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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 12, 2017 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is afternoon live. i am simon mccoy. today at 2pm: brexit negotiations. the uk says there's progress. the eu's assessment is very different. on this question we've reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing. while there is still work to be done, much work to be done, we've come a long way, it's important to recognise the significant progress we've made since june. harvey weinstein appears in public as the oscars academy calls an emergency meeting to discuss his behaviour. i gotta get help guys. you know what, we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope. 0k. boiler pressure, households warned to insulate homes and replace boilers to reduce uk emissions. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. a climate of fear in the swimming pool a climate of fear in the swimming pool. yes, an investigation into the british paralympic swimming team, it's found a culture of fear leading into last yea r‘s it's found a culture of fear leading into last year's rio olympics. 13
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athletes were subjected to unacceptable behaviour. thank you very much. more from you later. phil has the weather. a warm front coming. yes, it hasn't been so bad so far today, simon. in many parts of the british isles, one of the best days we have had. could this be the future? all the details live in half an hour. also coming up. forget your gordons, your hestons and yourjamies, if you want the best grub in the world you need to go to this pub in yorkshire. hello everyone. this is afternoon live. two sides, two negotiatiors — and two very different assessments of where we are with brexit. as the latest round of talks came to a close david davies says progress is being made. his opposite number, michel barnier, disagrees — using the words
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‘deadlock‘ and ‘disturbing'. richard galpin reports. the brexit secretary, david davis, heads out for more talks in brussels this morning. the first phase of the negotiations which deals only with the divorce settlement is still very much bogged down. and afterwards came confirmation that there had been no breakthrough, particularly on the issue of how much money britain would pay to leave the european union. the stalemate means there's no chance eu leaders meeting next week will agree to open negotiations on a trade deal. translation: on this question, we have reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing for thousands of project promoters in europe and it is disturbing also for taxpayers. on this basis, i'm not able, in the current circumstances, to propose to next week's
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european council that we should start discussions on the future relationship. britain was hoping the eu summit next thursday would be the moment the talks moved to the second phase, with the crucial issue of a trade deal between britain and the eu top of the agenda. but now it looks like that will be put back to another eu summit in december. and this just ten months before a deadline set by the eu's chief negotiator for a draft deal on the divorce to be put before european parliaments. in response to this, david davis appealed to the eu to allow the second phase of talks on a trade deal to begin much sooner. we are ready and well—prepared to start those discussions. as we look at the october european council next week, i hope the member states will recognise the progress we have made and take a step forward in the spirit of the prime minister's
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florence speech. but instead, the eu is focusing now on getting progress for the end of this year. we are negotiating in good faith, and we still hope the so—called sufficient progress will be possible by december. however, if it turns out that the talks continue at a slow pace and that sufficient progress has not been reached, then together with our uk friends we will have to think about where we are heading. that veiled warning made here in brussels earlier this week was not spelt out in more detail, but it does raise the spectre of britain leaving the eu without a trade deal. let's go to our chief political correspondent in westminster. don't
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know about you but listening to that you wonder if they were in the same meeting because there was strong words from michel barnier. it's true, it's become a pattern, he sounds gloomy, not much progress. david davis gets up and says actually we have made progress in some crucial areas. let's face it, the truth is probably somewhere in between. i think you do have to bear in mind here this is a very, very fraught negotiation. what goes on at press c0 nfe re nces fraught negotiation. what goes on at press conferences isn't necessarily the whole story. i think it was interesting at one point michel barnier did sound more optimistic saying with the right playical will he does think progress can be made in the next couple of months. —— right political will. let's discuss this more. what did you make of what you heard today? well, there's been a bit of progress, but you can't mask the fact there is a serious failure to hit an important deadline. we are seven months into the process. three months was thrown
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away with an unnecessary general election. the deadline of next week, having been missed, means the next council meeting won't be until december, that's another two months. it's a serious situation, that's why i have written to david davis today to urge him to request an emergency round of talks, monday to wednesday of next week, to see whether further progress can be made before that all—important progress can be made before that all—importa nt council meeting progress can be made before that all—important council meeting next week. this is a serious situation for us to find ourselves in. but it's not the end of the road, is it? you could hear from it's not the end of the road, is it? you could hearfrom michel barnier there is still a possibility of progress and aren't we being naive to think they would at the first hurdle given us what we wanted? it's not the end of the road but we can't move on to the trade negotiations and any discussion about transitional arrangements until possibly december, even into next year at the beginning — that's the best case scenario. now businesses have been queuing up to express to me anxiety about this because they wa nt to me anxiety about this because they want to hear discussions about transitional arrangements before christmas because they're having to
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decide what arrangements they put in place for march 2019. so, yes, there is sometime left, but there's little time left and another two months is going to go by in phase one. this — the government promised us this was going to be the easiest negotiations, it will be wrapped up quickly. there is a serious failure 110w. quickly. there is a serious failure now. who do you blame for this? you seem to be blaming the united kingdom for this, rather than the other side, isn't it also up to the eu to try and make some compromise? we talked about money, are we going to say now we are going to hand over billions without know whatting we are paying billions without know whatting we are ' billions without know whatting we are paying for? there has to be give and take on both sides. i never pressed the government to put a sum on the money they would put on the table. i have always supported the government and trying to get the sum as low as possible about but they need to move from saying a lot of the commitments, to actually setting out what the commitments are as a framework. so, the government needs to ta ke framework. so, the government needs to take this seriously. i accept the eu too needs to show some more flexibility. i would like to see barnier find flexibility. i would like to see barnierfind a way flexibility. i would like to see barnier find a way to have transitional arrangements discussed
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before christmas. i have sympathy with the government when it says you can't segregate phase one and two in the hard edged way. both sides i think have to budge, and budge quickly. that's an issue, this idea of separating the two. even yesterday philip hammond, a big remainer, he sounded frustrated, how can you sort out the irish border issue without really knowing what the wider borders will be eventually? that's a classic example. in northern ireland, the border is a hugely important issue and it seems it's really difficult to come up with any suggested way forward until you know what the customs arrangements are going to be and that's phase two issue. that's where there needs to be some movement on this. but i don't think we should lose sight of the fact that the failure to hit this deadline means that no deal is a bigger prospect today than it was yesterday and no deal is really disastrous for our country and for the eu. thank you very much. that's the eu. thank you very much. that's the view of labour there. really in terms of this negotiation all eyes
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110w terms of this negotiation all eyes now very much moving yet again further away, this time to december. we have had the labour view, but the worry for the conservatives is you get a different view depending on who you speak to. there is a feeling of infighting at a high level. yeah, and yesterday reports of a bit of an argument during the cabinet meeting and of course you do have people sitting around that cabinet table with very different views. those on the brexit side of the argument look very much at philip ham mopped, the chancellor, and think he is —— hammond, the chancellor and think he is in the being positive enough about brexit. this lunchtime an intervention from a former conservative chancellor who wasn't being particularly nice about philip hammond. is he undermining negotiations and the government? that may not be his intention, but i feel that he is. what should theresa may do? well, i think probably reshuffle. and where should he be reshuffled to? that's for her to decide. but he shouldn't be
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chancellor any loppinger because you think he is holding up the negotiations i fear he is unhelpful. i fear that what he is doing, he may not intend it, but in practice, what he is doing is very close to sabotage. there have been whispers about a possible reshuffle. i think it's worth bearing in mind that in the past they've never really made anything much better and they can cause an awful lot of trouble for a prime minister. thank you very much. let's go to brussels and adam fleming is there for us. i don't wa nt to fleming is there for us. i don't want to you translate every word of eu languages, but this word flexibility everyone is calling for, do they actually know what it means over there, because that's the criticism? that's what is going to be discussed over the next couple of days by civil servants, officials and ambassadors from the eu remaining 27 member states because the action has moved from the technicians run by michel barnier to politicians around europe now. they will be the ones that have to decide
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what language to use in their summit conclusions next week. they're going to have a meeting summit on thursday where theresa may will attend and they'll discuss pan—european, all 28 members' business. on friday, they'll have a meeting for the 27 remaining ones. they'll have to produce a communication at the end of that summit that has some words about the eu's view of where the brexit process is politically. there isa brexit process is politically. there is a debate going on behind closed doors now about do you write language that's optimistic and generous to the uk that could perhaps give barnier a bit more leeway in his instructions he has been given to start talking about things like a transition or implementation phase and starting to talk about the shape of the future relationship? some countries think that's the way forward. or, are you much tougher and less optimistic with the uk and basically say that there is not process isn't nearly far enough for there to be any discussions about this trade and future relationship stuff? that is
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what this word flexibility really means when you unpack it. that's certainly the definition that david davis was using when he was at the podium with michel barnier earlier, saying to the 27 leaders, look, we have given you loads of stuff, we are negotiating in good faith. return the favour and have discussions about wider stuff. adam, these smart cocktail parties you to go in brussels every evening and you chat to the movers and shakers, is there a sense of schadenfruede of what's going on in the british government, are they looking at the conservatives and saying we have a clea n conservatives and saying we have a clean hand here? well, it cuts two ways. in other words, taking joy in other‘s misfortune for those who don't know what that means, that is not really something you get here. there is not a lot of crowing in brussels to be fair to diplomats. they may do it in private not speaking to a british journalist, but they want a deal because they know that no deal is bad for both
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sides or that's the verdict on it anyway. they do want a deal. they wa nt to anyway. they do want a deal. they want to negotiate in good faith and they don't want things to collapse. in terms of their attitude to what's happening in westminster and the british government, it cuts both ways. one way is that this phase of talks is really technical, it's about citizens —— citizens‘ rights, money, and the irish border. technical. they‘ve their mandate and know what they want so it doesn‘t matter what‘s happening in the british government. in terms of stat of the british government they worry because they know that theresa may has to deliver the deal that‘s finally agreed. thank you very much. high winds are again fanning wild fires that have killed at least 23 people in northern california. almost 300 people are reported missing. police say that it may be
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due to the chaotic nature of the forced evacuations. cbs correspondentjoins us now. forced evacuations. cbs correspondent joins us now. towns have been evacuated. there is one town, 5,000 people live there. it‘s a ghost town this morning because eve ryo ne a ghost town this morning because everyone was forced to leave there. we couldn‘t go to our hotel last night because parts of napa were underan night because parts of napa were under an evacuation order as well. it is looking grim. because they aren‘t making any progress, they‘re trying awfully hard but not making any progress because the winds, it‘s calm right now, but as the day progresses, they become stronger and stronger and push this fire and then you mentioned 23 people have been confirmed dead from this fire, confirmed dead from this fire, confirmed killed. hundreds are missing. again this is day four, they‘ve got a lot of people together, but they are very concerned because there is so many homes that have burned down that they have not been able to carefully go through. they‘re concerned they‘re going to be finding more bodies. it looks like a moonscape
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behind you, there is nothing. people have literally lost everything, those that have survived? if you could see, if the sun was up here, it‘s early here, but if you could see, you can do a 360, you would not see, you can do a 360, you would not see one house as far as you can see. imean, see one house as far as you can see. i mean, it‘s a long way. blocks and blocks. you would not see one house standing. it‘s just remarkable. blocks. you would not see one house standing. it‘sjust remarkable. we saw people whose homes survived about a mile or two away, they were walking through this yesterdayjust seems so surreal because you see active people and nothing but devastation around them. they are saying they‘ve never seen anything like this either. it‘s hard to fathom. when we see it every day when the sun comes up, we marvel at what we are seeing, it‘s something. thank you very much. the headlines: as the fifth round of brexit talks ends, the eu‘s chief negotiator says there have been no great steps forward. he calls the lack of progress disturbing. sally annejones,
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lack of progress disturbing. sally anne jones, a lack of progress disturbing. sally annejones, a british woman fro kent who travelled to syria four yea rs fro kent who travelled to syria four years ago and helped recruit western women for so—called islamic state has reportedly been killed in a drone strike. harvey weinstein appears in public. the oscars academy calls for an emergency meeting to discuss his behaviour. and, if you want the best food in the world, this is the pub. in sport, british swimming has apologised to 13 of its para—athletes apologised to 13 of its pa ra—athletes and families apologised to 13 of its para—athletes and families after finding they were subjected to unacceptable behaviour. an niesh found a former coach created a climate of fear. —— inquiry. gordon strachan may find out today if he is going to keep hisjob, following their fallure to reach the world cup. and joanna conte can‘t qualify for the series ending finals after withdrawing with an injury. it was the british number one‘s last chance to break back into the world‘s top eight.
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i will be back with a full update in 15 minutes, including an update on ben stokes and a statement from his management. a british woman who travelled to syria four years ago to act as a recruiter for the so—called islamic state group has reportedly been killed in a drone strike. sally—annejones, who was originally from kent, became a high profile supporter for is and used social media to encourage western girls tojoin them. our security correspondent frank gardner reports. iconic, threatening and british. the propaganda pictures of the jihadist recruiter sally—annejones, who went to syria in 2013 with her young sonjojo and joined so—called islamic state. she married this man, junaid hussain, a computer hacker later killed in a drone strike. together they pumped out hateful propaganda online. she was a slightly telegenic white woman who had gone to join the fight against bashar al—assad so having her own side was important
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in terms of rejecting the idea they could get into the very reaches of british society. sally—annejones made this syrian city her home, raqqah, now heavily damaged by air strikes. msjones was trying to leave, reportedly to come back to britain. the missile strike by us drone reportedly killed her injune, close to syria‘s border with iraq. it‘s not known if her son was with her. her death would bring to at least six the number british jihadists with is killed in drone strikes. i think what we saw with the cluster of britons is they were involved in actively trying to direct plots in other countries. we‘ve seen this happening in the united states,
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the uk and other countries as well so they are targeting individuals they see as a specific threat. we know from research there were some british individuals involved in this direction. jones was useful to is for publicity purposes but now the group is on the verge of military defeat in iraq and syria, her death will have little impact on its already shrinking fortunes. the former punk rock singer from kent who turned 50 this year is now likely to be one more of the hundreds of western recruits to is to perish in the collapse of its caliphate. jeremy corbyn has opinion asked that brexit question, our core has tweeted. it‘s the one testimony refused to answer as to how she would vote if there was another referendum. this is what he said. this is from norman smith. he has tweeted: jeremy
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corbyn says he would still vote to remain ifa corbyn says he would still vote to remain if a brexit referendum was held today. he said he hadn‘t changed his mind, he voted to remain before and he would do that again. keepin before and he would do that again. keep in touch, norman has done an interview with him, we will be showing you that later on. the organisation behind the oscars is to consider taking action against the film producer, harvey weinstein, who‘s facing yet more accusations of sexual assault. the academy of motion pictures has called the allegations repugnant and said it would hold discussions this weekend. mr weinstein has admitted his behaviour has caused a lot of pain, but denies many of the allegations against him. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. the disgraced producer seen in public for the first time since the scandal broke. are you doing 0k? i‘m trying my best. after days of mounting allegations, for the first time he‘s addressed the situation in person. we are glad to see you're doing 0k. guys, i‘m not doing ok, i‘m trying. i‘ve got to get help, guys.
