to say i recently discovered that i enjoy drawing portraits so i would not necessarily say i'm a portrait artist by any means. i used the word artist by any means. i used the word artist loosely, it is not down to how many pixels you can put on square inches, it is about producing volumes of beautiful art which i haven't got, but my process is using various techniques, fine details, things like scalpels, there is white m, things like scalpels, there is white in, graphite, colouring pencils, and i tried to texture paper to get the desired effect. this inspiration, almost inevitably, the weather. there it is. that was about 20 years ago. not bad. i'm not sure i could do that. laughter it is the drama of working with colours, you don't would you know what is going to happen, a bit like
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the weather, to be honest. you have a full—timejob, doing the weather, to be honest. you have a full—time job, doing the weather, but this is part—time, you want to ta ke but this is part—time, you want to take it further? looking at children's books? this is a passion, and just as passionate about art, i'm obsessed with the weather and thatis i'm obsessed with the weather and that is why i do the job, but i'm obsessed with the weather and that is why i do thejob, but i'm also... that is you. that is a snippet of the kids but, that was a project that is still in process —— the kids book. i will keep you posted because at the moment it is a secret. it is utterly remarkable. everyone in the building is like, who knew? everyone has a hidden talent, i'm sure you have. laughter that was my friend in the studio earlier on. marvellous weather
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forecaster, none could beat him, apart from louise, of course. i'm supposed to be back tomorrow, by the way. i could leave you in limbo. supposed to be back tomorrow, by the way. icould leave you in limbo. how is it looking? i hope the football is it looking? i hope the football is more interesting than the weather forecast, because it is a bit dull and grey. a lot of cloud cover around. in berkshire this afternoon, threatening skies, but it stayed dry. beautiful afternoon in parts of yorkshire, not too bad in parts of eastern scotland, as well, the cloud has broken up but it has been a predominantly grey and dull story for many. not too bad for october, it must be said. cloud and rain will arrive, pushing in from the far north—west and it will start to pep up, bringing heavy bursts to northern ireland and scotland
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overnight. elsewhere, patchy rain, but further south, cloud, so it will not be a cold start tomorrow, but the nuisance weather front will have weakened. it might bring a few rogue showers into the south west in particular but elsewhere more sunshine coming through. yet again the cloud and the rain and the wind is set to strengthen in the far north—west. 10—18, not bad for the middle of october, but through the evening and overnight, winds strengthening. very heavy rain for time, through scotland and northern ireland, and the winds will be feature, pretty miserable wednesday. when the front clears and it will do so overnight on wednesday, we are likely to see the sky is clear and the touch of frost is like the first thing on thursday morning, maybe a grass frost. so that is worth bearing in mind, but thursday is
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shaping up to be a reasonable day. some dry sunny spells coming through. not too bad at all. similar story friday, warmer still, highs of 20 degrees and for england and wales but things will get pretty warm for the start of the weekend. this week will be a dry start, and a spell of wet and windy weather in the middle of the week, warming up in the south with highs of 22 likely, but that is only for the southern half of the country, and the extreme north and west looks like it will stay pretty wet and windy. that is it for me. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the european commission rebuffs theresa may's claim that the ball is in the eu's court over progress in the brexit negotiations— saying it's up to the uk to provide solutions. to stay or to go — the two main spanish parties put pressure on catalan's separatist leader not to declare independence, saying leaving spells economic ruin. the trial of an army sergeant accused of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute has
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heard more evidence about victoria cilliers jump over salisbury plain 80,000 of the 110,000 stranded abroad because of the collapse of monarch airlines have returned home. the transport secretary chris grayling called the event "hugely distressing". sport now. all hope on wales. you wouldn't bet against them. the republic of ireland have something to play for as well. they could upset celebration in cardiff tonight if they could win and that would offer them a route to the world cup. plenty to play for tonight in the world cup qualifier. we will leave it there, john. we need to go to the house of commons because theresa may
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stood up at the podium. today, the fifth round of negotiations begins in brussels and this government is getting on with thejob of this government is getting on with the job of delivering the democratic will of the british people. as i set out in my speech in florence, we wa nt to ta ke out in my speech in florence, we want to take a creative and pragmatic approach to securing a new, deep and special partnership with the european union which spans both a new economic relationship, and a new security relationship. so let me set out what each of these relationships could look like before turning to how we get there. mr speaker, i have been clear that when we leave the european union we will no longer be members of its single market or its customs union. the british people voted for control of their borders, their laws and their money and that is what this government is going to deliver. at the same time, we want to find a creative solution to a new economic
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relationship... the speaker: members must calm themselves. a little hush. the honourable member for southwark and bermondsey has had something for breakfast which i urge colleagues to avoid! at the same time, mr speaker we want to find a cre avetive solution to a new economic relationship that can support tos perity for all our peoples. we don't want to settle for adopting a model enjoyed by our countries. for this would mean having to adopt automatically and in their entirety new eu rules over which in future we would have little influence and no vote. neither are we seeking a canadian—style free trade agreement for compared with what exists today this would
