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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 10, 2017 10:45pm-11:00pm BST

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these my these kind of that. once these kind of allegations are on the front pages of the papers, the sheer weight of the amount of people that are talking about this, and it should be said that it about this, and it should be said thatitis about this, and it should be said that it is notjust massive hollywood stars, it seems to be a litany of sony people that he has a p pa re ntly litany of sony people that he has apparently worked with over the yea rs. apparently worked with over the years. —— of so many people. once it is out there and the floodgates have opened, people start feeling brave enough to speak out about it, it does not seem to me that you can salvage any kind of career from that. nor should you, salvage any kind of career from that. norshould you, if salvage any kind of career from that. nor should you, if they are correct. indeed, the company itself that he founded with his brother, they may have to change the name a p pa re ntly they may have to change the name apparently because it is going to be too tainted, the damages as the result of this? you hope that maybe it will change the culture. i have nothing to do with hollywood, but you do hear about the auditioning sofa, that thing. the casting couch, where it comes from. maybe it is a wake—up calland where it comes from. maybe it is a wake—up call and things will change. the front page of the times, hammond
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refuses to budget for hard brexit. no cash until the divorce talks fail. this is according to the times. he has a budget coming up. he does not seem to be budgeting for possibly falling out of the european union without a deal. this is kind of the hammond fight back. we had borisjohnson dominating of the hammond fight back. we had boris johnson dominating the headlines during the tory party conference. now it is philip hammond's turn. he has written an op—ed for the paper. he sets out how he has the budget coming up next month and there is a lot of pressure on the government to put billions aside to show that they are serious about walking away from the eu if there is no deal. he is making it very clear that, at times like this, where money is tight, that kind of provision is not going to be made yet. so, it is the sort of language
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thatis yet. so, it is the sort of language that is going to come i imagine, further deepen the rifts that are already splitting the cabinet. jessica, taking politics out of this, as a prudent chancellor, and we all hope that chancellors should be prudent, is this the kind of thing he should be doing? you should be putting aside a kitty for what could be a very rainy monsoon, potentially? one of the things he might argue is that to be a prudent chancellor you have to make choices on what to spend things on. if you think a no deal scenario is less likely, perhaps you don't want to allocate billions of pounds in contingency planning. that is a lot of pressure on a philip hammond budget. there is huge pressure to scrap pay restraint across the public sector, huge pressure to ease austerity measures and make commitments on housing right across
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whitehall. departments are all clamouring for more money. i am sure we will talk about the nhs later and how much the health service needs more money. i think this is hammond's first line in the sand ahead of the budget, that he does not have a limited money. they need to be prepared that he cannot commit billions for this or that. or he is shutting down the little voices saying i want this or that. no! he is good at doing that. treasury, no, defence, no. very good at doing that. guardian, theresa may dodges a question on the brexit wrote. she refuses to say if she would choose to leave the eu if there was a fresh referendum. it is a classic gotcha question, a hypothetical but most people should say, i do not answer hypothetical questions. but she got into sticky territory with their response. in fairness, ithink
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into sticky territory with their response. in fairness, i think she did sort of talk about it being hypothetical. the interviewer kept pressing her so she had to budge. she didn't really say anything. i think that is what people across about. she voted remain beforehand, and now she is obviously leading britain out of the eu. so, the brexiteers want her to come out and say, actually, i got that wrong, it is all right, we should be leaving. the remainers would like to stick to her guns and say that remain was genuinely what she meant. but she comes across, again, as a bit over rehearsed and not very genuine. when she talks about how i am being open and honest with you, it is like, neither open or honest. the bottom line is that she voted remain. we know that. why not to say, i voted remain before, there is not going to be another referendum. why are you asking me this dumb question, mate,
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fella! ? stuffit! it asking me this dumb question, mate, fella!? stuffit! it was a very clever question, he said, ivoted, even though she didn't say she would vote leave now, she is saying she does not agree with the current direction of the country that she is leading. you can imagine a scenario where she is able to say i would vote leave again because i believe it is the will of the british people, i think it would be foolhardy to have another one. iain dale knows and everybody knows that she voted remain. it's very telling that you cannot bring herself to say, yes, nowi that you cannot bring herself to say, yes, now i am totally on board with brexit. she cannot quite do that. if you have her in front of
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you, what is the first question you are going to ask? it is going to be this one. given what i cover, i don't think... ok, but your second question will be that. it will chase her around now. and every other cabinet minister. indeed, start rehearsing your responses. the nhs pay cap, jessica. it looks as if it is going to be scrapped for the nhs nurses and so on. is going to be scrapped for the nhs nurses and so on. we are on is going to be scrapped for the nhs nurses and so on. we are on the i now. we know it has been potentially scrapped for prison officers, police, teachers. but all of the money for that is coming out of the existing budget. that is a potential problem. that is the real catch. nhs staff, the i% pay cap is going to go. the health unions are saying that they think what is needed is around about a 3.9% pay rise. we