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we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope. a second chance seems unlikely. he‘s been suspended from bafta in the uk and the ruling body for the oscars has called an emergency meeting this weekend and described the allegations as repugnant. british model and actress cara delevingne is the latest to come forward — invited to a hotel room to discuss business, she says, instead forced to dodge his advances. the list of actresses includes some of hollywood‘s biggest names including angelina jolie and gwyneth paltrow. a few have accused him of serious sexual assault and rape, something he denies. his spokesperson says all sexual encounters were consensual. the police say they are investigating some of the allegations made him. earlier today a former assistant to weinstein said many knew he was a philanderer but that he went to great lengths to hide his most private moments from them. his voice has been disguised.
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get some help, man. it‘s been reported that weinstein is now receiving therapy at a us facility. let me know what you think about that, everyone deserves a second chance. all the details are on screen. the trial of an army sergeant accused of sabotaging his wife‘s parachute has been hearing from the man who packed the chute. victoria cilliers suffered multiple injuries when both her main and reserve parachutes failed to open during a jump over salisbury plain. emile cilliers denies the charges. duncan kennedy reports from winchester crown court. emile cilliers, on the left here, is accused
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of trying to sabotage his wife‘s parachute, so he could get an insurance policy pay—out and because he wanted a new life with another woman. the prosecution say he tampered with victoria cilliers‘s parachute by twisting chords on her main chute and removing kit from her reserve chute. alan westley was the man who packed victoria cilliers‘ reserve chute and was today cross—examined by the defence barrister, elizabeth marsh. this is one of our experienced ones, similar to the one involved. mr westley appeared in this video shown to the jury, to explain how reserve chutes are meticulously packed. miss marsh asks whether if the slinks were not put on tightly the equipment would come undone. mr westley said it wasn‘t just a case of doing up tightly but also putting them on correctly. miss marsh asked mr westley if he had any reason to think that the slinks
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were done up incorrectly. mr westley replied, "i guarantee that it was done properly." it was at netheravon airbase in wiltshire that victoria cilliersjumped in 2015. both her main and reserve chutes failed to open properly and she landed in this field, suffering several serious injuries. it ensures the main parachute is orientated the right way. the jury was shown this video of a main parachute being packed. the prosecution claim emile cilliers twisted the lines on his wife‘s main one as well as tampering with her reserve. the jury is visited the airfield and seen where the packing took place. mr cilliers denies two counts of attempted murder. we are hearing the united states is pulling out of the un cultural organisation unes co2 on the basis
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of the anti—israel bias of unesco. we will bring you more on that later on. it‘s a family owned pub in a village in north yorkshire. but it‘s not any old pub — because this one has just been named the best restaurant in the world, after being voted for by tripadvisor customers. the pub‘s restaurant is run by the uk‘s youngest michelin—starred chef, tommy banks. and it has beaten the likes of heston blumenthal‘s the fat duck and raymond blanc‘s le manoir. phil connell went along to sample the menu. nestled on the edge of the north york moors, it‘s a village restaurant that‘s ta ken the world by storm. the black swan at oldstead isn‘t the best in yorkshire or even britain, according to users of tripadvisor, this fine dining restaurant is the best in the world. it‘s a little bit surreal. it‘s been crazy. we‘re just a yorkshire farming family running a little pub, and to achieve an accolade like this is just amazing. what makes this accolade even more extraordinary is the age of the two brothers who run
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this family business. at 28 and 30, they are young, ambitious, and now receiving worldwide recognition. with james front of house, and tommy in the kitchen, this country pub has been transformed, earning a michelin star and from diners, glowing recommendations. i‘m very proud actually, as a yorkshire woman, to think that a restaurant in yorkshire has been voted the best restaurant in the world, marvellous. it's not always easy to find either, but boy is it worth the effort. but how can a restaurant in a small north yorkshire village take on the industry‘s greats? in second place was raymond blanc‘s famous restaurant in oxfordshire, while daniel‘s in new york came in sixth. there are some amazing restaurants on that list, places that i‘ve been wanting to go to my whole life. so it is amazing. but i think the best thing about this award is that it‘s voted for by our customers. the brothers say that with a bit of yorkshire grit, dreams can come true. in their case, a simple country pub transformed into the world‘s best fine dining restaurant.
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good luck to them. now the weather. phil is here. plymouth is looking nice. if only tfshgs can look like that at its best. this is a shot from the caribbean, shot by louise lear recently. and you are also a lake district man. i wanted to show you... this isn't a holiday show! two of you in one shot, that‘s terrifying. looking like a young david attenborough, i thought. i wa nted david attenborough, i thought. i wanted to show you this. move on, let‘s have a look, honestly, that‘s ridiculous! a family holiday, we we re ridiculous! a family holiday, we were dragged up there. move on!
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yes, i make the point that you can see with these mountains and the wind comes in, 211 millimetres of rain falling there yesterday. it was glorious when i visited. after a dreadful day yesterday it is much improved today. it doesn‘t always rain. we will come back to cumbria. simply because this is a decent sort of day for many parts of the british isle. but the satellite doesn‘t lie. that cloud is already filling in across parts of scotland and northern ireland, before the day is out you will see more rain. i want to point out the number of isobars, it‘s going to continue a gale, perhaps severe across parts of scotland. it will be a wet and windy night. somewhere across scotland and northern ireland i suspect someone will get woken up by the strength of the wind and rain. on that south—westerly the rain keeps coming. no surprises that it‘s going
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to be the southern uplands of scotla nd to be the southern uplands of scotland that will see the heaviest of the rain. it‘s on the move. it will eventually pull away from a good part of the north of scotland, but anywhere from the central belt to northern ireland. rain filling up here again. it‘s been wet of late across the welsh mountains, more rain to come. generally speaking the further south and east you are the dryer, finer, warmer your day will be. you could be looking around 20 degrees or so, and that‘s the first signs of things to come for the weekend for some, in that we will have this warmth piling in from the near continent but not everybody will see it. let me manage expectations. that weather front is going to take time to move north. you have to be south of it before you actually get to see some of that warmth and the prospect of a little bit of sunshine. there is the rain coming back to western scotland. it isn‘t all hearts and flowers by any means. on sunday, this is the day
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where we could see 22 or 23 degrees. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. brexit negotiations: the uk says there‘s progress. the eu‘s assessment is very different. translation: on this question, we‘ve reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing. our aim is provide as much certainty as possible to citizens, business and the european union — and on this we are making real and tangible progress. harvey weinstein appears in public — as the oscars academy calls an emergency meeting to discuss his behaviour. i gotta get help, guys. you know what, we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope, ok. boiler pressure — households are warned to insulate homes and replace boilers to reduce uk emissions. sport now on afternoon live with
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olly foster and british swimming has had to apologise to some members of its paralympic team. yes, this is very serious, simon. they have apologised to 13 of their paralympic athletes they have apologised to 13 of their pa ralympic athletes and they have apologised to 13 of their paralympic athletes and their families. this is an enquiry, news of it broke several months ago now after allegations of bullying within the organisation and they found that a former head coach had created a climate of fear heading into the real olympics last year. very successful it was too, by the way, and this independent investigation into those complaints of bullying from the 13 paralympic swimmers found that an unnamed member of staff which we understand to be rob green would had been communicating with his athletes in an abusive manner as well as using derogatory
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terms to describe his athletes. he won a national coaching award after the rio paralympics, they won 47 medals, but he left his job at the start of the year and declined to comment when contacted by the bbc. the chairman of british women is broken. it can't be a case of achieving success at any cost. the culture must sit well with the way we behave in team success. there is a thin dividing line between winning medals by proper conduct and achieving success by improper conduct which is wrong. and i don't believe that if we get the culture right that we will not achieve success or right that we will not achieve success or damage right that we will not achieve success or damage the aspirations of our athletes. maurice watkins, the chair of british women now talking
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about the sort of win at all costs mentality. it is something uk sport have looked at, other sports have had their own internal investigations. british cycling really sparked all this with theirs culture investigated and coaches having to leave their posts after allegations of intimidation. bobsleigh have also had to look at this. sticking with the investigation into british paralympic swimming, and senior figure in that programme was investigated and found to have management and communication issues but he does remain in post but it is all very worrying for british swimming and the culture that led up to the rio games last year. swimming and the culture that led up to the rio games last yearlj swimming and the culture that led up to the rio games last year. i want to the rio games last year. i want to move on to cricket because this time last do we were talking about ben stokes losing a sponsorship deal. there has been a development.
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there has. he was arrested on suspicion of actual bodily harm after a brawl in the early hours of the morning after a brawl outside a bristol nightclub. no charges have been broughtjet. as things stand, it seems that whilst this is an ongoing, he will not be available to play for england until further notice. as things stand, he will not travel out with the rest of the england squad to the ashes at the end of the month. thank you very much for the update on ben stokes. we now have an update on gordon strachan. the manager of scotland, he is no longer the scotla nd scotland, he is no longer the scotland head coach. he has left his role with immediate effect. we know
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that the s at a had a board meeting today to discuss his position amongst other things. it was a scheduled meeting because earlier in the week their qualifying campaign came to an end. they were just pipped to the play—off spot by slovakia. they finished third in their qualifying group, so after his tenure, he has failed to take scotla nd tenure, he has failed to take scotland to a major championship twice, to failed qualifying campaigns, simon, gordon strachan has left his role as scotland head coach with immediate effect. i‘m sure we will have more reaction to that on afternoon live in the next hour. i'm sure we will. that was unexpected, wasn‘t it? hour. i'm sure we will. that was unexpected, wasn't it? not so unexpected. his contract was up at the end of next month and it was a very shaky start to his qualifying campaign. it finished very strongly, just stumbled toward the end, but many scotland football watchers feel he made mistakes in their qualifying
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campaign and clearly the scottish football association have come to the same conclusion. i thought he might geta the same conclusion. i thought he might get a stay of execution but we will speak about it later. thank you very much. let‘s get more now on the latest round of brexit talks that have concluded in brussels — and the eu‘s chief negotiator, michael barnier has said that not enough progress has been made to move onto the next stage of talks. meanwhile, the brexit secretary, david davis has urged eu leaders to give mr barnier a mandate to start trade talks when they meet at a crucial summit next week. let‘s return to westminster and speak our chief political correspondent, vicki young. so, you pay your money, you take your choice, really? yes, that is the point about these negotiations. there are two very different sides to this story and these press conferences have ended up with michel barnier sounding negative, saying that hasn‘t been enough progress, and david davies saying that behind the scenes they are making steady progress. that hasn‘t been enough progress to move to the next second stage, as it is so cold,
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about the future relationship portrayed in the european union. some in westminster are getting frustrated with that but the prime minister has said within the last hour she bills progress is being made. there has actually been good progress made in these talks and michel barnier has himself recognise that over the coming weeks will will be able to make constructive progress as well. i know a lot of work has been put into this many issues on which we are very close to agreement, on citizens rights, for example, which is very important because we want eu citizens to be able to stay here in the uk, but we also want to be sure we can get onto the business of talking about the picture business partnership we will have with the eu. that is what i set out in my florence speech, a positive agenda for the future and we look forward to moving on to being able to speak about that. michel barnier was positive at one point, saying he felt was momentum to these talks and that good progress would be able to be made in
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the next couple of months but labour do not feel the government is doing enough. they have written to david davis, the brexit secretary, to say he needs to schedule more emergency meetings in order to get things moving. jeremy corbyn has been asked today how he would fight now if there was another referendum, the same question theresa may was recently asked. if the referendum was tomorrow, would you vote for brexit? i voted to remain in the referendum. would you vote to remain ain? referendum. would you vote to remain again? listen, there isn't going to be another referendum and i haven‘t changed my mind on that, but it is a hypothetical question because we accept the result of the referendum so we want to make sure we maintain tariff free access to the single market and membership of all the agencies we have achieved three european union membership. let's assess where we are after this latest round of brexit talks. i am
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joined by the former brexit minister david jones. how long do you think we should keep this going?m david jones. how long do you think we should keep this going? it can't go on indefinitely because clearly we need to make arrangements for if there isn‘t a deal. we have got the council next week and it seems very much like they will say that hasn‘t been sufficient process —— progress. i can‘t see it going on much past december and if they are still refusing to talk to us at that point about our beta relationship, we should indicate to them that we are suspending negotiations. mr barnier said not enough progress has been made on citizens rights, for example. do you think that is the case? there has been progress on that and on northern ireland and ireland. i think it is about money, as we always suspected it would be, andi as we always suspected it would be, and i think it would help if they said how much they want and why but they refuse to do that. they want us
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to make them an offer they can‘t refuse and it is right that we do not do that. there has been a lot of talk this week about no deal and what would happen if that were the case. would it be right and prudent to start spending a lot of money now under situation that may not arise? i think the chancellor needs to earmark money and he needs to make it clear in his budget that there is a sum of money which he thinks would cover the infrastructure cost and so on, giving reassurance to the british public and also a strong signal to the eu that we do mean to leave if there is no deal. i think what they are actively hoping for is that if they can stretch out these negotiations as long as possible and then break our hearts and i do not feel this is the way a negotiation such as this should be conducted. do you think the chancellor is being too gloomy about brexit? some of his collea g u es too gloomy about brexit? some of his colleagues and yours think he should be moved in the reshuffle. colleagues and yours think he should
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be moved in the reshufflelj colleagues and yours think he should be moved in the reshuffle. i think the country is looking to the government for a message that they are looking to get the best possible terms under whatever negotiation we have and that also they are preparing for a new life outside the european union and that‘s a message of positivity every member of the government should be doing. do you think he is doing that?|j government should be doing. do you think he is doing that? i think he ought to start doing so. so, all eyes now will turn to december to see if the european union decides there is enough progress to move onto the next stage. to bring you some breaking news on harvey weinstein, we have heard from new york that police there have said they are reopening an investigation into allegations of 2004 sex assault by the disgraced media mogul. an avalanche of sexual assault accusations including rape have come up accusations including rape have come
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up since... this comes as the host of the oscars are having emergency talks over harvey wallenstein following these allegations of sexual assault. they have been stated as saying they found these allegations repugnant. we heard from ba fta yesterday allegations repugnant. we heard from bafta yesterday that they have already suspended his membership. we will have more on that later on. the government has set out plans to cap gas and electricity bills for 12 million households until at least 2020. its draft bill will require the regulator, ofgem, to consult on and impose a temporary cap on standard variable tariffs as soon as possible after the legislation is passed. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. the government reckons the energy market is broken and that millions of people are paying too much for their gas and electricity. now it is planning to introduce a price cap to bring down their bills. our goal is to ensure a fair deal so the market is currently have not delivered this and that is why the energy companies and ofgem need
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to act but it‘s also precisely for this reason that we are publishing this draft bill. the government is concerned about so—called standard variable tariffs, the kind of rate you will be cheap deals come to an end or if you have never changed suppliers. about 12 million households in the uk are currently on those tariffs and it‘s costing them money. on average they will be paying £300 more than the cheapest rates available. the government says customers of the biggest six energy firms are overpaying by £1.4 billion per year. if i was to say the phrase standard variable tariffs to you... i would have no idea what you are talking about? not a clue. i wouldn't know, i wouldn't know. i have no idea really, sorry. do you know what rate you are not the moment, is it a fixed rate? it is, i believe. you believe?