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represent a restriction on our mutual market access that it would benefit none of our economies. i am proposing a unique and ambitious economic partnership. it will reflect our unprecedented position of starting with the same rules and regulations. we will maintain our unequivocal commitment to free trade and high standards and we will need a framework to continue to manage where we align and differ. there will be areas of policy and regulation which are outside the scope of our trade and economic relations where this should be straightforward. there will be areas which do affect our economic relations where we and our european friends may have different goals, or where we share the same goals, but wa nt to where we share the same goals, but want to achieve them through different means and there will be areas where we want to achieve the same goals in the same ways because it makes sense for our economies and
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because... and because rights and obligations must be held in balance. the decisions we both take will have consequences for the uk's access to the eu market and eu access to our market. but this dynamic creative and unique economic partnership will enable the uk and the eu to work side by side in bringing shared prosperity to our peoples. let me turn now to the new security relationship. as i said when i visited our troops... as i said when i visited our troops, serving on the nato mission in ease tonia last month the united kingdom is unconditionally committed to maintaining europe's security. and we will continue to offer aid and assistance to eu member states that are the victims of armed aggression, terrorism, and natural or man—made disasters. so we are proposing a
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bold new strategic agreement that provides a comprehensive framework for future security, law enforcement and criminaljustice for future security, law enforcement and criminal justice co—operation, for future security, law enforcement and criminaljustice co—operation, a treaty between the uk and the eu. we're also proposing a far—reaching partnership on how together we protect europe from the threats we face in the world today. so this partnership will be unprecedented in its breadth and depth, taking into co—operation on diplomacy, defence and security and development. so let me turn to how we build a bridge from where we are now to the new relationship that we want to see. when we leave the european union, on 29th march 2019, neither the uk, nor the eu and its member states will be ina the eu and its member states will be in a position to implement smoothly many of the detailed arrangements that will under pin the new relationship we seek. businesses will need time to adjust and governments will need to put new systems in place and businesses want certainty about the position in the
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interim. that's why i suggested in my speech at lancaster house there should be a period of implementation and why i proposed such a period in my speech in florence last month. during this strictly time limited period, we will have left the eu and its institutions, but we are proposing that for this period, access to one another‘s market should continue on current terms and britain also should continue to take pa rt britain also should continue to take part in existing security measures. the framework for this period, which can be agreed under article 50, would be the existing structure of eu rules and regulations. now, i know that some people may have some concerns about this, but there are two reasons why it makes sense. first, we want our departure from the eu to be as smooth as possible. it wouldn't make sense to make people and businesses plan for two sets of changes in the relationship between the uk and the eu. second, we should concentrate on negotiating
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time and capital on what really matters. the future long—term relationship we will have with the eu after this temporary period ends. during the implementation period people will continue to be able to come and live and work in the uk, but there will be a registration system and an essential preparation for the new immigration system required to re—ta ke for the new immigration system required to re—take control of our borders. and our intention is that new arrivals would be subject to new rules for eu citizens on long—term settlement. we will also push forward on our future settlement. we will also push forward on ourfuture independent trade policy, talking to trading partners across the globe and preparing to introduce the deals once the this period is over. how long the period should be, is determined simply by how long it will take to prepare and implement the new systems we need and as of today, these considerations point to an implementation period of around two years. an implementation period of around two yea rs. as an implementation period of around two years. as i said... as i said in
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florence, because i don't believe that either the eu or the british people want us to stay longer in the existing structures than necessary, we could also, we could also agree to bring forward aspects of that future framework such as new dispute resolution mechanisms more quickly if this can be done smoothly a the heart of the arrangements there should be a double lock, guaranteeing a period of implementation giving businesses and people the certainty that they will be able to prepare for the change and guaranteeing this implementation period will be time limited, giving eve ryo ne period will be time limited, giving everyone the certainty this will not go on forever. mr speaker, the purpose of the florence speech was to move the negotiations forward and thatis to move the negotiations forward and that is exactly what has happened. as michel barnier said after the last round, there is a new dynamic in the negotiations. and i want to pay tribute to my right honourable