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know that each i% pay rise costs the health service about £500 million. that is per year and that is a lot of efficiency savings. simon stevens was in front of one of the health select committee is today in parliament, saying we cannot do this u nless we parliament, saying we cannot do this unless we get more money. that is sort of laying the gauntlet down to jeremy hunt and saying, you are saying we can do this, but you need to let us do it. is it likely that in the budget coming up philip hammond is going to say, look, we have heard you, we understand what the situation is in terms of recruitment problems and so on for teaching staff, nurses and whatever, so we are teaching staff, nurses and whatever, so we are going to scrap it, we had to scrap the cap. i think it is very likely. i can speak from the defence side of things. massive pressure on the government to lift the pay cut for the armed forces, which has been in place now for as long as everybody else. we already know the defence budget is horrendously overheated. the idea that any additional money is going to come
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from the treasury to fund this cap seems a bit fanciful. so, any lifting of that freezes going to just put more pressure on a department that is already being made to make impossible sounding efficiency savings. he is in a really difficult position. unless he gives more money i don't see how he can possibly achieve that. well, the labour party would sayjust borrow it! the financial times, writes... assembled around this table are three incredibly bright human beings with iqs that asked —— are stratospheric. donald trump has challenged his secretary of state, rex tillerson, to an iq test. in unguarded comments, he allegedly called the president a moron. why am
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i laughing? somebody challenged my intelligence, that is the first thing i would say. an iq duel? i did an iq test, i was at work and stressed. the bosses put pressure on you. i was at the financial times, stressed. the bosses put pressure on you. i was at the financialtimes, i was tapping away at my keyboard, i did an iq test thinking that it would be easy. it was the bbc one as well, on the bbc website. it is our fault? it came out as 82. i thought, also, that sounds quite a lot. then i looked, and it is pretty bad. pretty terrible! apparently madonna has an iq of 144. almost double mine. jessica, there are lots of people, particularly critics, suggesting he does not have a particularly high iq, he was not a
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good businessman, he had some a ba n kru ptcy good businessman, he had some a bankruptcy is, if he had just left his money in the bank that he was given by his rich dad he would be richer than he is now because of the failed investments. it is a sore point for him. we know he has a bit ofa thin point for him. we know he has a bit of a thin skin. interesting he's willing to challenge his secretary of state to an iq test. this is classic trump. it would not surprise me if they ended up going through with it. really! ? the me if they ended up going through with it. really!? the way he runs his administration, essentially like the apprentice, where he picked his advisers against each other to see who comes out on top, it would not surprise me if this was something he ended up pulling off. but he has not got a track record of being overly frank underwood with the truth. he could easily distort the numbers and come up with it. —— frank and honest with the truth. like his inauguration crowd. it is quite
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clear from what you have said that you work for the mainstream media. you are finding it difficult to believe something donald trump says. iam quite believe something donald trump says. i am quite shocked by that. well, i only have an iq of 82. i am being asked what my io only have an iq of 82. i am being asked what my iq is. 1 million, of course! thank you forjoining us. let's look at some of the stories behind the headlines, thanks for that. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers — and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer thank you deborah and jessica. goodbye. it is really wet in the north—west of the uk right now, particularly around western scotland. tomorrow, wet and windy just for a around western scotland. tomorrow, wet and windyjust for a time for most of us. the weather fronts,
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there is a whole succession of them out in the atlantic. they are heading our way. the weather has not really changed an awful lot, at least the broad pattern. we keep the south—westerly wind, a lot of moisture, extensive cloud. in this situation, most of the rain falls across the hills. that is how it works when we have this weather pattern. to the south and east, a little bit of drizzle and very mild, 14 degrees in cardiff, fresh air in the north of scotland, 9 degrees. here is the weather front, a the north of scotland, 9 degrees. here is the weatherfront, a lot the north of scotland, 9 degrees. here is the weather front, a lot of rain around the lake district. it could be 100 millimetres of rain by the time this weather front is through. this is the scene about midday. the weather front is about here. behind it we have sunshine across aberdeenshire, down into the lowlands, northern ireland. it is raining heavily across the cumbrian fells at this stage, across northern parts of wales, southern parts of wales, hitting a good dose of rain. to the south, i think the cloud is going to be a lot more broken and utmost just bits
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going to be a lot more broken and utmostjust bits and pieces of light rain. the whole weather front will shift further towards the south and east. eventually, places like birmingham down into east anglia and london will get a few spots of rain. the weather front is out of the way on thursday. then we are under the influence of this area of high pressure before the next weather system arrives. thursday, i would say that is our best day of the week. there will be lots of sunshine around, quite chilly in the morning underneath clear skies. here is the weather for thursday. the best underneath clear skies. here is the weatherfor thursday. the best of which would be across many eastern areas of the uk, nice sunshine, feeling pleasantly warm. the weather front is already making its presence felt across the rest of the uk. clouding over with outbreaks of rain. here is friday, yet another weather front moving in, rain. here is friday, yet another weatherfront moving in, linked rain. here is friday, yet another weather front moving in, linked to the very big area of low pressure close to iceland. yet more rain to come. this is the south—westerly air current, the same situation happens, rain across north—western areas and the hills. in the south it could be rising, it's already 20 degrees on
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friday. we will keep the southerly to south—westerly wind through the weekend, up to 23 degrees. this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. the catalan president signs a declaration of independence, but says the effects will be suspended until more talks can be held. translation: the government and myself propose that this parliament suspends the effects of the independence referendum in order to establish dialogue. britain's leading defence manufacturer, bae systems, has announced plans to cut around 2,000 jobs. the hollywood producer, harvey weinstein, is now facing allegations of rape from three women. on the newsnight, we will speak live to the first secretary of state. and as rape allegations surfaced around harvey
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