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i don‘t know exactly, i will be honest with you. energy has become a massive thing for an awful lot of people. it is a big part of people's budgets and bills and therefore this is going be really important and offer some much—needed relief. but there could be a downside. opponents of the move say it will damage competition and some people could pay more. if they do impose the cab, we may see some reductions in price, we could see some increases in price. we will certainly see less competition, less viable market and less investment in the energy industry. the government hasn‘t said what level the cap will be set out, that would be a job for ofgem and it would have to carry out consultations first it‘s unlikely the cap will be in place before next autumn. with me is will hodson,
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co—founder of the big deal — an energy collective switch company, which helps consumers find the best energy deal. i want to pick up that last point first, whatever happens, this winter, things aren‘t going to change for millions. that's right, the best chance we have got of this price protection is the back end of 2018 so anyone wanting a good deal now should not be at the mercy of the government to get this through. you need to switch. what difference with a cap make once the legislation comes through? it should make a difference of around £120. two people on the worst deal with their supplier at the moment. that, i‘m afraid, is the vast majority of us. 18 million households across the country. what is it about the standard variable tariff? it is what
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you switch on to if you do not take the choice of choosing a deal for yourself. you can call it a standard variable tariff, a safeguard tariff, and emergency tariff, but you will have to end up somewhere and it will not be the best deal that you could have had if you had chosen it for yourself. it's the language, isn't it? standard tariff, you wouldn‘t worry, but emergency tariff, you would want to do something about it. it's would want to do something about it. it‘s a huge misnomer. when people see standard variable tariff and a bunch of numbers and references they don‘t understand, there might be lulled into getting a sense of security thinking that they are getting what everyone does. you run a switch company. i know what your advice will be but what do you suggest to people if they do switch? people could save 300, £400. that is important to get across. people shouldn‘t thinkjust important to get across. people shouldn‘t think just because important to get across. people shouldn‘t thinkjust because they will be protected by a price cap
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perhaps a year down the line that everything is fine. it is not. the incentive is still very much there for those people to engage with the market and keep switching. will, it is good of you to come in. thank you. 90 children are being taken into care every day in england and wales, with councils warning the situation is unsustainable because of pressures on funding. the number of children in the care system has now reached over 72,000 — a rise of three per cent since last year. dillon terry was put into the care system when he was nine — and following a series of foster placements, he went to hillcrest steps, a residential children‘s home in oxfordshire where sadie dangerfield helped to care for him. they both join us from chipping norton now. thank you both very much for coming on the programme. dillon, when we talk about children going into care, different people have different images. ijust different people have different images. i just want to go different people have different images. ijust want to go into your story a bit because i think you‘d been bought up by your grandparents, your parents i think where both in prison and when your grandfather
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died, your world sort of unravelled, didn‘t it? died, your world sort of unravelled, didn't it? yes, it did. what happened? i think you were taken into nine foster homes? yes, i was in nine foster homes because i didn‘t want the family, the family got rid of my family and i didn‘t have a family any more. i didn‘t wa nt have a family any more. i didn‘t want a have a family any more. i didn‘t wantafamily have a family any more. i didn‘t want a family any more, so i thought it was me against the world. and you got yourself into trouble.|j it was me against the world. and you got yourself into trouble. i did get myself into a little bit of trouble, yes. it wasn‘t a lot of trouble, it was just yes. it wasn‘t a lot of trouble, it wasjust stupid yes. it wasn‘t a lot of trouble, it was just stupid things because i yes. it wasn‘t a lot of trouble, it wasjust stupid things because i had a different mindset when i was younger. but now i have grown out of those mindsets. sadie, what is it that you offer that has got dillon ona that you offer that has got dillon on a different path? i think it's consistency and just being able to stabilise a young person when they have experienced crisis, so it is about matching and bordering and
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giving them —— and nurturing and supporting and giving them a place to talk, a place where people are prepared to listen and make a positive relationship which ultimately is what supported dillon through into his teenage years. dillon, i am through into his teenage years. dillon, iam interested, if you through into his teenage years. dillon, i am interested, if you went through nine foster families, dillon, i am interested, if you went through nine fosterfamilies, these foster families generally deserve universal praise for doing their bit but, as you say, it is not a family. is that the essential problem? no, i appreciate what they all far but for me, it wasn‘t the right thing. i didn‘t want that environment. i just came out of the environment of my own family and i didn‘t feel i wa nted own family and i didn‘t feel i wanted to go into another family. so i rebelled. that‘s not what i wanted. and then i came to hillcrest steps and it changed my life, really. changed my life -- your life and encouraged you to find out what july and the answer appears to be
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football, is that right? yes, definitely. that‘s the thing that has got me through all of this, football. as soon as the whistle goes, the mindset of everything else is gone. you are thinking about football and i live to play football. i'll tell you what, sadie, when i used the word football, you both smiled broadly. you have seen a remarkable change in this young man, haven‘t you? remarkable change in this young man, haven't you? there have been ups and downs and it has been difficult for dillon but ultimately he is a very good boy at heart. he has listened and he haven't always liked what he heard but he has grown into a young man who can reflect and is able to move forward and we are very proud of him. and clearly he is a young man to be very proud of. dillon, when you hear that 90 children are being taken into care every day in england and wales, each one of those has the story presumably very similarto has the story presumably very similar to yours. yes, i think so,
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but everyone‘s story to them is their story, so obviously your story is your story. i thought my story was the worst but coming into this sort of environment and care homes where there are a lot of children who come in and out of the place, you start to hear other people‘s stories and i must admit, that sta rts stories and i must admit, that starts to make you think about what they have gone through which makes you think, oh, my story isn‘t that bad and then you start comparing it and you stop feeling sorry for yourself. you go to do what you want to do. that is inspirational and i just want to ask both of you what you think you will be doing in ten yea rs‘ you think you will be doing in ten years‘ time. you think you will be doing in ten years' time. in ten years' time? i wa nt to years' time. in ten years' time? i want to be in football.|j years' time. in ten years' time? i want to be in football. i fully intend to be still doing what i did at hillcrest steps. well, i wish you
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both well. it‘s a great story and thank you very much for your time in telling it to us. thank you. thank you. alice is here. she has all the business news, but first, the headlines on afternoon live. as the fifth round of brexit talks ends — the eu‘s chief negotiator says there‘ve been no great steps forward — and he calls the lack of progress ‘disturbing‘. sally—anne jones — a british woman from kent who travelled to syria 4 years ago and helped recruit western women for so called islamic state — has reportedly been killed in a drone strike. banking giant hsbc has named john flint, current head of retail banking and wealth management, as its new boss. mr flint, who takes over from outgoing chief executive stuart gulliver, will start his new role next february. the move sees europe‘s biggest bank once again promote a company insider to run the firm.
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young first—time buyers are increasing their overall mortgage debt opting for lower monthly repayments, but a bigger overall bill because of the extra interest incurred. figures show the proportion of new buyers taking out 31 to 35—year mortgages has doubled in 10 years. the average mortgage term is traditionally 25 years. james murdoch will defend his position as sky‘s chairman at its annual shareholder meeting later. three advisory firms have called on shareholders to vote against his re—election, objecting to mr murdoch‘s position as chairman of sky and chief executive of 21st century fox. fox is attempting to buy sky, which some investors say is a conflict of interest for mr murdoch. so, did you‘s ceo was talking today
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and they said they will go fashion free as part of the company‘s move towards sustainability and being conscious. he also said the company would auction off all of their other fur items. animal rights activists have called this huge but a fur trade body has said that this makes no business or environmental sense. gucci isn‘t the first big fashion label out here to make this sort of announcement. stella mccartney has a lwa ys announcement. stella mccartney has always made quite a big deal out of the back they don‘t use animal products and just last year armani announced it was also going to go fur free. let‘s now
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announced it was also going to go furfree. let‘s now go announced it was also going to go fur free. let‘s now go live to the new york stock exchange and speak to michelle who has got a little more on this for us. michelle, this is a really big change, isn‘t it? it means gucci will no longer use any of the major materials it has used before it —— but for a lot, corey oti etc, with animal rights activists saying this is wonderful news and others saying it makes no business sense, does it? alice, i don‘t know if you ever had any of those gucci loafers with kangaroo fur that were fashionable a couple of years ago but this is the kind of thing that the company as a whole is saying they are stepping away from. they are bowing to pressure from consumers. fashion tastes are changing. they have been under pressure from passion —— from animal rights activists for decades but younger customers are indicating
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this same thing now. eventually, they are responding to the market. thank you, great to check in with you. let‘s stick with market activity, shall we, and see what is going on with the markets. simon, as you can see, the ftse 100, going on with the markets. simon, as you can see, the ftse100, having a really good time that at the moment. this is largely due to big drop in sterling that we have seen today after the european union‘s announcement on michel barnier saying that talks had reached an impasse, seeing the pound tumbling against both the euro and the dollar. the ftse100, a lot of those internationally focused companies, they earn money in dollars and therefore they benefit from that. alice, lots more from you later on.
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thank you very much. let‘s have a look at the weather now and philip avery has the latest. hello, thursday always did look to be one of the best days of the week with regard to dry weather and some sunshine as well. all the while, the cloud has been gathering across the western side of scotland, through northern ireland and i think here you will finish the day with rain moving in from the northern atlantic. notice to overnight that the rain really begins to pick up to gail if not severe gale force winds ina number of gail if not severe gale force winds in a number of locations especially in exposure in the far north. it will be a wet and windy start to the new day certainly across a good part of scotland, northern ireland, the hills of northern england and the wet weather getting down towards the hills of wales as well. generally speaking, the further south you are, the drier and brighter and warm your day will be. 20 degrees or so, maybe 21, and that is the theme we take onto the weekend if you are south of
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this weather front, there will be some autumnal warmth to get you through the weekend. this is afternoon live. i am simon mccoy. today at 3pm: brexit negotiations. the uk says there‘s progress. the eu‘s assessment is very different. on this question we‘ve reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing. harvey weinstein case, in the last hour new york police say they‘ll
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reopen an investigation into allegations of a sexual assault. earlier he spoke for the first time. i gotta get help guys. you know what, we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope. boiler pressure, households warned to insulate homes and replace boilers to reduce uk emissions. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. another failed qualifying campaign for scotland and they‘re looking for another manager. gordon strachan‘s contract won‘t be renewed. he has left with immediate effect. in the weather, phil, it‘s warming up. many parts of the british isle are enjoying a pleasant afternoon. the cloud is filling in already. is this the shape of things to come, for more, all the details in half an hour. forget your gordons, your hestons and yourjamies, if you want the best grub in the world you need to go to this pub in yorkshire. hello everyone.
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this is afternoon live. two sides, two negotiatiors — and two very different assessments of where we are with brexit. as the latest round of talks came to a close david davies says progress is being made. his opposite number, michel barnier, disagrees — using the words ‘deadlock‘ and ‘disturbing‘. richard galpin reports. the brexit secretary, david davis, heads out for more talks in brussels this morning. the first phase of the negotiations which deals only with the divorce settlement is still very much bogged down. and afterwards came confirmation that there had been no breakthrough, particularly on the issue of how much money britain would pay to leave the european union. the stalemate means there‘s no chance eu leaders meeting next week will agree to open negotiations on a trade deal. translation: on this question, we have reached a state of deadlock
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which is very disturbing for thousands of project promoters in europe and it is disturbing also for taxpayers. on this basis, i‘m not able, in the current circumstances, to propose to next week‘s european council that we should start discussions on the future relationship. britain was hoping the eu summit next thursday would be the moment the talks moved to the second phase, with the crucial issue of a trade deal between britain and the eu top of the agenda. but now it looks like that will be put back to another eu summit in december. and this just ten months before a deadline set by the eu‘s chief negotiator for a draft deal on the divorce to be put before european parliaments. in response to this,
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david davis appealed to the eu to allow the second phase of talks on a trade deal to begin much sooner. we are ready and well—prepared to start those discussions. as we look at the october european council next week, i hope the member states will recognise the progress we have made and take a step forward in the spirit of the prime minister‘s florence speech. but that doesn‘t seem likely. instead the eu is focussing on getting progress in the talks before the end of this year. we are negotiating in good faith, and we still hope the so—called sufficient progress will be possible by december. however, if it turns out that the talks continue at a slow pace and that sufficient progress has not been reached, then together with our uk friends we will have to think about where we are heading. that veiled warning made here in brussels earlier this week
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was not spelt out in more detail, but it does raise the spectre of britain leaving the eu without a trade deal. we can talk now to ryan heath who‘s the senior eu correspondent at politico. hejoins us now from brussels. ijust wonder, you pay your money, ta ke ijust wonder, you pay your money, take your choice, but are we looking at deadlock, progress, which is it? i would say it really is deadlock. there are small elements of progress. the uk has said it would give direct effect to some — to the agreement if one is reached by march 2019, and that gives a little bit more security to those eu citizens living in the uk and vice versa. but we have a situation where it talks really aren‘t taking place f the national governments aren‘t willing to say there‘s been sufficient progress, then that really is a deadlock. it‘s the two sides not
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willing to make compromises, but really sticking to what they think are their strategic guns and that ultimately is going to be difficult for the uk if it can‘t be resolved by december, because the eu, itsjob is to defend the status quo. the uk is to defend the status quo. the uk is the one that has to get the concessions and nail a deal if it‘s going to avoid disrupting its economy. david davis sort of smiles, michel barnier sort of never does. what‘s the mood of these meetings, do you think? well, they weren't really meeting this week so we can‘t say what the moods were this week. there were a few technical talks and this somewhat sham press conference, where if you haven‘t been negotiating it‘s silly to have a press co nfe re nce negotiating it‘s silly to have a press conference after to talk about negotiations that didn‘t take place. but david davis i think is trying to keep a light touch here in brussels. if he is going to make a move against theresa may, if the negotiations aren‘t working out, he doesn‘t want to be too associated with what‘s going on here, he wants those images always to be of him smiling, rather than being
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those images always to be of him smiling, ratherthan being in those images always to be of him smiling, rather than being in a grumpy mood. that‘s what‘s informing how david davis presents himself and michel barnier, he clearly is someone used to getting his way. he is the maeser of the eu bureaucratic systems and he is not getting his way at the moment. that‘s why he seems a little grumpy. of course michel barnier knows as soon as david davis walks back to the uk he enters a spat with his own cabinet. indeed. one of the problems for the eu in getting what it wants is that the uk in many ways is still negotiating with itself because that cabinet isn‘t united. theresa may looks firmly in place but weakened since the party conference last week and her somewhat ambiguous statements. of course that‘s going to be frustrating for the eu and a lot of hard work for david davis. ryan, thanks very much. a british woman who travelled to syria four years ago to act as a recruiter for the so—called islamic state group has reportedly been killed in a drone strike. sally—annejones, who was originally from kent, became a high profile supporter for is and used social media to encourage western
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girls tojoin them. our security correspondent frank gardner reports. iconic, threatening and british. the propaganda pictures of the jihadist recruiter sally—annejones, who went to syria in 2013 with her young sonjojo and joined so—called islamic state. she married this man, junaid hussain, a computer hacker later killed in a drone strike. together they plotted attacks and pumped out hateful propaganda online. she was a slightly telegenic white woman who had gone to join the fight against bashar al—assad so having her onside was important in terms of projecting the idea they could get into the very reaches of british society. sally—annejones made this syrian city her home, raqqah, now heavily damaged by air strikes. msjones was trying to leave, reportedly to come back to britain. the missile strike by us drone
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reportedly killed her injune, close to syria‘s border with iraq. it‘s not known if her son was with her. her death would bring to at least six the number of british jihadists with is killed in drone strikes. i think what we saw with the cluster of britons is they were involved in actively trying to direct plots in other countries. we‘ve seen this happening in the united states, the uk and other countries as well. so they are targeting individuals they see as a specific threat. we know from research there were some british individuals involved in this direction. jones was useful to is for publicity purposes but now the group is on the verge of military defeat in iraq and syria, her death will have little impact on its already shrinking fortunes. the former punk rock singer from kent who turned 50 this year is now likely to be one more of the hundreds of western
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recruits to is to perish in the collapse of its caliphate. jm has been giving his reaction to this. it's unconfirmed so we have to be quite careful on this. quite clearly it‘s significant if it‘s happened. i think what we now have to do is look to the next phase in syria, which is to bring everyone back around the table to get a political solution because you can‘t go on having a war forever. presumably you would rather sally jones was put on trial.|j presumably you would rather sally jones was put on trial. i think people who have committed crimes ought to be put on trial and when you interrogate someone you get more information about the back ground to it because i represent a constituency that lost many people in 7/7 and we remember what happened that day. would you have given the order to kill sallyjones with a drone strike
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to prevent british armed forces put unnecessarily in harm‘s way? to prevent british armed forces put unnecessarily in harm's way? it's difficult to give an answer to that question which is hypothetical. we have to look at carefully the effects on the civilian population of any bombing that takes place before such a decision is made but you have to look at all the facts. police in new york are reopening an investigation into claims of sexual assault against film producer harvey weinstein. the allegations date back to 2004. meanwhile, the organisation behind the oscars is to consider taking action against the film producer who‘s facing yet more accusations of sexual assault. mr weinstein has admitted his behaviour has caused a lot of pain, but denies many of the allegations against him. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. the disgraced producer seen in public for the first time since the scandal broke. are you doing 0k? i‘m trying my best. after days of mounting allegations, for the first time he‘s addressed the situation in person. we are glad to see you're doing 0k. guys, i‘m not doing ok, i‘m trying.