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friend the secretary of state for exiting the european union. for all he has done, to drive through real and tangible progress on a number of areas. on citizens rights, as i said many times, this government values the contributions of all eu citizens who made their lives in our country, we wa nt who made their lives in our country, we want them to stay. in florence, i gave further commitments that the rights of eu citizens in the uk and uk citizens in the eu will not diverge over time. committing to incorporate or agreement on citizens rights fully into uk law and making sure the uk courts can refer directly to it. since florence, there has been more progress including reaching agreement on reciprocal health insurance and a number of social security rights. i hope our negotiating teams can reach full agreement quickly. on northern
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ireland, we have now begun drafting joint principles on preserving the common travel area and associated rights and we have both stated we will not accept any physical infrastructure at the border. we owe it to the people of northern ireland and indeed, toe everyone on the island of ireland to get this right. then there is the question of the eu budget. as i've said, this can only be resolved as part of the settle m e nt be resolved as part of the settlement of all the issues that we are working through. i do not want our partners to fear they will need to pay more or receive less over the remainder of the current budget plan asa remainder of the current budget plan as a result of our decision to leave. the uk will honour xitments we have made during the period of our membership. and as we move forwards we will want to continue working together in ways that promote the long—term economic development of our continent, this includes continuing to take part in the policies and programmes which
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are the policies and programmes which a re greatly the policies and programmes which are greatly to ourjoint advantage such as those that promote, science, education and culture and those that promote our mutual security. and as i set promote our mutual security. and as iset in promote our mutual security. and as i set in in my speech at lancaster house, in doing so we would want to make a contribution to cover our fairshare of make a contribution to cover our fair share of the costs involved. mr speaker, i continued discussions on many of these issues when i met with european leaders in tallinn at the end of last month. and in the by lateral discussions i've had where chancellor merkel, prime minister s health care commission dwo and the taoiseach, they welcomed the tone set in florence and the impact this was having on moving on the negotiation forwards. preparing for life outside the eu is also about the steps we take. our eu withdrawal bill will shortly enter committee stage. carrying over eu rules and regulations into our domestic law, from the moment we leave the eu. and today, we are publishing two white papers on trade and customs. these
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pave the way for legislation to allow the uk to operate as an independent trading nation and to create an innovative customs system that help us achieve the greatest possible tariff and barrier—free trade as we leave the eu. while i believe it is profoundly in all our interests for the negotiations to succeed, it is also our responsibility as a government to prepare for every eventuality, so that's exactly what we are doing. these white papers support that work including setting out steps to minimise disruption for businesses and travellers. mr speaker, a new deep and special partnership between a sovereign united kingdom and a strong and successful european union is our ambition and our offer to our european friends. achieving that partnership will require leadership and flexibility. notjust from us,
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but from our friends, and flexibility. notjust from us, but from ourfriends, the and flexibility. notjust from us, but from our friends, the 27 and flexibility. notjust from us, but from ourfriends, the 27 nations of the eu. as we look forward to the next stage, the ball is in their court, but i'm optimistic it will receive a positive response because what we are seeking is notjust the best possible deal for us, but i believe that will be the best possible dealfor our believe that will be the best possible deal for our european friends too. so while, of course, progress will not always be smooth, by approaching these negotiations in a constructive way, in a spirit of friendship and co—operation, and with our sights furplly set on the future, i believe we can prove the doom sayers wrong and i believe we can seize the opportunities of this defining moment in the history of our nation. mr speaker, a lot of the day—to—day coverage is about process. but this on the other hand is vitally important. i am determined to deliver what the british people voted for and to get it right. that is my duty as prime minister, it is our duty as a
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government and it is what we will do andi government and it is what we will do and i commend this statement to the house. the speaker: jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i would like to thank the prime minister for the advance copy of the statement. 16 months on from the referendum, no real progress has been made. the prime minister delivered yet another definitive speech. designed to herald a breakthrough, which instead only confirmed the confusion at the heart of government. mr speaker, if we want to judge the progress the government has made since triggering article 50, we shouldn't just look at the latest florence speech. we should also look back at the prime minister's last big brexit speech injanuary where she outlined 12 objectives for
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brexit negotiations. and mr speaker, how many of those objectives have the government met ten months down the government met ten months down the line? the answer, none. the florence speech in fact demonstrated the scale of the mess the government is making of these negotiations. 15 months on from the referendum, we're still no clearer what the future of this country will look like. the question must be asked what on earth has the government been doing all this time? calling an election in which voters refused to give the prime minister the mandate she wanted. since then, since then, cabinet ministers have been squabbling amongst themselves all that time, 15 months wasted. i'm sure the prime minister wanted her
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speech in florence to bring life to these critical negotiations. on the substance of the speech itself, i'm pleased that the prime minister has taken pleased that the prime minister has ta ken labour's lead pleased that the prime minister has taken labour's lead and accepted... and accepted... accepted the need for transition as we leave the eu. however, mr speaker, it is still unclear what the prime minister envisages for a transitional period. or how long it will last. the prime minister said the implementation period would last around two years. yet the foreign secretary interprets that as two years and not a second more. while the chancellor, hints it might be more. he's here, he can correct us on this. she told us during a transition access to one another‘s markets should continue on current terms. yet, at the
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conservative party conference, the secretary of state for international trade contradicted this and said, "we will leave the single market and the customs union at the end of march 2019." the immigration minister told his party conference that freedom of movement will end as we know it in march 2019 so how does this square with the prime minister's assertion that we continue on current terms during the transition? it can't be both. can the prime minister clear up the confusion and tell the house exactly what her implementation period means in terms of the single market, the customs union and freedom of movement? mr speaker, on the financial settle m e nt mr speaker, on the financial settlement with the eu, the prime minister has offered to commit funds to ensure no eu member state has to
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pay more into the eu budget until the end of the current framework. we welcome this as a sensible offer. however, can the prime minister confirm whether the uk will be willing to pay money to the eu post transition to access programmes which benefit this country? it's an important issue for many parts of britain. on the issue of citizens rights, the prime minister says this is an area where progress has been made with the eu. i'm sure that many colleagues in this house will tv the level of concern and indeed desperation of many of our constituents who come to our surgeries across the country, in fear that families and friendships will soon be ripped apart. so mr speaker... into, it's not scaremongering, mr speaker. this is a serious issue. this is a serious issue that affects many people, that
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affects many people in this country day in and day out, who are frankly frightened of the future. so mr speaker, i call on the prime minister again today, to listen to the tuc and the cbi minister again today, to listen to the tuc and the cb! and guarantee the tuc and the cb! and guarantee the rights of eu nationals living in the rights of eu nationals living in the uk. given mr speaker this this house voted injuly the uk. given mr speaker this this house voted in july 2016 the uk. given mr speaker this this house voted injuly 2016 to guarantee the rights of eu citizens, can the prime minister finally reflect the will of the house and give people and businesses the assurances they need ? on northern ireland, we welcome the drafting ofjoipt principles, but 15 months on from the referendum, we should be beyond platitudes and negotiating the practicalities. mr speaker the speech in florence was supposed to put momentum into the brexit negotiations. it is
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staggering... it is staggering mr speaker that after... the speaker: there was a lot of noise when the prime minister began her statement and i indicated that people should calm down. the same applies now. the right honourable gentleman will be heard. he will be heard with courtesy and he'll be heard with courtesy and he'll be heard in full. jeremy corbyn. it is staggering that after eight months since triggering article 50 the government has made so little progress. the secretary of state for international trade said a deal with the eu should be the easiest in human history. that's what he said. now, the reality for this tory government is beginning to bite. but if things do not improve the reality may soon begin to bite for the jobs and living standards of the people of this country. these negotiations
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are the most important in britain's recent history. vital to our future and vital to our economy. just at moment when britain needs a strong negotiating team, we have a cabinet at each other‘s throats. half the conservative party want the foreign secretary sacked. the other half, wa nt secretary sacked. the other half, want the chancellor sacked! mr speaker... mr speaker... the speaker: order. order. order. i said to the member for braintree that i am advised that he is being groomed for statesmanship. i say to the aspiring statesman, it is in the circumstances in politic at best and rude at worst for him to
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point. i at best and rude at worst for him to point. lam at best and rude at worst for him to point. i am trying to help the honourable gentleman. jeremy corbyn. rather than fighting over their own jobs, the reality is that millions of people's jobs and living standards depend on the success of these negotiations. it is if this government can't negotiate a deal for britain they should make way for a team that can. thank you, mr speaker. mr speaker, the right honourable gentleman talks about what has happened over the last 15 months. well, i will tell him what has happened. this government has triggered article 50 and is negotiating the leaving of the european union. and we are negotiating the practical details that need to be in place to ensure that need to be in place to ensure that we first of all get the best
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possible dealfor that we first of all get the best possible deal for the uk and that secondly, that we get a deal where the withdrawal is as smooth and orderly as possible. now, he talks about a number of the these issues. he says that the florence speech was due to give momentum to the talks. indeed, it has given momentum to the talks, but i happily say to the right honourable gentleman, the last thing we need in these talks is his momentum. he said, will we leave the single market and the customs union? yes. i set out in the statement i made today about the difference that will come in during that period. he talked about citizens rights. there is considerable agreement between us and the european union on this issue. there are some remaining issues to be dealt with. i have been very clear at every stage that we wa nt very clear at every stage that we want eu citizens in this country to stay. we welcome the contribution