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i‘ve got to get help, guys. we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope. a second chance seems unlikely. he‘s been suspended from bafta in the uk and the ruling body for the oscars has called an emergency meeting this weekend and described the allegations as repugnant. british model and actress cara delevingne is the latest to come forward — invited to a hotel room to discuss business, she says, instead forced to dodge his advances. the list of actresses includes some of hollywood‘s biggest names including angelina jolie and gwyneth paltrow. a few have accused him of serious sexual assault and rape, something he denies. his spokesperson says all sexual encounters were consensual. the police say they are investigating some of the allegations made against him.
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earlier today a former assistant to weinstein said many knew he was a philanderer but that he went to great lengths to hide his most private moments from them. his voice has been disguised. get some help, man. thank you. it‘s been reported that weinstein is now receiving therapy at a us facility. millions of homes across the uk have to be better insulated — if the government is going to achieve its target for cutting carbon emissions to tackle climate change. and it‘s domestic heating boilers that are one of the biggest problems. one solution being looked at is to cut stamp duty for energy efficient homes to encourage more people to think about insulating their properties. our environment analyst roger harrabin explains. in the bedfordshire countryside, is this the home of the future? normal brick walls, but look at the window frame. the insulation will be
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half a metre thick. the windows, triple glazed. and shut that door. just looking at this door, you can see the thickness of the door, so it‘s really well insulated. but also to maintain the airtightness we don‘t have any letterboxes, so a letterbox would have a lot of heat loss through the door and we avoid that. just two radiators will keep this home warm. it will save £500 on average heating bills. but it could take 20 years to pay back the extra construction cost, so if the government wants homes like this it will have to force developers to build them. and here‘s the real problem. an infrared camera showing heat loss in an existing old home, wasting money and creating needless carbon emissions that are overheating the planet. today, the energy minister hinted that she‘d support changes in stamp duty to incentivise people to install better insulation. over the next 15 years, we know this is a long—term strategy,
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all measures should be looked at and whatever we need to do to deliver these improvements at the lowest possible cost, we shouldn‘t rule anything out. is one way to make old homes warm wrap them in a coat? this is a dutch technique. you can stay in your house while it‘s being done. energy campaigners say ministers need to offer people big incentives to improve their insulation. the government has set some really ambitious targets to decarbonise the uk economy, including decarbonising uk homes. this includes a plan to triple the amount of insulation going into uk homes every year. but the problem is they have not put the money down on the table yet to make this happen and the treasury are going to have to get their act together and help fund this plan. electric vehicles are also encouraged in today‘s plan
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to lower carbon emissions from the whole economy. industry will be urged to be more efficient too. energy campaigners say the ambition is there, but the policies are not. the headlines. the eu‘s chief negotiator says talks with the uk are deadlocked. it‘s been reported that a british woman who became a high profile recruiter for the islamic state group has been killed in syria. sally annejones was a former member of a punk group from kent. police in new york are reopening an investigation into claims of sexual assault against how old producer harvey weinstein. the allegations date back to 2004. ina allegations date back to 2004. in a moment, forget your gordons and hesto ns, in a moment, forget your gordons and h esto ns, if in a moment, forget your gordons and hestons, if you want the best grub in the world, you need to go to this pub in yorkshire. in sport, gordon strachan‘s account
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won‘t be renewed. after almost five yea rs won‘t be renewed. after almost five years in charge he has left his post as scotland manager with immediate effect, just four days after they failed to qualify for next um certificate‘s world cup. —— next summer‘s world cup. . an independent inquiry found that a former coach had created a climate of fear. joanna conte can‘t qualify for the season ending wta finals. it was her last chance to break back into the world‘s top eight players. i will be back with a full update. the trial of an army sergeant accused of sabotaging his wife‘s parachute has been hearing from the man who packed the chute. victoria cilliers suffered multiple injuries when both her main and reserve parachutes failed to open during a jump over salisbury plain. emile cilliers denies the charges.
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duncan kennedy reports from winchester crown court. emile cilliers, on the left here, is accused of trying to sabotage his wife‘s parachute, so he could get an insurance policy pay—out and because he wanted a new life with another woman. the prosecution say he tampered with victoria cilliers‘s parachute by twisting chords on her main chute and removing kit from her reserve chute. alan westley was the man who packed victoria cilliers‘ reserve chute and was today cross—examined by the defence barrister, elizabeth marsh. this is one of our experienced ones, similar to the one involved. mr westley appeared in this video shown to the jury, to explain how reserve chutes are meticulously packed. the reserve slinks, this is a connect device. miss marsh asks whether if the slinks were not put on tightly the equipment would come undone.
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mr westley said it wasn‘t just a case of doing up tightly but also putting them on correctly. miss marsh asked mr westley if he had any reason to think that the slinks were done up incorrectly. mr westley replied, "i guarantee that it was done properly." it was at netheravon airbase in wiltshire that victoria cilliersjumped in 2015. both her main and reserve chutes failed to open properly and she landed in this field, suffering several serious injuries. it ensures the main parachute is orientated the right way. the jury was shown this video of a main parachute being packed. the prosecution claim emile cilliers twisted the lines on his wife‘s main one as well as tampering with her reserve. the jury has visited the airfield and seen where the packing took place. mr cilliers denies two counts of attempted murder. more on the brexit negotiations,
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they‘ve concluded in brussels with little sign of progress. with me is our reality check correspondent paul adams. so, where are we? outstanding reality check i think is what you mean to say! fifth round of talks sincejune, mean to say! fifth round of talks since june, second since mean to say! fifth round of talks sincejune, second since theresa may‘s florence speech and both sides are still talking about the sense of momentum generated by that speech. i think it was quite striking that the warmer, more positive tone of the press co nfe re nce warmer, more positive tone of the press conference two weeks ago was noticeably absent. in some ways this was a tale of two quotes. the second one later. they‘re both from michel barnier. on the first one, on the brexit bill, the divorce bill, last time on this subject mrbarnier spoke ofa time on this subject mrbarnier spoke of a constructive discussion. this time he sounded pretty bleak. translation: this week, however, the uk repeated that it was still not
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ready to spell out these commitments. there have therefore been no negotiations on this subject. we can find ourselves — we confined ourselves to technical discussions, useful discussions but technical discussions. so on this question we have reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing. what are the other sticking points? well, the familiar ones. it‘s hard to tell how much real progress has been made. on the big issues, first of all, citizens‘ rights. signs of deadlock there too. they‘re deep in complex negotiations on arrangements to ensure that the rights of uk citizens living in the eu and eu citizens living in the eu and eu citizens living in the eu and eu citizens living in the uk are best protected. david davis said the two sides have yet to agree on a single model. these are really complicated things to do with family reunification, whether you can take benefits with you, whether british citizens can move on to another eu
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country citizens can move on to another eu cou ntry after citizens can move on to another eu country after brexit. some of the reporting around this in the last few days has suggested that diplomats are finding this incredibly difficult. theresa may speaking just yesterday in parliament said we are very close to an agreement on citizens‘ rights. but it wasn‘t at all clear that was apparent today. and that other one, what about ireland ? apparent today. and that other one, what about ireland? ireland, another very knotty set of technical issues. everyone gress that everything should be done to preserve the freedom of movement and trade across what will after all become the border between the uk and the eu. negotiators spoke of technical discussions, intensive work, of preserving the integrity of the good friday agreement. it does sound as if progress is being made but it‘s slow going. you said earlier, i was listening, tale of two quotes. indeed. just when you think it‘s all gloom and doom, michel barnier ended his part of the news conference with a very different sounding quote. let‘s have a listen and he was talking about the process as a
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whole. translation: there is a new momentum andl translation: there is a new momentum and i remain convinced today that with political will, decisive progress is within our grasp in the next two months. in other words, we may be bogged down right now, and it‘s clear that he does not think that this process can be unlocked in time foran eu that this process can be unlocked in time for an eu leaders‘ summit next week, but he does seem to be saying week, but he does seem to be saying we are deadlocked now, but in two months‘ time at the next eu summit in the middle of december, i think we can move on. now that‘s still frustrating for the british side, they think they‘ve done enough to move on to the trade negotiations, the trade partnership between the uk and the eu already. michel barnier say he is not going to recommend that but thinks he can get thatjob donein that but thinks he can get thatjob done ina that but thinks he can get thatjob done in a couple of months‘ time and that‘s, i suppose, done in a couple of months‘ time and that‘s, isuppose, a done in a couple of months‘ time and that‘s, i suppose, a small crumb of
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comfort for theresa may. paul, thank you. the government has set out plans to cap gas and electricity bills for twelve million households until at least 2020. its draft bill will require the regulator, ofgem, to consult on and impose a temporary cap on standard variable tariffs as soon as possible after the legislation is passed. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. the government reckons the energy market is broken and that millions of people are paying too much for their gas and electricity. now it is planning to introduce a price cap to bring down their bills. our goal is to ensure a fair deal so the market is currently have not delivered this and that is why the energy companies and ofgem need to act but it‘s also precisely for this reason that we are publishing this draft bill. the government is concerned about so—called standard variable tariffs, the kind of rate you will be cheap deals come to an end or if you have never changed suppliers. about 12 million households in the uk are currently on those tariffs and it‘s costing them money.
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on average they will be paying £300 more than the cheapest rates available. the government says customers of the biggest six energy firms are overpaying by £1.4 billion per year. if i was to say the phrase standard variable tariffs to you... i would have no idea what you are talking about? not a clue. i wouldn't know, i wouldn't know. i have no idea really, sorry. do you know what rate you are on the moment, is it a fixed rate? it is, i believe. you believe? i don‘t know exactly, i will be honest with you. energy has become a massive thing for an awful lot of people. it is a big part of people's budgets and bills and therefore this is going be really important and offer some much—needed relief. but there could be a downside.
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opponents of the move say it will damage competition and some people could pay more. if they do impose the cap, we may see some reductions in price, we could see some increases in price. we will certainly see less competition, less viable market and less investment in the energy industry. the government hasn‘t said what level the cap will be set out, that would be a job for ofgem and it would have to carry out consultations first, so it‘s unlikely the cap will be in place before next autumn. it‘s a family owned pub in a village in north yorkshire. but it‘s not any old pub — because this one has just been named the best restaurant in the world, after being voted for by tripadvisor customers. the pub‘s restaurant is run by the uk‘s youngest michelin—starred chef, tommy banks. and it has beaten the likes of heston blumenthal‘s the fat duck and raymond blanc‘s le manoir.
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phil connell went along to sample the menu. nestled on the edge of the north york moors, it‘s a village restaurant that‘s taken the world by storm. the black swan at oldstead isn‘t the best in yorkshire or even britain, according to users of tripadvisor, this fine dining restaurant is the best in the world. it‘s a little bit surreal, it‘s been crazy. we‘re just a yorkshire farming family running a little pub, and to achieve an accolade like this is just amazing. what makes this accolade even more extraordinary is the age of the two brothers who run this family business. at 28 and 30, they are young, ambitious, and now receiving worldwide recognition. with james front of house, and tommy in the kitchen, this country pub has been transformed, earning a michelin star and from diners, glowing recommendations. i‘m very proud actually, as a yorkshire woman, to think that a restaurant in yorkshire has been voted the best restaurant in the world, marvellous.
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it's not always easy to find either, but boy is it worth the effort. but how can a restaurant in a small north yorkshire village take on the industry‘s greats? in second place was raymond blanc‘s famous restaurant in oxfordshire, while daniel‘s in new york came in sixth. there are some amazing restaurants on that list, places that i‘ve been wanting to go to my whole life. so it is amazing. but i think the best thing about this award is that it‘s voted for by our customers. the brothers say that with a bit of yorkshire grit, dreams can come true. in their case, a simple country pub transformed into the world‘s best fine dining restaurant. phil connell, bbc news, oldstead. one minute he is there, now he is here. the chef tommy banks joins one minute he is there, now he is here. the chef tommy banksjoins me now from the world‘s best, i wonder how do you react to that? it's very difficult to know how to react. the world‘s best restaurant but it‘s in the middle of nowhere, i canjust about hear you! a lot of people looking at you now are going to go,
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hang on, i know that face. why do they know that face? the great british menu, but this has been an amazing award. i can‘t believe quite how much publicity it‘s getting but it‘s great everyone is getting behind us and celebrating the fact that a british restaurant has been awarded this. tommy, you were self—taught, weren‘t you ? awarded this. tommy, you were self-taught, weren't you? well! haven‘t had formal training. i prefer the term made it up as we went along as opposed to self—taught. that‘s what we do. went along as opposed to self-taught. that's what we do. ok, it‘s a family affair. your brother is front of house. in terms of the menu, how do you work out and put the menu together, what‘s on it? well, we are farmers originally. my dad is still a farmer and my mum is involved in the business as well. so, we really try and build a menu about what we have grown and been able to forage. that‘s been really important with this award because i think it‘s voted for by guests and
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they enjoy the experience of what we have been doing. what do you make of it, because you look at the hestons and gordons and jamies of this world, you strike me as very different. yeah, i think so, world, you strike me as very different. yeah, ithink so, it's important to be different, isn‘t it? all those guys are different, they‘re just different to me. yeah, it‘s a very surreal award to get when you look at the other people on the list. but it‘s great. we are very chilled out, we are informal. that‘s come through. that‘s what people want from fine dining now. they want it to be friendly and relaxed. looking through the tasting menu, turbot with strawberries and cream and strawberries with hay. what‘s that about? cream and strawberries with hay. what's that about? well, hay! growing up on a farm there‘s a lot of it around. but it‘s an amazing flavour, we infuse it in cream and it tastes like biscuits to be honest. there‘s lots of interesting flavours we found from being on the farm. what do you eat yourself, at
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the end of the day and you sit down, tired, exhausted and hungry, what do you have? oh, by the end of the day and we finish cooking, like 1am, usually go to the fridge and eat a load of cheese. on a day off, i like to put a slow braise on on a day off. a lot of people say you are impossible to find, you agree with them. what is it do you think that has made you the world‘s greatest? well, i mean, this award is voted for by the customers so i think a lot of awards for me can be all about just the food whereas this lot of awards for me can be all aboutjust the food whereas this is aboutjust the food whereas this is about the whole experience, customer service as well, and i think it‘s that we are very welcoming. we are a family business and i think i think it is the originality as well. we have tried very hard to do
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our own thing and i think it‘s paid off. you are a michelin starred chef yourself. do you ever go out and spend a fortune at somebody else‘s michelin starred restaurant and spoil yourself. absolutely, michelin starred restaurant and spoilyourself. absolutely, yes. that‘s what they‘re therefore, isn‘t it? yes, i love eating out and hasn‘t the food culture in britain got even better? the whole food scene, in the last five years or so, has really rocketed and britain is one of the best in the wild now. stop being so diplomatic! i am really asking, who is good, who is not? i am not going to say who is not? i am not going to say who is not good. the best place i have eaten this year in britain is the fa ct eaten this year in britain is the fact that which i know isn‘t the most accessible of restaurants, it‘s very expensive, but it‘s absolutely amazing. but there are lots of really good restaurants. what is next for you? what is next for me? well, just getting through today, really. it‘s an absolutely crazy
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since this award so get through today and then i‘m going to consolidate a bit. i‘ve got lots of plans, just finished writing a cookbook as well which will be out next year, which will be fantastic, but coming yes, leyds going on. what cheese have you got in the fridge for tonight? sorry? what cheese have you got in the fridge for tonight? i‘ve got a massive piece of gorgonzola so i will tap into that later with some beer. make it champagne because it is very deserved. thank you very much. let‘s get the weather now. hello, thursday did always looked to be one of the best days of the week in regards to dry weather and some sunshine as well but all the while the cloud has been gathering across the western side of england, northern ireland and scotland and you will finish the day here with rain moving in from the atlantic. the wind really begins
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to pick up in the north of scotland as well with gail if not severe gale force winds in a number of locations, especially in exposure in the far north. it will be a wet and windy start to friday across scotland, northern ireland and the hills of northern england. the wet weather getting down to the hills of northern wales as well. 20 degrees or so northern wales as well. 20 degrees orso in the northern wales as well. 20 degrees or so in the south, where it will be drier and brighter. that is what we ta ke o nto drier and brighter. that is what we take onto the weekend. if you are south of this weather front, there will be autumnal warmth to get you through the weekend. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. brexit negotiations: the uk says there‘s progress. the eu‘s assessment is very different. translation: on this question, we‘ve reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing. our aim is to provide as much
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certainty as possible to citizens, business and the european union — and on this we are making real and tangible progress. harvey weinstein — in the last hour, new york police say they‘ll reopen an investigation into allegations of a sexual assault. earlier he spoke for the first time. i gotta get help, guys. you know what, we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope, ok. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. it is goodbye gordon after almost five years. the scottish football association say it is is time for a new direction. that is the polite way they have put it this afternoon as they look to prepare for their next qualifying campaign, the year rose in 2020. we know gordon
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strachan‘s contract will not be renewed next month. a mutual parting of ways was agreed at a board meeting today, just four days after scotla nd meeting today, just four days after scotland failed to clinch a spot in russia for the world cup next summer. the second campaign in which they have fallen short of reaching a major tournament. they last featured ata major tournament. they last featured at a major tournament in 1998, at the world cup in france. the scots we re the world cup in france. the scots were at a lady championship then. here is the scottish football reporter. the news from hampden park is that scotland are looking for a new football manager. the scottish foot ball new football manager. the scottish football association met here this morning to discuss gordon strachan's feature and not long after 2pm this statement was released, confirming that gordon strachan's tenure as
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national mother was coming term —— national mother was coming term —— national manager was coming to an end with immediate effect. he released a statement saying it was a real privilege to be national manager and his biggest regret was not giving fans the major tournament finals he feels they deserved. the scottish football association chairman has been quoted, saying it is time for a new impetus and a change was needed and a new direction to prepare for the euro twe nty20 direction to prepare for the euro twenty20 campaign. this all comes after gordon strachan presided over to failed qualifying campaigns, the first to get to euro 2016 last year and then this latest failure with the world cup in russia coming up next year. strachan was appointed in 2013 and after two failed campaigns,
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the search is underway for gordon strachan's successor. no real rush for a replacement for their next competitive match. it isn‘t for another 11 months, to try to qualify for the european championships in 2020. that won‘t stop the bookies opening up the books. malky mackay is currently the performance director at the scottish football association, so could be an easy fit, currently the favourite. david moyes, remember him? he is also in the running, simon. ollie, thank you. ijust the running, simon. ollie, thank you. i just want to bring the running, simon. ollie, thank you. ijust want to bring you a bit of breaking news. we are healing from —— hearing from the high court that royal mail have won an injunction to stop a 48—hour strike from going ahead. we will get the latest from the high court a little
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later on. it‘s the story inspired loosely by true events that has terrified generations — and a later film adaptation is widely considered to be one of the scariest of all time. now it‘s the turn of london‘s theatre audiences to experience the terror of the exorcist when it‘s unleashed onto the west end stage for the first time next week. it tells the story of a young girl bed—ridden by a strange illness, forcing her mother to turn to the local priest for help. and we can talk to one of the cast members — adam garcia — who plays father damien is here now. great to see you. and you. it is one of the scariest films most people have ever seen. how can you replicate that on stage? is it as kerry? we hope so. someone fainted when we did a tryout in birmingham last year so that is always a good sign. this is based more of the novel, i guess, and all three are
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slightly different. the novel is more like a detective story, trying to figure out who or what killed this one person and the film obviously was terrifying because no one had ever seen horror like this. audiences are now used to horror. they have had 30, 40 years of horror films since then but this is both disturbing and horrific because it involves, it involves two things and this is what i like about the play, when we think about possession or exorcism or the devil, that sort of stuff, they are things we think about long ago in the past, where people had mental health problems, oh, they are possessed. this deals with the fact that a lot of the characters in the play are damaged or grieving or deeply unsettled and they have mental health issues, whether it be addiction or guilt and grief or esteem or any of these
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things. the play deals with how we think of mental health now and then challenges that with the idea that what if it is that mental health? what if it is something else? your role, you are the assisted, if you like, to the exorcist, played by peter bowles. and alsojenny seag rove peter bowles. and alsojenny seagrove is in this. it's a great cast. it really is a great cast. the phenomenal director directing this, although it is very disturbing and horrific, he has really focused on the story and the relationships, because that is where the people get the empathy and that terror from, from the fact these people need each other. a lot of people looking now will think, i know that face. they will think, i know that face. they will think, i know that face. they will think of the film poyet diaby. you were a dancer to begin with, when she? yes, i still am. i was a
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dancer doing musicals when i first arrived in the uk. at 17, you were in school in australia telling your mates you were a dancer. a lot of them said ya, yeah. you had a great a nswer them said ya, yeah. you had a great answer for that? yes, i would point out that i was in a room full of ladies or girls and they would be off tackling each other in rugby and i would be lifting girls in ballet, although i never dated any of those girls. you have made the uk your home. you have been here 23 years. and coming up next, one of the is talking about already, murder on the orient express. you are in that? yes, i can‘t wait. i had the pleasure of working for the bryan oviedo company in the winter ‘s tale
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about two years ago, a year and a half ago, and then i was asked to do albeit a small part in the movie. i had never been on a set that the, with kenneth branagh directing, johnny depp. it seems like every actor on earth of any worth it in it. dame judi dench and me. it is quite something. almost everyone will have seen some version of this film. how will it be different?” guess that is the enduring brilliance of agatha christie, the structure of how she does a mystery ora structure of how she does a mystery or a thriller still sort of engages and for those who don‘t know the story, which they might not, it is a lwa ys story, which they might not, it is always a thrill to try to work out a whodunnit. you have lived in this country, you still have your accent.
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although i hear you do a really mean east end accent. oh, look, i had to do one for my last play and actually someone said i played an australian and an east end and they said, it‘s such as james he can‘t get the australian right. i couldn‘t figure out which one to choose once i got hit. there are so many. i could go anywhere. but i haven‘t quite got the london one. as i say, you are settled here, you have got a child and one on the way. many congratulations. thank you very much. what else does the future hold for you? i don't know. i fell in love with london because of the theatre scene. i have done acting, dancing, presenting. is the biggest seenin dancing, presenting. is the biggest seen in london still seen as the best? because broadway has always been up there. broadway is amazing but i have always loved london, i
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think it‘s an amazing city and the uk. i love what they do with it here. of course i would love to go to broadway and maybe do something there one day. in the meantime, of course, you have got the exorcist, opening in a couple of weeks? yes, previews are for the next couple of nights and then press night is halloween. it runs all the way to march 11, so throughout the dark winter period there will be a dark winter period there will be a dark winter we show on. in the film, you played a role. presumably there was a moment where you saw the effects in the theatre for the first time. it was incredible. we have had illusionists working on it to try to create this atmosphere. people get really... because the set is really
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dark as well, it‘s really gloomy, people get full, the effects work really well. am i right in thinking there is an age limit on this? there is. i think it‘s 18, because it is graphic and the nature of the content is also graphic. well, you have got every under 18—year—old then, iam have got every under 18—year—old then, i am going to see that! add—in, it is great to see you. adam garcia. thank you. back to afternoon live and trainee gps will be offered money to work in parts of the uk that struggle to recruit. there are also plans to boost by a third the number of training places for accident and emergency doctors as our health editor hugh pym reports. today, plans to try to boost recruitment in some parts of the health service in england have been
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announced but new research suggests there are major challenges finding some clinical staff. the number of places for doctors starting specialist training in emergency medicine will be increased from 300 to 400 per year. the health secretary is to increase a scheme offering a one—off payment of £20,000 to encourage gps to work in areas where recruitment has been difficult. but a report by the kings fund think tank says number of people visiting nhs recruitment is falling for the first time since 2013. the government‘s new gp recruitment plan is designed to take the pressure of existing doctors as the pressure of existing doctors as the workload keeps increasing. most gps work incredibly hard and find that their work is very frustrating. they can‘t find as long as they want with their patients. one of the reasons for that is that in parts of the country it is very hard to recruit new gps when agp requires.
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recruiting new staff will take time. right now, the nhs is focused on pressures and getting more people including staff to have a flu jab. there are worries that the next few months will be extremely challenging. the nhs is under severe and unrelenting pressure. i think many people are very worried that this winter will be particularly difficult and the thing that i worry about most is that we have an outbreak of flu or the narrow virus that puts an added strain on the nhs services. labour said as winter approached, workforce failures had left the nhs precariously exposed and what was needed was a sustainable, long—term plans and more funding. hugh pym, bbc news. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has ordered an explanation from china after a british man was denied entry into hong kong. human rights activist ben rogers — who has been a vocal critic of chinese—ruled hong kong‘s human rights record was denied entry into the country yesterday morning and escorted on a flight back to thailand.
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and ben rogers is with me now having just returned to london from bangkok. it is good to see you but you would rather not be here. you would rather be in hong kong. what happened yesterday? you are right. i would prefer yesterday? you are right. i would p refer to yesterday? you are right. i would prefer to be in hong kong. iflew in yesterday morning, abridged immigration in the normal way and when they put my name into the computer, the computer said no and they took me to one side, asks to be not many questions and then told me they were denying the entry but refused to give as a reason. i asked several times that they said, we can‘t comment further. several times that they said, we can't comment further. why do you think they didn‘t let you in? can't comment further. why do you think they didn't let you in?” think they didn't let you in?” think two reasons. as he said, i have been outspoken in expressing concern that one country, two systems, as it has been over the past several years, has been facing gradual erosion of the basic freedom
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of hong kong. i think there is also a misunderstanding of the purpose of my visit and the status that i have. i happen to be the deputy chair of the conservative party human rights commission. they busily sober at —— they obviously saw that as an official visit and despite me assuring them in advance that i absolutely was not going... what capacity were you going in?” absolutely was not going... what capacity were you going in? i was going personally on a personal level to meet people. you can't have been that surprised when they put your name in the computer.” that surprised when they put your name in the computer. i wasn't that surprised as i had been warned that this was a possibility in advance but on another way i am surprised because one country, two systems is supposed to mean the hong kong government being in charge of affairs, particularly immigration, and asa
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affairs, particularly immigration, and as a british citizen, there was no requirement for a visa in advance andi no requirement for a visa in advance and i see this as a very worrying sign. very quickly, boris johnson says something needs to be done but why isn‘t anything being done? says something needs to be done but why isn't anything being done?” welcome his statement but i think there has been a real reticence about standing up to china because of its economic power, because of its influence in the world, but i think the time has come for others in the world to stand up to china and actually i think china respects you more when you stand up to them rather than kowtow to them. well, benedict rogers, a little earlier than you hoped, but welcome home. thank you. the united states is to withdraw from unesco, accusing the body of anti—israel bias. unesco has expressed regret over the united states official decision to withdraw from its organisation. they said it marked a loss for multilateralism
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and for the marked a loss for multilateralism and forthe un marked a loss for multilateralism and for the un family. 90 children are being taken into care every day in england and wales, with councils warning the situation is unsustainable because of pressures on funding. the number of children in the care system has now reached over 72,000 — a rise of three per cent since last year. council bosses responsible for child protection services they it is the biggest rise in seven years. alice is here. we will speak low pay in just a moment but first, our headlines. the eu‘s to brexit negotiator says talks with the uk are deadlocked over what has been known —— become known as the divorce bill. it has been said that a woman who became a high—profile recruiterfor so—called islamic state has been killed. sallyjones was from kent. police in new york are reopening
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claims of sexual assault against harvey when steam. the allegations date back to 2004. thanks, simon. iam thanks, simon. i am alice baxter. banking giant hsbc has named john flint, current head of retail banking and wealth management, as its new boss. mr flint, who takes over from outgoing chief executive stuart gulliver, will start his new role next february. the move sees europe‘s biggest bank once again promote a company insider to run the firm. young first—time buyers are increasing their overall mortgage debt, opting for lower monthly repayments, but a bigger overall bill because of the extra interest incurred. figures show the proportion of new buyers taking out 31 to 35—year mortgages has doubled in 10 years. the average mortgage term is traditionally 25 years. james murdoch has won backing from sky shareholders to stay as chairman.