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that they have made. but i'm also clear that we want uk citizens in the 27 member states of the european union to be given their rights too. and as and everybody in this house of commons should have a care for uk citizens as well as for eu citizens. and finally, he says that this is a historic moment. it is indeed an important moment for this country. this is a very important and significant set of negotiations that will set this country's future for generations to come. i'm optimistic and ambitious about what we can achieve for our country. he said we need to negotiate carefully. yes, we do. that's why the article 50 letter reflected the principles i had set out in the lancaster house speech and the florence speech updates that and the florence speech updates that and reflects again the principles of the lancaster house speech. what a contrast with the labour party which said that they would respect the
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result of the referendum and then voted against the withdrawal bill. they said, they said... they said they wanted to leave the single market. now, they say they might stay in the single market. they said, they said that staying in the customs union was deeply unattractive, now they want to stay in the customs union forever. they used to be against a second referendum, now they have refused to rule it out. with such a confused position on brexit, no wonder they say there will be a run on the pound if labour get into power. the speaker: mr kenneth clarke. will the prime minister reassure me that the prime minister reassure me that the statement clarifies that it is not the government's policy on the one hand to seek to remove all trading barriers with countries like japan and the united states, but on the other hand, to seek to create
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new regulatory customs and tariff barriers with the european union. with at the moment we have free trade and which is our largest trading partner in the world and if that's correct and that's consistent perhaps with what she has just said, as she recalls no doubt that ultra brexiteer including the present foreign secretary assured citizens during the referendum campaign that no difference at all would take place in our trading relationships with europe because they needed to sell us their mercedes and wine, would it not be best to proceed with the negotiations on the basis that our ideal solution would be to stay in the single market and the customs union and she can then seek to make changes. which are the things she
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explored when she tries to explain where she is at the moment. my learned friend has been consistent on this issue. when people voted in the referendum and voted for the uk to leave the european union, i think they were voting for us to take control of our borders, laws and our money. if we were to remain full members of the customs union and the single market that would bring with it continuing jurisdiction of the european court of justice it continuing jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice into the future, forever. it would also bring with it the requirement for free movement. what i have set out in the florence speech and the offer that we have made to the european union, is what i've described previously as a deep and special partnership with the eu. and my learned friend is right, we do want to ensure that the trading relationship we have with the european union can be as tariff—try and as frictionless as possible. but we also see advantage in being able to negotiate new trading agreements around the rest of the world as well. i think that
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is to the advantage of the united kingdom and that's what the government will be pursuing. let me thank the prime minister for advance copy of her statement. although i must say, that a statement that took 13 minutes to deliver and not one mention of the devolved administrations. that's the lack of respect... inaudible the speaker: order. it is a considerable discourtesy, i say to the honourable member, to walk past the honourable member, to walk past the member who is in the middle of his intervention. it is a point that's so obvious that it shouldn't need to be notified to the honourable gentleman, as he wasn't aware of discourtesy that was involved he now is and when the house has settled down perhaps we can hear the leader of the scottish national party who i remind the house must be heard. : thank you, mr
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speaker. now we respect the fact that the uk has voted to come out of europe. but we were told... in 2014 that if we stayed within the uk that our future in europe would be preserved and we have the situation today that scotland voted to remain and wants to stay in the single market and the customs union. it's about time that we got some respect from the government. mr speaker, the situation is now critical. can i say to the honourable gentlemen, i can hear them chantering, if they want to catch the speaker's eye, they are entitled to do so, but perhaps they could show a bit of respect. the public are watching this behaviour. mr speaker... studio: you are joining mr speaker... studio: you arejoining us on bbc news. you are watching live coverage from the house of commons of the
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prime minister's statement on the brexit strategy. this is the parliamentary leader of the scottish national party, responding to the prime minister's statement. we will recap on that statement in a moment, but let's rejoin the debate. the president of the eu commission said a miracle needs to happen for there to be any progress in these negotiations. meanwhile, the european parliament voted last week to stop negotiations moving onto the next phase, citing a lack of progress. mr speaker, the clock is running against the prime minister in more ways than one. an eu citizens rights, this government continues to drag its heels. there must
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