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three advisory firms had called on shareholders to vote against his re—election, objecting to mr murdoch‘s position as chairman of sky and chief executive of 21st century fox. fox is attempting to buy sky, which some investors had said was a conflict of interest for mr murdoch. asi as i said, you were looking at the issue of low pay. a new report says the number of low paid people in the uk has dropped by 20,000 in the last year. that‘s good news, isn‘t it? uk has dropped by 20,000 in the last year. that's good news, isn't it?m is the biggest drop we have seen in 40 yea rs is the biggest drop we have seen in 40 years but this report says we are still too reliant on low—paid workers and it also points out the huge discrepancies that exist across the country. people in certain countries are form —— far more likely to be on low pay and that women for example are far more likely to be on low pay although that gap is shortening. the national
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living wage has something to do with that? yes, the introduction of the national living wage for everyone over the age of 25 really did boost this figure. it is currently set at £7 50 per hour. that came up in april this year. for the benefit of clarity, the definition of someone who is low—paid is someone earning less tha n who is low—paid is someone earning less than two thirds of the median hourly wage. that works out at £8 25. when a national living wage was introduced, lots of businesses were quite nervous about it. earlier on, we spoke to conor darcey about it and asked whether any of those fears we re and asked whether any of those fears were actually justified. and asked whether any of those fears were actuallyjustified.” and asked whether any of those fears were actuallyjustified. i mean, this is always the fear, that if you raise the minimum wage to high it will start to damage employment and the people you are trying to help who are most adversely affected. but the evidence coming out today is that it hasn't had that impact and
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firms have ta ken that it hasn't had that impact and firms have taken a range of responses, they are bringing people in at entry—level or using more technology, and the knocking —— knock—on effect is not hurting people. something we have spoken of already, the cap on energy prices for 12 million households. already, the cap on energy prices for12 million households. yes, big news. this draft bill will give more power to the regulator ofgem to place a cap on an upper limit on the standard variable tariffs, a temporary upper limit on that tariffs. they estimate it will save consumers hundreds of pounds a year and it also reckons that this increased power for the and it also reckons that this increased powerfor the regulator, ofgem, will give consumers much more power to choose a better tariffs. there does seem to be a problem with standard variable tariffs. what are they? they offer consumers more
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flexibility but the problem is they tend to be 25% more expensive than other tariffs offered by providers. it is also argued that despite lots of awareness campaigns, consumers are not aware of that and they are not aware of how easy it is to change suppliers and they get stuck in this tariffs and are overpaying. we spoke earlier to anne robinson from the energy comparison website you switch and she said it is time consumers were offered a better energy deal. it has been going on for a long time. they have been talking about doing something for a long time so i am very pleased action is now being taken because we must face the fact that we, privatised energy has been going on for almost 20 years and for people who switch regulate, 50% of this, we are doing very well, but unfortunately — — 15% are doing very well, but unfortunately —— 15% of us, we are doing very well, but unfortunately most of us are on very expensive
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variable tariffs and in fact what is happening is most of the energy companies are making most of their money out of that and, in a way, you could say they are subsidising some of the fixed tariffs. it is time to put an end to that by capping them to make sure people get a good deal. 0k, to make sure people get a good deal. ok, you will be back with the markets later. thank you very much. now, a look at the weather. here is philip first they always did look like one of the best days of the week with regards to dry weather but all of the well cloud has been gathering across the west and you will end the day up here with cloud coming in from the atlantic and the wind will also pick up, that is gail if not severe gale force wind in a number of locations expressly in exposure —— especially in exposure in the north. in wet and windy start to the
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day certainly across parts of scotla nd day certainly across parts of scotland and northern ireland, the hills of northern england. generally speaking, the further south and east you are, the dryer, fine and will make your day will be. 20 degrees or so, maybe 21, and that is the theme we ta ke so, maybe 21, and that is the theme we take onto the weekend. if you are south of this weather front, there will be some autumnal warmth to get you through the weekend. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at four. brexit negotiations — the uk says there‘s progress. the eu‘s assessment is very different. on this question, we‘ve reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing. the harvey weinstein case. new york police say they‘ll reopen an investigation into allegations of a sexual assault. earlier, he spoke for the first time. i gotta get help, guys. you know what, we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope — ok? boiler pressure — households are warned to insulate homes
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and replace boilers, to reduce uk emissions. coming up all the sport with mike. gore dan‘s gone. coming up all the sport with mike. gore dan's gone. now a huge surprise, four days after scotland failed to qualify for the russia world cup next year. strachan has left his position as scotland manager with immediate effect. he took charge in 2013 but scotland are now looking for a new boss. phil has the weather. it will warm up, isn‘t it? phil has the weather. it will warm up, isn't it? it will. no complaints about the weather today but we have been talking about the rain in cumbria, and here is the rub, the rivers are already up, the rain is on the way back, more details with you in half an hour. details with you in half an hour. also coming up. forget your gordons, your hestons, and yourjamies. we hearfrom tommy — he‘s the chef at the best restaurant in the world. two sides, two negotiatiors —
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and two very different assessments of where we are with brexit. as the latest round of talks came to a close david davies says progress is being made. his opposite number, michel barnier, disagrees — using the words ‘deadlock‘ and ‘disturbing‘. richard galpin reports. the brexit secretary, david davis, heads out for more talks in brussels this morning. the first phase of the negotiations which deals only with the divorce settlement is still very much bogged down. and afterwards came confirmation that there had been no breakthrough, particularly on the issue of how much money britain would pay to leave the european union. the stalemate means there‘s no chance eu leaders meeting next week will agree to open negotiations on a trade deal. translation: on this question, we have reached a state of deadlock
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which is very disturbing for thousands of project promoters in europe and it is disturbing also for taxpayers. on this basis, i‘m not able, in the current circumstances, to propose to next week‘s european council that we should start discussions on the future relationship. britain was hoping the eu summit next thursday would be the moment the talks moved to the second phase, with the crucial issue of a trade deal between britain and the eu top of the agenda. but now it looks like that will be put back to another eu summit in december. and this just ten months before a deadline set by the eu‘s chief negotiator for a draft deal on the divorce to be put before european parliaments. in response to this, david davis appealed to the eu
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to allow the second phase of talks on a trade deal to begin much sooner. we are ready and well—prepared to start those discussions. as we look at the october european council next week, i hope the member states will recognise the progress we have made and take a step forward in the spirit of the prime minister‘s florence speech. but that doesn‘t seem likely. instead the eu is focussing on getting progress in the talks before the end of this year. we are negotiating in good faith, and we still hope the so—called sufficient progress will be possible by december. however, if it turns out that the talks continue at a slow pace and that sufficient progress has not been reached, then together with our uk friends we will have to think about where we are heading. that veiled warning made here in brussels earlier this week
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was not spelt out in more detail, but it does raise the spectre of britain leaving the eu without a trade deal. let‘s get more reaction now from the labour mp and chair of the commons brexit select committee, hilary benn. he‘s at westminster. are you depressed by what is going on? it is not a surprise, it has been clear for on? it is not a surprise, it has been clearfor some time, on? it is not a surprise, it has been clear for some time, that the eu was not prepared to move on to the next stage of negotiation, i think that is vital it happens as quickly as possible. the uk having said the prime minister in her speech in florence, we will seek transitional arrangele, the purpose is to offer certainty to business, and thejobs is to offer certainty to business, and the jobs that depend on them, about what is going to happen after believe the institutions of the european union, at the end of march
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2019. and what has happened today means that process cannot start until the next european council, in december, and all the time, the clock is ticking, we really need to get on with, and the government needs to do everything it can to make sure we do get on to face the talks. just looking at what is going on today, some people get the impression that this is just a case of the eu waiting until the uk comes into line. that word negotiation doesn‘t exist. into line. that word negotiation doesn't exist. look, in any negotiation you need both sides to compromise. that is my point. it doesn‘t seem as though there is compromise on one side when there has to be on the other. to be clear, i think that the talks should move on, to phase two as quickly as possible. if that requires movement on the part of the eu, they should make that movement, but let us be honest, it doesn‘t help that once again this week, we have seen open
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disagreement within the british cabinet, that doesn‘t help the negotiations in brussels because the 27 look at britain and think we are not sure what the government wants, and,i not sure what the government wants, and, ithink not sure what the government wants, and, i think to some extent the negotiations have been held hostage by those disagreements and to hear people talking again in britain this week about no deal, well, that is not something that is going to help, encourage the 27 to move on to the next stage of the negotiations because if you are serious about achieving a deal why are you spending time talking about no deal in particular, because it would be disastrous for the british economy, the return of tariff, making it harderfor the return of tariff, making it harder for the the return of tariff, making it harderfor the financial the return of tariff, making it harder for the financial services, we would leave important european bodies that deal with medicine safety, aviation, food, everywhere you look there would be a return of a hard border in northern ireland which everybody says they don‘t want, we need on the british sidance
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clarity, it is not thinking about no deal, it is focussed on trying to reach an agreement and we need europe, of course, to move as well, so that part two of the negotiations can start, so we can get the nature of the transitional agreement, agreed as quickly as possible. aren‘t you being a bit affair. they are damned if they do, damned if they don‘t. they need to prepare for everything just because they say they are looking at what happenings if there is no deal, they have to, don‘t they? if there is no deal, they have to, don't they? the prime minister said for a long time a bad deal is better than no deal. no deal is the worst deal of all, secondly it has taken a long time, for the government to get to the place where they should have arrived earlier, which is recognising you can‘t negotiate the kind of new relationship we need with the 27 member states in the time that is available. that is why it has been obvious for a long time transitional arrangements would be needed. it was only three weeks‘ ago that the prime minister finally
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recognised that reality, and if we are losing time because of disagreements, that is reducing the amount of time that is available to negotiate the substance of a deal, which is what and i am sure the 27 wa nt which is what and i am sure the 27 want but the clock is running dough on us. —— down on us the organisation behind the oscars is to consider taking action against the film producer, harvey weinstein, who‘s facing yet more accusations of sexual assault. the academy of motion pictures has called the allegations "repugnant" and said it would hold discussions this weekend. mr weinstein has admitted his behaviour has "caused a lot of pain", but denies many of the allegations against him. our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba reports. the disgraced producer seen in public for the first time since the scandal broke. are you doing ok? i‘m trying my best. after days of mounting allegations, for the first time he‘s addressed the situation in person. we are glad to see you're doing 0k.
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i‘m not doing ok, i‘m trying. i‘ve got to get help, guys. we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope. a second chance seems unlikely. he‘s been suspended from bafta in the uk and the ruling body for the oscars has called an emergency meeting this weekend and described the allegations as repugnant. british model and actress cara delevingne is the latest to come forward — invited to a hotel room to discuss business, she says, instead forced to dodge his advances. to discuss business, she says, instead forced to dodge his advances. the list of actresses includes some of hollywood‘s biggest names including angelina jolie and gwyneth paltrow. a few have accused him of serious sexual assault and rape, something he denies. his spokesperson says all sexual encounters were consensual. the police say they are investigating some of the allegations made him. earlier today a former assistant to weinstein said many knew he was a philanderer but that he went to great lengths to hide his most private moments from them. his voice has been disguised. get some help, man.
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it‘s been reported that weinstein is now receiving therapy at a us facility. a british woman who travelled to syria four years ago to act as a recruiter for the so—called islamic state group has reportedly been killed in a drone strike. sally—annejones, who was originally from kent, became a high profile supporter for is and used social media to encourage western girls tojoin them. our security correspondent frank gardner reports. iconic, threatening and british. the propaganda pictures of the jihadist recruiter sally—annejones, who went to syria in 2013 with her young sonjojo and joined so—called islamic state. she married this man, junaid hussain, a computer hacker
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later killed in a drone strike. together they plotted attacks and pumped out hateful propaganda online. she was a slightly telegenic white woman who had gone to join the fight against bashar al—assad so having her onside was important in terms of projecting the idea they could get into the very reaches of british society. sally—annejones made this syrian city her home, raqqah, now heavily damaged by air strikes. msjones was trying to leave, reportedly to come back to britain. the missile strike by us drone reportedly killed her injune, close to syria‘s border with iraq. it‘s not known if her son was with her. her death would bring to at least
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six the number of british jihadists with is killed in drone strikes. i think what we saw with the cluster of britons is they were involved in actively trying to direct plots in other countries. we‘ve seen this happening in the united states, the uk and other countries as well. so they are targeting individuals they see as a specific threat. we know from research there were some british individuals involved in this direction. jones was useful to is for publicity purposes but now the group is on the verge of military defeat in iraq and syria, her death will have little impact on its already shrinking fortunes. the former punk rock singer from kent who turned 50 this year is now likely to be one more of the hundreds of western recruits to is to perish in the collapse of its caliphate. millions of homes across the uk have to be better insulated —
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if the government is going to achieve its target for cutting carbon emissions to tackle climate change. and it‘s domestic heating boilers that are one of the biggest problems. one solution being looked at is to cut stamp duty for energy efficient homes to encourage more people to think about insulating their properties. our environment analyst roger harrabin explains. in the bedfordshire countryside, is this the home of the future? normal brick walls, but look at the window frame. the insulation will be half a metre thick. the windows, triple glazed. and shut that door. just looking at this door, you can see the thickness of the door, so it‘s really well insulated. but also to maintain the airtightness we don‘t have any letterboxes, so a letterbox would have a lot of heat loss through the door and we avoid that. just two radiators will keep this home warm. it will save £500 on average heating bills. but it could take 20 years to pay back the extra construction cost, so if the government wants homes like this it will have to force developers to build them. and here‘s the real problem.
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an infrared camera showing heat loss in an existing old home, wasting money and creating needless carbon emissions that are overheating the planet. today, the energy minister hinted that she‘d support changes in stamp duty to incentivise people to install better insulation. over the next 15 years, we know this is a long—term strategy, all measures should be looked at and whatever we need to do to deliver these improvements at the lowest possible cost, we shouldn‘t rule anything out. is one way to make old homes warm wrap them in a coat? this is a dutch technique. you can stay in your house while it‘s being done. energy campaigners say ministers need to offer people big incentives to improve their insulation. the government has set some really ambitious targets
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to decarbonise the uk economy, including decarbonising uk homes. this includes a plan to triple the amount of insulation going into uk homes every year. but the problem is they have not put the money down on the table yet to make this happen and the treasury are going to have to get their act together and help fund this plan. electric vehicles are also encouraged in today‘s plan to lower carbon emissions from the whole economy. industry will be urged to be more efficient too. energy campaigners say the ambition is there, but the policies are not. roger harrabin, bbc news. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the eu‘s chief brexit negotiator, says talks with the uk are deadlocked over the issue of financial commitments, in what has become known as the "divorce bill". police in new york are re—opening an investigation into claims of sexual assault against hollywood producer harvey weinstein, the allegations date back to 2004. it‘s being reported that a british
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woman who became a high—profile recruiter for the islamic state group has been killed in syria. sally—annejones was a former member of a punk group from kent. in a moment... forget your gordons, your hestons, and yourjamies. if you want the best grub in the world, you need to go to this pub — in yorkshire. and in the sport we have a gordon. gordon strachan‘s contract won‘t be renewed. he has left his post at scotla nd renewed. he has left his post at scotland manager with immediate effect, just four days after failing to qualify for the world cup nec summer. british swimming has apologised to 14 para athletes after finding they were subjected to unacceptable behaviour. a inquiry has found a former coach created a climate of fear and johanna konta can‘t qualify from the seasons final after withdrawing from the kremlin cup with a foot injury. all the details on that at half
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past. see you then. borisjohnson has boris johnson has been borisjohnson has been talking, he says wety we have made helpful suggestions to get the great brexit ship moving. this follows michel barnier‘s view of how 2 talks are progressing and in a quote i suspect will have borisjohnson has boris johnson has been borisjohnson has been talking, he says wety we have made helpful suggestions to get the great brexit ship moving. this follows michel barnier‘s view of how 2 talks are progressing and in a quote i suspect will have mileage in it, he says "it is time to put a tyinger in the tank, and get this brexit thing done.". so that is borisjohnson‘s view, we will have a reaction later on from westminster. high winds are again fanning wildfires that have killed at least 23 people in northern california. almost 300 people are reported missing, but police say that that may be due to the chaotic nature of the forced evacuations. thousands have been left homeless by the 22 huge blazes, which are spreading quickly and unpredictably. i spoke to cbs correspondent greg mills in the last hour, and he gave me this update from santa rosa in northern california.
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iger in the tank, and get this brexit thing done.". so that is boris johnson‘s brexit thing done.". so that is borisjohnson‘s view, we will have a reaction later on from westminster. there is four days into this fire and no progress made whatsoever. entire towns have been evacuated, there is a town 5,000 people lived there, it is a ghost town this morning because everyone was forced to leave there. we couldn‘t go to our hotel last night in nap a because that, parts of it were under an evacuation order, so it is looking grim, in a lot of respects because they aren‘t making progress, they are trying hard but not making any progress because of the winds, it is calm right now, but as the day progresses they become stronger and stronger and push this fire, and then you mentioned 23 people have been, confirmed dead from this fire, confirmed kill in this fire, hundreds are missing, again this is day four, have a lot of people together, but they are very concerned because there are so many homes that have burned down they have not been able to go through, they will be concerned they will be
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finding more bodies. bodies: there is nothing behind you so people have lost everything, those that survived. if you could see, with the sun was up here, it is early morning here you could a 360 you would not see one house as far as you can see, andi see one house as far as you can see, and i mean it is a long way, blocks and i mean it is a long way, blocks and blocks, and you would not see one house standing. it is remarkable. we saw some people whose homes survived about a mile or two away and they were walking... so surreal because you see active people and nothing but devastation round them and they are saying they have never seen anything like it. it is hard to fathom and when the sun comes up, we just marvel at what we are seeing. it is something. it‘s a family owned pub in a village in north yorkshire. but it‘s not any old pub — because this one has just been named the best restaurant in the world after being voted for by tripadvisor customers.
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the pub‘s restaurant is run by the uk‘s youngest michelin—starred chef, tommy banks. and it has beaten the likes of heston blumenthal‘s the fat duck and raymond blanc‘s le manoir. phil connell went along to sample the menu. nestled on the edge of the north york moors, it‘s a village restaurant that‘s ta ken the world by storm. the black swan at oldstead isn‘t the best in yorkshire or even britain, according to users of tripadvisor, this fine dining restaurant is the best in the world. it‘s a little bit surreal. it‘s been crazy. we‘re just a yorkshire farming family running a little pub, and to achieve an accolade like this is just amazing. what makes this accolade even more extraordinary is the age of the two brothers who run this family business. at 28 and 30, they are young, ambitious, and now receiving worldwide recognition. with james front of house, and tommy in the kitchen, this country pub has been transformed, earning a michelin star and from diners, glowing recommendations. i‘m very proud actually, as a yorkshire woman,
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to think that a restaurant in yorkshire has been voted the best restaurant in the world, marvellous. it's not always easy to find either, but boy is it worth the effort. but how can a restaurant in a small north yorkshire village take on the industry‘s greats. in second place was raymond blanc‘s famous restaurant in oxfordshire, while daniel‘s in new york came in sixth. there are some amazing restaurants on that list, places that i‘ve been wanting to go to my whole life. so it is amazing. but i think the best thing about this award is that it‘s voted for by our customers. the brothers say that with a bit of yorkshire grit, dreams can come true. in their case, a simple country pub transformed into the world‘s best fine dining restaurant. phil connell, bbc news, oldstead. earlier tommy banks told me how he felt for the restaurant to win and what tempts his own taste buds. very difficult to know how to react. the
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world‘s best restaurant but in the middle of nowhere. i canjust world‘s best restaurant but in the middle of nowhere. i can just about hear you. it is a family affair. your brother is front of house, in terms of the menu, how do you work out, how do you put it together, what is on it? well, we are farmers originally, my dad is still a farmer and my mum is involved in the business as well so we try and build a menu about what we have been able to grown and forage. that has been important with this award, because i think it is voted for by the guests, andi think it is voted for by the guests, and ijoan the expense of seeing what we have been doing. what do you make of it? you look at the hestons and the gordons and the jamies of this world, you strike me as very different. yes, i think so. this world, you strike me as very different. yes, ithink so. it is important to be different. all those quys important to be different. all those guys are different, they are just different to me. i mean, it is a very surreal award to get when you look at the other people on the list. but it is great. think we are very chilled out. informal and that
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has come through. that is what people want from fine dining. they wa nt people want from fine dining. they want it to be friendly and relaxed. iam want it to be friendly and relaxed. i am looking through the tasting men use, turbot with strawberries and cream. strawberries and hay, what is that about? hay. we grew up on a farm, there is is a lot around. it has an amazing flavour. we toast hay and infuse it in cream. it tastes like biscuits. there is lots of interesting flavours on the farm. what do you eat yourself when, at the end of the day and you sit down, tired and hungry, what do you have? 0h, tired and hungry, what do you have? oh, by the end of the day, god, like 1.00 in the morning i only, are you go to the fridge and scoff a load of cheese, but on a day off it is more, i like to put a slow braise on on a day off. tommy, we were hearing there, that a lot of people say you are impossible to find, you agree with them. so what is it, do you think, that has
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made you the world‘s greatest? what is it, do you think, that has made you the world's greatest? well, mine this award is voted for by the customers so i think, a lot of awards can be all aboutjust the food, this is customer service as well and the whole experience, and i think it isjust well and the whole experience, and i think it is just we are very welcoming, we have are a family business, people enjoy that, and i think also, it is the originality, we have tried really hard to do our own sort of thing, and it is starting to pay off. you are a michelin starred chef yourself, do you ever go out and spoil yours, spend a fortune at somebody else‘s restaurant? absolutely, yes, that is what they are there for. i love eating out. and hasn‘t the food culture in britain got so much better? even in yorkshire, it is fantastic, the whole food scene in the last five year has rocketed and britain is one of the best in the world. stop being diplomatic. i am asking who is good, who is not? who is good and who is
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not? i won‘t say who is not. but best place i have eaten this year was the fat duck, which i know isn‘t the most accessible, it is very expensive but it is amazing. but there is loads of great restau ra nts. but there is loads of great restaurants. i love the clove club in london. that is fantastic. what is next for you? well, i mean, just getting through today, really. it has gone crazy, since this award. so, yes, get through today and i am going to consolidate a bit. i have lots of plans. i have finished writing a cook book out next year, but loads going on. he has been tweeting about that interview. he is not alone, coming up interview. he is not alone, coming up we have nationwide, and we will talk to, well a television legend, there he is, nick owen. he will talk to us about the impact of that bbc documentary, you may have seen it about ambulances. they have looked
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at what impact that has had on what they do. looking forward to that. also we will talk about bed that hasn‘t been made for 19 years, 19 yea rs. hasn‘t been made for 19 years, 19 years. and it is going up on show. lucky it is not smell o vision. a bit of a clue as to why it is an expensive unmade bed. tracey emin and that bed is about to go on show. sorry about that last shot. never mind. let us look at the weather. phil is here. hurricane ophelia. a lovely na m e phil is here. hurricane ophelia. a lovely name but not a nice hurricane. if only it would stay there we would be happy. i am going to ta ke there we would be happy. i am going to take you on through the course of the weekend. we have talked about so many hurricanings in the caribbean, look where we expect, a lot of uncertainty, but that as, if we call it the remnants heading to us. if that track obviously is a bit
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further east, then we get a lot more than 60 or70mph further east, then we get a lot more than 60 or 70mph gusts. the met office have warnings about the thatis that is the track as we see it. it isa that is the track as we see it. it is a long way away. here i have taken do you tuesday. so a so that is your wind, what about the rain? we were talking about that yesterday? we were indeed. i want to show you how the rivers have responded. we were talking yesterday about a number of issues with the flood warnings and alerts, they are still in players but as you see, the rivers are well up. i mention this, if only because i think we are going to see more rain in that neck of the woods. but no great complaints today. there was with scene in leicestershire, seen that widely, but all the while we have seen a lot of cloud spilling in from the atlantic, i am sure you canjoin in with me with this particular script. more cloud on the way. more rain,
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and more wind. look at the number of isobars coming in across scotland. in in its own right could be windy. a gain and rail. not a cold night by any means at all. but a wet and windy start on friday, here comes that rain. the totals beginning to mount up. the front slow—moving again and that is half the problem, so it will be a wet commute, come the mid part moving away from the weekend. not a great problem by this stage north of the central belt. dry, fine, sunny. maybe a passings shower. there is the rain over the top end of the m6, the rainfall totals 70 millimetres before it sta rts totals 70 millimetres before it starts raining in cumbria. wet in the northern portions of wales, but generally speaking, the further south and east you are the drier your day s and 20 degrees is possible in the south. that is the sign of things to come for some parts of the british isles, we have
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warmth surging up from the near continent, from iron a. we could be looking at 23, not for everyone because you have got to be to the south of this warm front, in the warm air, and that is gradually pushing further north but it comes with rain for the western side of scotland. but, further south, with rain for the western side of scotland. but, furthersouth, if with rain for the western side of scotland. but, further south, if the cloud breaks, then they will be off. 20, 21 degrees, we are off to sunday here now, still that rain all over the western, northern parts of scotland, but by that stage, if we do get sunshine, that is where we could be kicking orange 21, 22, 23. it is all possible. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. brexit negotiations — the uk says there‘s progress. the eu‘s assessment is very different. translation: on this question, we‘ve reached a state of deadlock which is very disturbing. our aim is provide as much certainty as possible to citizens, business and the european union, and on this we are making real
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and tangible progress. scotla nd scotland yard has confirmed it has been passed an allegation of sexual assault against harvey weinstein. earlier, he spoke for the first time. i gotta get help, guys. you know what, we all make mistakes. second chance, i hope. 0k. sport now on afternoon live. gordon strachan, perhaps not surprisingly, has gone. they failed to qualify for the world cup in russia, not making the play—offs. he gave a bizarre press conference a few days ago when he suggested one of the reasons scotla nd suggested one of the reasons scotland failed to qualify was that genetically they were not big enough
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against the european sides of today. i think it was more the performances. they failed to qualify as well for the european championships in 2016. so gordon strachan has gone, after almost five yea rs. strachan has gone, after almost five years. the scottish football association say it is time for a new direction to prepare for the euros in 2020. the sfa will not be renewing gordon strachan‘s contract, which was due to run out next month. a mutual parting was agreed at a board meeting today, four days after scotla nd board meeting today, four days after scotland failed to clinch the play—off spot for the world cup next summer. yes, the news from hamdan is that scotla nd yes, the news from hamdan is that scotland are looking for a new football manager. the scottish football association board met here at the national stadium this morning to discuss gordon strachan‘s future, and not long after two o‘clock the statement was released, when it was confirmed that gordon strachan‘s tenure as national manager was
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coming to an end with immediate effect. gordon strachan says in the statement that it was a privilege being the national manager and his biggest regret was not giving the fa ns biggest regret was not giving the fans the tournament, the major tournament finals that he feels they deserve. the sfa chief executive is also quoted, saying that it is time for fresh impetus, and also quoted, saying that it is time forfresh impetus, and he felt a change was needed, and a new direction needed to prepare for the euro 2020 campaign and the forthcoming uefa nations league. this comes after gordon strachan presided over two failed qualifying campaigns, the first to get to euro 2016 last year, and this latest failure with the world cup in russia coming up next year. strachan was appointed in 2013 and after two failed campaigns, the sfa feel it is time forfresh failed campaigns, the sfa feel it is time for fresh impetus, failed campaigns, the sfa feel it is time forfresh impetus, new failed campaigns, the sfa feel it is time for fresh impetus, new blood, and the search is under way for
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gordon strachan‘s successor. indeed it is. no rush for a replacement because their next competitive matches not for 11 months, but malky mackay, former cardiff and watford manager, currently performance director at the sfa, is favourite to take over, and the odds have shortened on david moyes. trouble in the swimming pool for paralympian swimmers. what is going on? british swimming has apologised to some paralympic athletes after it was found that a former head coach created a climate of fear, after an independent investigation into complaints of bullying from no less than 13 swimmers found that an unnamed member of staff, understood to be rob greenwood, had been communicating with athletes in an abusive manner, as well as using derogatory terms to describe athletes. greenwood won a national coaching award following the rio paralympics last year but he left hisjob before the
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paralympics last year but he left his job before the enquiry started. co nta cted by his job before the enquiry started. contacted by the bbc, he declined to comment, but the chairman of british swimming has spoken. it can't be a case of achieving success at any cost. the culture must sit well with the way in which we behave in achieving success, and there is a thin dividing line between winning medals by proper conduct, and achieving success by improper conduct, which is wrong. and i don't believe that if we get the culture right, that we will not achieve success, or damage the aspirations of our athletes. and other senior investor to gator was found to have management and communication issues but remains in post. ben stokes has said he will make public his full explanation and
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evidence when the time is right. he was arrested after suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after a nightclub in bristol last month. no charges have been brought yet while the investigation is ongoing he will play no part in england‘s ashes tour, starting later this month. the season looks to be over forjohanna konta, who has pulled out of the tournament next week with a foot injury, meaning she is unable to qualify for the wta finals in singapore. she had to reach the final in moscow to break back into the world‘s top eight. she has slipped to ninth in the rankings, following a poor run of form. but she could still attend the singapore event as a stand—by in case of an injury to another player. social could still go. more later. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. in kent, a famous bed that has been left unmade for nearly 20 years is going on display to the public. bbc south east today‘s rob smith will explain more. and in a moment we‘ll speak to bbc
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midlands today‘s nick owen about a fly—on—the—wall documentary that‘s shone a light on the work of local paramedics. but first, rob, what‘s this about an unmade bed that became a work of art? we are talking tracey emin, of course, and her unmade bed, her famously elaborate leap painstaking league, artistically unmade bed. at the time when she made it in 1998, she was living in a council flat in waterloo. it was short listed for the turner prize and the newspapers went potty, with lots of debate about whether it was art, making her famous and infamous. it has become a symbol for the brit pop art era ever since. in 2014 it was sold at auction for £2.2 million, so there are auction for £2.2 million, so there a re clearly auction for £2.2 million, so there are clearly people out there who think a lot about it. today, the artist has been putting the final
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touches to putting that display of her unmade bed together at the turner contemporary gallery in margate. she says it is kind of like holding hands with the ghost, putting it together, because it is reminders of who she was when she was a young woman, and she is not that person any more. in fact, she says among the empty booze bottles and the cigarette buts, there is a belt on the floor next to it, and she says that it used to fit round her waist and now she would struggle to get it to fit around her five. we are having a chat with her about that. our strong link to this is that. our strong link to this is that she grew up in margate and has gone back to live there, plays with emotional resonance for her, and the turner contemporary gallery is important to margate‘s regeneration, a place that suffered when the cheap jet boom took off in the 1970s and people started going on holiday to the costa del sol instead of to margate. the town suffered and frankly became shabby for a period.
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turner contemporary gallery has been at the heart of regenerating the town and turning it into something new. our top story, town and turning it into something new. ourtop story, on town and turning it into something new. our top story, on a different tack, kind of a horrible cautionary tale, about a young lady from south korea, who fell off the cliffs at beachy head because she had asked a stranger to take a picture. she wa nted stranger to take a picture. she wanted to do a selfie and asked someone to hold the camera for her. shejumped up and down in front someone to hold the camera for her. she jumped up and down in front of the camera, lost her balance and fell off the cliff. this is a horrible cautionary tale, not least because there was a famous pop video filmed on the top of those cliffs by a taiwanese artist a couple of years ago, and as a result, literally thousands of people from the far east come to sussex every year and they all want to have their picture taken on top of those cliffs. so there are real problems with local authorities worrying that more people could find themselves in bother. they are warning people to keep away from the edge. plenty more in the programme, so dojoin us.
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nick owen, many people will have been watching the documentary about ambulances, and you have revisited. yes, simon. people have been entranced by this series and amazed at how challenging it can be in the ambulance service. as far as the west midlands is concerned, it is a huge area, with a conurbation of birmingham, wolverhampton, the black country and coventry, and the five counties around, well over 5 million people. i think people are amazed at how hard the ambulance staff have to work, covering such a huge area. they don‘t know what to expect when they get to work whether it will be stressful, tragic, or happy. we have one instance of a paramedic called natalie, who delivered a baby for the first time in her life. that epitomises how devoted and conscientious they are, that two months after that she went to visit the new mum and the little boy,
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george, because they really care and they are compassionate. they do so much in thisjob, above they are compassionate. they do so much in this job, above and they are compassionate. they do so much in thisjob, above and beyond the call of duty. i think people have really identified with that and they love the series for it. this is a bit weird because you may not remember but there was a certain brea kfast remember but there was a certain breakfast station on —— on another channel years ago and you were presenting. it is rather special to have you on this programme here. simon, you are too kind. of course i remember, back in the 1980s, pioneering days of breakfast television. i have such fond memories. it is the thing i am most proud of in my 40 years in television, 20 years doing bbc midlands today, the thing i am most proud of is that i was on the first day of breakfast television on itv and so many good things came out of that. my long—standing friendship with anne diamond, and so on. great
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days, and it is nice to remember it. thank you for bringing it up. we are a big happy family. i‘m too so much for that. —— thank you so much for that. trainee gps will be offered lump sums to work in parts of england struggle to attract family doctors. there are also plans to boost the number of training places for emergency doctors, as hugh pym reports. plans to try to boost recruitment in the nhs have been announced but research suggests there are challengers. the number of places for doctors starting specialist training in emergency medicine will be increased from 300 up to 400. the health secretary is to extend a scheme offering a one—off payment of
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£20,000, to encourage trainee gps to work in areas where recruitment has been difficult. but a report by the king‘s fund think tank says the number of nurses and health visitors in england is falling for the first time since 2013, down byjust over 1000 in the year tojune. the government‘s gp recruitment plan is designed to take the pressure off existing doctors, as the workload keeps increasing. most gps working incredibly hard and find that their work is very frustrating, they can‘t spend as long as they want with patients. one reason is because in certain parts of the country it is ha rd to certain parts of the country it is hard to recruit new gps when agp retires. recruiting more staff will ta ke retires. recruiting more staff will take time. right now, the nhs is focused on winter pressures and getting more people to have a flu jab. there are worries that a high—level that the next few months will be extremely challenging. the nhs is under severe, unrelenting pressure. many people are worried
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that this winter will be particularly difficult, and the thing i worry about most is that we have an outbreak of flu, or not a virus, which puts an added strain on the nhs services. labour said that as winter approached workforce failures had left the nhs exposed and what was needed was a sustainable long—term plan and more funding. n a moment, the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the eu‘s chief brexit negotiator, says talks with the uk are deadlocked over the issue of financial commitments , in what has become known as the "divorce bill". police in new york are re—opening an investigation into claims of sexual assault against hollywood producer harvey weinstein. the allegations date back to 2004. it‘s being reported that a british woman who became a high—profile recruiter for the islamic state group has been killed in syria. sally—annejones was a former member of a punk group from kent. hello, welcome to you. the business
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headlines: banking giant hsbc has named john flint, current head of retail banking and wealth management, as its new boss. mr flint, who takes over from outgoing chief executive stuart gulliver, will start his new role next february. the move sees europe‘s biggest bank once again promote a company insider to run the firm. young first—time buyers are increasing their overall mortgage debt opting for lower monthly repayments, but a bigger overall bill because of the extra interest incurred. figures show the proportion of new buyers taking out 31 to 35—year mortgages has doubled in ten years. the average mortgage term is traditionally 25 years. james murdoch has won backing from sky shareholders to stay as chairman. three advisory firms had called on shareholders to vote against his re—election, objecting to mr murdoch‘s position as chairman of sky and chief executive of 21st century fox. fox is attempting to buy sky, which some investors had said was a conflict of interest for mr murdoch. why was there a vote? investors have
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been complaining that there is a conflict—of—interest, the james murdoch holds two important positions, chairman of sky and chief executive of 21st century fox, at the time that fox is try to take control of sky. one investor, royal london, has said the dual position is inappropriate. but sky‘s spokespeople have said he is well placed because he has a knowledge of the global media industry, and he won the vote by a whisker on a 51.5% of investors voting for him to stay. a quick word about food takeaway is. something is off the menu. hungry houseis something is off the menu. hungry house is no more. it has been given the provisional go—ahead. there had been a query from the competition watchdog that that would muddy the competition waters, but they have
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decided it is probably not the case because hungry house is not enough ofa because hungry house is not enough of a big player. a quick one on something we have been talking about, a cap on energy prices. the d raft about, a cap on energy prices. the draft energy bill currently going through parliament is likely to give more powers to the regulator, ofgem, to put an upper limit on standard variable tariffs. lawrence gosling is editor in chief of investment week. lawrence, good to talk to you. let‘s begin with the story about sky news, james murdoch winning the vote by a whisker. was that a surprise?m james murdoch winning the vote by a whisker. was that a surprise? it was a surprise quite how close the vote was. as you said, many people have been uncomfortable about his dual position on sky as chairman and chief executive of 21st century fox. but it is amazing what a good set of numbers do to people. voting intentions, sky produced numbers which said they had attracted 160,000 new customers in the first quarter of this year, 50% up on last
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year, and the revenue in the first quarter was also good at 3.3 billion. so, whilst there is some dissatisfaction with his conflict of interest as some see it, the business numbers probably encouraged shareholders to vote in his favour. let‘s talk about a topic close to my heart, take aways. there is one less option on the menu. this is more than a storyjust aboutjust eat and hungry house. it is about this saturation of new entrants to this market, whereby consumers can go to one online platform and then order from a whole variety of restaurants and food outlets. the competition & markets authority looked at this and said that hungry house was quite a week player so being taken over was not going to affect competition. it talked about the fact that there are many delivery companies now, and a number of organisations. we have
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changed our lifestyles and we are happy to click and expect food to come to our door. very quickly, i wa nt to come to our door. very quickly, i want to ask about the energy cap story. the bigger question people are asking is what will this mean for energy prices, as energy providers, if the cap comes into force, will have to look for new ways to make money. what will it do to prices elsewhere in the market? whether it genuinely adds competition remains to be seen. i expect the energy companies have already built this into their models. over the longer term, already built this into their models. overthe longerterm, it might mean less switching by consumers, which probably provides more stability to bigger energy companies. we have to leave it there. many thanks. let‘s have a look at the markets. today the main drive on the ftse 100 today the main drive on the ftse100 and on the pound was the speech by michel barnier, the cheap brexit negotiator, saying negotiations have reached an impasse. that sent the
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pound lower against the dollar and the euro. that has the inverse reaction on the ftse100 where most of those companies are actually dollar earning, so they benefit from a weaker pound. the ftse100 having a weaker pound. the ftse100 having a great day, the best rise of the european markets. thank you. the trial of an army sergeant accused of sabotaging his wife‘s parachute has been hearing from the man who packed the shoot. he denies the charges, as duncan kennedy reports. emile cilliers, on the left here, is accused of trying to sabotage his wife‘s parachute, so he could get an insurance policy pay—out and because he wanted a new life with another woman. the prosecution say he tampered with victoria cilliers‘s parachute by twisting chords on her main chute
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and removing kit from her reserve chute. alan westley was the man who packed victoria cilliers‘ reserve chute and was today cross—examined by the defence barrister, elizabeth marsh. this is one of our experienced ones, similar to the one involved. mr westley appeared in this video shown to the jury, to explain how reserve chutes are meticulously packed. miss marsh asks whether if the slinks were not put on tightly the equipment would come undone. mr westley said it wasn‘t just a case of doing up tightly but also putting them on correctly. miss marsh asked mr westley if he had any reason to think that the slinks were done up incorrectly. mr westley replied, "i guarantee that it was done properly." it was at netheravon airbase in wiltshire that victoria cilliersjumped in 2015. both her main and reserve chutes failed to open properly and she landed in this field, suffering several serious injuries.
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it ensures the main parachute is orientated the right way. the jury was shown this video of a main parachute being packed. the prosecution claim emile cilliers twisted the lines on his wife‘s main one as well as tampering with her reserve. the jury is visited the airfield and scene where the packing took place. mr cilliers denies two counts of attempted murder. more on the breaking news about harvey weinstein. an investigation is being launched here. june kelly can tell us more. he is a global figure and it now appears he is being investigated on this side of the atlantic as well. in the past few minutes we have learned that scotla nd few minutes we have learned that scotland yard has received a complaint. evidently the complaint
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was made to the merseyside force because the complainant lives in the merseyside area. because the allegation relates to something which allegedly happened in the metropolitan police area, that is why the met are investigating. the tea m why the met are investigating. the team investigating are the child abuse and sexual offences, and. as well as looking into allegations of offences against children, they also look into allegations of offences against adults. that is all we are being told at the moment. scotland ya rd being told at the moment. scotland yard never give us the names of people they are investigating but it is understood it is the film mogul. so the investigation gets under way. obviously very early stages with this and what often happens in these cases is that once you get a flood of allegations, more people come forward. at this stage we should stress this is only an allegation and was only made two merseyside police yesterday so the police will be at early stages. any investigations and proceedings will have to wait for what happens in
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america. one would assume british authorities will liaise with american colleagues but this is the first case, the first allegation we have had over here. thank you. and finally, after a career fronting fashion magazines, gracing american talk shows and performing in concerts around the world, where do you go next? the un of course. but you may be able to spot something slightly different about this crowd pleaser. sophia is a robot. modelled on the actress audrey hepburn, hot sophia, as she‘s more commonly known, made a surprise appearance at a united nations meeting on artificial intelligence, and even had a brief conversation with the un secretary general amina mohammed. iam i am still burning a lot.” i am still burning a lot. i do know where you go from there. she was
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talking to the un secretary—general. the takeover starts here. she‘ll be after myjob next. time for a look at the weather. thursday always looked like being one of the best days of the week but cloud has been gathering across western scotland and northern ireland. here, you will finish the day with some rain moving in from the atlantic. overnight, the wind begins to pick up in the north of scotland. that is a gale, if not severe gale force winds in a number of locations. not a cold night but it will be a wet and windy start to friday. certainly across a good part of scotla nd friday. certainly across a good part of scotland and northern ireland, the hills of northern england, wet weather getting down towards the hills of wales, too. a further south and east you are, the dry and warm your day will be. maybe 21 degrees.
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that is the theme we take into the weekend. south of this weather front, which moves a bit further north, there will be some autumnal warmth to get you to the weekend. today at 5, a warning from the eu — there‘s a "disturbing" deadlock in the brexit talks over how much britain should pay when it leaves. the eu‘s chief negotiator, michel barnier, says the main obstacle to talks about trade and the future is the so—called "divorce bill". on this question, we‘ve reached a state of deadlock, which is very disturbing. but, for the uk, the brexit secretary insists progress has been made and he wants the talks to move on. while there is still work to be done, much work to be done, we‘ve come a long way. it‘s important to recognise the significant progress we‘ve made since june. we‘ll have the latest from brussels and westminster and we‘ll be assessing what progress, if any, has been made so far. the other main stories
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on bbc news at 5: sally—annejones, the british woman recruited by so—called
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